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Democracy Now
Nov 15, 2019

Justice for Rodney Reed: Millions Urge Texas to Halt Execution Amid New Evidence of His Innocence
The Supreme Court considers Friday whether to take up the case of Rodney Reed, an African-American death row prisoner in Texas who is scheduled to be executed in less than a week for a murder he says he did not commit. On Thursday, Reed's family braved the cold to camp outside the Supreme Court for a vigil asking the justices to help halt the execution. Millions of people around the country have joined their cause in recent weeks amid mounting evidence that another man may be responsible for the 1996 murder of Stacey Stites, a 19-year-old white woman. In 1998, an all-white jury sentenced Reed to die for Stites's murder after his DNA was found inside her body. The two were having an affair at the time of her death. But new and previously ignored details in the case indicate that Stites's then-fiancé, a white police officer named Jimmy Fennell, may in fact be responsible for the killing. Last month, a man who spent time in jail with Fennell signed an affidavit saying Fennell had admitted in prison to killing his fiancée because she was having an affair with a black man. Despite this, Reed's execution is scheduled for November 20. We speak with Maurice Chammah, a staff writer at The Marshall Project.

Democracy Now
Nov 15, 2019

Sen. Cory Booker on Environmental Justice, Nuclear Power & "Savage Racial Disparities" in the U.S.
The first-ever Presidential Forum on Environmental Justice, co-moderated by Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman and former EPA official Mustafa Santiago Ali, was held last Friday at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg. Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey was one of six Democratic candidates to share his plans to confront environmental injustices and the climate crisis. Booker spoke about racial disparities in the U.S., the creation of renewable energy jobs and the water contamination crises in cities across the country, including his hometown of Newark. "My community is not alone," Booker said. "Lead service lines should not be in the ground in a 21st century America, period."

Democracy Now
Nov 15, 2019

"This Is My Home": Meet the Lead Plaintiff in the Supreme Court Case to Save DACA
On Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments from three lawsuits demanding the Trump administration preserve Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The Obama-era program has granted protection from deportation and a work permit to at least 700,000 undocumented people who were brought to the United States as children. The court's conservative majority appeared poised to side with President Trump in ending the program, while some of the court's liberal justices seemed skeptical of Trump's efforts. In September 2017, the Trump administration announced it planned to terminate DACA, arguing the program was "illegal" and "unconstitutional," but three lower courts disagreed and have kept the program alive, thanks to lawsuits filed by California, New York and D.C. Immigrant rights activists have been pushing the Supreme Court to save DACA, with dozens of immigrants with DACA recently taking part in a 16-day, 230-mile march from New York to the steps of the Supreme Court. We speak with Martín Batalla Vidal, the lead plaintiff in the New York federal lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's attempt to terminate DACA, and Trudy Rebert, a staff attorney at the National Immigration Law Center, which also filed suit to block the Trump administration's cancellation of DACA.

Democracy Now
Nov 15, 2019

Headlines for November 15, 2019
Two Killed as 16-Year-Old Student Opens Fire at L.A. County High School, El Paso Walmart Reopens, Three Months After Massacre by Racist Gunman, House Speaker Pelosi Accuses Trump of Bribery, an Impeachable Offense, Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine to Testify She Felt Threatened by Trump, Chile to Hold Referendum on Rewriting Pinochet-Era Constitution, Chilean Protesters Mark Anniversary of Police Killing of Indigenous Activist, Mon Laferte Holds Topless Protest Against Chilean State Violence at Latin Grammys, Indigenous Bolivians Protest as Interim President Orders Evo Morales Silenced, Israel Resumes Bombing as Ceasefire with Gaza Militants Breaks Down, Iraqi Soldiers Kill Four Anti-Government Protesters, Bringing Death Toll to 320, Analysis Finds U.S.-Led Wars Since 9/11 Killed 801,000 at a Cost of $6.4 Trillion, Kentucky Republican Incumbent Matt Bevin Concedes Governor's Race, European Investment Bank to Divest from Most Fossil Fuel Projects, Climate Activist Greta Thunberg Sets Sail for Europe, Benie Sanders, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Unveil Green New Deal for Public Housing

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2019

CodePink Founder Medea Benjamin Threatened with Arrest After Protesting U.S. Foreign Interventions
CodePink co-founder and longtime peace activist Medea Benjamin was threatened with arrest in Washington, D.C., Wednesday and accused of assaulting a sitting congressmember after being forcibly removed from a press conference for opposing the U.S.-backed coup and U.S. sanctions in Venezuela. Benjamin vehemently denies the accusations and says she was in fact the one assaulted when she and other activists demonstrated at a press conference hosted by Florida Democrat Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Florida Republican Mario Díaz-Balart announcing the launch of a Congressional Venezuela Democracy Caucus. We speak with Medea Benjamin in Washington, D.C.

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2019

Chilean Activist: Same Elites Who Caused Social Crisis Can't Be Trusted to Write New Constitution
In Chile, protesters led a massive national strike Tuesday as they condemned the government's plans to rewrite the country's Constitution, which dates back to Augusto Pinochet's military regime. Chile's interior minister announced Sunday the government would draft a new constitution that Congress would then rewrite and put to a public referendum. But protesters say the people should be involved with the rewriting of the constitution from the beginning and that this is an attempt by Sebastián Piñera's government to delay political and social reforms in Chile. The Chilean authorities have killed at least 20 people and wounded thousands more since the protests erupted on October 19 in response to a subway fare hike and quickly grew into a revolt against austerity and economic inequality. Amnesty International has denounced the Chilean government for widespread human rights violations against protesters. From Santiago, we speak with Pablo Abufom, a member of the Solidaridad movement, an anti-capitalist and feminist organization in Chile.

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2019

"This Is Unacceptable": Ex-Congresswoman Who Voted to Impeach Nixon Says Trump Is a Rogue President
The public phase of the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump began Wednesday, with testimonies from two witnesses: George Kent, a deputy assistant secretary of state, and William Taylor, a former ambassador and the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine. The hearing brought forth new details about a previously unknown phone call in July between President Trump and Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union. Both Kent and Taylor expressed concern over the role President Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani had in dictating U.S. policy on Ukraine. We speak with Elizabeth Holtzman, a former U.S. congressmember from New York who served on the House Judiciary Committee that voted to impeach Richard Nixon.

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2019

In First Public Impeachment Hearing, Trump Implicated in Effort to Pressure Ukraine to Probe Bidens
The first public hearing of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump was held Wednesday. Trump is just the fourth president in U.S. history to face impeachment. Two witnesses testified before the House Intelligence Committee: George Kent, a deputy assistant secretary of state, and William Taylor, a former ambassador and the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine. They both said President Trump withheld aid to Ukraine in an attempt to pressure the country to investigate Joe Biden and his son Hunter, who served on the board of a Ukrainian natural gas company. We play highlights from the hearing.

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2019

Headlines for November 14, 2019
U.S. Diplomats Testify Trump Pressured Ukraine to Dig Up Political Dirt on Bidens, Trump Claims He Was "Too Busy" to Watch Impeachment Inquiry, Trump Hosts President Erdogan at White House Amid Turkish Attacks in Syria, 34 Palestinians Killed in Two Days as Israel Bombs Gaza Strip, Exiled Bolivian President Evo Morales Calls for "National Dialogue", Protests Rage as Bolivia's Self-Proclaimed Interim President Swears In Cabinet, Lebanese Soldiers Shoot and Kill Man as Protests Enter Fifth Week, Zimbabwe: Millions at Risk of Starving Amid Climate Change-Fueled Drought, Hundreds of Elephants Die as Drought Grips Southern Africa, Wildfires Rage in Australia as Former Fire Chiefs Warn of Climate Crisis, Mayor of Venice, Italy, Blames Climate Crisis for "Apocalyptic" Flooding, Chad Wolf Becomes Fifth Person to Head Homeland Security Dept. Under Trump, House Resolution Would Clear Path for Adoption of Equal Rights Amendment, Ex-Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick Formally Enters 2020 Presidential Race, Hillary Clinton Refuses to Rule Out 2020 Presidential Run, Teachers in Little Rock Go on One-Day Strike, Could Colin Kaepernick Return to NFL After Being Blacklisted? Workout Scheduled for Saturday, Police Threaten to Arrest Medea Benjamin After Venezuela Protest

Democracy Now
Nov 13, 2019

A Coup? A Debate on the Political Crisis in Bolivia That Led to Evo Morales's Resignation
In Bolivia, right-wing Senator Jeanine Áñez declared herself president Tuesday night despite a lack of quorum in Congress, amid a deepening political crisis in the country. Evo Morales, Bolivia's first indigenous president, left the country Monday after being granted asylum in Mexico. Morales announced his resignation Sunday shortly after the Bolivian military took to the airwaves to call for his departure. His Movement Toward Socialism party is refusing to recognize Áñez as president, calling her claim illegal and decrying Evo Morales's resignation over the weekend as a military coup. Last month, Morales was re-elected for a fourth term in a race his opponents claimed was marred by fraud. He ran for a fourth term after contesting a referendum upholding term limits. On Tuesday, the Organization of American States held an emergency meeting in Washington, where U.S. Ambassador Carlos Trujillo read a statement from President Donald Trump applauding Evo Morales's resignation and warning it should "send a strong signal" to Venezuela and Nicaragua. Mexico, Uruguay, Nicaragua and the president-elect of Argentina have all denounced Morales's departure as a coup. Morales's departure has sparked demonstrations and clashes across Bolivia. We host a debate on the political crisis in Bolivia with Pablo Solón, former ambassador to the United Nations under President Evo Morales until 2011, and Kevin Young, assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and the author of "Blood of the Earth: Resource Nationalism, Revolution, and Empire in Bolivia."

Democracy Now
Nov 13, 2019

Bill Moyers on Impeachment: All Presidents Lie, But Trump Has Created a Culture of Lying
We continue our conversation with legendary journalist Bill Moyers, who covered impeachment proceedings against Presidents Nixon and Clinton. The first televised impeachment hearings into President Trump begin today. Moyers says the current administration and the media have created a "culture of lying" that goes beyond what other presidents have done. "All presidents lie. It's a defense they use. But not all presidents lie systemically," Moyers says.

Democracy Now
Nov 13, 2019

Democracy on Trial: Bill Moyers on Impeachment Inquiry & Why PBS Should Air Hearings in Primetime
Televised impeachment hearings begin today in the inquiry into whether President Trump withheld military aid from Ukraine to pressure the Ukrainian president to investigate his political rivals. Two witnesses are testifying today before the House Intelligence Committee: George Kent, a deputy assistant secretary of state, and William Taylor, a former ambassador and the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine. Both officials have privately told congressional investigators that Trump withheld aid to Ukraine in an attempt to pressure Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Donald Trump is just the fourth U.S. president to face an impeachment inquiry. Bill Clinton was impeached in 1998. Andrew Johnson was impeached in 1868. Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 prior to an impeachment vote. We speak with the legendary journalist Bill Moyers, who covered the Nixon and Clinton impeachment hearings. In the 1960s, Moyers was a founding organizer of the Peace Corps and served as press secretary for President Lyndon Johnson. In 1971, he began an award-winning career as a television broadcaster that would last for over four decades. During that time, Moyers received over 30 Emmys and countless other prizes. He was elected to the Television Hall of Fame in 1995. Last week Bill Moyers took out a full-page ad in The New York Times urging PBS to broadcast the impeachment hearings live and to rerun them in primetime.

Democracy Now
Nov 13, 2019

Headlines for November 13, 2019
Televised Impeachment Hearings Begin Today, Right-Wing Senator Declares Herself President of Bolivia, Turkish President Erdogan Visiting Trump at White House, Supreme Court Heard Oral Arguments over DACA Program, Supreme Court Hears Arguments in Case of Mexican Teen Killed by U.S. Border Agent, Supreme Court Clears Way for Sandy Hook Families to Sue Gun Manufacturer, Federal Court Rules Warrantless Searches of Phones at Airport Are Unconstitutional, HHS Probes Google's Program to Collect Healthcare Data of Americans, U.S. Government Detained Record Number of Migrant Children in 2019, SPLC: Stephen Miller Sought to Promote White Nationalism Ahead of 2016 Election, Afghanistan: 7 Killed in Car Bombing in Kabul, Major Protests & Disruptions Continue in Hong Kong, Chile: Protesters Demand More Participation in Rewriting New Constitution, Former McDonald's Worker Sues over Sexual Harassment, Salma Sikandar Wins Asylum, After Husband's Hunger Strike, Historian Noel Ignatiev, Who Aimed to Abolish Whiteness, Dies at 78

Democracy Now
Nov 12, 2019

"Seattle Is Not For Sale": Voters Rebuke Amazon, Re-electing Socialist Kshama Sawant
In Seattle, Socialist City Councilmember Kshama Sawant has been re-elected in a race that pitted her against Amazon — Seattle's largest private employer and one of the most powerful companies in the world. Overall, Amazon poured $1.5 million into Seattle's City Council election and backed Sawant's opponent, Egan Orion, with nearly half a million dollars. Kshama Sawant is Seattle's first Socialist politician elected in nearly a century. She has successfully pushed a number of progressive policies, including making Seattle the first major American city to adopt a $15-an-hour minimum wage. Kshama Sawant joins us from Seattle. The re-election victory "has been a major repudiation, not only of Amazon and of Jeff Bezos himself, as the richest man in the world, but also it has been a referendum on the vision for Seattle," Sawant says. "The voters in Seattle have spoken, that Seattle is not up for sale."

Democracy Now
Nov 12, 2019

Vowing to End Cash Bail & Reform Justice System, Chesa Boudin Wins San Francisco DA Race
In a stunning victory, public defender Chesa Boudin has been declared the winner of a hotly contested district attorney's race in San Francisco. Boudin ran on a platform to end cash bail and dismantle the war on drugs, and was endorsed by Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders. His win sends a pointed message to the Democratic establishment, which had mobilized in full force against his campaign. San Francisco Mayor London Breed, California Governor Gavin Newsom and Senators Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris all endorsed Boudin's opponent, Suzy Loftus. Boudin is the child of Weather Underground activists Kathy Boudin and David Gilbert, who were both incarcerated when he was still a toddler. He learned the news that he'd won the race by a razor-thin margin while he was on a plane flying back from visiting his father, who remains in prison in upstate New York. After four days of ballot counting, Boudin was declared the winner. From San Francisco, we speak with Chesa Boudin.

Democracy Now
Nov 12, 2019

The Edge of Democracy: Lula is Freed in Brazil In Victory for Movement to Resist Bolsonaro
In Brazil, former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva was freed from prison Friday after 580 days behind bars. Lula's surprise release came after the Brazilian Supreme Court ruled to end the mandatory imprisonment of people convicted of crimes who are appealing their cases. He was serving a 12-year sentence over a disputed corruption and money laundering conviction handed down by conservative Judge Sérgio Moro, an ally of current far-right Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, and has long maintained his innocence. Lula has vowed to challenge Bolsonaro in the 2022 elections. At the time of his imprisonment in April 2018, Lula was leading the presidential polls. A new documentary, "The Edge of Democracy," chronicles the imprisonment of Lula and impeachment of former Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff. It also looks at the aftermath of the rise of President Jair Bolsonaro — a former military captain who glorifies Brazil's past military regime, denies the climate crisis and celebrates misogyny, homophobia and racism. We speak with Petra Costa, a Brazilian filmmaker and the director of "The Edge of Democracy."

Democracy Now
Nov 12, 2019

Headlines for November 12, 2019
Longtime Bolivian President Evo Morales Takes Asylum in Mexico, Supreme Court Hears Oral Arguments on DACA Cases, Televised Impeachment Hearings to Start Tomorrow, Former MA Gov. Deval Patrick May Jump Into 2020 Race, NY Republican Congressman Peter King Resigns, Donald Trump Jr. Heckled Off Stage by His Own Supporters, EPA to Restrict Scientific Research Used to Write Public Health Regulations, Israeli Military Kills Palestinian Commander in Targeted Assassination in Gaza, Afghan Government & Taliban Agree on Prisoner Exchange, Chilean Government Bows to Protests & Agrees to Rewrite Constitution, 260 Arrested in Mass Protests in Hong Kong, No More Deaths Activist Heads to Retrial in Arizona, Jimmy Carter Undergoes Operation to Reduce Swelling in His Brain, Father of Atatiana Jefferson Dies of Heart Attack After Daughter Killed by Police

Democracy Now
Nov 11, 2019

Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Environmental Justice, Shutting Down Pipelines, Capitalism & Billionaires
Six 2020 presidential candidates — Senators Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker, and Tom Steyer, Marianne Williamson, John Delaney and Joe Sestak — participated in the first-ever Presidential Forum on Environmental Justice in Orangeburg, South Carolina, on November 8. Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman and former EPA official Mustafa Santiago Ali co-moderated the event, which took place at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg. We air highlights of Warren speaking about the climate crisis, public health, shutting down pipelines, capitalism, the order of primary states and more.

Democracy Now
Nov 11, 2019

Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Environmental Justice, Shutting Down Pipelines, Embracing Capitalism & More
Six 2020 presidential candidates — Senators Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker, and Tom Steyer, Marianne Williamson, John Delaney and Joe Sestak — participated in the first-ever Presidential Forum on Environmental Justice in Orangeburg, South Carolina, on November 8. Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman and former EPA official Mustafa Santiago Ali co-moderated the event, which took place at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg. We air highlights of Warren speaking about the climate crisis, public health, shutting down pipelines, capitalism, the order of primary states and more.

Democracy Now
Nov 11, 2019

"This Is a Military Coup": Bolivian President Evo Morales Resigns After Army Calls For His Ouster
Bolivia is in a state of political crisis after longtime President Evo Morales resigned Sunday following what he described as a military coup. Weeks of protests have taken place since a disputed election last month. Morales announced his resignation in a televised address Sunday, shortly after the Bolivian military took to the airwaves to call for his resignation. Bolivia's vice president also resigned Sunday, as did the head of the Bolivian Senate and the lower house. Opposition leader Jeanine Áñez, who is the second vice president of the Bolivian Senate, is claiming she will assume the presidency today. Evo Morales was the longest-serving president in Latin America, as well as Bolivia's first indigenous leader. He was credited with lifting nearly a fifth of Bolivia's population out of poverty since he took office in 2006, but he faced mounting criticism from some of his former supporters for running for a third and then a fourth term. For more on the unfolding crisis in Bolivia, we speak with Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research. His latest piece for The Nation is headlined "The Trump Administration Is Undercutting Democracy in Bolivia." "This is a military coup — there's no doubt about it now," Weisbrot says.

Democracy Now
Nov 11, 2019

Headlines for November 11, 2019
Longtime Bolivian President Evo Morales Resigns, Brazilian Former President Lula Freed from Prison, Haley Said Kelly and Tillerson Told Her to Work Against Trump, Syria: 8 Killed in Bombing in Tel Abyad, Iraq: Death Toll in Anti-Government Protests Rise to 319, Hong Kong: Police Shoot Student Protester at Close Range , Cyclone Kills 20 in Bangladesh & India; Wildfires Rage in Australia , Germans Mark 30th Anniversary of Fall of Berlin Wall , Hundreds Protest Construction of Trump's Border Wall in Sonoran Desert , Kshama Sawant Declares Victory in Seattle City Council Race , Chesa Boudin Wins San Francisco District Attorney's Race

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2019

Remembering the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre When Police Shot Dead Three Unarmed Black Students
The 1968 Orangeburg massacre is one of the most violent and least remembered events of the civil rights movement. A crowd of students gathered on the campus of South Carolina State University to protest segregation at Orangeburg's only bowling alley. After days of escalating tensions, students started a bonfire and held a vigil on the campus to protest. Dozens of police arrived on the scene, and state troopers fired live ammunition into the crowd. When the shooting stopped, three students were dead and 28 wounded. Although the tragedy predated the Kent State shootings and Jackson State killings and it was the first of its kind on any American college campus, it received little national media coverage. The nine officers who opened fire that day were all acquitted. The only person convicted of wrongdoing was Cleveland Sellers, a member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, known as SNCC. Sellers was one of the organizers of the protest. He was convicted of a riot charge and spent seven months behind bars. He was pardoned in 1993. From Orangeburg, South Carolina, we speak with civil rights photographer Cecil Williams, who photographed the scene in the aftermath of the Orangeburg massacre. He is also the founder of the Cecil Williams Civil Rights Museum here in Orangeburg.

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2019

"We Can't Afford to Wait for the DNC": Why Black Lawmakers Organized an Environmental Justice Forum
The first-ever Presidential Forum on Environmental Justice takes place tonight in Orangeburg, South Carolina, where six presidential candidates will take to the stage at South Carolina State University. African-American communities and people of color on the frontlines in South Carolina have been fighting for justice in the face of extreme environmental racism for years. We host a roundtable with local leaders and environmental justice advocates to talk about the significance of the event, the issues their communities face and the 2020 candidates' platforms on environmental justice. Gilda Cobb-Hunter, president of the National Black Caucus of State Legislators, and Melanie Campbell, president of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, join us in Orangeburg.

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2019

Warren, Booker & Steyer to Take Part in First-Ever Presidential Forum on Environmental Justice
We broadcast live from South Carolina State University in Orangeburg, where tonight the first-ever Presidential Forum on Environmental Justice will be held. Six presidential candidates — Senators Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker, Tom Steyer, Marianne Williamson, John Delaney and Joe Sestak — are participating. The forum is hosted by the National Black Caucus of State Legislators and leaders from frontline communities. South Carolina is a crucial state for the 2020 presidential race and one of the first that will have a Democratic primary, following New Hampshire and caucuses in Iowa and Nevada. The region has been repeatedly pummeled by climate-fueled hurricanes, including Hurricane Florence, which swept through the South in 2018, causing epic floods. Black residents and communities of color have faced disproportionate air and water pollution and exposure to environmental hazards, but South Carolina is also home to some of the most successful responses to environmental racism. Ahead of Friday's presidential forum, we speak with Mustafa Ali, the forum's co-moderator and the former head of the environmental justice program at the Environmental Protection Agency. "It's important that we have these conversations about climate change, but those are the symptoms of a disease," Ali says. "The disease has been the racism, the structural inequality, that continues to happen inside of communities of color."

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2019

Headlines for November 8, 2019
George Kent: Giuliani Carried Out Smear Campaign Against U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, U.S. and China Aim to Roll Back Some Tariffs, "A Warning": Anonymous Senior Official Slams Trump in New Book, Michael Bloomberg Preparing to Jump Into 2020 Race, Sanders Immigration Plan: Abolish ICE & Create Path to Citizenship, Undocumented Students to Stage Walkout to Support DACA, Report: DHS to Have Biometric Data on 260 Million People, Iraq: Security Forces Continue Bloody Crackdown on Anti-Government Protesters, Tensions Rise in Bolivia over Disputed Presidential Election, Brazil Sides with U.S. at U.N. Vote Condemning U.S. Embargo on Cuba, Brazilian Supreme Court Ruling Could Free Former President Lula, Hong Kong Student Dies After Clash with Police Days Earlier, Judge to Rule on Marco Saavedra's Asylum Case Next Year

Democracy Now
Nov 07, 2019

"The Pollinators": New Film Shows How Decline of Bee Colonies Could Mean Collapse of Food Chain
A documentary film "The Pollinators" tells the story of the world's yellow-black jacketed honey bees, whose existence may determine the future of human survival. The insects pollinate nearly all the fruits, vegetables and nuts we consume, and some experts estimate one out of every three bites of food we eat depends on the work of honey bees. However, the future of the insects is now in peril with widespread reports of bee colony collapses. In the last decade and a half, beekeepers have reported staggering declines in their bee populations due to pesticides, parasites and loss of habitat. Scientists warn climate change is also threatening the insects' survival, noting bees could die off at faster rates as the Earth warms. For more about the crisis of bee population decline, we're joined by Peter Nelson, director of "The Pollinators," cinematographer and beekeeper.

Democracy Now
Nov 07, 2019

Ex-Twitter Workers Charged with Spying for Saudis as part of Kingdom's Growing Crackdown on Dissent
The U.S. Department of Justice has charged two former Twitter employees with helping Saudi Arabia spy on thousands of the kingdom's critics. Ali Alzabarah and Ahmad Abouammo are accused of giving the Saudi government detailed information about users, including telephone numbers and email addresses linked to the accounts, as well as internet protocol addresses that could be used to identify a user's location. The charges are being filed just over a year after the brutal murder of Saudi journalist and critic Jamal Khashoggi, who was killed inside the Saudi Consulate in Turkey. A new report by Human Rights Watch finds that one year after Khashoggi's brutal murder Saudi Arabia continues to arbitrarily detain countless activists, regime critics and clerics. The report says there is a "darker reality" behind Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's widely touted initiatives for Saudi women and youth, including mass arrests of women activists, some of whom have allegedly been sexually assaulted and tortured with electric shocks. We speak with Adam Coogle, Middle East researcher at Human Rights Watch.

Democracy Now
Nov 07, 2019

Algerian Protesters Are Still in the Streets, Months After Pushing Out Longtime President Bouteflika
In Algeria, protests against corruption, the jailing of opposition leaders and the army's powerful role in national politics have entered their ninth month. Tens of thousands filled the streets of the capital Algiers last Friday to mark the 65th anniversary of the war of independence from France and to demand a "new revolution" rather than an upcoming election they say will be rigged. Over 100 student protesters were arrested last night as the Algerian government intensified its crackdown on demonstrators ahead of the upcoming polls. Interim President Abdelkader Bensalah announced the country will hold a presidential election on December 12. This comes after longtime President Abdelaziz Bouteflika resigned in April following weeks of protests. We speak with Mehdi Kaci, an Algerian-American activist who organized a protest last weekend in San Francisco in support of Algerians, and Daikha Dridi, a journalist based in Algiers. "There is a political uprising, but there is also a huge sense of pride, of self-love, that the Algerian people are experiencing," Dridi says. "The Algerians are wanting a much, much deeper change, and they're not going back home."

Democracy Now
Nov 07, 2019

Headlines for November 7, 2019
Televised Impeachment Hearings Begin Next Week, Sessions to Run for Old Senate Seat; Pressley Endorses Warren, Trump Expands Military Mission in Syria Aimed at Controlling Oil Fields, Esper to Urge Trump Not to Intervene in Cases of Soldiers Accused of Murder, Judge Voids Trump Rule Allowing Medical Workers to Deny Care on Religious Grounds, ProPublica: Pence's Office Meddled in Foreign Aid Money to Favor Christians, DOJ Charges Ex-Twitter Employees; California Investigates Facebook, New Zealand Approves Landmark Climate Legislation Aimed at Zero Carbon Emissions, U.S.-Manufactured Ammunition Used in Massacre of Mormon Family in Mexico, Immigration Activist Marco Saavedra Heads to Final Asylum Hearing, New York's WBAI Back on Air with Local Programming

Democracy Now
Nov 06, 2019

Dems Win Big on Election Day, Flipping Virginia Legislature & Ousting Trump-Backed Kentucky Gov.
Results are coming in after Tuesday's elections, with major wins for Democrats in several crucial states. In Virginia, the party gained control of both legislative houses for the first time in 25 years. In Kentucky, Democratic challenger state Attorney General Andy Beshear has ousted Trump-backed Republican incumbent Matt Bevin in a tightly contested run for governor. In Mississippi, Republican Lieutenant Governor Tate Reeves defeated Democratic state Attorney General Jim Hood in the governor's race. Several local candidates across the country made history. In Scranton, Pennsylvania, Paige Cognetti was elected as the first woman mayor after running as an independent despite being a registered Democrat. She'll also be the first mayor-elect to give birth. Her child is due in December. Ghazala Hashmi became the first Muslim woman elected to the Virginia Senate after winning a suburban Richmond district. And Danica Roem made history for a second time, becoming the first out transgender person to win reelection to a state legislature, after defeating an anti-LGBT Republican candidate to represent the 13th District in the Virginia House of Delegates. Tuesday's election also decided several important state ballot initiatives. Voters in New York City approved ranked-choice voting, a measure supporters say will help underrepresented voters and candidates of color. In Jersey City, voters approved strict regulations on short-term rentals, in a major blow to Airbnb. A measure to make Tucson, Arizona, a sanctuary city was overwhelmingly defeated by voters there. We speak with John Nichols, a political writer for The Nation.

Democracy Now
Nov 06, 2019

Is Texas About to Execute an Innocent Man? Rodney Reed's Family Demands Retrial Amid New Evidence
The state of Texas is facing growing calls to halt the upcoming execution of Rodney Reed, an African-American man who has spent over 20 years on death row for a rape and murder he says he did not commit. A group of 26 Texas lawmakers — including both Democrats and Republicans — have written a letter this week to Governor Greg Abbott to stop the execution planned for November 20. More than 1.4 million people have signed an online petition to save Reed's life. Supporters include celebrities Kim Kardashian West, Rihanna and Meek Mill. Reed was sentenced to die after being convicted of the 1996 murder of a 19-year-old white woman, Stacey Stites, with whom he was having an affair. But since Reed's trial, substantial evidence has emerged implicating Stites's then-financé, a white police officer named Jimmy Fennell, who was later jailed on kidnapping and rape charges in another case. In a major development, a man who spent time in jail with Fennell signed an affidavit last month asserting that Fennell had admitted in prison that he had killed his financée because she was having an affair with a black man. We speak with Rodney Reed's brother Rodrick Reed, his sister-in-law Uwana Akpan and lawyer Bryce Benjet of the Innocence Project.

Democracy Now
Nov 06, 2019

Headlines for November 6, 2019
Democrats Take Virginia Legislature & Beat Trump-Backed Governor in Kentucky, NYC Approves Ranked-Choice Voting; Tucson Voters Reject Sanctuary City Measure, JPMorgan CEO Accuses Warren of "Vilifying" Richest Americans, Sondland Now Says There Was Quid Pro Quo on Ukraine, Scientists: Humanity Risks "Untold Suffering" from Climate Change, Brazilians Protest the Largest Oil Auction in Brazilian History, Activists Arrested After Blockading Port of Vancouver in Pipeline Protest, 9 Members of Mormon Family Murdered in Mexico, Pro-Beijing Lawmaker Stabbed in Hong Kong, Israeli Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Expelling Human Rights Watch Official, Zuckerburg Meets with Civil Rights Leaders Amid Facebook Controversies

Democracy Now
Nov 05, 2019

Colorado Has One of the Highest Voter Turnouts in the Country. Here's How They Did It
As local elections take place nationwide, voters in Colorado are enjoying greater access to the ballot than ever as the state's vote-by-mail system allows residents to bypass long lines at polling places. The state also has voting measures which include automatic voter registration with driver's license services, an extension of the vote to parolees, and allowance for some 17-year-olds to vote in primary elections. Colorado is considered an example for states needing to expand voter access at a time when Republican legislatures and statehouses across the country are attempting to suppress the vote. We speak with Jena Griswold, Colorado's secretary of state, who says that Colorado has "the highest percentage of eligible citizens registered to vote, and our participation rates are often the first or second for the entire nation."

Democracy Now
Nov 05, 2019

NYC Voters to Decide Today to Adopt Ranked-Choice Voting in Municipal Elections
Voters across the U.S. head to the polls today for statewide elections that will be seen as a measure of Donald Trump's influence in the Republican Party as he faces an impeachment inquiry. In New York City, a major ballot measure could change the way voters select their candidates in future elections. New Yorkers will decide whether to move from electing candidates by a plurality of votes to ranked-choice voting, a system in which voters rank their favorite candidates in order and the person with the most top-ranked votes wins. Proponents of the initiative say it will help underrepresented voters and candidates of color. Maya Wiley, senior vice president for social justice and professor of public and urban policy at The New School, joins us for a discussion of the ranked-choice voting system, which she says is about "voters having more choice on who gets elected into public office."

Democracy Now
Nov 05, 2019

"Release My Mother": A Yale Student Fights to Halt Deportation of His Mother with Stage IV Cancer
Tania Romero, an undocumented mother from Honduras and survivor of stage IV cancer, is fighting to remain in the United States with her four children. Two months ago, Romero was imprisoned by Immigration and Customs Enforcement at the privately owned Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia, interrupting her life-saving medical treatments. In mid-August, Romero was pulled over for a minor traffic infraction and arrested for not having a driver's license. Tania Romero's attorney requested a stay of deportation on humanitarian grounds because of her fragile health, but it was denied in September. Her son, Cristian Padilla Romero, is organizing against her deportation, with a petition demanding his mother's release with over 30,000 signatures. We speak with Cristian Padilla Romero, a Ph.D. student in Latin American history at Yale University and a Honduran immigrant with DACA status.

Democracy Now
Nov 05, 2019

Bill McKibben on U.S. Withdrawal from Paris Accord, California Fires, Climate Refugees & More
The Trump administration notified the United Nations Monday that it would withdraw the U.S. from the historic Paris climate agreement, starting a year-long process to leave the international pact to fight the climate crisis. The United States — the world's largest historic greenhouse gas emitter — will become the only country outside the accord. Trump's announcement of the withdrawal came on the first day possible under the agreement's rules. From Middlebury, Vermont, we speak with Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350.org. "The decision of the United States to be the only country on Earth … unwilling to take part in a global attempt at a solution to the greatest crisis we've ever faced — there's a lot to be ashamed of in the Trump years and a lot of terrible things that have happened — it's pretty hard to top that," says McKibben.

Democracy Now
Nov 05, 2019

Headlines for November 5, 2019
U.S. Formalizes Withdrawal from Historic Paris Climate Agreement, Democrats Begin to Release Impeachment Inquiry Transcripts, Voters Head to the Polls for Statewide Elections Today, E. Jean Carroll, Who Accuses Trump of Raping Her, Sues President for Defamation, Court Rejects Trump's Efforts to Fight NY Subpoena for Tax Returns, Trump Threatens to Cut Off Federal Funding for California's Wildfires, Thousands of Academics Demand Chile End Violent Crackdown Against Protests, Iraqi Authorities Cut Internet Access Amid Ongoing Anti-Government Protests, Two Indonesian Journalists Found Dead at Illegal Palm Oil Plantation, Thousands Protest in Spain over Verdict in Gang Rape of Teenage Girl, U.N. Warns Migration Land Route Across Africa Twice as Deadly as Mediterranean, Turkish Officials Say They've Captured Sister of Slain Former ISIS Leader, Judge Dismisses Uber's Challenge of NYC's Effort to Limit Ride-Hailing Apps, UnitedHealth Faces Probe over Racial Discrimination in Its Algorithm, FBI Arrests Man Allegedly Planning to Bomb Colorado Synagogue, Oklahoma: 462 Prisoners Freed in Largest Single-Day Commutation in U.S. History

Democracy Now
Nov 04, 2019

Remembering the Greensboro Massacre of 1979, When KKK & Nazis Killed 5 People in Broad Daylight
Hundreds gathered this weekend to mark the 40th anniversary of the Greensboro massacre, when 40 Ku Klux Klansmen and American Nazis opened fire on an anti-Klan demonstration in Greensboro, North Carolina, killing five anti-racist activists in a span of 88 seconds. Those killed were members of the Communist Workers' Party. Ten other activists were injured. No one was convicted in the massacre, but a jury did find the Greensboro police liable for cooperating with the Ku Klux Klan in a wrongful death. Local pastors in Greensboro are now calling on the City Council to issue an apology for the events that led to the 1979 killing. We speak with Dr. Marty Nathan, the widow of Dr. Mike Nathan, who was killed in the 1979 Greensboro Massacre.

Democracy Now
Nov 04, 2019

Pushed Out, Attacked & Criminalized: San Francisco's Unhoused People Speak out Amid Housing Crisis
Amid skyrocketing housing prices and rising inequality, the number of unhoused people across California is booming. Homelessness in San Francisco has spiked at least 30% since 2017. In Oakland, it's grown by nearly 50%. As more people have been forced onto the streets, encampments have popped up from Los Angeles to the Bay Area and in other city centers. But while advocates push for more affordable housing solutions, instead city governments have been cracking down on unhoused people with increasingly punitive measures that criminalize homelessness. In a special report, Democracy Now! traveled to San Francisco to speak with unhoused people and their advocates about conditions there.

Democracy Now
Nov 04, 2019

Emboldened by Bolsonaro, Illegal Loggers in Amazon Kill Indigenous Leader Paulo Paulino Guajajara
An indigenous forest protector named Paulo Paulino Guajajara was shot dead in the Amazon by illegal loggers on Saturday. It is the latest incident in a wave of violence targeting indigenous land protectors since the election of Brazil's far-right President Jair Bolsonaro last year. Guajajara was killed when he and another forest protector were ambushed by a group of illegal loggers inside the Araribóia reservation in the northeastern state of Maranhão. We speak with João Coimbra Sousa, a field coordinator and legal adviser for Amazon Watch, in São Luís in the northeastern state of Maranhão. And in San Francisco, we speak with Christian Poirier, program director at Amazon Watch.

Democracy Now
Nov 04, 2019

Headlines for November 4, 2019
Four White House Officials Refused to Testify in Impeachment Hearings, Turkish-Backed Forces Accused of War Crimes in Northern Syria, Sen. Warren Releases Details on Her Medicare for All Plan, Trump to Nominate Dr. Stephen Hahn to Lead FDA, EPA Slated to Roll Back Rules to Protect Waterways from Toxic Coal Ash, Group of Automakers Sides with Trump Admin in Fight over Fuel-Efficiency Standards, NYT: Major U.S.-Russia Nuclear Arms Treaty Could Expire Without Being Replaced, Mali: Over 50 Soldiers Killed in Attack on Military Post, Anti-Government Protests Continue to Sweep Iraq, Lebanon & Algeria, Brazilian Indigenous Leader Killed in Amazon, U.S. "Gag Rule" on Abortion Silences Popular Radio Host in Nepal, India: Toxic Smog Sparks Public Health Emergency in Delhi, German Officials Declare "Nazi Emergency" in Dresden, Milwaukee: Man Arrested in Alleged Anti-Immigrant Acid Attack, Saudi Aramco Plans to Go Public, Philadelphia Passes Domestic Workers' Bill of Rights, NYC: Protesters March Against Police Brutality in Subways, Nationals Pitcher Sean Doolittle Boycotts White House Visit in Protest Against Trump

Democracy Now
Nov 01, 2019

Five Indigenous Leaders Massacred in Colombia; New Wave of Violence Feared as 2,500 Troops Deployed
The massacre of five Indigenous leaders in Colombia has shocked the country. The killings took place in the southwestern region of Cauca. Among the victims was Cristina Bautista, the leader of the semi-autonomous Indigenous reservation of Nasa Tacueyó. Four of the community's unarmed guards were also killed, while six others were wounded. A group of U.N. experts have denounced the massacre and demanded the Colombian government to take urgent measures in cooperation with Indigenous authorities to investigate the murders. Police have made no arrests and no suspects have been named in the massacre. Since the signing of the Peace Accords in 2016, at least 700 social leaders, mostly Afro-Colombian and Indigenous activists, have been murdered in Colombia, according to the Institute for Development and Peace Studies. We speak with Mario Murillo, Vice-Dean of the School of Communications at Hofstra University and award-winning journalist who has extensively reported on Colombia and the region of Cauca.

Democracy Now
Nov 01, 2019

"It Was Necessary": Gambian Beauty Queen Returns Home to Testify About Rape By Former Dictator
In Gambia, a former beauty queen who says the president raped her when she was 18 years old has testified before a public truth and reconciliation commission that is investigating the atrocities of former president Yahya Jammeh. Fatou "Toufah" Jallow has become a leading voice against the former president, who ruled the West African country of 2 million people for 22 years before his regime ended in 2017. Two other women have also come forward to accuse the former president of rape and sexual assault. Survivors of the regime have also testified during the hearings, which have been live streamed across the country. The investigation is part of an ongoing process to reckon with the horrors committed during Jammeh's rule, including killing and disappearing hundreds of people, torture, unjustified jailings and sexual violence against women and girls. From Gambia, we speak with Fatou "Toufah" Jallow, along with attorney Reed Brody of Human Rights Watch, who is currently leading the prosecution of former Gambian dictator Yahya Jammeh.

Democracy Now
Nov 01, 2019

Chicago Teachers and UAW Members Show That Labor Movement Is Back After "Decades of Concessions"
The end of the Chicago teachers' strike comes amid a wave of labor movements, including the longest United Auto Workers strike in almost 50 years. We speak with labor journalist Sarah Jaffe about the historical importance of unions, the rise of worker participation in strike actions and the significance of the Labour Party's organizing in the United Kingdom. Jaffe says workers "are fighting back in the face of decades and decades of concessions, decades and decades of give-backs," and "understanding that unionizing is a way that they have power on the job." She is the author of _Necessary Trouble: Americans in Revolt_.

Democracy Now
Nov 01, 2019

"This Is a Win for Our City": Chicago Teachers Celebrate End of Historic Strike After 11 Days
Teachers in Chicago are heading back to school Friday, marking the end of a historic eleven-day strike that had shut down the nation's third-largest school district. After weeks of tense negotiations, the city agreed to reduce class sizes, increase salaries by 16 percent over the next 5 years and bring on hundreds more social workers, nurses and librarians. The union demanded that teachers be able to make up the full eleven days of school before agreeing to return to work and eventually settled with the city on five days. Earlier this week, 7,500 public school workers with the Service Employees International Union, who had been striking also settled with the city earlier. We speak with Stacy Davis Gates, the Executive Vice President of the Chicago Teacher Union, and labor journalist Sarah Jaffe.

Democracy Now
Nov 01, 2019

Headlines for November 1, 2019
House Votes to Formalize Impeachment Inquiry Into President Trump , Trump Will Avoid State Income Taxes After Declaring Florida Residency, CIA-Backed Afghan Forces Commit Atrocities, Says Human Rights Watch, Iraqi Prime Minister Offers to Resign Amid Anti-Government Protests, Thousands March in Argentina Against IMF-Imposed Austerity, Spain to Replace Chile as Host of COP25 U.N. Climate Conference, Rex Tillerson Denies Exxon Misled Investors Over Climate Risks, Greta Thunberg Turns Down Environment Prize for Her Climate Activism, New California Wildfire Burns Homes in San Bernardino, Keystone Pipeline Spill in North Dakota Leaked 383,000 Gallons of Oil, Rep. Katie Hill Blasts "Misogynistic Culture" in Final House Speech, Missouri Health Director Kept Spreadsheet of Women's Menstrual Cycles, Gambian Beauty Queen Testifies About Rape by Former President , Hong Kong Protesters Use Halloween to Defy Mask Ban, Jordan Recalls Ambassador to Israel After Jordanians Jailed Without Charge

Democracy Now
Oct 31, 2019

Ro Khanna Condemns GOP For Attacking Civil Servants to Shield Trump As House Votes on Impeachment
The House of Representatives is holding a historic vote today to formalize the impeachment process against President Trump. The probe centers on whether Trump withheld military aid to Ukraine to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate Trump's political rival Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, who served on the board of Burisma Holdings, a Ukrainian energy company. As the House votes today, lawmakers are continuing to question key Trump administration behind closed doors, including the top Russia official on the National Security Council, Tim Morrison. On Wednesday, House Democrats also requested that Trump's former National Security Adviser John Bolton testify. We speak with California Congressmember Ro Khanna.

Democracy Now
Oct 31, 2019

As Rich Hire Private Firefighters, Housekeepers Go to Work in Fire Zone & Prisoners Fight CA Blazes
As climate-fueled fires rage across California, we look at how the blazes are disproportionately affecting some of the state's most vulnerable communities. As a growing number of wealthy homeowners hire private firefighters to protect their properties for up to $3,000 per day, domestic workers and gardeners who tend to some of the most opulent homes in Los Angeles attended work despite the Getty Fire evacuation order earlier this week. Many of their employers failed to even tell them not to come in. Meanwhile, of the more than 4,000 firefighters currently working across the state, at least 700 are California prisoners. They earn as little as $1 per hour. We speak with Amika Mota, a former prisoner firefighter and the policy director at the Young Women's Freedom Center in San Francisco, and _Los Angeles Times_ journalist Brittny Mejia. Her piece is titled "Housekeepers and gardeners go to work despite the flames."

Democracy Now
Oct 31, 2019

As California Burns Again, Rep. Ro Khanna Calls for PG&E to Become Publicly Owned Utility
Extreme winds of up to 60 miles per hour caused new fires to erupt across southern California Wednesday, prompting tens of thousands to evacuate. The blazes are just the latest in a spate of climate change-fueled fires threatening the state. In Northern California, firefighters have finally beat back the Sonoma County Kincade Fire that had forced nearly 200,000 people to flee their homes over the weekend. Nearly all evacuees in the region have now been allowed to return to their homes and the utility giant Pacific Gas & Electric said Wednesday it would begin restoring power to the 365,000 customers who were plunged into darkness over the weekend as fires first erupted across the state. PG&E — the corporation that controls most of Northern and Central California's electricity and the biggest utility in America — has been implicated in many of the fires that have ravaged California in recent years, including the Camp Fire that killed 85 people and completely destroyed the town of Paradise in 2018. In January, PG&E declared bankruptcy amid a number of lawsuits related to the wildfires. We speak with California Congressmember Ro Khanna, who is calling for the California state government to take over control of PG&E. Khanna says, "PG&E is basically a private monopoly that gets a return on investment for their private investors, but has no competition. It is the worst of both worlds."

Democracy Now
Oct 31, 2019

New Study: 300 Million Face Severe Risk of Climate-Fueled Coastal Flooding by 2050
As a shocking new report finds that many coastal cities will be flooded by rising sea levels by 2050, Chile's President Sebastián Piñera announced Wednesday that the U.N. Climate Summit in Santiago has been canceled. Anti-inequality protests have entered their third week in the country with protesters calling for the Piñera government to resign. The U.N. said it is now looking for an alternative venue for the annual climate meetings. Meanwhile, a dire new report has warned 300 million people are at risk from rising sea levels, with the most vulnerable populations concentrated in the Global South. According to the study published in _Nature Communications_, global sea levels are expected to rise between two and seven feet or possibly more, with some coastal cities being wiped off the map. We speak with Harjeet Singh, the global lead on climate change for Action Aid who is based in New Delhi, India; and Benjamin Strauss, co-author of the study in Nature Communications and CEO and chief scientist at Climate Central.

Democracy Now
Oct 31, 2019

Headlines for October 31, 2019
Tens of Thousands Evacuate as New Blazes Erupt in Fire-Ravaged California, Chile Calls Off U.N. Climate Talks Amid Massive Protests Against Inequality, Protesters Confront JPMorgan Chase CEO Over Fossil Fuel Investments, Youth Climate Activists Stage Sit-In at House Speaker Pelosi's Office, Keystone Pipeline Breach Spills Oil in North Dakota, House Readies Vote to Formalize Impeachment Process, Top Immigration Official Grilled Over Move to Deport Critically Ill Immigrants, "Not Qualified" Rating from Bar Association Draws Tears from Judicial Nominee, India to Split Jammu and Kashmir Into Two Territories Controlled by New Delhi, Pentagon Releases Video Showing Raid on al-Baghdadi Compound, Philippines Island Rocked by Second Powerful Earthquake, Brazilian President Attacks Globo Over Report Linking Him to Marielle Franco's Murder, Colombia Deploys Troops After Five Indigenous Leaders Killed in Cauca, Twitter to Reject All Political Ads as Pressure Mounts Against Facebook, Pathologist Says Jeffry Epstein Was Strangled to Death, U.K. Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn to Challenge PM Boris Johnson in Dec. 12 Election, Chicago Teachers Reach Tentative Contract but Continue Strike Over Lost Days

Democracy Now
Oct 30, 2019

Who Burned the Bronx? PBS Film "Decade of Fire" Investigates 1970s Fires That Displaced Thousands
The new documentary "Decade of Fire" looks back at the history of a crisis that unfolded in New York City in the 1970s, when the South Bronx faced a near-constant barrage of fires that displaced almost a quarter million people and devastated an entire community. Co-directors and producers Vivian Vázquez Irizarry and Gretchen Hildebran tell the story of the government mismanagement, landlord corruption and redlining that lit the Bronx ablaze. They also describe how the community fought back to save their neighborhoods. The film airs next week on PBS.

Democracy Now
Oct 30, 2019

Chesa Boudin, Son of 1960s Radicals, Runs for San Francisco DA on Criminal Justice Reform Platform
Chesa Boudin is running for San Francisco district attorney as the latest candidate in a wave of decarceral prosecutors running for office across the United States. Bernie Sanders and other leading progressives have endorsed Boudin, who is a public defender and the child of Weather Underground activists Kathy Boudin and David Gilbert. His parents were imprisoned when Boudin was a toddler. These experiences have given him a first-hand view of "how broken our criminal justice system is," he says. "My earliest memories are going through steel gates and metal detectors just to see my parents, just to give them a hug." Boudin is running on a platform of ending cash bail and dismantling the War on Drugs, seeking to end "tough on crime" tactics and restore civil rights. Bay Area voters will cast their ballots Nov. 5.

Democracy Now
Oct 30, 2019

Lebanon's Prime Minister Hariri Resigns, But Protests and Demands For a New Government Continue
Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri announced the resignation of his government on Tuesday following nearly two weeks of nationwide anti-government protests. In a televised address, al-Hariri said he had hit a "dead end" in resolving the crisis. Demonstrators "were congratulating each other while at the same time acknowledging that the struggle is very long," says Lebanese journalist, Lara Bitar, who joins us from Beirut for an update. She says protesters have promised to stay in the streets until all of their demands are met, including the resignation of all top government officials, early parliamentary elections and the creation of a transitional cabinet of people unaffiliated with traditional political parties.

Democracy Now
Oct 30, 2019

Headlines for October 30, 2019
Vindman: Whole House Transcript of Trump Phone Call Omitted Key Words, Boeing CEO Grilled by Senate Lawmakers Over 737 MAX Failures, Lebanese Prime Minister Resigns Amid Massive Protests, Tens of Thousands Pour into Baghdad's Tahrir Square as Iraq Protests Continue, Anti-Government Protests in Haiti Enter their Seventh Week, Ceasefire Between Turkey and Syrian Kurds in Northern Syria Expires, House Votes for Resolution to Recognize Armenian Genocide, Blogger Max Blumenthal Says He Was Arrested on False Charges, National Weather Service Issues "Extreme Red Flag Warning" over Fires, Protesters Slam BlackRock for Investing in Coal and Oil

Democracy Now
Oct 29, 2019

Protests in Chile Were Sparked By a Subway Fare Hike, But Come After "30 Years of a Social Crisis"
In Chile, a new set of mass protests took place Monday as President Sebastián Piñera fulfilled the promise to appoint new members to his cabinet. As Piñera addressed the nation Monday, hundreds of protesters had already gathered outside the presidential palace in Santiago, waving flags, honking horns and demanding for Piñera's resignation. The reshuffling of his cabinet came after more than a million people flooded the streets last Friday in massive peaceful demonstrations over inequality, high cost of living and privatization. The protest drew more than 5% of Chile's population and followed days of widespread civil unrest and a violent police and military crackdown across Chile. At least 18 people have died, with more than 1,000 more protesters shot and wounded since the mobilizations erupted Oct. 19. We speak with Pablo Abufom, a member of the Solidarity Movement, an anti-capitalist and feminist organization in Chile. His recent article published in Jacobin magazine is titled "It's Not About 30 Pesos. It's About 30 Years."

Democracy Now
Oct 29, 2019

As Death Toll Tops 220, Iraqi Protesters Stay in Streets Calling For End to Corrupt Government
In Iraq, masked gunmen shot dead 18 protesters overnight and injured more than 800 people in the Shiite holy city of Karbala on Monday. Nearly 225 Iraqis have been killed since a wave of anti-government protests swept the country last month. The protesters in Karbala were attacked while they camped out in the city's Education Square to protest corruption, lack of jobs and poor public services. Meanwhile in Baghdad, hospital officials said four people died during protests on Monday, while another 109 were injured. On Monday, the Iraqi Parliament met for the first time since the protests began. Lawmakers voted to dissolve provincial councils and cut the salaries of some high-ranking officials. But the influential Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr dismissed the measures as a "sham" and called on the Iraqi government to announce early parliamentary elections. We speak with Yanar Mohammed, president of the Organization of Women's Freedom in Iraq.

Democracy Now
Oct 29, 2019

Fueled by Climate Change, California's Raging Wildfires Are Threatening Vulnerable Communities First
California is bracing for a day of strong winds as climate change-fueled wildfires continue to burn from Los Angeles to north of the Bay Area. After a chaotic weekend of mass evacuations and blackouts that left millions in the dark, firefighters in Sonoma, California, made headway Monday, containing 15% of the massive Kincade fire that has burned nearly 75,000 acres. But as high winds pick up again today, firefighters still face an uphill battle in combating the at least 10 blazes raging across the state, including the growing Getty fire, which erupted in one of Los Angeles's most opulent communities Monday. Fires in California are typical this time of year, but the length and severity of the state's fire season has grown due to climate change. We speak with Leah Stokes, an assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and researcher on climate and energy politics. We also speak with Ariel Kelley, the CEO of Corazón Healdsburg, a bilingual family resource center based in Northern Sonoma County.

Democracy Now
Oct 29, 2019

Headlines for October 29, 2019
Pentagon: U.S. Will Fight for Control of Oilfields in Syria, Ukraine Expert Who Listened to Trump Phone Call to Testify in Impeachment Hearings, Iraq: Death Toll from Month of Anti-Government Protests Tops 220, Trump Officials Join Industry Executives at Davos in Desert, Boeing CEO to Testify to Congressional Committees, Sanders Endorses Chesa Boudin for San Francisco District Attorney, Facebook Workers Call on Zuckerberg to Reverse Policy of Allowing Politicians to Lie in Ads, North Carolina Court Rules Against State's Gerrymandered Congressional Maps, U.S. Extends Deportation Relief to Salvadorans to 2021, Mexican Woman Dies in Border Patrol Custody, France: Man Attempts to Set Fire to Mosque, Shoots and Wounds 2 People, 15 Children Sue Canada over Climate Change, Peru: Graduate Student Makes History by Writing and Defending Thesis in Quechua, Protesters Gather for Day of Outrage over Police Killings of Black Women

Democracy Now
Oct 28, 2019

One Million Take to Streets of Chile in the "Largest Mobilization Since the End of Dictatorship"
Chilean President Sebastián Piñera has announced a major cabinet shuffle after more than one million people flooded the streets Friday in massive peaceful demonstrations over inequality, high cost of living and privatization. The protest drew more than 5% of Chile's population and followed days of widespread civil unrest that sparked a violent police and military crackdown across the country. At least 18 people have been killed and hundreds more have been shot and wounded since protests erupted Oct. 19. The protests in Chile began in response to a subway fare hike and have grown into a mass uprising against the government. We speak with Professor Macarena Gómez-Barris, founder and director of the Global South Center and chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at the Pratt Institute, and Alondra Carrillo Vidal, a spokesperson for Chile's largest feminist advocacy group, Coordinadora Feminista 8M.

Democracy Now
Oct 28, 2019

"People Have Reached the Limit": Lebanon Joins Wave of Anti-Government Protests Across Middle East
Tens of thousands of people in Lebanon joined hands on Sunday to form a human chain spanning north to south across the entire country. It was a symbolic display of unity across regional and sectarian divisions amid mass protests that have rocked the country in recent days. The protests sweeping Lebanon come amid a wave of similar anti-government protests in Iraq, Egypt and elsewhere in the Middle East. We speak with Rami Khouri, senior public policy fellow and journalist-in-residence at the American University of Beirut, and a columnist at The New Arab.

Democracy Now
Oct 28, 2019

The Death of al-Baghdadi: ISIS Grew Out of U.S. Invasion of Iraq. What Will Happen Next?
President Trump announced Sunday that ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was killed in a U.S. special forces raid on his compound in northwestern Syria. According to Trump, al-Baghdadi detonated an explosive vest he was wearing, killing himself and three of his children. The raid began early Sunday when eight U.S. military helicopters flew from a base near Erbil, Iraq, to northwestern Syria over airspace controlled by Syria and Russia. Baghdadi had led ISIS since 2010. In 2014, he proclaimed the creation of an Islamic State or caliphate during a speech in Mosul. At its peak, ISIS controlled a large swath of land across Syria and Iraq and maintained a force of tens of thousands of fighters recruited from more than 100 countries. The group also claimed responsibility for deadly attacks across five continents. We speak with three guests: Juan Cole, author and professor of history at the University of Michigan; Emma Beals, award-winning investigative journalist and researcher who has covered the Syrian conflict since 2012; and Rami Khouri, senior public policy fellow and journalist-in-residence at the American University of Beirut, and a columnist at The New Arab.

Democracy Now
Oct 28, 2019

Headlines for October 28, 2019
ISIS Leader al-Baghdadi Reportedly Dies in U.S. Raid in Syria, California Declares State of Emergency over Wildfires, Chile: Over One Million Take to Streets in Protest Against Inequality, Dozens Killed in Iraq Amid Latest Round of Anti-Government Protests, Lebanese Form Human Chain Across Country as Protests Continue, Alberto Fernandez Wins Argentine Election in Defeat for Right-Wing Incumbent, Brexit Deadline Extended Until Jan. 31, Trump Booed, Taunted at World Series Game, Pentagon Hands Microsoft a $10 Billion Contract, Chicago Teachers Strike Continues, While Support Staff Reach Tentative Deal, UAW and General Motors Finalize Deal to End 40-Day Strike, Congresswoman Katie Hill Resigns after Relationship with Campaign Aide, DACA Recipients Launch 16-Day March from NYC to Washington, Pittsburgh Residents March One Year since Massacre at Tree of Life Synogogue, Obama Praises Elijah Cummings at Funeral for Late Congressman, Longtime Michigan Congressman John Conyers Jr. Dies at 90

Democracy Now
Oct 25, 2019

"State of Emergency": Special Report on California's Criminalization of Growing Homeless Encampments
In a _Democracy Now!_ special report, we look at the rise in homelessness in many major cities across the United States. California has become the poster-child for this economic and humanitarian disaster, with growing encampments in Los Angeles and the Bay Area as more people are forced onto the streets. The state is home to 12% of the country's population but half of the country's unsheltered people. As the crisis deepens, so has the criminalization of homelessness, with increasing efforts by city and state officials to crack down on unhoused people occupying public space. President Donald Trump made headlines this month for attacking California's politicians over the homelessness crisis, threatening to destroy encampments, increase police enforcement and even jail unhoused people. But advocates say California has already employed hostile policies that criminalize homelessness, from laws against unsheltered people sitting on sidewalks to frequent sweeps of the encampments that have popped up on thoroughfares and under freeways across the state's cities. One of these crackdowns is currently unfolding at a massive Oakland encampment that Democracy Now! visited just a few weeks ago.

Democracy Now
Oct 25, 2019

Rashida Tlaib to Mark Zuckerberg: Why Haven't You Stopped Hate Groups From Organizing on Facebook?
We feature more highlights from the five-hour grilling of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg this week on Capitol Hill, where Michigan Congressmember Rashida Tlaib said she feared that far-right hate groups were using Facebook event pages to incite violence against Muslims and other minorities — including death threats directed at her office. Tlaib asked to be seen not only as a Congresswoman, but also as "a mother that is raising two Muslim boys in this pretty dark time in our world." Meanwhile, California Congressmember Katie Porter pinned Zuckerberg down on Facebook's privacy policies. "You are arguing in federal court that in a consumer data privacy lawsuit, in which your own lawyers admit that users' information was stolen, that the plaintiffs fail to articulate any injury," Porter said. "In other words, no harm, no foul. Facebook messed up, but it doesn't matter. Is that your position?"

Democracy Now
Oct 25, 2019

"You Won't Take Down Lies or You Will?": AOC Grills Facebook's Zuckerberg on Lies in Political Ads
This week, as Facebook said it will not fact check political ads or hold politicians to its usual content standards, the social media giant's CEO Mark Zuckerberg was grilled for more than five hours by lawmakers on Capitol Hill on the company's policy of allowing politicians to lie in political advertisements, as well as its role in facilitating election interference and housing discrimination. We play highlights from New York Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Ohio Congressmember Joyce Beatty, who asked Zuckerberg about Facebook's record on civil rights, which she called "appalling and disgusting" and said: "You should have known better," she said, saying the company might have if "you had real diversity and inclusion on your team."

Democracy Now
Oct 25, 2019

Kings Bay Plowshares 7 Found Found Guilty of Conspiracy at Naval Base Housing Nuclear Arsenal
In Georgia, a federal grand jury on Thursday found seven Catholic peace activists guilty on three felony counts and a misdemeanor charge for breaking into the Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base on April 4, 2018. The activists, known as the Kings Bay Plowshares 7, entered the base armed with hammers, crime scene tape, baby bottles containing their own blood, and an indictment charging the U.S. government with crimes against peace. The base is home to at least six nuclear ballistic missile submarines, each of which carries 20 Trident thermonuclear weapons. The activists said they were following the prophet Isaiah's command to "beat swords into plowshares." At this week's trial, the defendants were barred from citing their religious motivations or from mounting a "necessity defense" saying that their lawbreaking was necessary to prevent the far greater crime of a nuclear war. The activists will be sentenced within the next 90 days. They face more than 20 years in prison.

Democracy Now
Oct 25, 2019

Kings Bay Plowshares 7 Found Guilty of Conspiracy at Naval Base Housing Nuclear Arsenal
In Georgia, a federal grand jury on Thursday found seven Catholic peace activists guilty on three felony counts and a misdemeanor charge for breaking into the Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base on April 4, 2018. The activists, known as the Kings Bay Plowshares 7, entered the base armed with hammers, crime scene tape, baby bottles containing their own blood, and an indictment charging the U.S. government with crimes against peace. The base is home to at least six nuclear ballistic missile submarines, each of which carries 20 Trident thermonuclear weapons. The activists said they were following the prophet Isaiah's command to "beat swords into plowshares." At this week's trial, the defendants were barred from citing their religious motivations or from mounting a "necessity defense" saying that their lawbreaking was necessary to prevent the far greater crime of a nuclear war. The activists will be sentenced within the next 90 days. They face more than 20 years in prison.

Democracy Now
Oct 25, 2019

Headlines for October 25, 2019
Trump's Justice Department Opens Criminal Probe into Origins of Mueller Investigation, Trump Planning to Send Troops and Tanks to Eastern Syrian Oil Fields, U.N. to Probe Human Rights Abuses in Chile Amid Mass Protests, Ecuador's Indigenous Leaders Halt Talks with President Over Austerity Protests, Bolivia's Evo Morales Declares Election Victory as Opponents Cry Foul, Thousands March in Guinea to Oppose President's Bid for Third Term, Baltimore Congressmember Elijah Cummings Lies in State at U.S. Capitol, Joe Biden's Campaign Reverses Opposition to Super PACs, Protesters Demand New Jersey Offer Driver's Licenses to Undocumented Immigrants, Harvey Weinstein Confronted During Appearance in New York City Bar, Houston Astros Fire Manager Who Taunted Reporters Over Domestic Violence, MLB "Looking Into" Umpire Who Threatened Civil War Over Trump's Impeachment, Tens of Thousands Flee Homes as Wildfires Explode Across California, South Dakota to Drop "Riot Boosting" Law Targeting Pipeline Protesters, Top U.S. Student Loan Official Quits, Calling for Massive Debt Forgiveness

Democracy Now
Oct 24, 2019

GOP Lawmakers Disrupt Impeachment Hearing As More Damaging Details Emerge About Trump's Misconduct
Republican lawmakers stormed a closed hearing room Wednesday, disrupting the House impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump and delaying a Pentagon official's testimony. In an extraordinary chain of events, dozens of Republican congressmembers pushed into a secure hearing room as Laura Cooper, the U.S. defense official who oversees Ukraine and Russia matters, was due to testify. A five-hour stand-off ensued. The spectacle unfolded one day after Tuesday's explosive testimony by William Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine. Taylor told congressional lawmakers that the Trump administration held up $391 million in aid to Ukraine for the purpose of pushing Ukraine to incriminate Trump's political rivals, particularly presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden. We go to Capitol Hill to speak with Mitch Jeserich, the host of Letters & Politics heard on KPFA and Pacifica Radio. And we speak with retired colonel and Vietnam War veteran Andrew Bacevich, co-founder of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft.

Democracy Now
Oct 24, 2019

Ending Endless War: Andrew Bacevich on How Reckless Use of U.S. Military Power Caused Today's Crisis
President Trump has announced sanctions will be lifted on Turkey as a ceasefire remains in place in northern Syria, where Turkey invaded earlier this month after Trump withdrew U.S. troops. On Tuesday Turkey reached an agreement with Russia that would force Syrian Kurdish forces to retreat from a wide swath of the Syrian-Turkish border. The United Nations is reporting Turkey's offensive in northern Syria has displaced over 176,000 people, including nearly 80,000 children. The Turkish assault also led to a number of former ISIS fighters escaping from jail in northern Syria. We speak with Andrew Bacevich, co-founder of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft and author of several books. He is Professor Emeritus of International Relations and History at Boston University. "I think in any discussion of our wars, ongoing wars, it's important to set them in some broader historical context," Bachevich says. "To a very great extent, we created the problems that exist today through our reckless use of American military power."

Democracy Now
Oct 24, 2019

Headlines for October 24, 2019
Trump Lifts Sanctions on Turkey, Citing Ceasefire Agreement, Republican Lawmakers Disrupt Closed-Door Impeachment Hearing, Trump's Lawyer Argues the President Can't Be Prosecuted for Murder, Death Toll in Chile Protests Rises to 18 as Human Rights Groups Allege Torture, Spain Removes Remains of Francisco Franco from National Mausoleum, Julian Assange Appears Frail and Confused in London Court Hearing, 39 Bodies Found in Tractor-Trailer in Southeast England, Honduran Woman's Lawsuit Claims Years of Sexual Assault by ICE Agent, Immigrant Worker Injured in New Orleans Hotel Collapse Arrested by ICE, California Utilities to Cut Power to Hundreds of Thousands Over Wildfire Fears, Trump Touts Natural Gas Fracking and "Beautiful Wall" in Colorado, Jewish Leaders Arrested For Protesting Trump One Year After Mass Shooting at Pittsburgh Synagogue, AOC Grills Mark Zuckerberg Over Cryptocurrency Plan and Political Ads

Democracy Now
Oct 23, 2019

Big Tech Platforms Have Had a "Profound Negative Effect on Democracy." Is It Time to Break Them Up?
Facebook continues to face growing criticism and demands that it be broken up. Massachusetts senator and Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has repeatedly called for Facebook and other big tech companies to be broken up on antitrust grounds. Roger McNamee, a Silicon Valley investor who went from being an early supporter of Facebook to a vocal critic, speaks with us about 2020 candidates' platforms on big tech. Antitrust regulation is "the one issue that seems to cut across the entire political spectrum," McNamee says. "People of all political stripes understand that there's a problem here."

Democracy Now
Oct 23, 2019

Mark Zuckerberg's Former Mentor: I Tried to Raise Alarm Over Russian Interference But Was Ignored
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies on Capitol Hill Wednesday, where he is expected to face questioning about the company's cryptocurrency Libra, among other issues. Zuckerberg has faced scrutiny before, including for Facebook's role in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. A former mentor of Zuckerberg and longtime Silicon Valley investor Roger McNamee speaks out about the company's dismissal of Russian interference in the election. "They treated it like a PR problem, not a business issue," McNamee says.

Democracy Now
Oct 23, 2019

Zucked: Early Facebook Investor Roger McNamee on How the Company Became a Threat to Democracy
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying Wednesday on Capitol Hill as his company's actions face escalating criticism. The focus of today's House Financial Services Committee hearing is on Facebook's plan to launch a cryptocurrency called Libra that would reshape the world's financial system. Meanwhile, New York Attorney General Letitia James announced Tuesday that her probe of Facebook for violating antitrust regulations is now backed by attorneys general from 47 states and territories. Facebook is also facing criticism from several Democratic presidential candidates for refusing to ban political ads from candidates containing false information. We speak with Roger McNamee, a former mentor to Mark Zuckerberg and early investor in Facebook, who has since become one of the company's most vocal critics. His recent book is titled, "Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe."

Democracy Now
Oct 23, 2019

Headlines for October 23, 2019
Taylor Testifies Trump Tied Ukraine Aid to Investigation of Hunter Biden, Trump Tweets Impeachment is a "Lynching," Sparking Widespread Condemnation, Turkey and Russia Reach Agreement on Northern Syria, Protests Erupt in Bolivia Over Allegations of Election Rigging, Chilean President Announces Reforms Aimed to Curb Massive Protests, Boris Johnson Loses Critical Brexit Vote, Canada's New Anti-Immigrant Party Is Crushed in National Elections, UAW Member Dies After Being Struck by Car Near Picket Line, Chicago Teachers Head into Second Week of Strike, New York's Probe of Facebook Backed by 46 Attorneys General, Mexican Immigration Dies in Border Control Custody, Cop Fired for Threatening to Shoot Black Family after 4-Year-Old Girl Took a Doll from Family Dollar, Report: 95% of Baby Foods in U.S. Contain Toxic Heavy Metals, MLB Investigating Outburst to Female Reporter by Houston Astros' Assistant GM, Boeing Ousts a Top Executive over Fatal Plane Crashes, Two Proud Boys Sentenced to 4 Years in Prison in New York

Democracy Now
Oct 22, 2019

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor: Bernie Sanders Would "Transform the Lives of Poor and Working-Class People"
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, an assistant professor at Princeton University, has just published a book about the racial wealth gap and falling rate of homeownership by African Americans. Her book is titled "Race For Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Home Ownership." Taylor speaks with us about the 2020 presidential candidates' platforms, including Senator Bernie Sanders's proposed wealth tax. She says Sanders's policies bring "to light the connection between the systemic forces that drive inequality and the impact that they have in people's lives."

Democracy Now
Oct 22, 2019

Race for Profit: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor on How Banks & Real Estate Biz Undermined Black Homeowners
Recent U.S. census data reveals the homeownership rate for African Americans has fallen to its lowest level since before the civil rights movement. In the second quarter of this year, the rate fell to just 40% — the lowest level since 1950. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor's new book, "Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Home Ownership," examines the roots of this crisis. The book has just come out and has been longlisted for the 2019 National Book Award. From Phillidelphia, we speak with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, an assistant professor at Princeton University.

Democracy Now
Oct 22, 2019

"Unprecedented" Protests Rage Across Lebanon as People Demand PM's Resignation and End to Austerity
Mass protests in Lebanon have entered their sixth day as hundreds of thousands around the country are taking to the streets to demonstrate against dire economic conditions, austerity and corruption, demanding the country's leaders step down. The protests were sparked last week when the government announced a tax on WhatsApp calls, but the massive demonstrations have since grown into a call for revolution. More than a million demonstrators flooded the streets of Beirut, Tripoli and other cities over the weekend. Prime Minister Saad Hariri revoked the WhatsApp tax on Monday and announced a package of economic reforms, but protesters are continuing to call for his ouster. For more, we speak with independent Lebanese journalist Kareem Chehayeb, whose recent piece for The Washington Post is headlined "Lebanon's protests and wildfires tell the same grim story."

Democracy Now
Oct 22, 2019

Headlines for October 22, 2019
Erdogan Meets with Putin as Turkish Ceasefire in Syria Expires, William Taylor Testifies in Impeachment Hearings, NYT: U.S. Has Quietly Pulled Thousands of Troops Out of Afghanistan, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Held onto Power in Tight Elections, Israel: Netanyahu Fails to Form Coalition Government, Massive Protests Continue in Chile, Northern Ireland Decriminalizes Abortion & Legalizes Marriage Equality, Indonesia: Former General Prabowo Subianto to Join the Cabinet, ExxonMobil Goes on Trial in New York over Climate Change, Four Drug Companies Reach Settlement with Two Ohio Counties, Macy's to Stop Selling Fur Products, 7 Arrested Protesting MoMA Trustee's Ties to Puerto Rican Debt

Democracy Now
Oct 21, 2019

"We Want Democracy to Be Restored": Protesters in Chile Decry Inequality Amid Military Crackdown
In Chile, as many as eight people have died in widespread civil unrest that has brought Santiago to a standstill and sparked a violent police crackdown across the country. The protests began in response to a subway fare hike two weeks ago and have grown into a mass uprising against rising inequality, high cost of living and privatization. President Sebastián Piñera canceled the fee increase on Saturday, but protests are continuing, with a national strike called for today. Over the weekend, Piñera declared a state of emergency in Santiago and five other cities, imposing a curfew and sending the military into the streets in response to civil unrest for the first time since dictator Augusto Pinochet's regime. Military tanks rolled through Santiago this weekend, and at least 1,400 protesters have been detained. Francisca Perales, one of the leaders of the newly formed left-wing political party Social Convergence, and Andra Chastain, an assistant professor of history at Washington State University in Vancouver, join us for a conversation about the massive protests in Chile.

Democracy Now
Oct 21, 2019

Kings Bay Plowshares 7: Trial Begins for Liz McAlister & Others for Breaking Into Nuke Sub Base
Seven Catholic peace activists are going on trial in Georgia today for breaking into the Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base on April 4, 2018. The activists, who are known as the Kings Bay Plowshares 7, face up to 25 years in prison if convicted. The activists entered the base armed with just hammers, crime scene tape, baby bottles containing their own blood and an indictment charging the U.S. government with crimes against peace. Over the past four decades activists in the Plowshares movement have taken part in about 100 similar actions at nuclear arms facilities, beginning in 1980 at the General Electric nuclear missile plant in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. We recently spoke to Catholic nun Liz McAlister, who goes on trial today with her co-defendants Father Stephen Kelly, Mark Colville, Patrick O'Neill, Carmen Trotta, Clare Grady and Martha Hennessy, who is the granddaughter of Dorothy Day, the founder of the Catholic Worker movement. They all have been charged with three felonies and a misdemeanor.

Democracy Now
Oct 21, 2019

Bernie's Back: AOC Backs Sanders as 26,000 Rally in NYC at Largest Presidential Rally of 2019
Vermont independent senator and 2020 presidential candidate Bernie Sanders held the largest campaign rally of the primary season so far on Saturday. An estimated 26,000 supporters packed into Queensbridge Park in New York City. The event was held in the shadow of the nation's largest public housing development. It was Sanders's first campaign rally since he suffered a heart attack earlier this month. Sanders was joined on stage by three prominent supporters: Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico; filmmaker Michael Moore; and Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who volunteered on Sanders's 2016 campaign before being elected to the House of Representatives in 2018. Ocasio-Cortez endorsed Sanders at the rally.

Democracy Now
Oct 21, 2019

Headlines for October 21, 2019
U.S. Troops Leaving Syria Headed for Iraq, Anti-Government Protests Sweep the Globe, Bolivia Presidential Election Appears to Head for a Runoff, Brother of Honduran President Found Guilty of Cocaine Trafficking, Trump Says G7 Will Not Be Held at His Private Golf Course, Hillary Clinton Accuses Jill Stein, Tulsi Gabbard of Being Linked to Russia, Landmark Trial over Opioid Epidemic in Cleveland, Ohio, Tornado Rages Through Dallas, Leaving 100,000 Without Power, Judge Temporarily Blocks Florida Law Limiting Voting by Ex-Felons

Democracy Now
Oct 18, 2019

Cyntoia Brown-Long on Surviving Sex Trafficking, Her Teenage Murder Conviction & Winning Her Freedom
At the age of 16, she was arrested for killing a man who had picked her up for sex, after she had been forced into sexual slavery as a child. She was tried as an adult and sentenced to life in prison after being convicted of first-degree murder for shooting the man who bought her for sex when she feared for her life. Today Cyntoia Brown-Long joins us to share her experience, what has happened in the 15 years she was incarcerated, and how she won her release. In an incredible development, after a years-long campaign to win her freedom, Cyntoia was granted clemency in January after former Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam commuted her sentence. She was released from prison in August. We spend the hour discussing her experience as she recounts in her memoir, published this week, "Free Cyntoia: My Search for Redemption in the American Prison System."

Democracy Now
Oct 18, 2019

Sentenced to Life in Prison as a Teen, How Cyntoia Brown Survived Sex Trafficking & Won Her Freedom
At the age of 16, she was arrested for killing a man who had picked her up for sex, after she had been forced into sexual slavery as a child. She was tried as an adult and sentenced to life in prison after being convicted of first-degree murder for shooting the man who bought her for sex when she feared for her life. Today Cyntoia Brown-Long joins us to share her experience, what has happened in the 15 years she was incarcerated, and how she won her release. In an incredible development, after a years-long campaign to win her freedom, Cyntoia was granted clemency in January after former Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam commuted her sentence. She was released from prison in August. We spend the hour discussing her experience as she recounts in her memoir, published this week, "Free Cyntoia: My Search for Redemption in the American Prison System."

Democracy Now
Oct 18, 2019

Headlines for October 18, 2019
Under U.S. Deal, Turkish Occupation of Northern Syria Continues; Ethnic Cleansing Feared, "We Do That All the Time": Mulvaney Admits to Quid Pro Quo over Ukraine, Ambassador Sondland Confirms Giuliani Pushed Ukraine Policy, Energy Secretary Rick Perry to Resign, U.S. to Host G7 at Trump Resort in Possible Violation of Constitution, Civilian Casualties Reach New High in Afghanistan, Corbyn Urges Labour Party Members to Reject New Brexit Deal, Chicago Teacher Strike Enters Second Day, NYC City Council Backs Plan to Close Rikers as Activists Call for No New Jails, Cuban Asylum Seeker Dies in Solitary Confinement in Louisiana, General Strike Shuts Down Barcelona Following Sentencing of Catalan Separatist Leaders, Mass Protests Continue in Lebanon over Economic Crisis, Mexican Forces Release El Chapo's Son After Coming Under Deadly Attack by Cartels, Cuban Ballerina Alicia Alonso, 98, Dies

Democracy Now
Oct 17, 2019

Rep. Ro Khanna: We Need a Responsible Withdrawal From Syria, Not One Oblivious to Human Life
As hundreds of thousands of civilians face displacement and violence amid Turkey's assault on Kurdish-controlled areas in northern Syria, the House of Representatives voted to condemn Trump's decision to withdraw U.S. support for the Kurds on Wednesday. The measure passed 354 to 60. We speak with Representative Ro Khanna, who says, "We can't just get involved in a place and then walk away and not have some moral responsibility. We have a moral responsibility not just to the Kurds who fought with us against ISIS. We have a moral responsibility to accept Syrian refugees. We have a moral responsibility to help rebuild a society that was ravaged by civil war, where we were involved." We also speak with Ozlem Goner, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at the City University of New York. She is a member of the Emergency Committee of Rojava.

Democracy Now
Oct 17, 2019

"Meltdown": Trump Defends Syria Withdrawal as House Votes 354 to 60 to Condemn His Actions
As the displacement of 300,000 civilians over Turkey's assault on Kurdish-controlled areas continues in northern Syria, the House of Representatives voted Wednesday to condemn President Trump's actions. Turkey invaded the region on October 9, shortly after Trump virtually greenlit the Turkey assault by abruptly withdrawing a small number of U.S. troops who were protecting Kurdish areas in northern Syria. Since then, the Kurds have aligned themselves with the Syrian government, and a number of former ISIS fighters who were being held by the Kurds have escaped. We speak with Ozlem Goner, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at the City University of New York. She is a member of the Emergency Committee of Rojava.

Democracy Now
Oct 17, 2019

30,000 Chicago Teachers & Support Staff Go on Strike Calling on City to Invest More in Schools
More than 30,000 workers are walking out of Chicago Public Schools today to demand better pay and benefits, smaller class sizes and more nurses, counselors, social workers and librarians. The historic strike has brought the country's third-largest school system to a standstill, with classes canceled for more than 350,000 students. The strike was confirmed Wednesday when the Chicago Teachers Union rejected a final offer by the city's new mayor, Lori Lightfoot, following months of labor negotiations. The city offered pay raises of 16% over a five-year period, while union representatives have been calling for a 15% increase over three years. Seven thousand five hundred public school workers with the Service Employees International Union are also striking today after rejecting their own offer from the city. From Chicago, we speak with Stacy Davis Gates, executive vice president of the Chicago Teachers Union, and Science Meles, executive vice president of SEIU Local 73, about the strike and public school workers' demands.

Democracy Now
Oct 17, 2019

Headlines for October 17, 2019
Trump Has "Meltdown" After Lawmakers Rebuke His Actions on Syria, Gordon Sondland to Testify in Impeachment Inquiry Today, Britain and European Union Reach Brexit Deal, Protests Continue in Catalonia After Sentencing of Separatist Leaders, Trump Admin Proposes Opening Up Tongass National Forest to Logging, 500,000 Kids Could Lose Free School Lunches Under Changes to Food Stamp Program, Chicago Public School Teachers on Strike Today, General Motors and UAW Reach Tentative Deal Aimed at Ending Strike, NYC Council Slated to Vote on $8 Billion Plan to Close Rikers & Build New Jails, Maryland Congressmember Elijah Cummings Dies

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

It Was the Longest Debate So Far, But CNN & NYT Asked No Questions on Climate Crisis & Immigration
Despite ongoing climate chaos and a sustained humanitarian disaster at the southern border, The New York Times and CNN failed to ask candidates directly about immigration or the climate crisis at Tuesday night's Democratic presidential debate. We speak with Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center, who says the lack of attention to immigraton "was a major gap in the three-hour debate." We also speak with journalist Kate Aronoff about the debate's failure to address the climate crisis.

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Democrats Decry Trump's Syria Policy But Fail to Address Palestine, Yemen, China & Other Issues
At Tuesday's debate, Democratic candidates took aim at President Trump's recent move to withdraw support from the Kurds in northern Syria, paving the way for Turkey to invade the region. We speak with Intercept contributor Mehdi Hasan, host of the "Deconstructed" podcast, about the candidates' foreign policy proposals.

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Dem Debate: "Disingenuous" Attacks on Medicare for All Distract From Cost of Today's Broken System
Democratic candidates sparred at Tuesday's debate over their healthcare platforms and Medicare for All. We speak with Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, a professor at CUNY-Hunter College and the co-founder of Physicians for a National Health Program. Moderators in the CNN and New York Times debate repeatedly pressed Elizabeth Warren on whether taxes would increase under Medicare for All. "The framing of that question is crazy," says Dr. Woolhandler. "What really matters is how much a household is paying."

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Warren and Sanders: A Wealth Tax Is Needed to Address Staggering Inequality
2020 progressive front-runners Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren pushed for a wealth tax at the fourth Democratic debate Tuesday night. We speak with senior contributor at The Intercept, Mehdi Hasan, who hosts their "Deconstructed" podcast, and David Cay Johnston, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter. He is the founder and editor of DCReport.org.

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Mehdi Hasan: "There Should Only Be Two Front-Runners Right Now: Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren"
Twelve candidates took to the stage for the fourth round of the Democratic presidential debate in Westerville, Ohio, Tuesday to spar over healthcare, foreign policy, impeachment, gun violence, economic inequality and more. Senator Elizabeth Warren — who is now leading some national polls — repeatedly came under attack from her rivals. In the first debate since Senator Bernie Sanders suffered a heart attack two weeks ago, the Vermont senator advocated for a Green New Deal, Medicare for All and a wealth tax. Former Vice President Joe Biden attacked the proposals of both Sanders and Warren and faced scrutiny for his son Hunter's dealings in Ukraine. We host a roundtable with Intercept senior contributor Mehdi Hasan, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston and journalist Kate Aronoff.

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Headlines for October 16, 2019
12 Democratic Candidates Take to the Stage in Ohio, Pence Heads to Turkey as Erdogan Vows No Ceasefire in Northern Syria, State Dept. Official: White House Put "Three Amigos" in Charge of Ukraine Policy, Activists Arrested in D.C. over Trump Plan to Gut Refugee Resettlement, British Family Detained for a Week After Mistakenly Driving Across U.S.-Canada Border, Egypt Tortured Journalist & Activist Esraa Abdel Fattah in Custody, Worst Fires in Decades Rage Across Lebanon, Mexican Senate Slated to Vote on Bill to Legalize Marijuana, Mohawk Man Launches Hunger Strike Amid Land Dispute with Real Estate Developers, California: Fuel Storage Tanks Explode at NuStar Facility Outside San Francisco, MSNBC's Chris Hayes Criticizes Own Network & Praises Ronan Farrow Book, Tarana Burke Launches #MeTooVoter Campaign Ahead of 2020

Democracy Now
Oct 15, 2019

Homewreckers: How Wall Street, Banks & Trump's Inner Circle Used the 2008 Housing Crash to Get Rich
We speak with investigative reporter Aaron Glantz about his new book "Homewreckers," which looks at the devastating legacy of the foreclosure crisis and how much of the so-called recovery is a result of large private equity firms buying up hundreds of thousands of foreclosed homes. "Homewreckers: How a Gang of Wall Street Kingpins, Hedge Fund Magnates, Crooked Banks, and Vulture Capitalists Suckered Millions Out of Their Homes and Demolished the American Dream" reveals how the 2008 housing crash decimated millions of Americans' family wealth but enriched President Donald Trump's inner circle, including Trump Cabinet members Steven Mnuchin and Wilbur Ross, Trump's longtime friend and confidant Tom Barrack, and billionaire Republican donor Stephen Schwarzman. Glantz writes, "Now, ensconced in power following Trump's election, these capitalists are creating new financial products that threaten to make the wealth transfers of the [housing] bust permanent." Aaron Glantzis a senior reporter at Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting. He was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize this year for his reporting on modern-day redlining.

Democracy Now
Oct 15, 2019

Botham Jean, Then Atatiana Jefferson: Outrage in Texas As Police Kill Another Black Resident at Home
A white police officer in Fort Worth, Texas, has been arrested and charged with murder, after he shot and killed an African-American woman who was inside her own home. Officer Aaron Dean was responding to a non-emergency call for a wellness check after a neighbor had called the Fort Worth police to report that 28-year-old Atatiana Jefferson's front door was open at around 2:30 in the morning on Saturday. Soon after the officers arrived, Dean, who never identified himself to be a police officer, shouted through Jefferson's bedroom window to put her hands up, and then immediately opened fire, killing her. Minutes before the shooting, Jefferson had been playing video games with her 8-year-old nephew, who witnessed the shooting but was not physically injured. Atatiana Jefferson is the seventh person since June who has been killed by one of the police department's officers. From Dallas, we speak with Lee Merritt, a civil rights attorney representing the family of Atatiana Jefferson.

Democracy Now
Oct 15, 2019

Headlines for October 15, 2019
Syrian Troops Advance Across Northern Syria After Deal with Kurds, Ex-Top Russia Adviser Testified Bolton Called Giuliani a "Hand Grenade", 12 Democrats Will Take the Stage for Presidential Debate in Ohio Tonight, Fort Worth Cop Charged for Murder After Killing Atatiana Jefferson, Judge: Trump Broke Law by Declaring Emergency to Secure Border Funding, Arizona: Bulldozers Destroyed Protected Cacti to Clear Way for Trump Wall, 8-Year-Old Girl Easily Scales Replica of Trump's "Impenetrable" Border Wall, Protests Erupt at Barcelona Airport over Sentencing of Catalan Leaders, Mexico: 14 Police Officers Killed in Ambush in Michoacán, Hong Kong: Pro-Democracy Protesters Demand Support from U.S. Lawmakers, London Bans All Extinction Rebellion Protests, But Direct Actions Continue, Ecuador: President Signs Decree to Revert Fuel Prices Back to Subsidized Levels, General Motors Workers Enter Fifth Week of Strike, Native Americans Mark Indigenous Peoples' Day

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