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Democracy Now
Jul 19, 2019

In 2003, This U.K. Whistleblower Almost Stopped the Iraq Invasion. A New Film Tells Her Story
In 2003, Katharine Gun, a young specialist working for Britain's Government Communications Headquarters, exposed a highly confidential memo that revealed the United States' collaboration with Britain in collecting sensitive information on United Nations Security Council members in order to pressure them into supporting the Iraq invasion. Gun leaked the memo to the press, setting off a chain of events that jeopardized her freedom and safety, but also opened the door to putting the entire legality of the Iraq invasion on trial. ??Acclaimed Pentagon Papers whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg described Gun's action as "the most important and courageous leak I have ever seen." Gun's incredible story is depicted in the new film "Official Secrets," which premieres in the U.S. August 30. We speak with Katharine Gun; the British journalists who reported on Gun's revelations in The Observer newspaper, Martin Bright and Ed Vulliamy; and Gavin Hood, director of "Official Secrets."

Democracy Now
Jul 19, 2019

Anti-Racist Historian: Attacks on Rep. Omar Rooted in Belief "America is for White People"
On Thursday, President Trump attempted to distance himself from the racist chant of "send her back" about Minnesota Congresswoman Ilhan Omar at a Trump campaign rally Wednesday in North Carolina. The chants rang across the rally in response to Trump's own verbal attack against the congresswoman. He did nothing to intervene. On Wednesday, the House of Representatives narrowly passed a resolution condemning Trump's racist remarks against Congressmembers Omar, Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. We speak with Ibram X. Kendi, founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University.

Democracy Now
Jul 19, 2019

Headlines for July 19, 2019
70 Catholics Arrested in Capitol Hill Protest of Trump's Immigration Policies, Asylum Seekers in Texas ICE Jail Launch Hunger Strike, House Democrats Grill Acting DHS Chief over Migrant Deaths and Squalid Jails, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez Confronts DHS Chief over Racist & Sexist Border Patrol Posts, Trump Disavows "Send Her Home" Chant After Racist Attacks on Rep. Ilhan Omar, Rep. Ilhan Omar Welcomed Back to Minnesota with Chants of "Welcome Home", House Approves $15-an-Hour Minimum Wage Hike, Domestic Workers Bill of Rights Would Bring Overtime Pay, Union Rights, Trump to Nominate Anti-Union Lawyer Eugene Scalia as Labor Secretary, Jeffrey Epstein Denied Bail Ahead of Sex Trafficking Trial, Iran Denies Trump's Claim the U.S. Shot Down Iranian Drone, Afghan Bombers Kill 20 in Attacks in Kandahar and Kabul, Arson Attack in Kyoto, Japan, Kills 33, Excessive Heat Warning Declared Across Much of U.S. , EPA Won't Ban Toxic Pesticide Despite Link to Brain Damage in Children, Trump Administration Proposes Slashing Regulations for Nuclear Power Plants

Democracy Now
Jul 18, 2019

"It Is Not Just War. It Is Life": Acclaimed Doc "For Sama" Offers Rare Glimpse into War-Torn Syria
We look at the award-winning documentary feature titled "For Sama," a devastating account of war-torn Syria told through the eyes of director Waad al-Kateab. She filmed hundreds of hours of footage in her native Aleppo to create a stunning depiction of life during wartime. Amid airstrikes and attacks on hospitals, Waad falls in love with one of the last remaining doctors in Aleppo, gets married and has a baby girl, Sama, to whom the film is dedicated. When protests against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad first began in 2011, Waad al-Kateab was a young economics student who began filming on a cellphone. For five years, she documented her own life and the lives of those around her as the Assad regime intensified its brutal response to the uprising. She eventually gathered hundreds of hours of footage. Ahead of the film's release in the U.S. next Thursday, we speak with Waad al-Kateab and her husband Hamza al-Kateab, a doctor and the co-founder and former director of the Al Quds Hospital in Aleppo.

Democracy Now
Jul 18, 2019

Nearly 100,000 in Puerto Rico Protest Demanding Gov. Rosselló Resign over Lewd Texts & Corruption
Close to 100,000 Puerto Ricans took to the streets Wednesday chanting "Ricky Renuncia!" as they called for the resignation of Governor Ricardo Rosselló, following the leak by Puerto Rico's Center for Investigative Journalism of hundreds of misogynistic, homophobic and violent text messages between Rosselló and members of his Cabinet. On Monday, Denis Márquez of the Puerto Rican Independence Party introduced formal complaints against the governor and called for his impeachment. All of this comes as former Education Secretary Julia Keleher and five others have been arrested on charges of steering federal money to unqualified, politically connected contractors. We speak with Melissa Mark-Viverito, interim president of the Latino Victory Project, and, from San Juan, journalist Juan Carlos Dávila, Democracy Now!'s correspondent in Puerto Rico.

Democracy Now
Jul 18, 2019

Headlines for July 18, 2019
House Lawmakers Vote to Table Trump Impeachment Resolution, Trump Renews Racist Attacks on Four Progressive Congresswomen, Rep. Ilhan Omar Introduces Bill Affirming the Right to Boycott, House Votes to Bar Trump's Planned Weapons Sales to Saudi Arabia, UAE, U.S. to Deploy 500 Troops to Saudi Air Base, Sudan's Military Rulers Agree to Share Power with Civilian Protesters, United Nations Declares Global Health Emergency as Ebola Spreads, Puerto Ricans Demand Resignation of Governor Ricardo Rosselló over Hateful Messages, AG Barr & Commerce Secretary Ross Held in Contempt of Congress, Sen. Rand Paul Blocks Vote on September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, Drug Lord Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán Sentenced to Life in Prison, 1992 Video Shows Donald Trump Partying with Jeffrey Epstein, Prosecutors Drop Sexual Assault Charge Against Kevin Spacey, Pentagon IG Ordered to Probe U.S. Use of Ticks as Biological Weapons, Protests Mark Fifth Anniversary of Eric Garner's Killing by NYPD Cop, NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio Won't Say If Eric Garner's Killer Should Be Fired, Hawaiian Elders Arrested at Nonviolent Protest of Mauna Kea Telescope

Democracy Now
Jul 17, 2019

Happiest Place on Earth? Meet the Disney Heiress Speaking Out Against Disneyland's Abuse of Workers
Abigail Disney, the heiress of the Disney fortune, is once again speaking out against the company's unfair labor and wage practices. She recently spoke to Disneyland employees in California, where they shared their experiences with the theme park's work environment. In the past, Abigail Disney has criticized Disney CEO Bob Iger's obscene salary and the drastic pay gap between Iger and other Disney employees. Abigail Disney also testified in May at the House Committee on Financial Services during a hearing on strengthening the rights and protections of workers. We speak with Abigail Disney, filmmaker and the co-founder of the Walt Disney Company.

Democracy Now
Jul 17, 2019

Amazon Workers Demand Fair Pay & Conditions as Company Continues Undercutting Rivals
While online shoppers around the world flocked to Amazon's mega-sale "Prime Day" this week, the retail giant faced growing outrage from protesters, workers and lawmakers for its unsafe working conditions and collaboration with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Demonstrators in Seattle delivered a petition with over 270,000 signatures to Amazon headquarters demanding it stop exploiting workers and cooperating with ICE. Lawmakers, including Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Ilhan Omar, co-signed a letter to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration demanding a full investigation into Amazon's workplace conditions on Tuesday, citing reports of Amazon workers facing severe physical and mental distress while on the job. Also on Tuesday, the House Judiciary Committee's antitrust panel challenged an Amazon executive on allegations that the company competes against its own sellers. We speak with Angeles Solis, lead organizer on the workplace justice team at Make the Road New York, and Stacy Mitchell, co-director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, who testified about Amazon Tuesday before a House Judiciary Subcommittee.

Democracy Now
Jul 17, 2019

"They Didn't Do Their Job": Eric Garner Family Outraged DOJ Won't Prosecute His Death by Police
It's been five years since Eric Garner, an African-American father of six, was killed when a white New York City police officer wrestled him to the ground and applied a fatal chokehold, while Garner, who was unarmed, said "I can't breathe" 11 times. On Tuesday, federal prosecutors announced they will not bring civil rights charges against Daniel Pantaleo, the police officer implicated in Garner's death. The move reportedly came after Attorney General William Barr ordered that the case be dropped. Earlier this year, a medical examiner testified that it was a chokehold that triggered an asthma attack that led to Garner's death, which was ruled a homicide. Pantaleo remains on the police force and earns a salary of more than $100,000. We speak with Jumaane Williams, public advocate for New York City.

Democracy Now
Jul 17, 2019

Headlines for July 17, 2019
House Votes to Condemn Trump's Racist Tweets, Rep. Al Green Introduces Impeachment Articles, Kellyanne Conway to Reporter Asking About Trump's Racism: "What's Your Ethnicity?", Rights Groups File Lawsuits to Stop Trump's Draconian New Asylum Rule, White Police Officer Who Killed Eric Garner Will Not Face Federal Charges, Ex-Peruvian President Alejandro Toledo Arrested in California over Corruption Scandal, Press Freedom Advocates Call for Release of Yemeni Journalist Yahya al-Sawari, Planned Parenthood Removes President Dr. Leana Wen over Disagreements on Direction of Org., Organizations Say They Will Not Comply with Trump Ban on Abortion Referrals, Kamala Harris Unveils Prescription Drugs Plan as Joe Biden Shuns Medicare for All, Suspect Arrested in Murder of Beloved Louisiana Civil Rights Activist, Judge Recommends Daily Stormer Publisher Pay $14 Million to Woman Targeted with Anti-Semitic Trolling, Judge Sentences Charlottesville Neo-Nazi Murderer to 2 More Life Sentences, Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens Dies at 99, Activists Arrested as They Take Over ICE Headquarters in D.C.

Democracy Now
Jul 16, 2019

Julián Castro Is Running for President & Supporting Striking Amazon & McDonald's Workers
Amid labor strikes against poor working conditions and low wages for Amazon and McDonald's workers, we speak with 2020 presidential candidate Julián Castro about workers' rights, fair pay and where he stands on foreign policy, from China to Israel.

Democracy Now
Jul 16, 2019

Julián Castro is Running for President & Supporting Striking Amazon & McDonalds Workers
Amid labor strikes against poor working conditions and low wages for Amazon and McDonald's workers, we speak with 2020 presidential candidate Julián Castro about workers' rights, fair pay and where he stands on foreign policy, from China to Israel.

Democracy Now
Jul 16, 2019

2020 Hopeful Julián Castro Vows to Break Up ICE & Calls Trump's New Asylum Rule Unconstitutional
As Trump faced national rebuke for his racist comments against four progressive congresswomen, his administration announced a new rule essentially banning most immigrants from seeking refuge in the United States. The rule, which the ACLU has already vowed to challenge in court, would deny asylum to any migrant who failed to apply for protection in another country they passed through on the way to the U.S. border—including children traveling alone. If enacted, the law would effectively block people from Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, as well as Haitians, Cubans and many people from African countries, who come to the U.S. via the southern border. We speak with 2020 presidential candidate Julián Castro about the asylum ban and his immigration reform proposals.

Democracy Now
Jul 16, 2019

"Our Squad Is Big": Reps. Ocasio-Cortez, Omar, Tlaib and Pressley Condemn Trump's Racist Attack
Congressmembers Ayanna Pressley, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar condemned President Trump's spate of racist attacks against them in a news conference Monday. Their public rebuke followed Trump tweeting Sunday telling them to "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." The comments have been widely condemned as racist and xenophobic. We hear from the progressive congresswomen in their own words.

Democracy Now
Jul 16, 2019

Headlines for July 16, 2019
Trump Announces Radical Plan to Bar Almost All Migrants from Seeking Asylum at U.S. Border, Squad Rejects Trump's Racist Attacks & Calls for Impeachment as House Plans Resolution to Condemn, Protesters Call for Exit of Puerto Rican Gov. Rosselló After Leaked Text Messages, El Salvador Rape Survivor Being Retried for Homicide for Having Stillbirth, U.N. Report Accuses Venezuela's Special Forces of 1000s of Extrajudicial Killings, Workers and Activists Protest Amazon, Calling for an End to Labor Abuses, Collaboration with ICE, Washington Activist Protesting Immigrant Detention Shot Dead, Historian and Civil Rights Activist Sadie Roberts-Joseph Found Killed, Epstein Abuse Survivors Ask Judge to Deny Bail, Hawaiian Land Defenders Protest Construction of Thirty Meter Telescope at Mauna Kea

Democracy Now
Jul 15, 2019

"Fossil Fuel Stooges" Deny Climate Crisis as Barry Pummels Louisiana, 100 Die in South Asian Rains
Ongoing heavy rain has killed at least 67 people in Nepal, 25 in India and 14 in Bangladesh as flooding from monsoons has displaced 1 million people in South Asia. This year's flooding in the region has been worse than ever before and is likely fueled by rising global temperatures, which have led to more extreme weather. Scientists warn that the risk of deadly floods is not over. In the United States, New Orleans residents managed to avoid the worst of Tropical Storm Barry, but 11 million people continued to be on flash flood warning as the storm slowly made its way through Louisiana over the weekend. President Trump has declared a state of emergency in Louisiana, where more than 60,000 remained without power on Sunday. We speak with Dahr Jamail, a staff reporter at Truthout and author of "The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption." "We can look around the world and just see, right now, before our very eyes, evidence of how deep in this crisis we already are," says Jamail. "June was the hottest June ever recorded on the planet. The last five years are the hottest five years in history. This is the trajectory that we're on, and these numbers are only going to continue to increase."

Democracy Now
Jul 15, 2019

"Fossil Fuel Stooges" Pence & Trump Deny Climate Crisis As Deadly Rains Slam Louisiana & South Asia
Ongoing heavy rain has killed at least 67 people in Nepal, 25 in India and 14 in Bangladesh as flooding from monsoons has displaced 1 million people in South Asia. This year's flooding in the region has been worse than ever before and is likely fueled by rising global temperatures, which have led to more extreme weather. Scientists warn that the risk of deadly floods is not over. In the United States, New Orleans residents managed to avoid the worst of Tropical Storm Barry, but 11 million people continued to be on flash flood warning as the storm slowly made its way through Louisiana over the weekend. President Trump has declared a state of emergency in Louisiana, where more than 60,000 remained without power on Sunday. We speak with Dahr Jamail, a staff reporter at Truthout and author of "The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption." "We can look around the world and just see, right now, before our very eyes, evidence of how deep in this crisis we already are," says Jamail. "June was the hottest June ever recorded on the planet. The last five years are the hottest five years in history. This is the trajectory that we're on, and these numbers are only going to continue to increase."

Democracy Now
Jul 15, 2019

"We Are in Fear": Undocumented Immigrant in Sanctuary Responds to Raids from Colorado Church
As immigrant communities face ongoing raids across the country, we speak with Rosa Sabido, one of dozens of undocumented immigrants living in churches across the United States. She entered sanctuary in May 2017 in the fellowship hall at United Methodist Church in Mancos, Colorado, after being told that her latest request of stay of deportation had been denied by ICE. She first came to the U.S. on a visitor visa in 1987 to see her mother and stepfather, who are both naturalized U.S. citizens. "We are in fear. We are on guard," says Sabido. "We are on constant panic, and we don't know what's going to happen in our communities."

Democracy Now
Jul 15, 2019

Cruelty Is the Point: Communities Fight Back as Threat of ICE Raids Terrorize Immigrant Families
This weekend, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents launched a handful of raids across the country as part of President Trump's push to detain and deport thousands of undocumented migrants in 10 major cities. Agents in Chicago reportedly arrested a mother and her children only to quickly release them. Arrests were also attempted in New York City, in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, and Harlem, where immigrants reportedly refused to open their doors to ICE agents because they did not have warrants. Authorities say more raids are planned this week, prompting fear but also generating mass protests on the ground. We speak with Elora Mukherjee, a professor of law and director of the Immigrants' Rights Clinic at Columbia Law School. She has spent the past 12 years representing immigrant children and adults along the U.S.-Mexico border. "The raids will leave children without their parents. The raids will leave children without their caregivers," Mukherjee says. "The raids will leave U.S. citizen children without anyone in America to care for them. It is a heartbreaking situation."

Democracy Now
Jul 15, 2019

Headlines for July 15, 2019
ICE Raids Roll Out on Smaller Scale While Immigrant Communities and Supporters Mobilize, Mike Pence Says Jailed Migrants "Well Cared For" After Visiting Texas Facilities, Trump Launches Racist Attack on Progressive Congresswomen of Color, Guatemala Cancels Meeting with Trump as Court Halts Contested Migration Deal, Labor Sec. Acosta Resigns Amid Epstein Scandal, South Asian Floods Kill Dozens, Displace At Least 1 Million People, Tunisia Recovers 82 Missing Bodies from Migrant Shipwreck, Algerians Protest Ruling Government for 21st Straight Week, Ecuador: Waorani Win Case to Protect Amazon Against Oil Exploitation, Israeli Army Kills Hamas Member in Gaza Strip, Somalia Attack Kills 26, Including Beloved Somali-Canadian Journalist, New Leak from Ex-U.K Ambassador: Trump Withdrew from Iran Deal to Spite Obama, House Passes $733B Defense Bill, Aims to Curb Trump's Ability to Attack Iran, Tropical Storm Barry Brings Major Flooding, Wrecks Homes & Cuts Power in Louisiana, Noted Union Leader Hector Figueroa Dies in New York at Age 57

Democracy Now
Jul 12, 2019

Ousted Honduran President Zelaya: The 2009 U.S.-Backed Coup Helped Cause Today's Migrant Crisis
Since the 2009 U.S.-backed military coup in Honduras, extreme poverty and violence has skyrocketed in the country, forcing tens of thousands of Hondurans to flee to the U.S. with the hope of receiving political asylum. We speak with ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya in the capital of Tegucigalpa about the 10th anniversary of the coup in Honduras, U.S. intervention in Central America and its link to today's migration crisis.

Democracy Now
Jul 12, 2019

Know Your Rights: How Immigrant Rights Activists Are Preparing for Looming ICE Deportation Raids
Immigrant communities across the country and their allies are preparing for nationwide raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement planned to begin Sunday that will target undocumented members of immigrant families in at least nine major cities. The cities where raids will take place are said to be Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Francisco. New Orleans had been on the list, but the city announced this weekend that ICE was temporarily postponing the raids due to Tropical Storm Barry. We speak with a roundtable of immigrants' rights activists: Adelina Nicholls, the executive director of Georgia Latino Alliance of Human Rights in Atlanta; Shannon Camacho, the Los Angeles County Raids Rapid Response Network coordinator for the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights; and Natalia Aristizabal, co-director of organizing at Make the Road New York. Camacho says, "We tell our community members that no matter what ICE does, don't open the door."

Democracy Now
Jul 12, 2019

Headlines for July 12, 2019
Trump Backs Down on Adding Citizenship Question to 2020 Census, Immigrant Communities Brace for Weekend ICE Raids, Immigration Activists Disrupt Amazon Web Services Conference over ICE Ties, Salvadoran Journalist Manuel Duran Released from ICE Jail After 15 Months, New Orleans Braces for More Flooding as Tropical Storm Barry Looms, Britain Accuses Iran of Blocking Tanker's Passage Through Strait of Hormuz, Trump Threatens New Trade War as France Approves 3% Tax on Tech Giants, Jeffrey Epstein Asks for Release on Bail Ahead of Sex Trafficking Trial, R. Kelly Arrested on Federal Sex Crimes Charges, Gen. John Hyten, Trump's Joint Chiefs Nominee, Accused of Sexual Misconduct, House Democrats Authorize Subpoenas for Top Current and Former Trump Admin Officials, NJ Governor Signs Bill to Limit Use of Solitary Confinement in State Prisons, AFT Sues Betsy DeVos over Student Loan Forgiveness Program, U.N. Human Rights Council Votes to Probe Duterte's Deadly Drug War

Democracy Now
Jul 11, 2019

Alex Acosta Enabled Jeffrey Epstein's Sex Crimes. Now He's Gutting Funding for Trafficking Victims
During a press conference Wednesday, Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta dismissed calls for his resignation and defended the 2008 plea deal given to the billionaire serial child sex abuser Jeffrey Epstein while he was the U.S. prosecutor in Florida. Acosta has also come under fire for his proposal to cut funding for victims of sex trafficking. His 2020 budget proposal for the Department of Labor includes an almost 80% decrease in funds for the Bureau of International Labor Affairs, the office tasked with fighting child sex trafficking. Critics of the proposal argue it would effectively dismantle many programs aimed at preventing child sex trafficking and put large numbers of children at risk. We speak with Taina Bien-Aimé, executive director of the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women.

Democracy Now
Jul 11, 2019

The U.S. Women's Soccer World Cup Win Was a Victory for Title IX & the Fight for Equal Pay
Thousands gathered in Manhattan Wednesday to celebrate the U.S. women's national soccer team's fourth World Cup championship at a ticker tape parade that stretched up Broadway and past Wall Street. Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, Rose Lavelle and their teammates rode floats through New York City's Canyon of Heroes, ending their celebrations at a ceremony at City Hall. Supporters chanted "U.S.A.!" and "Equal pay!" The U.S women's World Cup victory came just months after members of the 2015 women's team sued the U.S. Soccer Federation over gender discrimination. Their high-profile fight for pay equity is focusing the spotlight on the pay gap for all women, not just soccer players. We speak with Julie Suk, professor of sociology at the Graduate Center at CUNY.

Democracy Now
Jul 11, 2019

The U.S. Women's Soccer World Cup Win Was a Victory for Title IX & the Fight for Pay Equity
Thousands gathered in Manhattan Wednesday to celebrate the U.S. women's national soccer team's fourth World Cup championship at a ticker tape parade that stretched up Broadway and past Wall Street. Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, Rose Lavelle and their teammates rode floats through New York City's Canyon of Heroes, ending their celebrations at a ceremony at City Hall. Supporters chanted "U.S.A.!" and "Equal pay!" The U.S women's World Cup victory came just months after members of the 2015 women's team sued the U.S. Soccer Federation over gender discrimination. Their high-profile fight for pay equity is focusing the spotlight on the pay gap for all women, not just soccer players. We speak with Julie Suk, professor of sociology at the Graduate Center at CUNY.

Democracy Now
Jul 11, 2019

"Unconscionable & Unacceptable": Rep. Barragan Decries Detention of Migrant Children in Prison Cells
Yazmin Juárez, the Guatemalan mother whose child died after being held in an ICE detention center from a lung infection, testified before members of a congressional panel Wednesday. She shared the story of her daughter, 19-month-old Mariee, who died last year shortly after being released from the Dilley Family Detention Center in Texas. Juárez filed a $60 million lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Customs and Border Patrol and the Department of Health and Human Services. The House subcommittee convened to examine the treatment of refugees in U.S. detention, just over a week after lawmakers flocked to the U.S.-Mexico border to observe the horrible treatment of refugee children and families in immigration jails amid reports of continued unsafe and unsanitary conditions for asylum seekers. Meanwhile, NBC reports that migrant children jailed in Yuma, Arizona, have been subjected to mistreatment and sexual violence. We speak with Democractic Rep. Nanette Barragán from California, who recently visited detention centers in Texas. She's the second vice-chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and serves on the House Committee on Homeland Security.

Democracy Now
Jul 11, 2019

"Unconscionable & Unacceptable": Rep. Barragán Decries Detention of Migrant Children in Prison Cells
Yazmin Juárez, the Guatemalan mother whose child died after being held in an ICE detention center from a lung infection, testified before members of a congressional panel Wednesday. She shared the story of her daughter, 19-month-old Mariee, who died last year shortly after being released from the South Texas Family Detention Center in Dilley, Texas. Juárez filed a $60 million lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Customs and Border Patrol and the Department of Health and Human Services. The House subcommittee convened to examine the treatment of refugees in U.S. detention, just over a week after lawmakers flocked to the U.S.-Mexico border to observe the horrible treatment of refugee children and families in immigration jails amid reports of continued unsafe and unsanitary conditions for asylum seekers. Meanwhile, NBC reports that migrant children jailed in Yuma, Arizona, have been subjected to mistreatment and sexual violence. We speak with Democratic Rep. Nanette Barragán from California, who recently visited detention centers in Texas. She's the second vice-chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and serves on the House Committee on Homeland Security.

Democracy Now
Jul 11, 2019

Headlines for July 11, 2019
Labor Secretary Alex Acosta Refuses to Step Down over Plea Deal for Sex Offender Jeremy Epstein, Jennifer Araoz, Alleged Survivor of Jeffrey Epstein, Says She Was Raped at Age 15, Guatemalan Mother Tells Lawmakers About Her Daughter's Death After ICE Detention, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Wants to Dismantle Department of Homeland Security, ICE Opens Three New Immigration Jails, Flouting Congressional Limits on Jailing Migrants, Six Arrested at Sit-in Protest of Joe Biden's Record on Deportations, Rep. Ilhan Omar Urges Boycott of Fox News Host Tucker Carlson over Racist Attack, White House "Social Media Summit" to Feature Far-Right Conspiracy Theorists, Federal Court Throws Out Emoluments Lawsuit Against President Trump, Trump Organization Cancels Golf Tournament Hosted by Miami-Area Strip Club, FBI Arrests Former Aides to Puerto Rico's Governor in Corruption Probe, Heavy Rains Bring Floods to Louisiana as Tropical Storm Strengthens Offshore, State Department Analyst Resigns in Protest of White House Censorship of Climate Testimony, Study Finds Antarctic Glacier Is Melting and Could Add 50cm to Sea Level Rise, Victorious U.S. Women's Soccer Team Honored in New York Amid Chants of "Equal Pay!"

Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2019

How the Climate Crisis Is Pushing Central Americans Out of Their Homes Toward the U.S.
As the U.S. continues to crack down on migrants seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border, we look at one of the underreported driving factors leading people to flee their home countries: the climate crisis. John Carlos Frey, author of "Sand and Blood: America's Stealth War on the Mexico Border," spent time with Central American climate refugees traveling in a caravan toward the United States. He says, "If this drought continues, we're looking at all-out famine from Central America. ...That's one of the major reasons why they're coming. … The government doesn't even acknowledge the fact that there is a climate crisis in Central America."

Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2019

John Carlos Frey: America's Deadly Stealth War on the Mexico Border Is Approaching Genocide
John Carlos Frey's new book, "Sand and Blood: America's Stealth War on the Mexico Border," chronicles how the U.S.-Mexico border became a war zone through decades of deadly bipartisan immigration policy. But it also examines the border through the personal history of his family. Born in Tijuana, Mexico, Frey moved to the U.S. with his family when he was a toddler in 1965. He grew up in southern San Diego, California, where he witnessed the effects of American immigration policy on the borderlands every day. His father was an American citizen. His mother was a Mexican immigrant. Frey's book is dedicated "To my mother, an immigrant from Mexico who came to America to provide a better life for me and my siblings, and to all the mothers and fathers who had the same intention and lost their lives in the attempt." We speak with John Carlos Frey in our New York studio.

Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2019

The Inhumane Treatment of Migrants Is Not New. It's a Key Part of a Decades-Old Bipartisan Policy
More than a week after lawmakers flocked to the U.S.-Mexico border to observe the horrible treatment of refugee children and families in immigration jails, reports of unsafe and unsanitary conditions for asylum seekers are continuing. In Clint, Texas, the Border Patrol station that garnered international attention for jailing hundreds of migrant children without access to sufficient food, water, beds or medical care now has a spreading outbreak of scabies, shingles and chickenpox, according to border agents. In Yuma, Arizona, NBC reports that jailed migrant children have been subjected to mistreatment and sexual violence. We speak with prize-winning author John Carlos Frey, whose new book, "Sand and Blood: America's Stealth War on the Mexico Border," examines the history of U.S. immigration policies, looking at how both Democrats and Republicans laid the groundwork for the deadly system we have today.

Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2019

Headlines for July 10, 2019
Children Recount Mistreatment, Sexual Abuse at Yuma, AZ Migrant Jail, Scabies, Shingles & Chickenpox Spreading Among Children at Clint, TX Migrant Jail, Jewish Activists Arrested After Protesting Migrant Detention on Capitol Hill, Judge Rejects DOJ Move to Replace Legal Team Charged with Census Citizenship Battle, Court Says Trump Cannot Block Critics on Twitter, U.K. Ambassador Resigns After Leaked Cables Scandal, Afghan Peace Talks Close as Deadly Attacks Continue, Appeals Court Hears Arguments on Constitutionality of Affordable Care Act, Megan Rapinoe to Trump: "Your Message Is Excluding People", Calls Grow for Acosta to Resign over Epstein Scandal, SF Man Apologizes for Calling Police on Black Man for Entering a Building, 2-Time Presidential Candidate Ross Perot Dies at 89, Billionaire Democratic Donor Tom Steyer Enters 2020 Race

Democracy Now
Jul 09, 2019

"This Is Not a Surprise": U.S. Sanctions and Saber Rattling Led to Iran's Renewed Uranium Enrichment
In ongoing fallout from the Trump administration's decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear accord, the International Atomic Energy Agency confirmed on Monday that Iran has begun enriching uranium above the level agreed to by the 2015 nuclear deal. Iran has threatened to continue to increase their production of enriched uranium if European signatories of the nuclear deal do not help ease the impact of the U.S. sanctions. We speak with Trita Parsi, executive vice president of the new think tank, the Quincy Institute, and author of "Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran, and the Triumph of Diplomacy."

Democracy Now
Jul 09, 2019

Despite Death Threats, Glenn Greenwald Speaks Out About Exposing Large Corruption Scandal in Brazil
A political crisis in Brazil is growing in the wake of The Intercept's investigation into a judge who likely aided federal prosecutors in their corruption case against former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. The Bolsonaro administration announced Monday that Brazilian Justice Minister Sérgio Moro has been granted a leave of absence from July 15-19 to "deal with personal matters." Leaked cellphone messages among Brazilian law enforcement officials and other data obtained by The Intercept point to an ongoing collaboration between then-Judge Sérgio Moro and the prosecutors investigating a sweeping corruption scandal known as Operation Car Wash. Lula was considered a favorite in the lead-up to the 2018 presidential election until he was put in jail and forced out of the race on what many say were trumped-up corruption charges. The leaked documents also reveal prosecutors had serious doubts about Lula's guilt. The jailing of Lula helped pave the way for the election of the far-right former military officer Jair Bolsonaro, who then named Judge Sérgio Moro to be his justice minister. The news of Moro's leave of absence comes amid increased calls for him to step down after new revelations of Moro's questionable role in Operation Car Wash were published in Brazil's leading conservative magazine, Veja, in partnership with The Intercept. We speak with Glenn Greenwald, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and one of the founding editors of The Intercept. Greenwald has faced death threats and a possible government investigation due to his reporting on the scandal.

Democracy Now
Jul 09, 2019

How Investigative Reporting & Survivor Testimony Toppled Billionaire Serial Abuser Jeffrey Epstein
Billionaire hedge fund manager Jeffrey Epstein was charged in a Manhattan federal court Monday with sex trafficking and conspiracy. He is accused of sexually assaulting and trafficking dozens of underage girls between 2002 and 2005 at his homes in Manhattan and Palm Beach, Florida. Epstein, who has counted Presidents Donald Trump and Bill Clinton among his friends, pleaded not guilty and is being held in jail until his bond hearing next week. Several accusers were present in federal court in Manhattan on Monday. In November 2018, the Miami Herald published a series of articles by investigative reporter Julie Brown exposing Epstein's crimes and the high-powered people, such as President Trump's Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, who protected him. Epstein's arrest after more than a decade of accusations is in part being hailed as a feat of local investigative journalism. We speak with Casey Frank, the senior editor for investigations at the Miami Herald.

Democracy Now
Jul 09, 2019

Headlines for July 9, 2019
NY Prosecutors Charge Jeffrey Epstein with Trafficking Dozens of Girls, DOJ Says They Will Pursue New Path to Add Citizenship Question to 2020 Census, New NY Bill Allows Congress to Access Trump's State Tax Returns, Democrats Probe Trump Emoluments Violations, Issuing Dozens of Subpoenas, Protesters Vow to Stay in the Streets After Hong Kong Leader Calls Extradition Bill "Dead", Report: China's Separation of Uyghur Children from Families a "Cultural Genocide", 2 Indigenous Rights Activists Killed in Guatemala, 24 Ex-South American Officials Sentenced for Role in Operation Condor, German Charity Ship Saves 44 People at Sea as Clash Btw. Italy and Rescuers Continue, Trump Lashes Out at U.K. Ambassador, PM Theresa May Following Leaked Cables, U.N. Human Rights Chief Blasts U.S. Detention of Migrants, Bernie Sanders and AOC to Introduce Resolution Declaring Climate Emergency, Trump Touts "Environmental Leadership" Despite Destructive Climate Policies, Arizona Man Fatally Stabs Teenager for Playing Rap Music, Queens DA Race Headed to Recount After Latest Tally Separates Candidates by 16 Votes

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2019

Charges Dropped Against Pregnant Shooting Victim Amid Outcry Over the Criminalization of Pregnancy
Following immense public pressure, prosecutors in Alabama have dropped manslaughter changers against Marshae Jones, a 28-year-old African-American woman whose pregnancy ended after she was shot in the stomach by a coworker. Local police accused Jones of starting the fight that led to the shooting in the parking lot of a Dollar General store outside of Birmingham. A grand jury then indicted Jones on manslaughter but dismissed any charges against the shooter. The case drew national outcry from women's rights advocates concerned about the criminalization of pregnant women and the legal implications of so-called fetal personhood. The National Abortion Federation, along with the Yellowhammer Fund and other reproductive justice advocacy groups, launched a successful campaign to get the charges against Jones dropped. Alabama is one of 38 states to have a fetal homicide law. We speak with Lynn Paltrow, founder and executive director of National Advocates for Pregnant Women.

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2019

Jeffrey Epstein, a Billionaire Friend of Presidents Trump & Clinton, Arrested for Sex Trafficking
Billionaire hedge fund manager Jeffrey Epstein, who has been accused of sexually assaulting underage girls for more than a decade, will appear in federal court today in Manhattan on sex trafficking charges. He was arrested on Saturday for allegedly running a sex trafficking operation by luring underage girls as young as 14 years old to his mansion in Manhattan. Epstein was previously accused of molesting and trafficking dozens of underage girls in Florida, but he ended up serving just 13 months in county jail after the U.S. prosecutor in Florida, Alexander Acosta, cut what's been described as "one of the most lenient deals for a serial child sex offender in history." The plea deal allowed Epstein to avoid a federal trial and possible life in prison, and effectively ended an FBI probe into the case. Acosta is now Donald Trump's labor secretary. Epstein has counted Presidents Donald Trump and Bill Clinton among his friends. We speak with Vicky Ward, an investigative journalist who profiled Jeffrey Epstein for Vanity Fair in 2003 in a piece headlined "The Talented Mr. Epstein." The magazine's editor at the time, Graydon Carter, cut out the testimonies of two young women Epstein allegedly molested who had spoken to Ward on the record. Ward later wrote about the incident for The Daily Beast in an article headlined "I Tried to Warn You About Sleazy Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein in 2003."

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2019

U.S. Women's Soccer Team Wins World Cup, Condemning Pay Discrimination and President Trump
The U.S. national women's soccer team made history by winning its record fourth World Cup after defeating the Netherlands 2 to 0 on Sunday in Lyon, France. The U.S. women's World Cup victory came just months after members of the 2015 women's team sued the U.S. Soccer Federation over gender discrimination. Following the victory, audience members began to chant "equal pay" in solidarity with the team's demands for an equal salary to their male counterparts. Prize money for this year's Women's World Cup is just $30 million compared to $400 million for the 2018 men's World Cup. Co-captain Megan Rapinoe was awarded the Golden Ball and the Golden Boot awards for best player and top goal scorer. Rapinoe has been the center of attention throughout the tournament. Before games she refused to sing the national anthem or put her hand on her heart. She also made headlines for saying she would refuse to go to the White House if invited. We speak with Shireen Ahmed, award-winning sports activist focusing on Muslim women in sports, and Amira Rose Davis, assistant professor of history and African American studies at Penn State University.

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2019

U.S. Women's Soccer Team Wins World Cup, Criticizing Pay Discrimination and President Trump
The U.S. national women's soccer team made history by winning its record fourth World Cup after defeating the Netherlands 2 to 0 on Sunday in Lyon, France. The U.S. women's World Cup victory came just months after members of the 2015 women's team sued the U.S. Soccer Federation over gender discrimination. Following the victory, audience members began to chant "equal pay" in solidarity with the team's demands for an equal salary to their male counterparts. Prize money for this year's Women's World Cup is just $30 million compared to $400 million for the 2018 men's World Cup. Co-captain Megan Rapinoe was awarded the Golden Ball and the Golden Boot awards for best player and top goal scorer. Rapinoe has been the center of attention throughout the tournament. Before games she refused to sing the national anthem or put her hand on her heart. She also made headlines for saying she would refuse to go to the White House if invited. We speak with Shireen Ahmed, award-winning sports activist focusing on Muslim women in sports, and Amira Rose Davis, assistant professor of history and African American studies at Penn State University.

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2019

U.S. Women's Soccer Team Wins World Cup, Rebuking Pay Discrimination and President Trump
The U.S. national women's soccer team made history by winning its record fourth World Cup after defeating the Netherlands 2 to 0 on Sunday in Lyon, France. The U.S. women's World Cup victory came just months after members of the 2015 women's team sued the U.S. Soccer Federation over gender discrimination. Following the victory, audience members began to chant "equal pay" in solidarity with the team's demands for an equal salary to their male counterparts. Prize money for this year's Women's World Cup is just $30 million compared to $400 million for the 2018 men's World Cup. Co-captain Megan Rapinoe was awarded the Golden Ball and the Golden Boot awards for best player and top goal scorer. Rapinoe has been the center of attention throughout the tournament. Before games she refused to sing the national anthem or put her hand on her heart. She also made headlines for saying she would refuse to go to the White House if invited. We speak with Shireen Ahmed, award-winning sports activist focusing on Muslim women in sports, and Amira Rose Davis, assistant professor of history and African American studies at Penn State University.

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2019

Headlines for July 8, 2019
Trump & DOJ Reverse Stance, Will Keep Pushing for Citizenship Question in 2020 Census, Trump Admin Threatens It's Ready to Start Deporting Up to 1 Million People, ICE and FBI Have Used Facial Recognition Technology to Mine DMV Databases, Trump: Migrants "Very Happy" with Situation in U.S. Migrant Jails, Iran Breaches Nuclear Deal Limits, Condemns U.K.'s Seizure of Oil Tanker, Sudanese Military Leaders and Opposition Agree to 3-Year Power-Sharing Deal, Greek Snap Elections Hand Victory to Conservative Party, U.S. Women's Team Wins Soccer World Cup, Shining a Spotlight on Gender Pay Disparity, State of Emergency Declared After 2 Major Earthquakes Shake California, Joe Biden Apologizes for Praising Segregationists, Defends Record, 2020 Dems Propose Measures to Address Racial Labor, Housing Inequalities, Rep. Justin Amash Leaves GOP, Blasts D.C.'s "Partisan Death Spiral", Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein Arrested for Sex-Trafficking Women and Girls, NJ Judge Under Fire for Defending Privileged Teen Who Filmed Himself Assaulting 16-Year-Old Girl, Alabama DA Drops Charges Against Woman Indicted After She Was Shot and Miscarried Fetus

Democracy Now
Jul 05, 2019

An Hour with Noam Chomsky on Fascism, Nuclear Weapons, Climate Change, Julian Assange & More
In April, hundreds of people packed into the Old South Church in Boston to hear the world-renowned dissident and linguist Noam Chomsky speak. In this hour-long special, we air an excerpt of Chomsky's speech and his on-stage interview with Amy Goodman.

Democracy Now
Jul 04, 2019

Danny Glover & Ta-Nehisi Coates Make the Case for Reparations at Historic Congressional Hearing
On June 19, a subcommittee of the House Judiciary held a historic hearing on reparations for slavery—the first of its kind in over a decade. The hearing coincided with Juneteenth, a day that commemorates June 19, 1865, when slaves in Galveston, Texas, finally learned that the Emancipation Proclamation had abolished slavery. This year marks the 400th anniversary of the transatlantic slave trade. Lawmakers are considering a bill titled the "Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act." It was introduced by Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Houston, after former Congressmember John Conyers had championed the bill for decades without success. The bill carries the designation H.R. 40, a reference to "40 acres and a mule," one of the nation's first broken promises to newly freed slaves. Ahead of the hearing, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said, "I don't think reparations for something that happened 150 years ago, for whom none of us currently living are responsible, is a good idea." Award-winning author Ta-Nehisi Coates and actor Danny Glover testified at the historic congressional hearing on reparations.

Democracy Now
Jul 04, 2019

Ta-Nehisi Coates & Danny Glover Make the Case for Reparations at Historic Congressional Hearing
On June 19, a subcommittee of the House Judiciary held a historic hearing on reparations for slavery—the first of its kind in over a decade. The hearing coincided with Juneteenth, a day that commemorates June 19, 1865, when slaves in Galveston, Texas, finally learned that the Emancipation Proclamation had abolished slavery. This year marks the 400th anniversary of the transatlantic slave trade. Lawmakers are considering a bill titled the "Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act." It was introduced by Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Houston, after former Congressmember John Conyers had championed the bill for decades without success. The bill carries the designation H.R. 40, a reference to "40 acres and a mule," one of the nation's first broken promises to newly freed slaves. Ahead of the hearing, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said, "I don't think reparations for something that happened 150 years ago, for whom none of us currently living are responsible, is a good idea." Award-winning author Ta-Nehisi Coates and actor Danny Glover testified at the historic congressional hearing on reparations.

Democracy Now
Jul 04, 2019

"What to the Slave Is 4th of July?": James Earl Jones Reads Frederick Douglass's Historic Speech
In a Fourth of July holiday special, we hear the words of Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery around 1818, Douglass became a key leader of the abolitionist movement. On July 5, 1852, in Rochester, New York, he gave one of his most famous speeches, "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro." He was addressing the Rochester Ladies Antislavery Society. This is actor James Earl Jones reading the speech during a performance of historian Howard Zinn's acclaimed book, "Voices of a People's History of the United States." He was introduced by Zinn.

Democracy Now
Jul 03, 2019

Scott Warren of No More Deaths Faces Retrial for Providing Humanitarian Aid to Migrants in Arizona
Federal prosecutors announced Tuesday they will retry humanitarian aid volunteer and immigration rights activist Scott Warren on two charges related to aiding migrants along the U.S.-Mexico border. This comes just a few weeks after a jury refused to convict Warren for providing water, food, clean clothes and beds to two undocumented migrants crossing the Sonoran Desert in southern Arizona. Eight jurors found Warren not guilty; four said he was. Federal prosecutors will make their case against Warren again in an 8-day jury trial in November. They have dropped a conspiracy charge against him. If convicted on the two felony migrant harboring charges, Warren faces up to 10 years in prison.

Democracy Now
Jul 03, 2019

Border Agents Caught Posting Racist, Sexist Messages About Migrants & AOC in Secret Facebook Group
Customs and Border Protection has opened an investigation into the posting of racist and xenophobic messages by current and former Border Patrol agents on a private Facebook group. More than 9,500 people are part of the group, which was exposed by ProPublica on Monday. The Facebook group is filled with racist, homophobic, anti-immigrant and misogynistic content about migrants and asylum seekers, as well as public officials like Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who is depicted in a photoshopped image being sexually assaulted by President Trump. In another thread, members of the group made fun of a video of a man trying to carry a child through a rapid river in a plastic bag. Someone commented, "At least it's already in a trash bag." We speak with ProPublica reporter A.C. Thompson, who broke the story.

Democracy Now
Jul 03, 2019

Headlines for July 3, 2019
DHS Watchdog: "Dangerous Overcrowding" and Dire Conditions at Texas Migrant Jails, 30-Year-Old Honduran Migrant Dies in U.S. Custody, Federal Judge Blocks Trump Plan to Deny Bail to Asylum Seekers, DHS Fining Immigrants Up to $500,000 for Not Leaving the U.S., Nationwide Protests Demand Lawmakers #CloseTheCamps, Cory Booker Vows to End Immigrant Detention in 2020 Proposal, In Defeat for Trump Admin, 2020 Census Will Not Include Citizenship Question, House Dems Sue Treasury and IRS over Trump's Tax Returns, Airstrike Hits Migrant Detention Center in Libya, Killing At Least 40, Ethiopian-Israeli Community Protests Police Killing of Ethiopian Teen, Navy SEAL Accused of War Crimes Acquitted of Murder, Arizona Prosecutors Will Retry Activist Scott Warren for Helping Migrants, Black Patient Who Was Arrested for Taking a Walk While Hooked Up to an IV Speaks Out, GOP Upset After Nike Pulls Sneaker Design Featuring Slavery and Racism-Linked Flag, Trump Pushes Ahead with Costly Military Spectacle for July 4th Celebrations, Chubb Becomes First U.S. Insurer to Stop Coverage for Coal Companies, June 2019 Was Hottest on Record, London Climate Activists Descend on Oil Company HQs, Demand an End to Drilling

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2019

Kamala Harris Says She Was a Progressive Prosecutor. Her Record Tells Another Story
As Senator Kamala Harris rises in the early presidential polls, she is facing increasing scrutiny over her record as a prosecutor in California. In 2004, Harris became district attorney of San Francisco. She held the post until 2011, when she became the attorney general of California. We speak with Lara Bazelon, a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law. In January, she wrote a piece in The New York Times titled "Kamala Harris Was Not a 'Progressive Prosecutor.'" In it, Bazelon writes, "Time after time, when progressives urged her to embrace criminal justice reforms as a district attorney and then the state's attorney general, Ms. Harris opposed them or stayed silent. Most troubling, Ms. Harris fought tooth and nail to uphold wrongful convictions that had been secured through official misconduct that included evidence tampering, false testimony and the suppression of crucial information by prosecutors."

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2019

New "Birther" Smear: Attacks on Kamala Harris Are Just the Latest in Trump Family's Racist Record
California senator and presidential candidate Kamala Harris is riding a new wave of momentum following her debate performance last week when she challenged Joe Biden's past history of working with segregationist lawmakers and his opposition to busing to integrate schools in the 1970s. While Harris has jumped in several opinion polls, there has also been a right-wing backlash online. On Thursday, Donald Trump Jr. retweeted a message from an "alt-right" personality that read, "Kamala Harris is *not* an American Black. She is half Indian and half Jamaican. I'm so sick of people robbing American Blacks (like myself) of our history. It's disgusting. ... Harris' family were actually slave owners." Trump Jr. shared the tweet with his followers, writing, "Is this true? Wow." He deleted the tweet later that night, but he has come under fire from several other 2020 presidential candidates for his comments. We speak with Shireen Mitchell, founder of the group Stop Online Violence Against Women.

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2019

"Her Days Are Numbered": Calls Grow for Hong Kong Leader to Resign as Protesters Storm Legislature
Riot police used tear gas to forcibly remove hundreds of protesters occupying a Legislature building early Tuesday morning. The activists began their occupation on Monday when they stormed Hong Kong's Legislative Council and smashed the glass to gain entry, tearing down portraits of officials and spray-painting the walls. The action took place as hundreds of thousands flooded the streets Monday to mark the anniversary of Hong Kong's return to Chinese control 22 years ago. It was just the latest mass demonstration since millions took to the streets in a series of marches last month to protest a contested bill that would allow for extraditions of Hong Kong residents and visitors to mainland China. We speak with Claudia Mo, a democratic lawmaker in Hong Kong.

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2019

Headlines for July 2, 2019
Lawmakers Decry Dire Conditions and Lack of Accountability During Visit to Texas Migrant Jails, Migrant Child Freed from Clint Border Patrol Jail: "They Treated Us Badly", ProPublica: Secret Border Patrol Facebook Group Rife with Racist, Sexist and Anti-Immigrant Posts, Migrant Father and Daughter Who Drowned in Rio Grande Buried in El Salvador, #CloseTheCamps Protests Planned Across the U.S., Mexico Deploys National Guard, Ramps Up Crackdown on Immigrants, Hong Kong Protests Continue as Activists Renew Demands to Withdraw Extradition Bill, Iran Surpasses Enriched Uranium Stockpile Allowed Under Nuclear Deal, Japan Resumes Commercial Whaling After 30 Year Moratorium, USDA to Move 100s of Jobs Out of D.C. Amid Pushback from Employees, Lawmakers and Climate Scientists, Trump Requests Tanks, Fighter Jets for July 4th Military Parade

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2019

"We Will Not Be Quiet! Stonewall Was a Riot!": Queer Liberation March Returns Pride to Radical Roots
Four million people took to the streets of New York City Sunday in the largest LGBTQ Pride celebration in history. There were two marches to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising that sparked the modern day LGBTQ movement. Revelers marched down Fifth Avenue cheered on by millions for the WorldPride parade. And in Sheridan Square, at the very site where gay and trans people clashed with police on the early morning of June 28, 1969, tens of thousands of activists gathered for the anti-corporate Queer Liberation March. Their chant was "Stonewall was a riot! We will not be quiet!!" Democracy Now!'s Tey-Marie Astudillo and Libby Rainey were there in the streets. They spoke to some of the activists who were there in the days of the Stonewall uprising 50 years ago, as well as those who carry on the tradition today, among them Raquel Willis, who recently became the first transgender woman to be executive editor of Out magazine. But we begin with veteran activist and journalist Ann Northrop, co-host of the Free Speech TV show "Gay USA."

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2019

Trump Makes History by Walking Into North Korea. Could This Help to Finally End the Korean War?
President Trump made history Sunday when he became the first sitting U.S. president to step foot in North Korea. Trump was there to visit North Korean leader Kim Jong-un at the military demarcation line at the Korean Demilitarized Zone. Kim then invited Trump to cross the line, which has divided North and South Korea since 1953. Trump then took about 20 steps into North Korea. Following the meeting at the DMZ, Trump and Kim held a three-way gathering with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Sunday marked Trump and Kim's first meeting since nuclear talks broke down in February. More nuclear talks are reportedly scheduled to begin in the coming weeks. We speak with Suzy Kim, associate professor of Korean history at Rutgers University, and Christine Ahn, founder and executive director of Women Cross DMZ, a global movement of women mobilizing to end the Korean War.

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2019

Headlines for July 1, 2019
Trump Sets Foot in North Korea in Historic First, Hong Kong Protesters Take to Streets, Enter Gov't Building, U.S. and China Ease Trade Tensions, Trump Lavishes Praise on MBS at G20 Summit, At Least 10 Killed in Sudanese Anti-Gov't Protests, Afghanistan: Violent Attacks Kill 100s in Recent Days as U.S.-Taliban Peace Talks Resume, Italian Police Arrest Captain of Migrant Ship After She Rescues 53 Refugees, Senate Rejects Effort to Prevent Trump from Attacking Iran Without Congressional Approval, Charles Koch and George Soros Team Up to Fund New Anti-Interventionist Think Tank, SCOTUS Rejects Alabama Ban on Most Common 2nd-Trimester Abortion Procedure, SCOTUS to Hear Trump Case on Repealing DACA, CA Judge Again Halts Trump Border Wall Construction Using Military Funds, 9/11 Responder and Survivor Luis Alvarez Advocate Dies of Cancer, Neo-Nazi Who Killed Activist Heather Heyer at Charlottesville Rally Sentenced to Life, Rights Groups Sue After Florida Gov. Signs Bill Curbing Voter-Mandated Felon Re-enfranchisement, 2020 Candidates Beto O'Rourke and Julián Castro Go to Clint, Texas, Migrant Jail, Donald Trump Jr. Reposts, Then Deletes Tweet Attacking Kamala Harris's Racial Identity, Jewish activists Arrested Protesting ICE Prison in New Jersey, NYC's "Queer Liberation March" One of Many Pride Events Around the Globe

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2019

Remembering Stonewall: On 50th Anniversary, Leaders of Uprising Look Back on Sparking the LGBTQ Movement
Fifty years ago today, just after midnight, at 1:30 in the morning on June 28, 1969, New York City police officers raided a gay- and trans-friendly bar called the Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street in Greenwich Village. As the police began dragging some of the patrons out, the community fought back, sparking three days of rioting. Their historic resistance launched the modern-day LGBTQ movement and became known as the Stonewall uprising. We hear the leaders of the Stonewall uprising in their own words, in a radio documentary produced by Dave Isay in 1989 called "Remembering Stonewall."

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2019

Dem Candidates All Support Healthcare for Undocumented People, Split On Decriminalizing Immigration
Immigration was among the top issues in the second night of the first Democratic presidential debates, with California Senator Kamala Harris saying she would reinstate Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a program that provides a temporary work permit and deportation relief for undocumented youth, on her first day in office. South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg spoke of the criminalization of immigration as the basis for family separation, referring to the Trump administration's "zero tolerance "policy as "dead wrong." While most candidates are running on different platforms to address the criminalization of immigration and the separation of refugee families at the border, they all agreed on one thing: providing healthcare to undocumented people living in the U.S. When asked if they agreed, all candidates raised their hand. Prior to the debate night, many of the candidates, including Kamala Harris and Bernie Sanders, visited the Homestead detention facility, where hundreds of migrant children are currently incarcerated, located just a few minutes from Miami. We speak with Andrea Mercado, executive director of New Florida Majority.

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2019

Kamala Harris Challenges Biden on Opposing Busing & Integration In 1970s: "That Little Girl Was Me"
The second night of the first Democratic presidential debate was billed as a face-off between front-runners former Vice President Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders, but it was California Senator Kamala Harris who took command of the stage Thursday night. Harris sparred with Biden over his recent comments about working with segregationists in the Senate and for his opposition to Delaware's attempts to bus students in an effort to integrate its schools in the 1970s. "There was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate her public schools, and she was bused to school every day. That little girl was me," Harris said. We speak with Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change.

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2019

Supreme Court Hands GOP Big Victory on Gerrymandering, Ensuring "Massive Election Rigging"
The Supreme Court hands down two major decisions. The first is a victory for Republicans, allowing extreme partisan gerrymandering to continue. The other temporarily blocks the Trump administration from adding a citizenship question on the 2020 census. We get response from Ari Berman, senior writer at Mother Jones, a reporting fellow at the Type Media Center and author of "Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America." He says the ruling that federal courts can't resolve claims of partisan gerrymandering is "almost guaranteed to facilitate massive election rigging in the future."

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2019

Headlines for June 28, 2019
Supreme Court Says Partisan Gerrymandering Can't Be Challenged in Federal Courts, Trump Threatens to Delay Census After Supreme Court Blocks Adding Citizenship Question, Kamala Harris Takes on Joe Biden over Working with Segregationists and His Opposition to Busing, Congressional Hispanic Caucus Decries New Border Bill as an Unacceptable Betrayal, U.S. Helps Block Progress at German Climate Summit as Europe Sizzles in Record Heat, With a Smile, Trump Tells Putin at G20 Not to Meddle in U.S. Elections, Trump's Chief of Diplomatic Protocol Resigns After Accused of Carrying Whip at Work, Brazilian Air Force Officer Arrested in Spain With 86 Pounds of Cocaine , Alabama Woman Was Shot While Pregnant, Then Charged with Manslaughter After Pregnancy Ended, U.S. Soccer Star Megan Rapinoe Defends Remarks on Refusing to Go to White House, Brooklyn Lindsey, 32-Year-Old Trans Woman, Found Dead in Kansas City, Major Marches Planned for 50th Anniversary of Stonewall Uprising

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2019

Sen. Elizabeth Warren: We Need to Make Structural Changes to Our Government & Economy
Senator Elizabeth Warren pushed for structural changes to the U.S. government in Wednesday's presidential debate, saying she would make college free and eliminate private insurance altogether. We speak with Anand Giridharadas, editor-at-large at Time magazine and author of "Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World," about Warren's debate performance and the issues facing the 2020 candidates. He joins a roundtable discussion with Sunrise Movement co-founder Varshini Prakash, She the People founder Aimee Allison and Ana María Archila, co-executive director of the Center for Popular Democracy.

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2019

Activists Still Want a Separate Debate on Climate After It Received Just 7 Minutes in First Debate
As the Democratic debate took place in Miami, climate activists from the Sunrise Movement protested the Democratic National Committee's refusal to host a climate change-centered primary debate. Climate activists are still camping out in front of DNC headquarters in Washington, D.C. At last night's two-hour debate, about seven minutes focused on climate issues.

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2019

She the People's Aimee Allison: We Need a Candidate to Support Economic, Racial and Gender Politics
The first night of the two-part 2020 presidential debate kicked off Wednesday night with a focus on the economy, healthcare, immigration, gun control, Iran and climate change. It was a historic night with three female candidates taking part: Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii. It marked the first time more than one female candidate appeared in a major political party debate in the United States. We speak with She the People founder Aimee Allison about the women in the race and foreign policy in Afghanistan and Iran. Allison won an honorable discharge as a conscientious objector in the First Gulf War.

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2019

In First Debate, Julián Castro Challenges Democrats to End the Criminalization of Immigration
The Democrats' first debate was held in Miami, Florida. The venue was less than an hour away from Homestead, Florida, where more than 2,000 unaccompanied minors are incarcerated in a for-profit detention center run by Caliburn. Trump's former Chief of Staff Gen. John Kelly sits on its board. Prior to the debate, Senators Warren and Klobuchar visited the facility. During the debate, Julián Castro, the former secretary of housing and urban development, criticized the immigration policies of fellow Texan, former Congressmember Beto O'Rourke. We air part of the debate and speak to Ana María Archila of the Center for Popular Democracy.

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2019

Headlines for June 27, 2019
2020 Democratic Primary Debate Kicks Off with Focus on Immigration, Healthcare, Senate Passes Border Aid Package After Rejecting House Version, Bank of America Ends Relationship with Migrant Prison Companies, Asylum Officers Say Trump's "Remain in Mexico" Policy Threatens Migrants' Lives, Family of Black Man Shot by Indiana Cop Sues Officer, City of South Bend, Twin Suicide Bombs Rock Tunis, Trump, World Leaders in Osaka for G20, Court Rules France Failed to Properly Address Air Pollution, U.N. Expert Warns of Impending "Climate Apartheid", NYC Votes to Declare a "Climate Emergency", Dems Vote to Subpoena Kellyanne Conway for Hatch Act Violations, Iraqi Man Granted Reprieve from Deportation After Spending 2 Years in Church Sanctuary

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2019

Survivor of WWII Internment Camp Speaks Out: Japanese Americans Know the Trauma of Child Detention
Amid reports of inhumane and degrading conditions at child immigration jails along the southern border, we speak with Satsuki Ina, a Japanese-American psychotherapist who was born in the Tule Lake Segregation Center, a maximum-security internment camp for Japanese Americans during WWII. "After decades of living our lives as compliant and quiet, and demonstrating and proving ourselves as good citizens, many of us have felt that it's time for us to speak out, to protest, to resist, and to speak out in ways that we haven't in the past, because we know what these children are experiencing," Ina said. "We know what it's like to have family separation, to suffer the long-term consequences of the trauma of being incarcerated—for some of us, more than four or five years."

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2019

DHS Whistleblower Who Spoke Out Against Obama-Era Immigration Jails Condemns Conditions on Border
Immigration jails along the southern border are facing heightened scrutiny following horrific reports of dirty and unhygienic conditions at a detention center in Clint, Texas, and other facilities. We speak with government whistleblower Dr. Scott Allen, who was hired in 2014 to inspect facilities where immigrant families are incarcerated, who says degrading conditions for jailed migrants date back to Obama's presidency. He is calling for more government transparency about conditions in immigration facilities, saying, "I think most Americans, if they were confronted with the humanity of what we are doing here, would be outraged and would not tolerate it." Allen is still on contract with the Department of Homeland Security's Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. He and fellow whistleblower Dr. Pamela McPherson were recently awarded the 2019 Ridenhour Prize for Truth-Telling and are represented by the non-profit Government Accountability Project.

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2019

AOC Joins Other Progressives to Vote Against Dems on Funding Bill for DHS, Call for Abolition of ICE
A divided House approved a contentious $4.5 billion emergency funding package to address the border crisis Tuesday, under growing pressure to address the Trump administration's inhumane treatment of migrants. The bill passed largely along party lines in a 230-195 vote, with some progressive Democrats voting in favor after negotiating to include provisions including new health and safety standards for jailed migrants. Four Democrats voted against the bill: Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib. Last week, the progressive congressmembers issued a statement condemning the bill and calling for the abolition of ICE. The Senate is slated to consider its own border funding measure this week, including President Trump's original request for more than a billion dollars for Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. We speak with Renée Feltz, a Democracy Now! correspondent and producer who has long reported on the criminalization of immigrants, family detention, and the business of detention. Her recent report for Rewire.News is headlined "'Willful Recklessness': Trump Pushes for Indefinite Family Detention."

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2019

Trump Admin Moves 100 Migrant Kids Back to "Child Jail" Despite Concern over Inhumane Conditions
The Department of Homeland Security has moved 100 migrant children back to a Border Patrol facility in Clint, Texas, where infants and toddlers have been locked up without adequate food, water, sanitation or medical care, with older children having to care for the younger ones. Around 300 kids were removed from the facility Monday following widespread outrage over the reports, but Customs and Border Protection said some of the children are being sent back, claiming that the facility is no longer overcrowded. Lawyers who recently visited the facility described a scene of chaos and sickness, with children unable to shower or change into clean clothes for weeks on end. We speak with Clara Long, senior researcher at Human Rights Watch. She was part of the monitoring team that visited Border Patrol facilities last week, including Clint.

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2019

Trump Admin. Moves 100 Migrant Kids Back to "Child Jail" Despite Concern Over Inhumane Conditions
The Department of Homeland Security has moved 100 migrant children back to a Border Patrol facility in Clint, Texas, where infants and toddlers have been locked up without adequate food, water, sanitation or medical care, with older children having to care for the younger ones. Around 300 kids were removed from the facility Monday following widespread outrage over the reports, but Customs and Border Protection said some of the children are being sent back, claiming that the facility is no longer overcrowded. Lawyers who recently visited the facility described a scene of chaos and sickness, with children unable to shower or change into clean clothes for weeks on end. We speak with Clara Long, senior researcher at Human Rights Watch. She was part of the monitoring team that visited Border Patrol facilities last week, including Clint.

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2019

Juan González: There Are Refugees in Desperate Need of Help in Airports Across the United States
Co-host Juan González was at the Dallas/Fort Worth airport this past Sunday, where he encountered Central American refugee families recently released from detention centers. The families, who were from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, had been left there by Immigration and Customs Enforcement without guidance or a translator to help them navigate their flight information. The families were likely traveling to cities where they could reunite with loved ones already in living in the U.S. In the case of the Guatemalan families, most of them didn't speak Spanish, but indigenous languages. None of them spoke English. They had no money and received no assistance from American Airlines employees. Several airport staff, mostly maintenance workers and others, said they have been trying to assist the stranded Central American refugees, providing them with food, blankets and other aid. This is a common scene at major airports around the country.

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2019

Headlines for June 26, 2019
DHS Moves 100 Children Back to Texas Border Patrol Station Deemed Unsafe and "Inhumane", House Passes Contentious $4.5 Billion Emergency Border Bill, "Defund Hate Campaign" Activists Call for Action on Migrant Deaths and Detention, Trump Threatens to "Obliterate" Iran as Bipartisan Reps Seek to Avoid Unauthorized Strikes, Robert Mueller to Testify Before House in July, Tiffany Cabán Leading Queens DA Race, U.S. and N. Korea in Talks for Third Summit, Pompeo Says U.S. Hoping for a Peace Deal and Ready to Pull Out Troops in Afghanistan, Spanish Supreme Court Ups Conviction of Men Who Raped and Filmed Teenager in 2016, Illinois Legalizes Marijuana, Paving Way for Expungement of Nearly 800,000 Cases, San Francisco Set to Ban E-Cigarettes, #WayfairWalkOut Protests Furniture Retailer's Participation in Migrant Detention, DOJ Alleges Rep. Duncan Hunter Used Campaign Money to Fund Multiple Affairs, 2020 Democratic Primary Debate Kicks Off as Activists Demand a Focus on Climate Change

Democracy Now
Jun 25, 2019

Oregon Republicans Backed By Right-Wing Militias Flee State to Stall Vote on Historic Climate Bill
The Oregon state Legislature has been in a standoff for nearly one week, after 11 Republican lawmakers fled the Capitol Thursday to avoid voting on a landmark climate change bill. Some are believed to be hiding out in Idaho. Right-wing militias supporting the rogue GOP legislators have threatened violence, which led the remaining lawmakers to shut down the state Capitol in Salem. The climate crisis bill aims to decrease emissions by implementing a statewide cap-and-trade model. Without at least two of the rogue Republican senators present, Oregon Democrats, who control the state Senate and House of Representatives, don't have the necessary quorum to vote on the legislation. We speak with Oregon Democratic state Representative Karin Power. She is co-chair of the state's Joint Committee on Carbon Reduction and co-sponsor of the cap-and-trade bill.

Democracy Now
Jun 25, 2019

Jonathan Kozol: Joe Biden Didn't Just Praise Segregationists. He Also Spent Years Fighting Busing
Former Vice President Joe Biden made headlines last week when he fondly reminisced about his "civil" relationship in the 1970s and 1980s with segregationist senators James Eastland of Mississippi and Herman Talmadge of Georgia. While Biden's recent comments made the news, far less attention has been paid to the former vice president's actual record. In the 1970s, then-Senator Biden was a fierce critic of Delaware's attempts to bus students in an effort to integrate its schools. We speak with National Book Award-winning author Jonathan Kozol about Biden's track record.

Democracy Now
Jun 25, 2019

As Trump Imposes New Sanctions, Iran Says U.S. Has "Permanently Closed Path to Diplomacy"
President Trump announced Monday his administration is imposing a new round of sanctions on Iran, targeting several prominent Iranians including Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and Iran's top diplomat, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. Iran said the move "permanently closed the path to diplomacy" between Iran and the United States. The latest tension comes after the downing of a U.S. drone by Iran on Thursday. Iran maintains the drone had entered its airspace, while the U.S. claims the drone was in international waters. The U.S. military prepared to directly attack Iran in retaliation, but Trump reportedly called off the bombing at the last minute. We speak with Iranian-American author and analyst Trita Parsi, former president and founder of the National Iranian American Council.

Democracy Now
Jun 25, 2019

Headlines for June 25, 2019
Iran Says New U.S. Sanctions Shut Down Diplomatic Option, 300 Children Moved from Texas Border Patrol Station After Reports of Neglect, Inhumane Conditions, FBI Investigating Deaths of 3 Children, 1 Woman Found Near Texas' Southern Border, Trump Responds to E. Jean Carroll Rape Allegations: "She's Not My Type", Palestinians Resist Kushner's Middle East Workshop as Business Leaders Gather in Bahrain, Experts Warn Climate Crisis Exacerbating Heat Waves as 100 Degree Temps Grip Europe, Chennai, India's 6th-Largest City, Has Almost Run Out of Water, SCOTUS Makes FOIA Requests More Difficult for Journalists, Oregon Republicans Flee Capitol to Avoid Voting on Climate Bill, Missouri's Only Abortion Clinic Has Until Friday to Resolve Licence Dispute, 9/11 First Responders to Meet with McConnell over Healthcare Funding, Former PA Rep. Joe Sestak Enters Crowded Democratic 2020 Race, Treasury Will Review Trump Admin Delay to Harriet Tubman $20 Bill Redesign, U.S. Women's Soccer Will Enter Mediation over Gender-Based Pay Discrimination Suit

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2019

Ola Bini, Privacy Activist and Julian Assange Friend, Speaks Out After Release from Ecuadorian Jail
Last week, an Ecuadorian judge ordered the release of Swedish programmer and data privacy activist Ola Bini, who spent more than two months in jail without charge. Bini is a friend of WikiLeaks editor Julian Assange. He was arrested in Quito on the same day that Assange was forcibly taken by British authorities from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. We speak with Ola Bini in Quito, where he remains under investigation for allegedly hacking the Ecuadorian government. He says, "Through the whole process, 70 days in prison, and all of the days since, we've been asking the prosecution to tell us what it is I have done. And they still have not actually given us any single answer."

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2019

Japanese-American Internment Survivors Protest Plan to Jail Migrant Kids At Fort Sill, a WWII Camp
Five Japanese-American elders, survivors of U.S. internment camps, engaged in civil disobedience Saturday outside the Fort Sill Army post in Oklahoma, where the Trump administration plans to indefinitely detain 1,400 immigrant and refugee children starting next month. Fort Sill was an internment camp for 700 Japanese-American men in 1942. It was one of more than 70 sites where the U.S. government incarcerated about 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, including one of 14 U.S. Army bases. President Obama first used Fort Sill in 2014 to detain migrant children seeking asylum from violence in Central America. Descendants of internment camp survivors were also present at the peaceful protest. We speak with Mike Ishii, co-chair of Tsuru for Solidarity. Ishii was at Fort Sill Army Base Saturday and helped organize the act.

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2019

Japanese-American Internment Survivors Protest Plan to Jail Migrant Kids at WWII Prison Camp
Democracy Now! was there when five Japanese-American elders, survivors of U.S. internment camps, engaged in civil disobedience Saturday outside the Fort Sill Army post in Oklahoma, where the Trump administration plans to indefinitely detain 1,400 immigrant and refugee children starting next month. Fort Sill was an internment camp for 700 Japanese-American men in 1942. It was one of more than 70 sites where the U.S. government incarcerated about 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, including one of 14 U.S. Army bases. President Obama first used Fort Sill in 2014 to detain migrant children seeking asylum from violence in Central America. Descendants of internment camp survivors were also present at the peaceful protest. We feature a video report from Fort Sill and speak with Mike Ishii, co-chair of Tsuru for Solidarity. Ishii was at Fort Sill Army Base Saturday and helped organize the act.

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2019

"Somebody Is Going to Die": Lawyer Describes Chaos, Illness & Danger at Migrant Child Jail in Texas
Outrage is mounting over a shocking Associated Press report published late last week revealing that at least 250 migrant infants, children and teenagers have been locked up for nearly a month without adequate food, water or sanitation at a Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas, near the city of El Paso. Lawyers who visited the facility described a scene of chaos and sickness, with children unable to shower or change into clean clothes for weeks on end. The AP report came the same week that the Trump administration argued in federal court that the government is not required to provide toothbrushes, soap or beds to children detained at the border, and as other reports found similarly squalid conditions at a number of immigration jails. We speak with Warren Binford, a lawyer who interviewed children detained at the Clint, Texas, facility.

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2019

Headlines for June 24, 2019
U.S. Announces New Iran Sanctions Days After Aborted Military Strike, Trump Delays ICE Roundups Amid Democratic Pushback, Columnist E. Jean Carroll Accuses Trump of Raping Her in 1990s, Turkey's Ruling AK Party Loses Istanbul Mayoral Race in Election Do-Over, Ethiopian Army Chief and Local Gov. Killed in Attempted Coup, 1000s of Climate Activists Block German Coal Mining Operation, Extinction Rebellion Activists Call on New York Times to Improve and Increase Climate Crisis Reporting, Sen. Sanders Introduces Plan to Cancel All Student Debt, Pete Buttigieg Faces Hometown Backlash in Indiana over Police Shooting of Black Man, Eddie Africa of MOVE 9 Released from Prison After 40 Years, Japanese-American Survivors of WWII Internment Camp Protest Trump Detention Plans at Fort Sill

Democracy Now
Jun 21, 2019

Her Mother Was Killed by U.S.-Backed Security Forces. Now Lucrecia Mack Is in Guatemala's Congress
In a Guatemalan election marked by fraud and corruption, Lucrecia Hernández Mack is one of just a few new faces in politics sparking hope in the country, after being elected as a legislator in the Guatemalan Congress with the progressive party Movimiento Semilla. Guatemala's Supreme Electoral Tribunal announced Thursday it will hold a recount amid fraud allegations following last Sunday's presidential and legislative elections. Hernández Mack is the daughter of renowned Guatemalan anthropologist Myrna Mack, who was murdered by U.S.-backed Guatemalan security forces on September 11, 1990, during the country's brutal 36-year civil war. In 2016, Hernández Mack became the first woman to lead Guatemala's Ministry of Health, but resigned after current Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales announced the U.N.-backed International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala was no longer welcome in the country. We speak with Thelma Aldana, former attorney general of Guatemala, and Lucrecia Hernández Mack about her historic win.

Democracy Now
Jun 21, 2019

Thelma Aldana, Barred from Guatemala Presidential Election, Says Country Is "Captured" by Corruption
Guatemala's Supreme Electoral Tribunal announced Thursday it will hold a recount amid fraud allegations following last Sunday's presidential and legislative elections. The country's former Attorney General Thelma Aldana, who was a leading presidential candidate with the center-left party Movimiento Semilla, was barred from participating in the race and was forced to flee the country after receiving death threats and a warrant for her arrest. During her time as Guatemala's top prosecutor, Aldana, alongside the U.N.-backed International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala, known as CICIG, helped investigate hundreds of politicians and businessmen on corruption charges. Aldana says the criminal accusations against her are retaliation for her work with Guatemala's anti-corruption movement. We spoke with Aldana earlier this week.

Democracy Now
Jun 21, 2019

Trump Pulls Back from Iran Attack as Bolton & Pompeo Continue to Push for War
After threatening to strike Iran in retaliation for shooting down an unmanned U.S. drone, President Trump reportedly approved, and then abruptly called off, military strikes. The move came after the operation was already underway in its initial stages, with warships and planes already being put into position. We go to Tehran to get response from Mohammad Marandi, a professor at the University of Tehran who was part of the nuclear deal negotiations in 2015. We also speak with CUNY professor and historian Ervand Abrahamian, author of several books about Iran. Whether or not Trump wants war with Iran doesn't ultimately matter, says Abrahamian. "The long-term agenda in the White House" from Bolton, Pompeo and others is much more aggressive. "They want basically the destruction of the Islamic Republic."

Democracy Now
Jun 21, 2019

Headlines for June 21, 2019
Report: Trump Ordered Military Strikes on Iran But Then Pulled Back, Democrats: Congressional Approval Is Needed Before Attacking Iran, Senate Votes to Block Weapons Sales to Saudi Arabia & UAE over Yemen War, U.K. Court Rules British Arms Sales to Saudi Arabia Were Unlawful on Humanitarian Grounds, Federal Court Rules in Favor of Trump Administration Title X Abortion "Gag Rule", Detained Migrant Children Denied Adequate Food, Water & Sanitation in Texas, Trump Administration Says Detained Children Not Entitled to Soap, Toothbrushes & Beds, Protest Planned over U.S. Plan to House Children at Site of Former WWII Internment Camp, Colorado Immigrant Rights Activist Jeanette Vizguerra Denied a Visa, Federal Judge Blocks Authorities from Making Immigration Arrests in Mass. Courts, Honduran President Orders 25,000 Troops into Streets as Protests Grow, Ecuadorean Judge Orders Release of Detained Internet Activist Ola Bini, British MP Suspended for Grabbing & Shoving Climate Activist, At Eddie Gallagher War Crimes Trial, a Medic Claims He Was Real Killer, Explosion at Philadelphia Oil Refinery Starts Large Fire, CDC: Suicide Rate for Indigenous Women Soars as Nationwide Rate Hits Post-WWII High, Eight Activists Arrested for Protesting U.S. Drone Warfare at New York Base

Democracy Now
Jun 20, 2019

Ta-Nehisi Coates: "Joe Biden Shouldn't Be President"
Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden is under fire for fondly reminiscing about his "civil" relationship with segregationist senators in the 1970s and 1980s. Speaking at a fundraiser at the Carlyle Hotel in New York City on Tuesday night, Biden expressed nostalgia for his relationship with the late Democratic pro- segregation Senators James Eastland of Mississippi and Herman Talmadge of Georgia. Biden reportedly said, "I was in a caucus with James O. Eastland. ... He never called me 'boy'; he called me 'son.'" Biden went on to say, "A guy like Herman Talmadge, one of the meanest guys I ever knew, you go down the list of all these guys. Well, guess what. At least there was some civility. We got things done." Biden was widely criticized by other Democratic presidential contenders, including Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Bill de Blasio. We speak with acclaimed writer Ta-Nehisi Coates about Joe Biden's long record on the wrong side of civil rights legislation, from opposing busing in the 1970s to helping to fuel mass incarceration in 1990s. Coates says, "Joe Biden shouldn't be president."

Democracy Now
Jun 20, 2019

Ta-Nehisi Coates: Reparations Are Not Just About Slavery But Also Centuries of Theft & Racial Terror
On the heels of Wednesday's historic hearing on reparations, we speak with renowned writer Ta-Nehisi Coates on the lasting legacy of American slavery, how the national dialogue about reparations has progressed in the past five years and his testimony in favor of H.R. 40, which took direct aim at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Coates says, "It is absolutely impossible to imagine America without enslavement."

Democracy Now
Jun 20, 2019

Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates Makes the Case for Reparations at Historic Congressional Hearing
On Wednesday, a subcommittee of the House Judiciary held a historic hearing on reparations for slavery—the first of its kind in over a decade. Wednesday's hearing coincided with Juneteenth, a day that commemorates June 19, 1865, when slaves in Galveston, Texas, finally learned that the Emancipation Proclamation had abolished slavery. This year marks the 400th anniversary of the transatlantic slave trade. Lawmakers are considering a bill titled the "Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act." It was introduced by Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Houston, after former Congressmember John Conyers had championed the bill for decades without success. The bill carries the designation H.R. 40, a reference to "40 acres and a mule," one of the nation's first broken promises to newly freed slaves. Ahead of the hearing, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said, "I don't think reparations for something that happened 150 years ago, for whom none of us currently living are responsible, is a good idea." Award-winning author Ta-Nehisi Coates testified at the historic congressional hearing on reparations and took direct aim at McConnell.

Democracy Now
Jun 20, 2019

Headlines for June 20, 2019
Iran Shoots Down U.S. Drone, But Officials Dispute Territory of Incident, House Dems Grill Trump's Iran Rep. over War Authorization, Congress Holds Historic Hearing on Reparations, 2020 Dems Slam Joe Biden for Praising Segregationist Lawmakers, Dems Vow to Compel Hope Hicks Testimony After She Refuses to Answer House Questions, Trump's EPA Rolls Back Coal Restrictions, Xi Jinping and Kim Jong-un Meet for Talks in North Korea, U.N.: 71 Million People Displaced Worldwide Last Year, 4 People Charged in Downing of 2014 Malaysia Airlines Flight Over Eastern Ukraine, Rev. Barber Calls for "Moral Budget" to Respond to Poverty Epidemic, Gov. Newsom Apologizes for California's Genocide of Native Americans, Joy Harjo Named First Native American Poet Laureate

Democracy Now
Jun 19, 2019

"I Thought We Were Going to Be Executed": Police Held Family At Gunpoint After 4-Year-Old Took Doll
An African-American family is suing the city of Phoenix, Arizona, after police held them at gunpoint because their 4-year-old daughter had allegedly taken a doll from a Family Dollar store. In a video that has since gone viral, officers point guns and yell at the family, and one officer even threatens to shoot the 4-year-old girl's father, Dravon Ames, in the face. The girl's mother, Iesha Harper, is heard saying she is unable to hold her hands up because she is holding a child and that she is pregnant. Phoenix's mayor and police chief have both apologized for what happened, and criticized how the police officers handled the situation. Activists in Phoenix say this is just the latest incident in a police department plagued by issues of police violence and killings. Last year, the city had 44 police shootings, nearly double that of the previous year, and led the nation in police shootings among cities of its size. We speak with Dravon Ames and Iesha Harper, as well as a family spokesperson, Rev. Jarrett Maupin. On Monday, the couple filed a $10 million lawsuit against the city.

Democracy Now
Jun 19, 2019

One Year After AOC, Tiffany Cabán Challenges Establishment in Outsider Bid to be Queens DA
It's been nearly a year since Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won the 2018 Democratic primary, toppling Joe Crowley—one of the most powerful Democrats in the House of Representatives—and upending the political machine in New York City overnight. Since then, Ocasio-Cortez has gone from outsider to one of the most influential politicians on Capitol Hill. Now another young Queens candidate is trying to pull off a historic upset. Tiffany Cabán, a 31-year-old queer Latina public defender, is running for district attorney in Queens. She is running to end cash bail, stop prosecuting low-level offenses, decriminalize sex work, and go after bad landlords, cops and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Her election would mark a major shift in the Queens criminal justice system and yet again set an example for the country. To win, Cabán will have to beat out a crowded field of seven candidates who are all claiming they'll reform the system, including Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, who is backed by the Queens establishment. The Democratic primary is June 25. We speak with Tiffany Cabán in our New York studio.

Democracy Now
Jun 19, 2019

Big Tech's War for Your Wallet: Facebook Sparks Outrage After Announcing Plans for Digital Currency
In a move that could reshape the world's financial system, Facebook has unveiled plans to launch a new global digital currency called Libra. Facebook announced its plans on Tuesday after secretly working on the cryptocurrency for more than a year. It will launch Libra next year in partnership with other large companies including Visa, Mastercard, PayPal and Uber. Facebook said it wants to create "a simple global currency and infrastructure that empowers billions of people." The plan has already come under fierce criticism from financial regulators and lawmakers. Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown tweeted, "Facebook is already too big and too powerful, and it has used that power to exploit users' data without protecting their privacy. We cannot allow Facebook to run a risky new cryptocurrency out of a Swiss bank account without oversight." We speak with David Dayen, the executive editor of The American Prospect. He recently wrote a piece for The New Republic headlined "The Final Battle in Big Tech's War to Dominate Your World."

Democracy Now
Jun 19, 2019

Headlines for June 19, 2019
Shanahan Withdraws from Defense Sec. Consideration over Domestic Violence Past, U.N. Finds "Credible Evidence" of MBS's Responsibility in Khashoggi Murder, U.S. Excludes Saudi Arabia from List of Countries Using Child Soldiers, DOJ Intervenes to Keep Paul Manafort Out of Rikers, Trump Taps Anti-Muslim Katharine Gorka for CBP Press Sec., Acting Head of USCIS Tells Agency Staff to Crack Down on "Frivolous" Asylum Claims, AOC Calls Immigration Prisons "Concentration Camps", AOC Calls Out Amazon's Poor Labor Practices, Gunmen Kill At Least 40 People in Mali Amid Mounting Ethnic Conflict, Trump Launches 2020 Presidential Bid at Florida Rally, House Holding Hearing on Slavery Reparations, Trump Refuses to Admit He Was Wrong in 1989 "Central Park 5" Case, SCOTUS Rules Public Access Station Not Bound by 1st Amendment, PG&E Agrees to Pay Out $1 Billion for Role in NorCal Wildfires, Indigenous Groups in Canada Prepare to Fight Trans Mountain Pipeline Extension

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2019

Julian Assange Indictment "Criminalizes the News Gathering Process," Says Pentagon Papers Lawyer
A London judge has ordered WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to appear before a court in February 2020 to face a full extradition hearing. Prosecutors in the U.S. have indicted Assange on 18 counts, including 17 violations of the Espionage Act. This is the first-ever case of a journalist or publisher being indicted under the World War I-era law. Assange said that his life was "effectively at stake" if the U.K. honors a U.S. request for his extradition. Assange is currently serving a 50-week sentence in London's Belmarsh Prison for skipping bail in 2012. We speak with James Goodale, former general counsel of The New York Times. In 1971, he urged the paper to publish the Pentagon Papers, which had been leaked by whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg.

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2019

Mohamed Morsi: Six Years After Coup, Egypt's First Democratically Elected President Dies in Court
Former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, 67, died Monday after collapsing while in a glass cage inside a Cairo courtroom. The Muslim Brotherhood leader was elected in 2012 in Egypt's first, and still only, democratic election. He was overthrown a year later in a military coup led by Egyptian army chief General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. Morsi's death comes as el-Sisi continues to jail tens of thousands of people in what the Associated Press has described as the heaviest crackdown on dissent in Egypt's modern history. In his final comments, Morsi insisted he was still Egypt's legitimate president. Morsi spent the last six years of his life in jail, including extended periods in solitary confinement. His family and global human rights groups often denounced the poor conditions and Morsi's treatment in jail, arguing he had been deprived of much-needed healthcare. Morsi was buried in Cairo earlier today. We speak with Sharif Abdel Kouddous, Democracy Now! correspondent and a reporter with Mada Masr, an independent media outlet in Cairo.

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2019

Headlines for June 18, 2019
Ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi Dies, U.S. to Send 1,000 More Troops to Gulf as It Ignores Calls for Restraint, Mexico Deploys 6,000 Along Southern Border, Trump Tweets ICE Will Start Removing "Millions" of Immigrants from U.S., U.S. Cuts Aid to Central American Countries over Immigration, Nigeria: At Least 30 Killed in Suicide Bombing, U.N. Warns It May Suspend Yemen Food Aid, Israel Announces Plans for "Trump Heights" Settlement in Occupied Golan Heights, SCOTUS Rules Against Virginia GOP Appeal to Gerrymandering Case, SCOTUS Rules States and Federal Gov't Can Prosecute over Same Criminal Offenses, Trial Opens for Accused War Criminal, Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher, New York Grants Driver's Licenses to Undocumented Residents, Harvard Rescinds Admission to Parkland Survivor over Racist & Anti-Semitic Posts, Boeing Issues Alert over Possible Flaw in 787 Dreamliner, Rising Temperatures Precipitating Arctic Ice Melt, Threatening Sea Rise and Permafrost, Activists Draw Attention to Trump's "Family Separation" Policy at U.N. Headquarters, New Yorkers Call Out Joe Biden for Weak Stance on Climate in 2020 Platform

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2019

"16 Shots": Chicago Police Killing of Laquan McDonald Exposed a System Built on Lies
The documentary "16 Shots" examines the 2014 murder of African-American teenager Laquan McDonald in Chicago and the attempt by the city's police department to cover up the events. McDonald, who was 17, was shot 16 times by former police officer Jason Van Dyke. Van Dyke was found guilty in 2018 of second-degree murder and sentenced to six years and nine months in prison for McDonald's murder. He was also found guilty on 16 counts of aggravated battery—one count for each of the 16 bullets he fired at McDonald. The film is screening on Showtime. We speak with Rick Rowley, director of "16 Shots."

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2019

Massive Hong Kong Protests Demand Withdrawal of Extradition Bill, Leader's Resignation
As many as 2 million protesters took to the streets of Hong Kong Sunday demanding the withdrawal of a bill that would allow the extradition of Hong Kong residents to mainland China. Protesters also called for the resignation of Hong Kong's chief executive, Carrie Lam, and other top officials who pushed for the extradition bill. Lam has apologized for her handling of the legislation and indefinitely delayed a vote on the bill; however, the bill has not been fully withdrawn. Critics of the extradition bill say it would infringe on Hong Kong's independence and the legal and human rights of Hong Kong residents and visitors. Just a few days ago, police fired tear gas, rubber bullets and pepper spray at tens of thousands of demonstrators. We speak with Nathan Law, a pro-democracy activist who helped lead the Umbrella Movement, and Minky Worden, director of Global Initiatives at Human Rights Watch.

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