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NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

Man Treks 1,000 Miles From Alabama To Minnesota For 'Change, Justice And Equality'
Cheered on by supporters both online and on the road, Terry Willis walked from Huntsville, Ala., to the site of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis to protest the injustices faced by Black Americans.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

Florida Shatters U.S. Record In Largest Single-Day Increase In COVID-19 Cases
Florida reported the largest one-day increase in COVID-19 cases of any state, with more than 15,000 people testing positive.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

Scathing Obit Blaming Politicians For Father's COVID-19 Death 'Hit A Nerve'
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Kristin Urquiza, whose father died due to COVID-19, about the obituary she wrote for him, which is a scathing indictment of politician's failures to control the virus.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

Tallahassee Mayor On Florida's Record Single-Day COVID-19 Increase
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with John Dailey, the mayor of Tallahassee, about the record-setting number of cases reported in Florida on Sunday and how his city is dealing with the surge.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

When Schools Reopen, Grandparent Caregiver's Safest Choice Is Homeschooling
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Keith Lowhorne, a caregiver to his three young grandchildren, about the possibility of schools reopening in the fall amid the coronavirus pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

Florida Smashes U.S. State Record Of Daily New Cases: More Than 15,200
Gov. Ron DeSantis has not ordered a statewide mask mandate, even as coronavirus cases set new records in Florida. Some local officials have imposed their own restrictions to try to slow the spread.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

Roger Stone Clemency Latest Example Of Trump Rewarding His Friends, Scholars Say
The Founding Fathers intended the presidential pardon power to protect the national interest. Leading clemency experts question Trump's use of his authority.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

Immigrant Mom Must Return To Mexico - With Or Without Her Newborn Child
Border Patrol agents gave one asylum seeker who crossed the southern border a choice: Turn her U.S.-born baby over to child services here and leave the country, or return to Mexico with her child.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 12, 2020

Richmond, Va., Photographer Watches Familiar Anger Resurface In Recent Protests
Regina Boone has been documenting the protests against Confederate statues for the Richmond Free Press. As the daughter of the paper's Black founders, she says, "This is not a new story for us."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

Coronavirus Outbreak Hits Mississippi Legislature
At least 26 members of Mississippi's legislature have tested positive for COVID-19. After lawmakers returned to session in May, safety precautions at the Capitol gradually slipped.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

Trump Wears Mask In Public For First Time During Walter Reed Visit
"I love masks in the appropriate locations," Trump said Saturday. The president's frequent refusal to wear a face covering has stoked controversy, especially as coronavirus cases rise across the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

Cities Divert Police Budget Funds To Youth Summer Jobs
Some cities are shifting money from police budgets into summer youth jobs programs. A new challenge is adapting them to be safe during the coronavirus pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

San Antonio Pre-K Program Seeks To Fix Achievement Gap
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Sarah Baray, CEO of "Pre-K for SA," about the importance of early learning programs in mitigating education inequality.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

Left To Enforce Local Mandates, Front-Line Retail Workers Face Threats
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Rachel Michelin, the president and CEO of the California Retailers Association, about the role of retail workers in enforcing masks within their stores.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

Masks And Mouse Ears: Disney World Reopens As Coronavirus Cases Climb In Florida
After 117 days being closed, Disney World welcomed guests back to its Magic Kingdom and Animal Kingdom parks. Masks and temperature checks were required, as well as advance reservations.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

A Phoenix Nonprofit Opens Up A Hotel To Homeless Coronavirus Patients
Scott Simon speaks with Thomas Salts, one of the COVID-19 patients treated and cared for in a Phoenix hotel by Circle the City, a group providing care and services to people experiencing homelessness.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

The Latest On Several Violent Weekends In Chicago
At least seventeen people have been shot in Chicago just since yesterday afternoon - the latest in a string of violent weekends for the city.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 11, 2020

The Racial Justice Reckoning Over Sports Team Names Is Spreading
In the wake of George Floyd's killing, Confederate monuments have fallen, food companies have scrubbed racist imagery from labels, and now, pro sports teams names are under fresh review.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Trump Says Upcoming Immigration Measure Will Include DACA
In an interview with Noticias Telemundo, Trump made a series of seemingly conflicting comments about his next steps.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

President Trump Commutes Roger Stone's Sentence
President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of Roger Stone. Stone was convicted of lying to Congress about his efforts to contact WikiLeaks during Russia's interference in the 2016 election.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Georgia Governor And The Mayor Of Atlanta In Turf War Over COVID-19 Restrictions
Amid a surge in coronavirus cases, Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms ordered a return to Phase 1 restrictions. But Gov. Brian Kemp quickly pushed back, saying only he has that authority.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

3 LAPD Officers Charged Over Allegations They Falsely Identified Gang Members
In a 59-count complaint, they are alleged to have wrongly marked dozens of people as having gang affiliation on field interview cards used by officers on duty.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

President Trump Says He Is Planning To Sign 'A Very Major Immigration Bill'
President Trump in a Friday interview on Telemundo said that soon he may introduce new measures to protect "Dreamers" — people who were brought to the U.S. as children by undocumented parents.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

'In A Fight For Our Lives': Mississippi Issues New Mask Order Amid COVID Spike
Gov. Tate Reeves imposed the order in 13 counties, including those that are home to some of the state's most populous cities. It comes on the same day the state saw more than 1,000 new cases.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

'In A Fight For Our Lives': Mississippi Issues New Mask Order Amid COVID-19 Spike
Gov. Tate Reeves imposes the order in 13 counties, including those that are home to some of the state's most populous cities. It comes on the same day the state saw more than 1,000 new cases.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Denver School Principal On How Black Students Led Swift Changes To History Curriculum
Kimberly Grayson took her high schoolers to the African American history museum in D.C. When students pressed their white teachers to take the same trip, a revised history curriculum quickly followed.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

California Will Release Up To 8,000 Prisoners Due To Coronavirus
Anyone who is eligible for release will be tested for COVID-19 within seven days of their return to society, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation says.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Key Takeaways From Supreme Court Term
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with lawyer and SCOTUSblog publisher Tom Goldstein and NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg about the decisions reached by the U.S. Supreme Court this term.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Large Minneapolis Homeless Encampment Concerns Officials
A homeless encampment in Minneapolis has grown to 550 tents after officials had legalized camping. The camp is causing concerns as crime and assaults make the city rethink the ambitious plan.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Why Memes Around Breonna Taylor's Death Are Not Doing Her Story Any Justice
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with pop culture critic Cate Young about the proliferation of memes around Breonna Taylor's death and how many disregard Taylor and her story.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Union Leader On Why Kids Should Not Be Back In Classrooms This Fall
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Cecily Myart-Cruz, president of United Teachers Los Angeles, about why her union is against reopening public schools in the fall.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Reporter On Catholic Church Getting Over $1 Billion In Coronavirus Aid
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Michael Rezendes of The Associated Press on its investigation into the U.S. Roman Catholic Church receiving over $1 billion in coronavirus aid.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Black Lives Matter Protesters March To Rap Songs By Local Heroes
Some of the songs being played during the Black Lives Matter protests in the U.S. aren't overtly political. Instead, they're rap songs by local heroes — songs celebrating being Black.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

'Who Does This To A Kid?' D.C. Family Mourns 11-Year-Old Killed By Crossfire
Davon McNeal was one of several children killed by gun violence over the July Fourth weekend while doing everyday things: playing in the yard, walking through a mall, watching fireworks.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Goya Foods CEO's Praise Of Trump Causes Backlash Among Latino Communities
There are growing calls among Latino communities to boycott Goya Foods — one of the most ubiquitous brands in Latino kitchens — after the company's CEO praised President Trump.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Experts Worry About Arizona Health Care System As State's Hospitals Near Capacity
Arizona hospitals are now reaching capacity — some have to send patients to other states. Many experts are concerned the health care system could soon crumble under pressure.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Nearly Every Major League Baseball Team Has Had A Coronavirus Test Come Back Positive
So far, 71 players have tested positive for the coronavirus, the MLB said on Friday. "I'm actually kind of pleased it's as low as that," the league's medical director says.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

More Than 20 U.S. States Now Require Face Masks In Public
An alarming surge in coronavirus cases is forcing more states to require face coverings. Two of the worst-hit states — Florida and Arizona — still don't have statewide mandates.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

At Least 82 Coronavirus Cases Linked To Missouri Sleepaway Camp
Kanakuk Kamps shut down its K-2 program after 41 campers, staff and counselors tested positive. That number has since doubled, according to county health officials.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

In Minority Neighborhoods, Knocking On Doors To Stop The Spread Of The Coronavirus
Through a partnership between state and local government, volunteers and city workers in Richmond, Va., are passing out PPE in at-risk neighborhoods.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Martha Minow: How Can Restorative Justice Create A More Equitable Legal System?
Our justice system is flawed and inequitable, says Harvard law professor Martha Minow. She calls for a reset to emphasize accountability, apology, and service, rather than punitive punishment.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Brent Leggs: How Can Seeing Black History As American History Begin To Make Amends?
How can we make amends for the atrocities of slavery and segregation? Historian and preservationist Brent Leggs discusses one step in confronting the past: preserving African American historic sites.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

Federal Government Will Resume Executions
Federal executions are scheduled to resume after nearly 20 years. Three inmates are scheduled to be put to death at a prison in Indiana.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

'It Was Personal.' After Tragedy, Physicist Devotes Career To Cancer Research
Hadiyah-Nicole Green lost the aunt and uncle who raised her to cancer. The loss inspired her to develop a cancer treatment using lasers. "I was born to do this," she tells her cousin at StoryCorps.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

News Brief: California COVID-19 Surge, Trump And Biden Campaign, SCOTUS Ruling
California is seeing a surge in COVID-19 cases. Trump and Biden are focusing on the economy in their campaigns. And, a SCOTUS ruling has big implications for Native Americans.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 10, 2020

OffLimits Cereal Brand Launches With Female Mascot
The author of the book Breakfast has launched a new cereal brand called OffLimits, using a fictional female mascot named Dash for one of the flavors. And her OffLimits team is all female.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Police Viewed Less Favorably, But Few Want To 'Defund' Them, Survey Finds
A poll conducted in mid-June found that most respondents thought police officers should be held legally accountable for misconduct. But few respondents favored cutting funding for law enforcement.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

#Goyaway: Calls To Boycott Goya Foods After CEO Praises President Trump
Speaking at the White House Thursday, the CEO of Goya Foods praised the president as a "builder."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Supreme Court Rules That About Half Of Oklahoma Is Indian Land
"Today we are asked whether the land these treaties promised remains an Indian reservation. ... Because Congress has not said otherwise, we hold the government to its word," wrote Justice Gorsuch.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Supreme Court Rules That About Half Of Oklahoma Is Native American Land
"Today we are asked whether the land these treaties promised remains an Indian reservation. ... Because Congress has not said otherwise, we hold the government to its word," wrote Justice Gorsuch.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Death Of Robert Fuller, Who Was Found Hanging From Tree, Ruled Suicide
Fuller's death on June 10 was initially ruled a suicide, but that conclusion outraged his family, who insisted that he would not take his own life.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Columbia University President On New ICE Regulations Regarding International Students
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Lee Bollinger, president of Columbia University, about new regulations regarding international students released Monday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Esper And Milley Testify On Military's Role In Handling Recent Protests
Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley appeared before a House panel Thursday to talk about the role of the National Guard during recent protests.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

'Silent Screams': Will U.S. Amusement Parks Ban Screaming On Roller Coasters?
Japanese amusement parks have banned screaming on roller coasters in an attempt to stop the spread of the coronavirus. NPR asks U.S. amusement parks whether they will impose the same rules.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Pet Owners Struggling To Reunite With Their Furry Family Members Amid The Pandemic
Border closures due to the pandemic have kept many people apart from their relatives for months. Others had to face separation from a different kind of family — their pets.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Is It Enough To Remove Words With Racist Connotations From Tech Language? Hint: No
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Web developer Caroline Karanja about how the terms "master" and "slave" are used in the industry and how they reflect a bigger issue in U.S. culture.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Who Is Keisha Lance Bottoms, One Of Biden's Potential Running Mates?
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has raised her national profile amid the pandemic and protests against racism. That exposure has landed her on Joe Biden's list of potential running mates.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Trump Says The Supreme Court Rulings On His Tax Records Are 'Not Fair'
President Trump complained the Supreme Court rulings that prevent him from blocking access to his tax returns were "not fair" — even though they are unlikely to be released before Election Day.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

What A Supreme Court Ruling Means For Native Americans And Oklahoma
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with journalist Rebecca Nagle about Thursday's Supreme Court ruling that much of eastern Oklahoma falls within an Indian reservation.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Joe Biden Lays Out His Economic Recovery Plan
Presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden unveiled his economic recovery plan Thursday. He outlined steps for immediate relief, with a focus on mobilizing manufacturing in the United States.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

National Institutes Of Health Chief Gives Update On The Coronavirus In The U.S.
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Dr. Francis Collins, the National Institutes of Health director, about the surge in coronavirus cases, the reopening of schools this fall and the race for a vaccine.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Rep. Maxine Waters On The Supreme Court Rulings On Trump's Tax Records
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters about the Supreme Court rulings on subpoenas seeking President Trump's pre-presidential financial records.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Cameo Celebrity App: Will Birthday Wishes From Snoop Dogg Mean A Big Investor Payday?
Cameo has become one of the fastest-growing tech startups by letting anyone pay for birthday wishes and other greetings recorded by celebrities and influencers. But will its Silicon Valley hype last?

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

5 People Arrested In Killing Of Rapper Pop Smoke, LA Police Say
Three men and two juvenile males have been arrested in connection with the rapper's death in February, the Los Angeles Police Department announced.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Some People Agree To Disagree Over What's Safe During The Pandemic
The coronavirus pandemic requires people to weigh risks and make choices about their activities. But there can be problems when a choice conflicts with what the people around us decide to do.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

NYC Begins Painting Black Lives Matter Mural In Front Of Trump Tower
President Trump derided the mural plan last week, saying it would be "denigrating this luxury Avenue" and antagonize the city's police as "a symbol of hate."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

What The Case Looks Like For Trump After SCOTUS Ruling On His Tax Returns
David Greene speaks with Loyola University law professor Jessica Levinson about the Supreme Court's ruling on two cases that deal with President Trump's taxes.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Supreme Court Rules On Two Key Cases In Battle For Trump's Taxes
The Supreme Court ruled on two key cases that deal with President Trump's financial records and whether they can be subpoened by Congress and a New York grand jury.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Trump Not 'Immune' From Releasing Tax Returns, Supreme Court Rules
David Greene talks with constitutional lawyer Kim Wehle about the Supreme Court rulings on President Trump's tax returns.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

'STOP GETTING Tested!' Ohio Politician Tells Constituents
"This is what happens when people go crazy and get tested," Ohio state Rep. Nino Vitale wrote on social media.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

'STOP GETTING TESTED' For Coronavirus, Ohio Politician Tells Constituents
"This is what happens when people go crazy and get tested," Ohio state Rep. Nino Vitale wrote on social media.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

'We Were Treated Worse Than Animals': Disaster Recovery Workers Confront COVID-19
Disaster recovery workers cleaning up after major flooding in Michigan tested positive for the coronavirus. The outbreak shined a light on working conditions in the fast-growing industry.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Supreme Court To Rule On Trump Tax Records
The Supreme Court prepares to end a blockbuster term, and decisions on whether Congress and a New York grand jury can access President Trump's tax and financial information loom.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 09, 2020

Yale Library To Release Large Collection Of Materials From Frederick Douglass
The Beinecke Library of Yale University will make public the largest known collection of material related to Frederick Douglass, including scrapbooks, newspaper clippings, and letters.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Census Bureau Expands Early Door Knocking For Count To 6 More States
Despite the pandemic, Census Bureau officials say they've determined it's safe enough for visits to unresponsive homes in parts of Connecticut, Indiana, Kansas, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Police Bodycam Transcripts: George Floyd Pleaded 20 Times That He Couldn't Breathe
Filed as part of a motion to dismiss charges against one of the officers, the transcripts also appear to show an officer expressing concern about Floyd's well-being in the moments before his death.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Transcripts Of Police Body Cams Show Floyd Pleaded 20 Times That He Couldn't Breathe
Filed as part of a motion to dismiss charges against one of the officers, the transcripts also appear to show an officer expressing concern about Floyd's well-being in the moments before his death.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Georgia Congressman Asks DOJ To Investigate DA Handling Rayshard Brooks Case
Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., wants the Fulton County District Attorney investigated for "egregious abuse of power." Collins is running for a U.S. Senate seat in the fall.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Ga. Congressman Calls For Investigation Of Black DA Handling Rayshard Brooks Case
Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., wants Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard investigated for "egregious abuse of power." Collins is running for a U.S. Senate seat in the fall.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

'I Didn't Want To Be A Hashtag,' Says Black Man Who Feared Being Lynched In Indiana
"I hear a woman in the crowd yell out, 'Don't kill him.' And in that second, I realize that she's talking about me," Vauhxx Booker tells NPR.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Family Autopsy Finds Andres Guardado Was Shot 5 Times In The Back
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department has put a hold on the medical examiner's official autopsy report while it investigates the deputy-involved shooting. The family wants that report released.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Effective Anti-Racist Education Requires More Diverse Teachers, More Training
Travis Bristol, an assistant professor of education at the University of California at Berkeley, explains how teacher training and the presence of Black teachers can help reshape education.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

United Airlines Tells 36,000 Employees They Might Lose Their Jobs
With bookings down and cancellations on the rise amid a surge in new COVID-19 cases, United's furloughs will be a "gut punch" to employees when federal coronavirus relief funding runs out.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

In Alabama, A City Debates How To Depict Its Past In The Present
When the city of Mobile, Ala., took down a statue of a Confederate naval officer it sparked a conversation about what the statue meant, and how the city's Confederate history should be portrayed.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

West: Coronavirus-Related Restrictions By State
Get the latest on coronavirus-related restrictions in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

What It Would Take To Get An Effective Anti-Racist Education
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Travis Bristol, an assistant professor of education at UC Berkeley, about the role of teacher training and workforce diversity in anti-racist education.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

The Coronavirus Disrupts Resumed High School Baseball And Softball Seasons In Iowa
Iowa became the first state to resume high school sports, allowing baseball and softball players to start competing on June 1. The coronavirus has already disrupted seasons for more than 40 teams.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Is There A Way To Safely Reopen Schools In The Fall?
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Brown University economist Emily Oster about the consequences of not opening schools for the fall semester.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Key Figure In The Impeachment Inquiry Resigns From The Military
Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman was a key figure in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump. Vindman retired from the military on Wednesday and accused Trump of waging a "retaliation" campaign.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Key Figure In The Impeachment Inquiry Retires From The Military
Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman was a key figure in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump. Vindman retired from the military on Wednesday and accused Trump of waging a "retaliation" campaign.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Rare California Condors Seen In Sequoia National Park
California condors are among the biggest flying creatures in North America and are very close to extinction. They were recently spotted in Sequoia National Park for the first time in nearly 50 years.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Spike In Coronavirus Cases Overwhelms Testing Labs Across The U.S.
The surge in coronavirus cases has led to a sharp demand for testing, making labs fall further behind. That, in turn, is hampering efforts to identify and isolate people who are spreading the disease.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

History Professors Find Letter Showing Frederick Douglass' Opinion On Lincoln Statue
A debate over the statue of Lincoln and a freed slave in Washington, D.C., led two history professors to discover Frederick Douglass' letter, which could sway some opinions on the matter.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Black Man Speaks On Being Attacked, Threatened With A Noose In Bloomington, Ind.
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Vauhxx Booker, a Black activist in Bloomington, Ind., about experiencing what he describes as an attempted lynching and authorities' response to the incident.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Top Pediatrician Says States Shouldn't Force Schools To Reopen If Virus Is Surging
The American Academy of Pediatrics says children are better off in school but that the decision to reopen cannot ignore spiking infection rates.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Trump Acknowledges GOP Convention May Adapt As Florida Coronavirus Tally Rises
Trump's campaign has long wanted a sports arena packed to the rafters, but the president concedes in an interview that the worsening Florida outbreak may force those plans to shift.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Michael Drake Will Be The First Black President In U.C. System's 152-Year History
Michael Drake, a physician, previously served as the president of The Ohio State University. He was unanimously approved by the University of California Board of Regents on Tuesday.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Lt. Col. Vindman, Witness In Trump Impeachment, Is Retiring From Military
Vindman is retiring "after it has been made clear that his future within the institution he has dutifully served will forever be limited," his lawyer said Wednesday.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

Vindman, Key Impeachment Witness, Retires Over 'Bullying, Intimidation' By Trump
Vindman is retiring "after it has been made clear that his future within the institution he has dutifully served will forever be limited," his lawyer said Wednesday.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 08, 2020

3 Million Cases: Coronavirus Continues To Surge Across U.S.
One million of those cases have been confirmed over the past month — part of a wave of infection that began after many states started to reopen their economies in May.

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