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NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

As Fallout From The 737 Max Crisis Continues, The Cost To Boeing Is Growing
Boeing reported a big cut in profits on Wednesday as the 737 Max remains grounded. The company fired a top executive as questions remain about when the Max will return to service.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

Washington State Is Thinning Out Forests To Reduce Wildfire Risk
The state of Washington is moving to aggressively thin forests to reduce the worsening wildfire risk. The initiative signals a rare truce between loggers and environmentalists.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

After Slamming Trump, Biden Apologizes For Referring To 'Partisan Lynching' In 1998
"This wasn't the right word to use and I'm sorry about that," Joe Biden tweeted, after a video resurfaced of him using the term to describe the impeachment of President Bill Clinton.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

Giuliani Associates Plead Not Guilty To Charges Of Making Illegal Campaign Donations
Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman were arrested at Dulles airport holding one-way tickets out of the country. Their case begins amid the inquiry into President Trump's alleged political pressure on Ukraine.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

New National Marine Sanctuary For Shipwrecked Vessels Is A 'Time Capsule'
Thirty miles from Washington, D.C., lies one of the largest collections of shipwrecks in the world. Now, these WWI-era vessels are attracting tourists and federal investment.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

In Puerto Rico, The Days Of Legal Cockfighting Are Numbered
A congressional ban on the sport was a victory for animal rights activists, but on the island, many say that cockfighting is part of their culture — and they're willing to take the sport underground.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

Vote Continues On United Auto Workers' Tentative Deal With GM
Members of the UAW at General Motors' largest factories vote Wednesday and Thursday on a tentative contract agreement. Ratification would end the longest strike against GM since 1970.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

Voting Continues On United Auto Workers' Tentative Deal With GM
UAW members at General Motors' largest factories vote Wednesday and Thursday on a tentative contract agreement. Ratification would end the longest strike against GM since 1970.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

Wisconsin School Breaks Up Lunchtime Cliques With Assigned Seating
The school is trying to take anxiety out of the lunchroom experience. It has assigned seating with a teacher at each table. Officials say it improves school culture. Others aren't so sure.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 23, 2019

As Vaping Devices Have Evolved, So Have Potential Hazards, Researchers Say
The technology behind e-cigarettes has changed over the years, and researchers are now finding evidence that the way different sorts of vaping devices and e-liquids interact could harm consumers.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Astros And Nationals Tied 2-2 In Game 1 Of World Series
The Series features well-matched teams with superb starting pitchers.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Nationals Beat Astros 5-4 In Game 1 Of World Series
Washington's 20-year-old Juan Soto was a standout, hiting a solo home run, then a two-run double that gave his team a lead over Houston that the Nationals never lost.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Nationals Lead Astros 5-2 In Game 1 Of World Series
Washington's Juan Soto was the star of the first half of the game, hitting a solo home run, then a two-run double that gave his team a 5-2 lead over Houston.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

New Charges Against Lori Loughlin And 10 Other Parents In Admissions Case
New federal charges were filed Tuesday against a total of 18 defendants accused of being part of a conspiracy to cheat their children into top colleges.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Michiganders Get A Late Autumn Surfing Opportunity With Lake Waves As High As 13 Feet
Surf's up in one of the most unlikely places today. Unusually high waves are pounding Lake Michigan shore and exciting some end-of-the-season surfers.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Vermont Girls' Soccer Team Protests For Equal Pay In Solidarity With USWNT
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with three co-captains of the Burlington High School girls' soccer team in Vermont about their protest last week in solidarity with the equal pay campaign of the USWNT.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

From The U.S. To Ukraine, 2 Giuliani Associates' Ties To Impeachment Inquiry
Little-known businessmen Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman are facing campaign finance charges. The case sheds light on the Soviet-born men's involvement in events at the heart of investigations into Trump.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Chicago Teachers' Strike Continues As Students And Parents Start To Feel The Toll
Teachers in Chicago continued their strike for the fourth school day on Tuesday. The work stoppage is starting to take a toll.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

More California Blackouts To Avert Wildfires May Start Wednesday, PG&E Says
The utility giant warned over 200,000 customers in 16 California counties that gusty winds and low humidity may bring more proactive power shutoffs starting Wednesday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Trump Plan Weakens Protections For California Fish, Diverts Water To Farms
The move fulfills a Trump campaign promise to help California's farmers. But it ignores the warnings of federal biologists who were sidelined.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Questions Raised Over Whether The Cannabis Industry Is Contributing To Air Pollution
There's new concern that the growing cannabis industry may be contributing to air pollution. But it's a tricky thing to study, since pot is still illegal under federal law.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Is It A Meth Case Or Mental Illness? Police Who Need To Know Often Can't Tell
Calming techniques officers learn during training for intervening in a mental health crisis don't seem to work as well when a suspect is high on meth. Police say meth calls can be much more dangerous.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Fraud Case Against Exxon Could Impact Efforts To Curb Climate Change
NPR's Audie Cornish talks with InsideClimate News reporter Nicholas Kusnetz about a fraud case against ExxonMobil. The trial begins Tuesday and the outcome could impact efforts to curb climate change.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Boeing Exec Out As Company Prepares To Report More Post-Crash Losses
The news comes on the eve of Boeing's release of third-quarter financial results, continuing the repercussions from two 737 Max crashes that killed 346 people.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Top Aide To Former Defense Chief James Mattis Recounts What The General Has Not
Holding the Line is the tell-all many wished Mattis' own Call Sign Chaos had been. But for all of Guy Snodgrass' in-the-room accounts, there are some unverifiable elements and inaccuracies.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Exxon Is On Trial, Accused Of Misleading Investors About Risks Of Climate Change
New York's Attorney General argues Exxon used shady methods of calculating carbon costs, affecting its share price and defrauding shareholders. Exxon says the lawsuit is politically motivated.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Trump Administration Withdraws Huge Fines For Some Immigrants In U.S. Illegally
The Trump administration is withdrawing hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines against some immigrants in the country illegally who have sought refuge in churches.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

A Half Million 2020 Census Jobs: Will They Be Filled In Time?
The Census Bureau hopes to hire around a half million workers by next spring to complete the national head count. But it's running into trouble with low unemployment and background-check delays.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Jimmy Carter Fractures Pelvis, Is Hospitalized After Fall
The former president, 95, was admitted to a Georgia hospital "for observation and treatment of a minor pelvic fracture," the Carter Center says. It adds that Carter "is in good spirits."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Tell Us About A Time Someone Asked For A Favor
With the phrase "quid pro quo" all over the news, Morning Edition wants to hear about the nature of favors. What kind of expectations do you have around doing something for someone else?

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Tell Us About A Time Someone Has Asked For A Favor
With the phrase "quid pro quo" all over the news, Morning Edition wants to hear about the nature of favors. What kind of expectations do you have around doing something for someone else?

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Opioid Settlement In Ohio Leaves Many Unanswered Questions
Two Ohio counties reached a deal Monday with the drug industry valued at about $260 million. Local officials say the money from drug makers and distributors is desperately needed to fight the crisis.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

The IMF Warns About Rising Regional Inequality
A new study by the International Monetary Fund finds that advanced nations have seen a rise in regional inequality since the 1980s.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Astros And Nationals Primed To Start 2019 World Series In Houston
The Astros won their second pennant in three years and hope to cement themselves as one of the best teams of the decade. The Nationals are making their first-ever Series appearance.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Astros And Nationals Set To Face Off As World Series Starts Tuesday In Houston
The Astros won their second pennant in three years and hope to cement themselves as one of the best teams of the decade. The Nationals are making their first-ever Series appearance.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Census Bureau Struggles To Add Staff For 2020's Census
The federal government hopes to hire around half a million workers by next spring to complete the 2020 census. But it's running into trouble with low unemployment and background-check delays.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Woman Detained In Hospital For Weeks Joins Lawsuit Against New Hampshire
She was detained because she couldn't get a court hearing. She couldn't get a hearing because they are available only to people in psychiatric beds and the state's psychiatric facilities are full.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2019

Trump's Former VA Secretary Describes 'Toxic' Washington Culture In New Book
David Shulkin's memoir, It Shouldn't Be This Hard to Serve Your Country, focuses on his time as veterans affairs secretary, tells of his fights against privatizing the VA — and settles some scores.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Committee Backs Suspension Of Broward Sheriff Over 2018 High School Shooting
Gov. Ron DeSantis charged Scott Israel with incompetence and dereliction of duty before and after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. A state Senate panel backs the governor.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Committee Backs Suspension Of Broward Sheriff Over 2018 School Shooting
Florida Gov. DeSantis charged Scott Israel with incompetence and dereliction of duty before and after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. A state Senate panel backs DeSantis.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Horses Have Continued To Die As New Season Begins At Santa Anita Park
The Santa Anita race track near Los Angeles is preparing for the high profile Breeders' Cup next month. But horse deaths have continued this season, despite government investigations.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Justice Department Announces Plan To Collect DNA From Migrants Crossing The Border
Immigrant advocates are denouncing the proposal, arguing that collecting genetic information of border crossers could have implications for family members residing in the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

2 Ohio Counties Reach Settlement In Lawsuit Over Opioid Epidemic
Three U.S. drug distributors and a manufacturer reached a last-minute deal with two Ohio counties Monday, avoiding what would have been the first trial in a federal case on the opioid crisis.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Nordstrom Bets On A Big NYC Store As Other Retailers Close Across U.S.
The luxury department store chain is opening a 320,000- square-foot store in Manhattan as retailers such as Barneys and Forever 21 file for bankruptcy and more competition comes from online brands.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Justice Department Proposal Would Allow Federal Agents To Collect Immigrants' DNA
The Trump administration plans to begin collecting DNA samples from asylum-seekers and other migrants detained by immigration officials, according to a filing Monday from the Justice Department.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Are Blackouts The Future For California?
Residents are wondering whether widespread power outages are the future and whether they're the only way to prevent wildfires. New technology may help prevent them if utilities are willing to invest.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Tornado Touches Down In North Texas, Destroys Houses, Churches, Commercial Buildings
Severe weather in Dallas has lead to mass power outages and business closures, but the area escaped a more devastating blow from dangerous tornadoes.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

A Tornado Struck Overnight. Now Dallas Is Assessing The Damage
Extensive structural damage was apparent by sunrise, but no fatalities or injuries have been reported, Mayor Eric Johnson said early Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

A Tornado Struck Sunday Night. Now Dallas Is Assessing The Damage
Extensive structural damage was apparent by sunrise, but no fatalities or injuries have been reported, Mayor Eric Johnson said early Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Some U.S. Troops May Remain In Northeast Syria To Protect Oil Fields
Other U.S. troops will pivot to fighting ISIS in Iraq, rather than immediately heading home. Some 300,000 people have reportedly been displaced since Turkey's offensive began.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Opioid Trial: 4 Companies Reach Tentative Settlement With Ohio Counties
Four defendants, including the three big U.S. distributors, have struck a deal with Summit and Cuyahoga counties. It doesn't resolve thousands of other lawsuits filed against the firms across the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

After Redistricting, Virginia's House Speaker Faces Tough Re-Election Bid
It was ruled that the House speaker's district was racially gerrymandered and needed to be redrawn. Now Republican Kirk Cox faces his first competitive race in 30 years.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

California Wildfire Victims Face Deadline To File Against PG&E
Monday is the deadline for victims of wildfires caused by California power company PG&E to file their claims. Only about half of those eligible for payments have already filed.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2019

Residents In Kentucky's Martin County Face Escalating Water Bills
In a rural coal region of Kentucky, moves to fix a notoriously dirty water supply have created a new crisis. Many are now unable to afford their water bills and are drinking water from other sources.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

Rudy Giuliani's Time As New York Mayor
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with journalist Bob Hennelly, who has spent years covering New York politics, about former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who is a central figure in the impeachment inquiry.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

Impeachment Inquiry: Witness Testimonies Continue This Week
More witnesses are expected to speak with lawmakers this week as part of the impeachment inquiry. One of them is the current top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, William Taylor.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

Off Script: Andrew Yang's Appeal To Undecided Voters
NPR's Noel King speaks to Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang and undecided voters, who pressed Yang on his candidacy and how he'll garner enough support for universal basic income.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

How 2 Kentucky Colleges Are Making Tuition-Free Work
A handful of colleges around the country charge zero dollars for tuition. To make the math work, they build their budgets around the concept that they won't collect revenue from students.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

Mulvaney Walks Back Ukraine Remarks, Admits It Wasn't A 'Perfect Press Conference'
The acting White House chief of staff denied what he previously said: that defense funding to Ukraine was frozen in part over the demand that Kyiv dig up dirt on Trump's political rivals.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

3 Soldiers Killed In Training Accident On Fort Stewart In Georgia
The tragic early morning training exercise also resulted in three other soldiers being hospitalized. The incident involved the Bradley Fighting Vehicle on which they were riding.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

3 Soldiers Killed In Training Accident At Fort Stewart In Georgia
The tragic early morning training exercise also resulted in three other soldiers being hospitalized. The incident involved the Bradley Fighting Vehicle on which they were riding.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

Lawyer Ben Crump On 'Open Season'
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Ben Crump, a lawyer for the families of many black Americans killed by police, about his new book Open Season: Legalized Genocide of Colored People.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

Partisan Divide Grows Over Opioid Settlement Plan
While most Republican attorneys general embrace Purdue Pharma's structured bankruptcy plan, all but two Democratic attorneys general reject it. "This is a moral issue for them," one expert says.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2019

Poll: Number Of Americans Who Favor Stricter Gun Laws Continues To Grow
The overall percentage of Americans who support tougher gun laws is on the rise, even as the partisan divide remains stark, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2019

Mayor Of Stockton, Calif., Discusses Universal Basic Income Program Results
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Michael Tubbs, mayor of Stockton, Calif., about his city's experiment with a universal basic income.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2019

Mentoring Those Who Faced Sexual Abuse
Some children who are sexually abused may turn to crime if they don't find help. A young man in Tennessee is opening up about his own abuse and the trouble that followed as a way to help others.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2019

Emmett Till Memorial Dedicated For 4th Time After Vandalism
NPR's Scott Simon talks to Patrick Weems, executive director of the Emmett Till Memorial Commission, about this weekend's rededication of a memorial sign after after the first three were vandalized.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2019

California Wants To Train Doctors To Prevent Gun Deaths
NPR's Scott Simon asks UC Davis Health psychiatrist Amy Barnhorst about training doctors to prevent gun deaths through counseling patients.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

California Can Expect Blackouts For A Decade, Says PG&E CEO
PG&E is under fire for its management of last week's planned power outages that left about 800,000 customers in the dark. CEO Bill Johnson admits the company was ill-prepared for the operation.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

Boeing Pilots Detected 737 Max Flight Control Glitch 2 Years Before Deadly Crash
One pilot messaged that the problem was "egregious" and he had "basically lied to the regulators (unknowingly)" when he had told the FAA that the flight control system was safe.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

Boeing Pilots Detected 737 Max Flight Control Glitch Two Years Before Deadly Crash
One pilot messaged that the problem was "egregious" and he had "basically lied to the regulators (unknowingly)" when he had told the FAA that the flight control system was safe.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

Opioid Case With 2 Ohio Counties As Plaintiffs Set To Go To Trial Next Week
The first federal case against the opioid industry goes to trial Monday. Some companies have settled to avoid trial, others will get their day in court.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

New Movement Along Garlock Fault Line In California Could Mean Bigger Earthquakes
The bulging of the Garlock fault line in California can be seen from space and it's moving in ways never seen before, raising the question for Californians if it raises the risk of "The Big One."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

New Orleans Will Use Explosives To Topple Cranes At Hard Rock Hotel Collapse Site
A tropical storm will bring gusty winds to the area, threatening the stability of two towering cranes that remain unstable following last weekend's disaster.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

The Long, Strange Journey Of 'Gung-Ho'
The word "gung-ho" used to mean "industrial cooperative." So, how did it come to describe that over-eager middle-schooler taking high school math? On today's edition of Word Watch, we explore.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

In Virginia, 2 Young Candidates Vie To Be First Black GOP Lawmakers In 15 Years
Since Reconstruction, Virginia has elected only two African American Republicans to the legislature. This year, two young black men are running against Democrats might change that.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

Baltimore Responds To Elijah Cummings' Death
Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Democrat from Maryland, was widely admired as a champion for his hometown of Baltimore. Residents of Baltimore react to the news of his death.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

He Traded Single Life To Be Foster 'Pop' To More Than 50 Kids
Guy Bryant has fostered dozens of children over the past 12 years. At StoryCorps, he told one of his foster kids that he wants them to pass on what they've learned from him.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

News Brief: Impeachment Inquiry Latest, Turkey Suspends Incursion, Mexico Violence
Turkey says it is suspending its incursion in Syria. We look at the reality on the ground. Also, the latest on the impeachment inquiry and violence in Mexico connected to the son of "El Chapo."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

Striking Auto Workers Vote On Agreement
Auto workers at General Motors have a tentative agreement, but it doesn't mean their strike is over.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

Mercy Corps Faces Sexual Abuse Scandal
A disturbing story of child sexual abuse: a victim is coming forward decades after alleged abuse. NPR's Steve Inskeep talks with Tania Culver Humphrey and reporter Noelle Crombie of The Oregonian.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2019

Drone Delivery Is One Step Closer To Reality
Walgreens is testing out delivery from store to door by drone in Virginia, and UPS won approval to expand air delivery of medical supplies.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

City Council Votes To Close New York's Notorious Rikers Island Jail Complex
The city expects to reduce its jail population by more than half by 2026 and plans to relocate prisoners in four smaller jails spread across the city.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

Energy Secretary Rick Perry To Resign
As the country's 14th secretary of energy, Perry leads an agency he once vowed to eliminate. He has emerged as a central figure in the impeachment inquiry of Trump.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

Nearly 50,000 General Motors Employees May Soon Be Headed Back To Work After Strike
A tentative agreement between the United Automobile Workers and General Motors will allow for the closure of three plants. Union leaders are deciding whether to put the agreement to a full vote.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

Vaping Giant Juul Settles Lawsuit, Will Not Market To Teens And Children
An environmental group sued e-cigarette maker Juul and achieved a settlement that will restrict the company's marketing practices in several ways. Plus, the latest on vaping illnesses from the CDC.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

Senators Press CFPB To Dig Into Problems With Public Service Student Loan Program
The senators urged the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to do more to examine problems with a troubled loan forgiveness program, citing an investigative story by NPR this week.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

New England Nor'easter Storm Shuts Power Off For Hundreds Of Thousands
A powerful and intense coastal storm has pummeled several states with heavy rain and strong winds, downing power lines and trees in Maine, Massachusetts and other states.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

News Brief: Pence In Turkey, Gordon Sondland Profile, Chicago Teachers
Vice President Pence is meeting with Turkey's President Erdogan in Ankara, trying to convince him to stop the assault on the Kurds in Syria. Also, a look at the history of Gordon Sondland.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

Opioid Companies Try To Reach Settlements Before Trial
Negotiations are underway as the drug industry scrambles to avoid a high profile national opioid trial set to begin on Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

Chicago Teachers Go On Strike
Chicago teachers will hit the picket line Thursday morning. The teachers' union voted to go on strike after delegates rejected the school district's contract proposals.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

4th Defendant Arrested In Alleged Campaign Contribution Scheme Linked To Giuliani
David Correia, who was listed as one of four defendants in a grand jury indictment issued last week, has surrendered to authorities after returning to New York following a trip to the Middle East.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

2 Businessmen Linked To Giuliani Plead Not Guilty In Campaign Finance Scheme
David Correia surrendered to authorities upon returning to New York after a trip to the Middle East. Andrey Kukushkin was arrested last week in California.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday
The system will detect the beginning of a quake and send out alerts warning residents that they have a few seconds to prepare for a possibly deadly temblor.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Chicago Teachers Will Go On Strike, Capping Years Of Social Justice Activism
For the second time in seven years, Chicago Public Schools teachers will be on strike starting Thursday, walking out of class, they say, in the name of better schools.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

McConnell Prepares Senate For Trump Impeachment Trial As Inquiry Escalates
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell briefed his caucus on what a Trump impeachment trial could look like in the Upper Chamber. It could last weeks, and begin after the Thanksgiving holiday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

NASA's First All-Female Spacewalk Set For Friday
Astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir will replace a faulty power regulator on the International Space Station. Only 15 women have participated in spacewalks, and all were accompanied by men.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

United Automobile Workers And General Motors Reach Tentative Agreement
The United Automobile Workers and General Motors have reached a tentative agreement that is subject to a vote by the full membership.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Doctors Faced With Tough Decisions Due To Shortage Of Drug Used To Treat Cancer
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Yoram Unguru, a hematologist and oncologist in Baltimore, about a shortage of vincristine, a drug used to treat childhood cancer.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Family 'Ambushed' By Trump's Surprise Meeting With Woman Who Caused Fatal Crash
Trump said his meeting with the parents of 19-year-old Harry Dunn "was beautiful in a certain way," before arguing that driving the wrong way in Europe "happens to a lot of people."

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