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NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

U.S. Blocks Downloads of TikTok, WeChat, Starting Sunday
The Commerce Department says it will ban all U.S. business transactions with Chinese-owned apps WeChat and TikTok. The parent company ByteDance is under pressure to sell TikTok to a U.S. company.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Breonna Taylor's Mother: 'I Won't Go Away. I'll Still Fight'
Tamika Palmer says she wants the officers who killed her daughter to be charged. "Even in the very beginning of this year, she kept saying 2020 was her year," she said. "And she was absolutely right."

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Breonna Taylor's Mom Reflects On Settlement For Her Daughter's Wrongful Death Suit
Breonna Taylor's mother Tamika Palmer and her lawyer Lonita Baker speak with NPR's Rachel Martin about the settlement they received in the wrongful death of Taylor.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

COVID-19 Medications Are In Development, But A True Cure Would Likely Take Years
Most drugs don't actually cure diseases. They can help ease symptoms and up the odds of survival. This will likely be true for COVID-19 drugs. A true cure would likely take years to develop.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Navy Fighter Pilot Program Fines Students For 'Topgun' Quotes
Many Topgun trainees are fans of Tom Cruise's classic film. However, expressing their passion for the film has consequences at the elite Navy fighter pilot program.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Dania Beach Florida Gets New Sign In Wrong Town
Dania Beach, Florida's bright new sign beautifully shows off the town's slogan. The only problem? It was placed just over the border in the neighboring town.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

'We Do Belong Here': Father Teaches Daughter To Have Black Pride
For StoryCorps, Erin Haggerty spoke with her father, George Barlow, about how his words saw her through the tough times she faced as one of the only Black kids in her Iowa City community.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

News Brief: Trump's 'Patriotic' Curriculum, Voter Misinformation, German Gas Pipeline
President Trump announced a commission to promote "patriotic" education. Latino voters in Florida face election misinformation. And, Germany tries to save the development of a gas pipeline.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Oregon Inmates Evacuate Amid Wildfires
Oregon has evacuated more than 2,500 prison inmates due to wildfires. The experience was harrowing, families say, as inmates faced unsanitary and unsafe conditions.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Trump Administration's New Natural Gas Transportation Rule Sparks Safety Concerns
The Trump administration is now allowing liquefied natural gas to be transported by rail anywhere in the country, including major cities. Critics worry about accidents and catastrophic explosions.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Trump Announces 'Patriotic Education' Commission
At the White House Conference, President Trump said history teachers' focus on slavery has taught children to hate their country and announced a national commission to promote "patriotic" education.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Sunday The Emmys, But First The Deggys
NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans tells us who he thinks should win the 72nd Primetime Emmy Awards with his own prize he calls The Deggys.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Rabbis Share How Rosh Hashanah Will Be Affected By COVID-19
The Jewish High Holidays begin tonight with the celebration of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Rabbis share how their sermons will be shaped by this year's events.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Wildfires Threaten Historic Mt. Wilson Observatory
Fire threatened the Mt. Wilson Observatory near Los Angeles. It's one of the most important observatories in the first half of the 20th century, home to the 100-inch Hooker telescope.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Lego Fans Tricked By Counterfeit Kits
Discontinued Lego sets can be worth a lot of money. Counterfeit Lego kits, made illegally in China, are scamming collectors.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

How Alabama And Florida Are Faring After Hurricane Sally
It's been several days since Hurricane Sally hit the northern Gulf coast. Sally was less powerful than past hurricanes, but still caused a slew of damage.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Florida Voters Face Election Misinformation
Latino voters in the swing state of Fla. are seeing a barrage of alarming messages about the election on WhatsApp and Facebook — misinformation that some fear could influence the election's outcome.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

Germany Reportedly Offered U.S. $1 Billion To Save Russian Pipeline
Germany reportedly offered to build $1 billion worth of infrastructure to import American gas if the U.S. lifts sanctions on a controversial pipeline that would carry Russian gas to Germany.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 18, 2020

COVID-19 May Have A More Serious Impact On Formerly Redlined Communities
The first national-level study reveals public health consequences still persist from the "redlining" of neighborhoods in the 1930s.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

President Trump Contradicts Head Of CDC Regarding Vaccine, Masks
Trump says a COVID-19 vaccine could be ready by the end of 2020. At the same time, the top communications official at Health and Human Services is going on leave after comments he made on Facebook.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

Hurricane Sally Hit Gulf Shores, Ala., With 25 Inches Of Rain
NPR's David Greene talks to meteorologist Marshall Shepherd, professor of Geography and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Georgia, about Hurricane Sally's tremendous amount of rain.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

Daughter's Tweet Helps Boost Sales For Her Dad's Taco Truck In Texas
Pandemic business was so bad that Elias Aviles had only sold $6 of food that day. But the next morning when he got to his truck, there was already a line. People had seen Giselle Aviles' tweet.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

McDonald's Runs Low On Ingredients For Travis Scott Quarter Pounder
The fast food chain's Travis Scott meal is just a Quarter Pounder with the rapper's favorites: cheese, bacon, lettuce, fries, BBQ sauce and a Sprite. The cost is $6.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

Hundreds Rescued In Pensacola After Catastrophic Flooding
In Florida, the area around Pensacola is dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Sally. Forecasters say the storm surge was the third worst ever to hit the city.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

News Brief: COVID-19 Vaccine, HHS Spokesman, Hurricane Aftermath
Contradicting CDC, Trump says COVID-19 vaccine could be ready by the end of 2020. A top HHS official is on leave after accusing government scientists of sedition. And, Sally brings torrential rain.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

How Democrat Joe Biden's Catholic Faith Shaped His Life, Politics
Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden's faith is central to how he sees the world. How does his Catholicism affect his politcs?

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

High Schoolers Cross State Lines For An Opportunity To Play Football
Seeking potential college scholarships, some high school football players are moving to states that are playing the game because their local school boards have banned play due to the pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

College Newspapers Aim To Keep Schools Transparent During Pandemic
NPR's David Greene talks to two student newspaper editors-in-chief — Ivan Jackson and Anna Pogarcic about what it's like to cover COVID-19 outbreaks at their respective universities.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

'Scientific American' Breaks 175 Years Of Tradition, Endorses A Presidential Nominee
Laura Helmuth of Scientific American says the decision to break tradition was both unanimous and quick: "We took this decision very seriously. You don't give up 175 years of tradition for nothing."

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

'Scientific American' Breaks Tradition, Endorses A Presidential Candidate
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Laura Helmuth of Scientific American about the magazine endorsing Joe Biden for president. It's the first presidential endorsement in the magazine's 175-year history.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

As Oregon Wildfires Burn, Some Evacuees Are Returning Home
Firefighters are making progress against wildfires in the state. Some residents are slowly being allowed to return to their homes and businesses after wildfires swept through their area.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

Sally Downgraded To A Tropical Storm But Still Producing Major Rainfall
Residents and officials in Gulf Shores, Ala., and Pensacola, Fla., are taking stock after Hurricane Sally. The storm brought a tremendous amount of rain with it — causing extreme flooding conditions.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

States That Border West Coast Wildfires Close Schools Because Of Smoke
Idaho and Montana frequently battle big wildfires this time of year. But this season their biggest challenge is smoke from West Coast fires that has led to shutting down schools and other problems.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

Swiss Referendum Considers Canceling Freedom Of Movement With EU
Switzerland will vote this month on whether to end freedom of movement with the European Union. If it passes, it could destroy the country's close relationship with the EU.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

Wis. Law Requires Investigation Before Officer Can Be Charged In Shooting
It's almost a month since Jacob Blake was shot by a police officer in Kenosha, Wis. As the community seeks answers, the officer has not yet been charged with a crime.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

Why More Shofar Blowers Are Needed To Celebrate Jewish New Year
To help people celebrate a socially distanced Jewish New Year, there are free courses in Israel teaching how to blow the shofar — the ritual ram or antelope horn.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 17, 2020

Yusuf Revisits 'Tea For The Tillerman,' His Landmark Album As Cat Stevens
Known as Yusuf since becoming a Muslim in the late '70s, the man who was Cat Stevens discusses Tea for the Tillerman 2, a reimagining of his now-50-year-old masterpiece.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Big Ten Reverses Decision To Cancel Football Season
David Greene talks with sports columnist Christine Brennan about the decision by the Big Ten conference to play its season beginning in late October amid the coronavirus pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Hurricane Sally Makes Landfall Near Gulf Shores, Ala.
Sally came ashore as a Category 2 hurricane, pushing a surge of ocean water onto the coast and dumping torrential rain. Forecasters expect the storm to cause dangerous flooding.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Japan's Parliament Picks Suga To Succeed Abe As Prime Minister
Yoshihide Suga, 71, was voted in as the country's next leader. Suga was outgoing Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's right-hand man, and is generally seen as an uncharismatic technocrat.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

California Aims To Add Housing Away From Wildland Urban Interface
NPR's David Greene talks to Wade Crowfoot, California's secretary of Natural Resources, about this year's wildfire season, and what can be done to prevent or control them.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Climate Change Is Not The Only Reason For Record Wildfires
Climate change is exacerbating the severity of the wildfires on the West Coast, but prior and current forest management decisions, and politics, also play a huge role.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Walls And Ceiling Of Florida Condo Are Covered With Beer Cans
From the outside it looks like any condo. But scroll through the real estate listing, and you'll see the inside is wallpapered with beer cans. And not just any beer — the king of beers: Budweiser.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Malaysia Man Discovers Who Snapped Photos With His Lost Phone
The man was in for a surprise when he found his phone in the jungle behind his house. He tells the BBC that the phone has selfies of a monkey and a video of it trying to eat the phone.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes
An investigation into the troubled plane's development and certification finds a "disturbing pattern" of Boeing design flaws, management failures and "grossly insufficient oversight by the FAA."

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

College Towns Welcome Students Back But Worry COVID-19 Tags Along
College towns depend on business from the students that attend the school. In places like Ann Arbor, Mich., residents are nervous about returning students bringing the coronavirus with them.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Breonna Taylor's Family Settles With Louisville Over Wrongful Death Suit
Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced the city has agreed to pay $12 million to the family of Breonna Taylor in a wrongful death lawsuit. Police shot and killed the 26-year-old Black woman in March.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

As Renters Accumulate Housing Bills, Can An Eviction Tsunami Be Held Off?
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks with Michelle Singletary — personal finance columnist for The Washington Post — about the widespread risk of evictions due to job loss amid the pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

News Brief: PPE Shortages, ICE Whistleblower, 737 Max Report
The U.S. still doesn't have enough personal protective equipment. A nurse blows the whistle on an ICE detention center in Georgia. And, lawmakers are out with a damning report on Boeing and the FAA.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Indigo Girls' New Song Is About Patience And Fortitude In The COVID-19 Era
Amy Ray and Emily Saliers rarely write together, but the unique challenges of the pandemic inspired the veteran folk-rockers to try true collaboration for the first time in years.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

West Coast Wildfires Disrupt Life Even In Areas Far From Flames
Poor air quality from West Coast wildfires have interfered with life across the region. In Los Angeles, street vendors were forced inside and parents scrambled to prevent children's asthma attacks.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Whistleblower In Georgia Claims High Number Of Hysterectomies At ICE Facility
Democratic lawmakers want an investigation after a nurse alleged medical neglect and questionable hysterectomies of ICE detainees at an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in Georgia.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Transitioning To Online Learning Is Tough For Students With Disabilities
Two students with special needs share their excitement and fears for what will be a very different year at school. For students with disabilities, adjusting to constant change is more complicated.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

NPR Probes Why Personal Protective Equipment Is Still In Short Supply
Six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. still isn't making enough N95 masks and other PPE to satisfy soaring demand. Smaller domestic manufacturers could help, but they're wary of the risk.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Parents Keep Children Home As China Limits Mongolian Language In The Classroom
As it has long done with the Tibetan and Uighur languages, Beijing is reducing instruction in Mongolian in favor of Mandarin Chinese in ethnic Mongolian areas of the country.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Poll: Pandemic Worsens Minorities Income And Savings
Besides being hit hard by the pandemic health-wise, a poll by NPR and other organizations finds that the coronavirus has taken a bigger financial toll on minority communities.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 16, 2020

Poll: Pandemic Worsens Minorities' Income And Savings
Besides being hit hard by the pandemic health-wise, a poll by NPR and other organizations finds that the coronavirus has taken a bigger financial toll on minority communities.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Hastings Writes About Netflix's Cultural Reinvention In 'No Rules Rules'
Netflix added 26 million subscribers so far this year. Reed Hastings co-founder and CEO of the streaming service credits the company's unorthodox office culture for its meteoric rise.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

WHO: Once COVID-19 Case Numbers Go Down, Don't Let Up Precautions
As the world nears 1 million deaths from the pandemic, NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Dr. Margaret Harris of the World Health Organization about what's ahead in the fight against the coronavirus.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

'Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air' Mansion Is Available To Rent On Airbnb
Actor Will Smith posted about the offer on his Instagram page. The show used only exterior shots of the manor — with its iconic columns and stately driveway. The show turned 30 this month.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Grohl Ups His Game In Drum Battle With 10-Year-Old Opponent
Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl wrote and performed a new song dedicated to Nandi Bushell, who first challenged him last month with a cover of the Foo Fighters' song "Everlong."

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Hurricane Warnings Are Up From Southeast Louisiana To Florida's Panhandle
Hurricane Sally is projected to hit somewhere along the Gulf Coast. Residents and businesses in Orange Beach, Ala., are preparing for the storm's heavy rains and strong winds.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

News Brief: Trump Denies Climate Change, Latest Hurricane, Israel-Arab Relations
In California, President Trump is pressed on climate change. Gulf Coast communities brace for Hurricane Sally. And, Israel is set to sign deals opening formal relations with two Arab nations.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Learning Curve: Daily Life Is A Logistical Challenge For Atlanta Mom
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Fairrah Newsome Jackson, an Atlanta mom juggling her job with school for one of her daughters, for our series examining how COVID-19 is changing education.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Macron's Burst Of Global Activity Isn't Boosting His Popularity At Home
French President Emmanuel Macron has been engaged in a flurry of international diplomacy in recent weeks. Analysts say he is looking to give France a larger role on the world stage.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

'If Then' Examines Early Fears That Computers Would Manipulate Voters
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Jill Lepore about her latest book If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future. Her acclaimed books include These Truths, a history of the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Court: Government Can End Protections For Some 300,000 Immigrants
A federal appeals court dealt a setback to some immigrants living in the U.S. under protected status, ruling the administration can proceed with plans to send them back to their countries.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

For 'Ike,' A Monument Unlike Any Other: Eisenhower Memorial Is Dedicated In D.C.
A new memorial to President Dwight D. Eisenhower will be dedicated just off the National Mall on Sept. 17. It was designed by renowned architect Frank Gehry, but faced an uphill battle for approval.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

With Signing, White House Touts Efforts To Reshape Middle East
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the foreign ministers of the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain will establish diplomatic relations in a formal signing at the White House on Tuesday.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

With Theaters Still Closed, 136-Year-Old 'Playbill' Does A Quick Online Pivot
The magazine given out at theaters isn't just a program, it's a cherished souvenir. The publication has doubled down on its digital offerings, and to almost everyone's surprise, it's doing quite well.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Wildfire Refugees Spent 2 Weeks Housed At Santa Cruz Baptist Church
NPR's David Greene talks to Drew Cunningham, lead pastor of the Santa Cruz Baptist Church, which took in families seeking refuge from the CZU Lightning Complex fire in Northern California.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Wyoming Doubles Down On Its Long Support For Carbon Capture
The country's largest coal producing state is desperate to keep the struggling industry going. Wyoming is investing big to try to clean up coal's carbon emissions, even as many say it's too late.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 15, 2020

Visiting California Fires, President Trump Denies Climate Change
Trump declined to acknowledge the role climate change likely plays in fueling the flames. In Delaware, Democratic challenger Joe Biden addressed the disasters' links to human-caused climate change.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

In Florida, Schools Under Pressure To Get Rid Of Police Officers
The demands by student activists face what could be an insurmountable obstacle: security fears in the aftermath of the Parkland shooting.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Oregon Wildfires Continue To Consume Land, Firefighters' Attention
There are many fires spread out across the state, and tens of thousands of people have been evacuated. Two of the biggest fires that are threatening areas near Portland are raging unchecked.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Abraham Lincoln Artifacts Sell For More Than $81,000 At Auction
A lock of Abraham Lincoln's hair along with a blood-stained telegram about his 1865 assassination have been sold. No information about the buyer was disclosed.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Alphorns Are The Perfect Instrument For Social Distancing
The large wooden horns which are traditional in the Alps can be more than 10 feet in length. Over the weekend, professionals serenaded the German city of Dresden from the top of an apartment building.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

As Auto Industry Roars Back, Worker Shortages Throw Up Roadblocks
The U.S. auto industry has an absenteeism problem. The word might bring to mind people playing hooky, but during a pandemic there are lots of good reasons people might not show up to work.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

ByteDance Rejects Offers For TikTok's U.S. Operations
With its deadline to sell or be banned in the U.S. fast approaching, Chinese tech giant ByteDance said it will not sell TikTok to either Microsoft or Oracle. That's according to China state TV.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Greece Criticized For Policies Toward Refugees Housed On Island Of Lesbos
For an update on how Greece is responding to last week's massive fires at a refugee camp, NPR's David Greene talks to Faris Al-Jawad of Doctors Without Borders.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

News Brief: Wildfires, Woodward's 'Rage,' Voters In Pa. County Speak Out
Wildfires burn millions of acres in California, Oregon and Washington. Bob Woodward addresses criticism that he should've detailed Trump comments earlier. And, we hear from voters in Erie County, Pa.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Israel Imposes 2nd Nationwide Lockdown As COVID-19 Cases Skyrocket
Israel has announced it will launch another national lockdown after severe coronavirus infections began rising. The new restrictions begin on Friday.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

It's Real, It's Fiction, It's A Paradox: Ayad Akhtar On His 'Homeland Elegies'
The narrator's name in the novel is also Ayad Akhtar, and the book reads like memoir. Akhtar says he had to "pilfer" from his own life to write a novel that had the "addictive thrill" of reality TV.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Swing Voters In Northwestern Pennsylvania Weigh In On Fall Election
President Trump unexpectedly won Erie county in 2016. As the nation's attention turns to key swing regions in the country, voters there feel the pressure.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

U.K. Government Enforces New Coronavirus Restrictions
A surge in the number of reported cases of COVID-19 in the United Kingdom has led to new constraints. Among other rules, more than six people will be forbidden to gather — indoors or out.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Woodward Criticized For Not Publishing Trump Revelations Sooner
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Bob Woodward about his new book: Rage. Woodward documents that President Trump was aware of how lethal the coronavirus was, well before he let on in public.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Despite A New Federal Ban, Many Renters Are Still Getting Evicted
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ordered a nationwide eviction ban for people who can't pay rent and have no place to go. It's helping some, but many others are getting evicted anyway.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 14, 2020

Biden Pledges To Dismantle Trump's Sweeping Immigration Changes — But Can He Do That?
The Trump administration has undertaken more than 400 executive actions on immigration, according to the Migration Policy Institute. Biden vows to roll back many policies — but faces obstacles.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 12, 2020

A COVID-19 Vaccine May Be Only 50% Effective. Is That Good Enough?
Scientists are racing to develop a vaccine that proves "safe and effective." It may not prevent infection in everyone who gets it, but it still could eventually stop the pandemic. Here's how.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

How Climate Change Affects Wildfires
Wildfires have burned in six states on the west coast. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Char Miller, Director of Environmental Analysis at Pomona College about the the fires and climate change.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

Postcard Finally Arrives In Mail 100 Years Later
Brittany Keech found a postcard in her mailbox recently. The card was addressed to her cousins, and originally mailed out in 1920.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

Alligator Pool Floatie Surprises Florida Couple
When a Sheriff's deputy responded to a call about an alligator on a roof, he didn't expect the animal to be a pool accessory.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

How The Pandemic Has Affected The Latino Community In L.A.
The latest NPR poll finds 70 percent of Latinos in Los Angeles have experienced serious financial problems because of the job losses and other economic impacts during the pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

Hangover From Alcohol Boom Could Last Long After Pandemic Ends
Americans are drinking far more during the COVID-19 pandemic. A beer in the evening can feel like a taste of normal life, but health experts worry about alcohol's deadly side-effects.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

Keeping Up With Amanda Jones, Score Composer On The Rise
Jones is the first African American woman ever nominated for an Emmy for an original television score. She got her start because producer/writer Lena Waithe took a chance on her.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

Microsoft Warns Russian Spies Who Hacked 2016 Election Are Back
Microsoft says it found the Russian spies who hacked the 2016 election, and they are targeting political parties again. The company says more than 200 organizations have been targeted since 2019

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

News Brief: U.S. Wildfires, Coronavirus Relief Bill, Russian Election Hackers
Fires continue to rage in the West Coast. The Senate failed to advance another COVID-19 relief bill. And, Microsoft says the Russian hackers who disrupted the 2016 election are back.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

Parts Of America See Housing Boom During The COVID-19 Pandemic
The lopsided housing market reflects two Americas: one living in booming "Zoom Towns" and one on the brink of eviction.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

Philippine President Pardons U.S. Marine In Killing Of Transgender Woman
In the Philippines, the surprise pardon of a US Marine convicted of killing a transgender woman has stirred old resentments about preferential treatment for American forces who run afoul of the law.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 11, 2020

Two Sets Of Elephant Twins Born Amid Elephant Baby Boom In Kenya
With good rains for the past two years in Kenya, Amboseli National Park has seen an elephant baby boom, including two rare sets of twins.

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