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NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2019

If We All Ate Enough Fruits And Vegetables, There'd Be Big Shortages
There's already not enough produce for everyone in the world to get the daily recommended amount. Two new studies urge revamping the food system to feed the growing population and protect the planet.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2019

Future Of Key Farming Research Uncertain As 2/3 Of USDA Staff Say They Won't Move
The mandatory move imposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on most of the workers at two vital research agencies has been criticized as a "blatant attack on science."

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2019

Scientists Desert USDA As Agency Relocates To Kansas City Area
The mandatory move imposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on most of the workers at two vital research agencies has been criticized as a "blatant attack on science."

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 15, 2019

Hidden Brain: How People React To Election Interference By Foreign Countries
Robert Mueller will testify soon before Congress about the Russia probe. New research finds that Americans have partisan reactions to foreign interference in elections.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 12, 2019

Rippling Rainbow Map Shows How California Earthquakes Moved The Earth
NASA has mapped changes in the ground's position caused by the recent earthquakes — and it happens to be look like beautiful, psychedelic art.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 11, 2019

Cutting Just 300 Calories Per Day May Keep Your Heart Healthy
That's the equivalent of about six standard Oreos. But this modest reduction in calories could have protective benefits for our hearts, a new study finds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 11, 2019

Bet On The Bot: AI Beats The Professionals At 6-Player Texas Hold 'Em
Six-player Texas Hold 'em has been too tough for a machine to master — until now. A bot named Pluribus crushed some of the world's best poker players using brash and unorthodox strategies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 11, 2019

Could Mussels Teach Us How To Clean Up Oil Spills?
A review of "mussel-inspired chemistry" points to promising ways we can learn from mussels to clean up water.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2019

How Best To Snag And Destroy Bedbugs?
Vigilance and heat are currently your best weapons against bedbugs, exterminators say. But scientists are working on a way to give the bugs the hook with a strategy inspired by a Balkan folk remedy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2019

Hand Dryers Harm Children's Hearing, Canadian Study Shows
Research finds many hand dryers operate at noise levels that are harmful to children. Nora Keegan is the 13-year-old student who did the study in the Canadian journal: Pediatrics and Child Health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2019

ICE Uses Facial Recognition To Go Through Driver's Licenses, Researchers Say
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Jake Laperruque of the Project on Government Oversight about word that FBI and ICE agents used driver's license databases to scan millions of faces without consent.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2019

13-Year-Old Scientist's Research Shows Hand Dryers Can Hurt Kids' Ears
Research finds many hand dryers operate at noise levels that are harmful to children. Nora Keegan is the 13-year-old student who did the study in the Canadian journal Paediatrics & Child Health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 04, 2019

New Markers For Alzheimer's Disease Could Aid Diagnosis And Speed Up Drug Development
Researchers are using brain scans, blood and spinal fluid to detect early signs of Alzheimer's disease. These "biomarkers" may also offer a quicker way to test new Alzheimer's drugs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 02, 2019

California's 1st Surgeon General Spotlights Health Risks Of Childhood Adversity
Dr. Nadine Burke Harris has spent much of her career alerting the medical community to health damage that adverse childhood experiences can wreak. Now she aims to protect and heal California's kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 02, 2019

California's First Surgeon General Spotlights Health Risks Of Childhood Adversity
Dr. Nadine Burke Harris has spent much of her career alerting the medical community to health damage that adverse childhood experiences can wreak. Now she aims to protect and heal California's kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 01, 2019

Fair Trade Helps Farmers, But Not Their Hired Workers
According to a new study of cocoa-producing cooperatives, Fair Trade certification boosts the income of small farmers, but those benefits aren't shared with their hired workers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 01, 2019

Scientists Make Model Embryos From Stem Cells To Study Key Steps In Human Development
Researchers hope these so-called embryoids could provide crucial new insights into how to treat infertility, prevent miscarriages and birth defects and many diseases. But they stir ethical concerns.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 01, 2019

There's More Evidence That Too Much Sitting Can Be Very Unhealthy
A study from Columbia University finds that sitting for long periods in front of the television is more dangerous than sitting at work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 28, 2019

How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing
In many states, convicted criminals are being housed in private prisons. New research finds that when a private prison opens, the length of criminal sentences modestly increases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 28, 2019

Hidden Brain: How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing
In many states, convicted criminals are being housed in private prisons. New research finds that when a private prison opens, the length of criminal sentences modestly increases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 27, 2019

Veggie Surprise: Teeth Of Ancient Crocs Reveal Some Likely Ate Plants
What do you imagine an ancient croc snacking on? Maybe a fish or a bird? For some relatives of modern crocodiles, a safer guess would be a big bunch of flowers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 27, 2019

Veggie Surprise: Teeth Of Ancient Crocs Reveal That Some Very Likely Ate Plants
What do you imagine an ancient croc snacking on? Maybe a fish or a bird? For some relatives of modern crocodiles, a safer guess would be a big bunch of flowers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 23, 2019

A New Hope: Seal Learns To Sing Star Wars Theme
Researchers say teaching seals to copy melodies might help inform speech therapy for humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 23, 2019

Breaking The Booze Habit, Even Briefly, Has Its Benefits
Tens of thousands of Instagram followers can't be wrong: Curiosity about the sober life is trending. Scientists say cutting out alcohol can improve your sleep and blood pressure, and help your liver.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 21, 2019

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies
A Moscow scientist claims he has a safe way of editing genes in human embryos — a method that could protect resulting babies from being infected with HIV. Approval of the experiment seems unlikely.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 20, 2019

New Report Says College-Educated Women Will Soon Make up Majority of U.S. Labor Force
This year U.S. women who graduated from college will likely make up a majority of adults with degrees in the labor force. The increase could signal greater earning potential for women in the future.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 20, 2019

New Report Says Women Will Soon Be Majority Of College-Educated U.S. Workers
This year U.S. women who graduated from college will likely make up a majority of adults with degrees in the labor force. The increase could signal greater earning potential for women in the future.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 20, 2019

What Dropping 17,000 Wallets Around The Globe Can Teach Us About Honesty
Scientists used "lost" wallets to test whether people are more likely to be dishonest when they might profit. The results were puzzling — so they put more money in the wallets.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2019

There's More To Look Forward To After Peaking Professionally
Social scientist Arthur Brooks set out to figure out how life after 50 can be more professionally fulfilling. His advice? "Stop being an innovator and start being an instructor."

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2019

I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers
Scientists are using old spy satellite images to measure the effects of climate change. They're finding that glaciers in the Himalayas are melting twice as fast as they were a few decades earlier.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 18, 2019

Boaty McBoatface, Internet-Adored Sub, Makes Deep-Sea Discovery On Climate Change
Since the delightful snafu that led to the research vessel's goofy moniker, the autonomous submarine has been off gathering deep-sea data on the effects of Antarctic winds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 18, 2019

Scientists Explain Puppy Dog Eyes
You know that feeling you get when a dog looks into your face and either looks really sad or kind of confused? Scientists say they've figured out why they do that, and why it makes us melt.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2019

A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Can Help
Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in the book, Elderhood.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2019

A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Help Seniors Thrive
Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in her book Elderhood.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 15, 2019

Pass The Brazier: Early Evidence Of Cannabis Smoking Found On Chinese Artifacts
Humans have been smoking pot to get high since the first millennium B.C. Archaeologists have found early evidence of cannabis use from wooden bowls exhumed from ancient tombs in western China.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2019

How Almonds Went From Deadly To Delicious
In a new study, researchers pinpoint the genetic mutation that transformed almonds from toxic and bitter to tasty and sweet.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2019

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Improve The Life Expectancy Of Black Men
Black men have the lowest life expectancy of any major demographic group in the U.S. Researchers say the solution appears to be pairing black men with black physicians.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2019

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Improve Black Men's Life Expectancy
Black men have the lowest life expectancy of any major demographic group in the U.S. Researchers say the solution appears to be pairing black men with black physicians.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 12, 2019

The Swap: Less Processed Meat, More Plant-Based Foods May Boost Longevity
A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who ate less.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2019

To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over
Scientists often share their latest research on posters displayed at big conferences. Posters are a long-standing tradition, but one reformer says they're mostly terrible and need to change.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 10, 2019

We Drink Basically The Same Wine As Ancient Romans — And That's Not So Great
Many of today's most popular wine varieties are extremely genetically similar to wines that may have existed for thousands of years, a new study finds. In the face of climate change, that's risky.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 10, 2019

We Drink Basically The Same Wine Varietals As Ancient Romans, And That's Not So Great
Many of today's most popular wine varietals are extremely genetically similar to wines that may have existed for thousands of years, a new study finds. In the face of climate change, that's risky.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 10, 2019

Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?
Changing how the mind reacts to pain can reduce the discomfort experienced, according to scientists who study brain pathways that regulate pain. A new type of therapy aims to enhance that effect.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2019

Accumulated Mutations Create A Cellular Mosaic In Our Bodies
It turns out you aren't simply a clone of cells from the womb. Over a lifetime, mutations create a patchwork of tissues made with pieces that have subtly different genetic signatures.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2019

Microplastics Have Invaded The Deep Ocean — And The Food Chain
Giant gyres of plastic in the ocean grab headlines, but it's the tiny bits of plastic that scare scientists. And they've made their way everywhere, a new study finds - including our seafood.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2019

You May Be Stressing Out Your Dog
When people who own dogs are stressed, their dogs also get stressed, a new study suggests. It's another indication of how emotionally synchronized dogs and their humans can be.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 05, 2019

Trump Administration Bars Federal Research Involving Human Fetal Tissue
At the the National Institutes of Health, "research that requires new acquisition of fetal tissue from elective abortions will not be conducted," the Department of Health and Human Services says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 05, 2019

Trump Administration Restricts Federal Research Involving Human Fetal Tissue
National Institutes of Health research "that requires new acquisition of fetal tissue from elective abortions will not be conducted," the Department of Health and Human Services says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 04, 2019

House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies
A congressional committee has upheld a prohibition against the Food and Drug Administration considering using gene-edited embryos to establish pregnancies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 04, 2019

House Committee Votes To Continue Research Ban On Genetically Modified Babies
A congressional committee has upheld a prohibition against the Food and Drug Administration considering research into gene-edited embryos that could be used to establish pregnancies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2019

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death
Analysis of DNA from more than 400,000 people in the UK suggests a genetic modification that protects against HIV may actually increase the overall risk of premature death.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2019

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats
Move over, fruit flies, rats and zebrafish. Squid and octopuses have elaborate brains and behaviors, and scientists say studying them in the laboratory could yield important biological insights.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 31, 2019

As CBD Oils Become More Popular, The FDA Considers Whether To Set New Rules
The marijuana extract is touted as a way to ease anxiety and inflammation despite limited science, and the industry has grown quickly. Now, the FDA is holding its first public hearing on CBD.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 30, 2019

Scientists Genetically Modify Fungus To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Malaria
The modified fungus produces spider toxin that rapidly kills mosquitoes, raising hopes for a new weapon to fight a disease that sickens millions. But not everyone is convinced.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 28, 2019

Why It's Time To Think About Self-Driving Cars In Regards To Parking
Self-driving cars may be great for those who don't want to own a car or get behind the wheel, but they promise to be a nightmare for parking enforcement.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 25, 2019

Why Corned Beef Sandwiches — And The Rest Of The Universe — Exist
Somehow, at the beginning of time, there was an imbalance of matter and antimatter. That's how all the stuff in the universe came about. Scientists think they may find an answer by studying neutrons.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2019

At $2.125 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever
The Food and Drug Administration approved a new gene therapy for a rare but devastating genetic disorder. The drugmaker says the cost is worth it because it's a one-time treatment that saves lives.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2019

At $2.1 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever
The Food and Drug Administration approved a new gene therapy for a rare but devastating genetic disorder. The drugmaker says the cost is worth it because it's a one-time treatment that saves lives.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 23, 2019

Since The 1960s, Researchers Track Perry Preschool Project Participants
For decades, researchers have followed the participants of a 1960's preschool program. They found a range of social and economic benefits, and not just for the participants in the program.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2019

Scientists Modify Viruses With CRISPR To Create New Weapon Against Superbugs
Superbugs are bacteria that can beat modern medicine's most powerful drugs. So doctors are racing to find new ways to fight back, such as developing "living antibiotics."

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2019

News Brief: Impeaching Trump, Iran Threat, CRISPR Modified Viruses
House Democrats meet to decide whether to move forward with impeaching the president. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are briefed on the threat Iran poses. And, the latest on genetically modified viruses.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2019

News Brief: Impeaching Trump, Iran Threat, CRSPR Modified Viruses
House Democrats meet to decide whether to move forward with impeaching the president. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are briefed on the threat Iran poses. And, the latest on genetically modified viruses.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2019

Computerized Model Reveals Details Of How Human Cells Divide
The nonprofit Allen Institute in Seattle has produced a visualization of human cell division that promises to be useful for professional scientists and curious amateurs alike.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 21, 2019

Can CBD Reduce Cravings And Stress In Opioid Users?
Researchers wanted to know if CBD can help people who are former opioid users resist relapse. Their double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial suggests CBD can help reduce stress and cravings.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2019

Calories, Carbs, Fat, Fiber: Unraveling The Links Between Breast Cancer And Diet
A new study finds that women who ate a low-fat diet and more fruits, vegetables and grains, lowered their risk of dying from breast cancer. But which of those factors provided the protective effect?

NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2019

Suicide Rate For Girls Has Been Rising Faster Than For Boys, Study Finds
Researchers found that the increase was highest for girls ages 10 to 14 in the U.S., rising by nearly 13% since 2007. The increase for boys of the same age was 7%.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2019

Researchers Say Evidence Shows What You Eat Really Does Matter
Two new diet studies add to the evidence that when it comes to staying healthy, counting calories may not be enough. What really matters is what you choose to eat and the quality of your diet.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 16, 2019

It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain
"Landmark" study finds a highly processed diet spurred people to overeat compared with an unprocessed diet, about 500 extra calories a day. That suggests something about processing itself is at play.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 16, 2019

How To Help A Kid Survive Early Puberty
Around 15% of girls begin menstruation by age 7. The challenges of puberty can rock anybody, but being the first of your friends to go through it can be especially stressful. Good parenting helps.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 16, 2019

Remote Island Chain Has Few People — But Hundreds Of Millions Of Pieces Of Plastic
The Cocos Keeling Islands make up barely 6 square miles in the Indian Ocean. It's a good place to measure plastic waste as almost no one lives there. Scientists were flabbergasted by what they found.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 14, 2019

Spider Uses Web As Slingshot To Ensnare Prey, Scientists Find
There's a type of spider that can slowly stretch its web taut and then release it, causing the web to catapult forward and entangle unsuspecting prey in its strands.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 09, 2019

Placebos May Be A Powerful Tool That Medicine Has Overlooked
Physicians believe placebos work only if patients think they're getting medicine. In other words, doctors have to deceive patients. But there might be a way to get placebos to work without deception.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 08, 2019

Uber And Lyft Caused Major Traffic Uptick In San Francisco, Study Says
Researchers compared data from fall 2010 — before the companies made inroads in the city — and fall 2016. They found that the companies are to blame for more than half of a big increase in traffic.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 08, 2019

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection
Treatment with genetically altered bacteriophages — viruses that attack bacteria — may have halted a patient's near-fatal infection, hinting at new ways to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 07, 2019

News Brief: U.S. China Trade Talks, Humans Excelerate Species' Extinction
The White House is fighting China in trade talks, but a new report found top advisers battled over whether to impose tariffs on Chinese imports. The U.N. warns which species are at risk of extinction.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 07, 2019

News Brief: U.S.-China Trade Talks, Humans Accelerate Species' Extinction
The White House is fighting China in trade talks, but a new report found top advisers battled over whether to impose tariffs on Chinese imports. The U.N. warns which species are at risk of extinction.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 07, 2019

News Brief: U.S.-China Trade Talks, Humans Excelerate Species' Extinction
The White House is fighting China in trade talks, but a new report found top advisers battled over whether to impose tariffs on Chinese imports. The U.N. warns which species are at risk of extinction.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 06, 2019

1 Million Animal And Plant Species Are At Risk Of Extinction, U.N. Report Says
"Protecting biodiversity amounts to protecting humanity," says UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay, who warns that species are being lost at an alarming rate.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 06, 2019

If Drones Had 'Claws,' They Might Be Able To Fly For Longer
Small drones have a problem — their battery life runs out relatively quickly. A team of roboticists says it has created special landing gear that can help conserve precious battery life.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 05, 2019

From Gloom To Gratitude: 8 Skills To Cultivate Joy
Taking time each day to note positive moments and personal strengths; mindful breathing and reaching out in kindness are all part of program that reduces anxiety and depression. But it takes practice.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 03, 2019

After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug
Now that so many experimental drugs targeting amyloid-beta have bombed, scientists are looking for different approaches for treating Alzheimer's, including a drug that failed as a cancer treatment.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 02, 2019

Traces Of Cocaine, Pesticides Detected In U.K. Shrimp
Scientists collected freshwater shrimp at 15 locations in Suffolk. Animals from all of the sites were found to have detectable amounts of cocaine, and many had other drugs or pesticides.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 01, 2019

Denisovans, A Mysterious Form Of Ancient Humans, Are Traced to Tibet
Until now, the only Denisovan remains came from a cave called Denisova in Siberia. The new find is "much more complete," one expert says.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 01, 2019

Denisovans, A Mysterious Kind Of Ancient Humans, Are Traced to Tibet
Until now, the only Denisovan remains came from a cave in Siberia. The new find is "much more complete," one expert says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Political Crisis In Venezuela Escalates
Opposition leader Juan Guaidó says he is in the final phase of a plan to oust Nicolás Maduro. Maduro's officials say they are successfully putting down a coup attempt.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Trump Sues Deutsche Bank And Capital One To Block Records' Release
President Trump wants to keep the banks from complying with congressional subpoenas seeking his bank records. He's joined in the suit by three of his children and some of his real estate businesses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Jury To Decide The Fate Of Ex-Officer Who Killed 911 Caller
A jury resumes deliberations in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor, who shot and killed a woman while responding to her 911 call.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

U.S. Infrastructure Shows The Effects Of Neglect, Smith Says
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Tom Smith, executive director of the American Society of Civil Engineers, about the current state of the nation's infrastructure. The group issued a report card in 2017.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Infrastructure Gets The Attention Of Trump, Schumer And Pelosi
President Trump is meeting with Democratic leaders in the Senate and House Tuesday morning to discuss the nation's infrastructure needs. It seems to be a rare moment of bipartisanship.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Drone Transports Human Kidney For Transplant
The drone was custom built to be able to monitor the payload while in the air. The kidney made it to the University of Maryland Medical Center. The woman who received the kidney called it "amazing."

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Whale Off Norway's Coast Found Wearing Camera Harness
The harness read "Equipment St. Petersburg." A researcher told CNN that the whale was probably trained by Russia's navy. He said they've "been known to train belugas to conduct military operations."

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Trump Lauds Disbarred Lawyer While Criticizing Others, Mueller Report Says
Attorney General William Barr heads to Capitol Hill this week to face questions about the Mueller report. Critics say Barr is running interference for President Trump.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Ground-Breaking Director John Singleton Dies At 51
Filmmaker John Singleton died Monday after complications from a stroke. He made history with 1991's Boyz n the Hood as the first African American nominated for a best director Oscar.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

'High Five' Readers Invited To Participate In Secret Tournament
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to best-selling, children's book author Adam Rubin about his latest: High Five. It tells the story of a secret high-five tournament that's been held in the animal kingdom.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

After 5 Years, ISIS Leader Purportedly Releases Another Video
A video purports to show the ISIS leader speaking to followers and referencing the Easter Sunday bombings in Sri Lanka. The first video was released in 2014 as ISIS was rapidly increasing in strength.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi's 'Call Me Zebra' Wins PEN/Faulkner Prize
The 35-year-old author won $15,000 along with the prestigious award for fiction. As she tells NPR, the prize also carries a special significance for her personally.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Japan's Emperor Akihito Abdicates The Chrysanthemum Throne
Akihito, citing failing health, becomes the first Japanese monarch in some two centuries to step down. His reign ends at midnight Tuesday, and then his son, Crown Prince Naruhito, ascends the throne.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

More Than 700 Measles Cases Reported Across 22 States, CDC Data Show
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, about the resurgence of the measles virus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2019

Negotiators Are In Beijing For Talks On Ending U.S.-China Trade War
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has been suggesting that the U.S. and China are closing in on a trade deal. NPR's David Greene talks to Erin Ennis, of the U.S.-China Business Council.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 29, 2019

Measles Shots Aren't Just For Kids: Many Adults Could Use A Booster Too
With U.S. measles cases at record highs, doctors say adults who got vaccinated prior to 1968 should consider getting revaccinated to make sure they and their neighbors are protected.

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