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NPR U.S. News
Mar 18, 2019

Former Physician At Rikers Island Exposes Health Risks Of Incarceration
Dr. Homer Venters describes a number of traumatic outcomes related to subpar medical care inside the New York City jail complex, including the death of a man who was denied insulin during intake.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 18, 2019

Major Flooding In The Midwest Leaves 2 Dead, 2 Missing
Spring floods are no surprise in communities along the Missouri River. "My washer and dryer are floating around down there somewhere," said one Iowa resident.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 18, 2019

MySpace Says It Lost Years Of User-Uploaded Music
Millions of music and other media files may have been lost, the company acknowledges. The news comes after some users reported difficulty accessing their music files over the past year.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 18, 2019

News Brief: Mosque Attack, Boeing 737 Max, Midwest Flooding
In New Zealand, thousands pay tribute to the 50 people killed in the attacks. There are new developments in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines flight. "Bomb cyclone" leaves behind torrential flooding.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 18, 2019

Small Towns In Nebraska Struggle To Deal With Historic Flooding
The governors of Iowa, Wisconsin and Nebraska declared states of emergency after a "bomb cyclone" caused severe flooding. Nebraska officials say the flooding is a "death knell" for some small towns.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 17, 2019

Georgetown Students React To Admissions Fraud Scandal
A bribery and admissions fraud scandal has touched several universities, including Georgetown. NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Georgetown seniors Christian Paz, Margaret Gach and Ramon Lyons.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 17, 2019

Americans Hold Vigils Following New Zealand Mosque Shootings
People across the U.S. have been gathering to show support for the Muslim worshipers who came under attack in New Zealand on Friday.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 17, 2019

'We Are Not Safe Unless We Are Together' — Interfaith Vigils Follow Mosque Shootings
Many American Muslims feel vulnerable following the attacks in New Zealand. Other faith and community groups are stepping in to offer solace and to say they are not alone.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 17, 2019

Why Are So Many Farmers Markets Failing? Because The Market Is Saturated
Farmers aren't producing enough to keep up with the number of smaller markets that keep popping up, often in close proximity to others. This results in fewer customers, unsold food, and maybe closure.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 17, 2019

How Quick Communication Helps In Vaccination
A man infected with measles recently visited a tight-knit Orthodox Jewish community in Michigan. Officials say a lightning-fast communication network within that community kept it from spreading.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 17, 2019

For Some Colorado Lawmakers, The Death Penalty Debate Is Personal
Bills to abolish the death penalty are being debated in state legislatures across the country. In Colorado, a couple of lawmakers have a very personal connection to this political lightning rod.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

The Midwest Battles Historic Floods In The Aftermath Of 'Bomb Cyclone'
A powerful weather system swept through the region last week, bringing blizzard conditions and leaving many communities with record-setting floods.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

Sen. Tim Kaine Visits Venezuela-Colombia Border To Express Guaidó Support
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine about his trip to the Venezuela-Colombia border.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

Presidential Hopefuls Line Up To Back Candidates For Iowa Special Election
A special election for state Senate in Iowa is drawing the attention of a number of presidential candidates, all eager to meet voters in the influential early-voting state.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

John Boehner Was Once 'Unalterably Opposed' To Marijuana. He Now Wants It To Be Legal
The former speaker of the House says he has never used marijuana. But he says that "if other people use the product, who am I to say they shouldn't?"

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

A 'Mainstreaming Of Bigotry' As White Extremism Reveals Its Global Reach
In the aftermath of the New Zealand mosque shootings, experts who monitor hate groups say violent white extremism is on the rise, and is the most prominent threat.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut
With expanding markets for hemp and marijuana, some students believe that taking the class could help their careers. "I'm definitely interested in the plant and where it can go," Madison Blake said.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

ICE Raids North Carolina After Local Authorities End Cooperation
A number of areas in North Carolina have decided not to work with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. In the following weeks, ICE has carried out a number of raids, arresting hundreds.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

Sandy Hook Father Responds To Court Ruling Against Remington
NPR's Melissa Block speaks with David Wheeler. His son was killed in the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting. Victims' families are suing the manufacturer of the weapon used in the attack.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

U.S. Muslims Search For Solace After New Zealand Attack
American Muslims are talking about where to stand and pray in their own mosques in case what happened in New Zealand were to happen here. They're also thinking about how to talk to their children.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

As Parents And Grandparents Age, More And More Millennials Are Family Caregivers
About 40 million people in the U.S. are family caregivers. One in four is a millennial, which presents tensions for a generation still making its way into the world.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 16, 2019

Ending HIV In Mississippi Means Cutting Through Racism, Poverty And Homophobia
More than half the new HIV diagnoses in the U.S. are in Southern states, where the rates among gay and bisexual black men remain stubbornly high, despite the existence of medicine to stop the virus.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

After New Zealand Attacks, Muslim Americans Call For Action Against Rising Bigotry
On Friday, Muslim Americans urged political leaders and tech companies to confront the spread of hate and racism that has led to scores of worshippers being slaughtered in religious institutions.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

After New Zealand Attacks, Muslim-Americans Call For Action Against Rising Bigotry
On Friday, Muslim-Americans urged political leaders and tech companies to confront the spread of hate and racism that has led to scores of worshippers being slaughtered in religious institutions.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Students Around The World Skip School To Call For More Action To Address Climate Change
Thousands of students around the world — and across the U.S. — skipped school on Friday to protest inaction on climate change.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

New Zealand Mosque Attacks Raise Questions About Internet's Role In Radicalization
The rambling document allegedly written by the attacker in New Zealand echoes the sarcasm and "trolling" of the internet. How much of his inspiration comes from internet politics in the U.S.?

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

California Gov. Gavin Newsom Discusses His Decision To Halt State Executions
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with California Gov. Gavin Newsom about his decision to halt all executions in his state during his term in office.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

U.S. Muslims Say They Refuse To Be Intimidated After New Zealand Attacks
The Muslim community in the United States reacts to the mass killings at two mosques in New Zealand that were ambushed by gunfire.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

The History Of Grounding Planes In The U.S.
The Federal Aviation Administration grounded Boeing's 737 Max 8 and 9 this week. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Bloomberg reporter Alan Levin about the historical precedent and possible fallout.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

How The Mafia Has Survived And Is Involved In International Crime Today
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Oxford University professor of criminology Federico Varese about how the Italian-American mob functions in 2019.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

How One Father Allegedly Bribed His Son's Way Onto A College Water Polo Team
One of the people charged in the massive college admissions scandal is a Massachusetts businessman accused of bribing a water-polo coach to help his son get into the University of Southern California.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Trump Vetoes Congressional Effort To Limit Border Wall Funding
President Trump used his veto pen for the first time Friday. GOP senators who bucked the president in Thursday's vote said they did so to preserve congressional control over government spending.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Episode #1912
24 hours at the border, and a look at a shelter for stranded youth in Tijuana.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Seriously Ill Federal Prisoners Freed As Compassionate Release Law Takes Effect
Judges are beginning to limit the sentences of cancer sufferers and other badly ailing prisoners after a law passed last year by Congress.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

'Welcome To Marrdy's' - A Shared Kitchen For Local Cooks In Gentrifying West Atlanta
As part of NPR's Kitchen Table Conversations, we revisit an entrepreneur in West Atlanta who wants to preserve the culinary traditions of a neighborhood even as it gentrifies and changes.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

As End Nears To Mueller Era, D.C. Lawyers Fear Lasting Politicization Of Justice
Washington's legal community worries the attacks on federal law enforcement, judges and the broader justice system may hurt its reputation long after the special counsel's investigation wraps.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

From Triumph To Tragedy, 'First' Tells Story Of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor
First is unlike any other book written about the justice. Evan Thomas breaks new ground with extraordinary access to O'Connor, her papers, journals — and even 20 years of her husband's diary.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Idaho Voters Speak Up As Lawmakers Work To Make Ballot Initiative Process Harder
Lawmakers in Idaho and other states across the country are trying to make it more difficult for voters to get issues they care about onto the ballot. Voters say they feel silenced.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

A Father-Daughter Relationship Strained By 'Mental Illness And Time'
Shotzy Harrison's dad has spent most of his adult life homeless. Growing up, he was in and out of her life. They reunited in 2013 before he disappeared again — but she hopes she'll see him again.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Court: Sandy Hook Victims' Lawsuit Against Gun Maker May Move Forward
Connecticut's Supreme Court has ruled that Sandy Hook families may sue Remington Arms, the manufacturer of the rifle used in the shooting. The case could expose Remington Arms' marketing practices.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Facing Lawsuits Over Opioid Epidemic, Purdue Pharma Considers Bankruptcy
Big drug makers face a wave of lawsuits stemming from the opioid epidemic. One option the companies have to reduce potential liability is to file for bankruptcy.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Reputed Gambino Crime Family Boss, Fank Cali, Is Killed In N.Y. Attack
Francesco "Frank" Cali was shot to death outside his Staten Island home Wednesday night. David Greene talks to author and organized crime expert George Anastasia.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Reputed Gambino Crime Family Boss, Frank Cali, Is Killed In N.Y. Attack
Francesco "Frank" Cali was shot to death outside his Staten Island home Wednesday night. David Greene talks to author and organized crime expert George Anastasia.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 15, 2019

Trump Administration Cuts The Size Of Fines For Health Violations In Nursing Homes
Inspectors are citing facilities more often than during the Obama administration. But in response to industry prodding, the average fine is nearly a third lower, and the total assessed is down.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Feds Indict 5 New Mexico Compound Residents On Terror and Gun Charges
The search for a missing child led to a raid of a rural compound and the grisly discovery of 11 emaciated children. Their relatives were training to attack U.S. personnel, federal authorities say.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Feds Indict 5 New Mexico Compound Residents On Terrorism And Gun Charges
The search for a missing child led to a raid of a rural compound and the grisly discovery of 11 emaciated children. Their relatives were training to attack U.S. personnel, federal authorities say.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Smithsonian Shortens Folklife Festival On National Mall To Just 2 Days
The celebration will take place on June 29 and 30, while the original 10 days of events will be postponed to next year, in part as a result of the partial government shutdown.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

College Admissions Scandal Is Just The Latest For University Of Southern California
The University of Southern California finds itself at the center of the college admissions scam revealed this week. This is the latest in a string of high profile scandals that have caused turmoil.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Former Indiana Sen. Birch Bayh — 'A Great Hoosier'
Sen. Birch Bayh (D-Ind.) authored Title IX, a law guaranteeing women access to educational and athletic programs in higher education. He passed away Thursday at the age of 91.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Do You Think The College Application Process Is Fair? Tell Us Your Experience
NPR wants to talk to college students and recent graduates about their college admissions experience.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

White Nationalist Rhetoric Heard Today Echoes America A Century Ago
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Atlantic writer Adam Serwer about his new piece "White Nationalism's Deep American Roots."

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

A Honduran Father Is Reunited With His Daughter, 10 Months After Being Separated
Jose Eduardo was separated from his daughter Yaimy after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border last spring. He was deported, but his daughter remained in U.S. custody. Now, he has returned to find her.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Skipping School To Protest Climate Change
Students around the country are skipping class Friday to protest inaction on climate change. It's part of a wave of pressure by young people as Democrats struggle to agree on a climate policy.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

The FAA's Relationship With Airlines And Manufacturers Is Under Scrutiny, Again
The Federal Aviation Administration regulates and oversees aviation in the United States. But it can also be a cozy relationship, as it works closely with airlines and manufacturers.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Boeing Will Pause Delivery Of 737 Max Jets, But Continue To Build Them
Boeing's 737 Max line has been grounded, making things tricky at the plant near Seattle. It's filled with undelivered 737s and it's not clear what will happen to them.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Why Potholes Are So Bad As Winter Turns To Spring
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Jonathan Gano, director of public works for Des Moines, Iowa, about why potholes are so bad at the end of winter and what can be done about them.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Southern Poverty Law Center Fires Morris Dees, Its Co-Founder
The civil rights organization, well-known for its tracking of hate groups, was founded in 1971. No specific reason was given for his firing, although Dees said it related to a personnel issue.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Connecticut's Supreme Court Rules That Sandy Hook Families Can Sue Gunmaker
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Bloomberg reporter Polly Mosendz about the Connecticut Supreme Court's ruling that Sandy Hook families are not barred from suing the gun manufacturer Remington.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Passengers Experience Little Disruption Despite Grounding Of Boeing's 737 Max Jets
A day after the FAA ordered the grounding of all Boeing 737 Max jets, there were plenty of cancelled flights and stranded passengers, but overall there was little disruption to the air traffic system.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

'Bomb Cyclone' Paralyzes Central U.S., Bringing Snow, Floods And Dangerous Winds
The winter storm has been linked to at least one death, after a Colorado patrolman was struck by a driver who lost control of his car.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Lawsuit By Sandy Hook Victims Against Gun Manufacturer Allowed To Move Forward
Gun companies have rarely been held liable for crimes committed with their products. This lawsuit could mark a new front in the battle over gun regulations and corporate accountability.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

With Grounding Of Boeing 737 Max Fleet — Where Does That Leave Air Travelers?
Some U.S. airlines are scrambling to rebook passengers after the FAA announced it was grounding the Boeing 737 Max Fleet. Airlines affected include Southwest, American and United Airlines.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

'The Trial Of Lizzie Borden' Adds Fodder To The Murder Case's Mystery
Who killed the Bordens more than 100 years ago remains unsolved. Like a lawyer, author Cara Robertson lays the facts and evidence before us, occasionally pointing towards the biases of the day.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Frank Cali, Reputed Gambino Crime Family Boss, Is Killed In N.Y. Attack
In a killing that echoes mob murders of the 1980s, a man who was believed to be running a mafia family was gunned down outside his home.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

FAA Acting Head Dan Elwell On Boeing Decision
NPR's David Greene speaks with Dan Elwell, acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, about the decision to ground all Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Johnson & Johnson Hit With $29 Million Verdict In Mesothelioma Case
The woman said she used J&J talc-based products in the 1960s and 70s, and later developed mesothelioma. The pharmaceutical company says its product is safe, and plans to appeal.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

News Brief: FAA Grounds 737 Max, Mueller Team Member Leaves
The FAA has grounded all Boeing 737 Max aircraft in the U.S. as investigators probe the cause of the crash in Ethiopia. Also, new information suggests the special counsel's investigation is done.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

College Access And Inequality
Steve Inskeep talks to education journalists Nikole Hannah-Jones and Alexandra Robbins about the college admissions scandal and the role of pay-for-admission in perpetuating education inequality.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Pentagon To Implement Restrictions On Transgender Recruits
Starting next month, the Pentagon will allow recruits to enlist only as the gender given to them at birth. David Greene speaks with Army Capt. Alivia Stehlik about her transition and the new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 14, 2019

Commerce Secretary To Face Lawmakers In Hearing On Census Citizenship Question
After fending off requests to testify in lawsuits over the census citizenship question, Wilbur Ross goes before the House Oversight and Reform Committee on Thursday.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Colleges Use More Than SAT Scores When Deciding Which Students To Admit
The criminal case about parents who allegedly paid bribes to get their children into top schools spotlights the admissions process. Officials look for aspects of the applications that reveal lies.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Rare Blizzard Meteorologists Are Calling 'Bomb Cyclone' Hits Central U.S.
A major winter storm is expected to bring blizzard conditions and extremely strong winds to much of the central U.S. Forecasters say it will be one of Colorado's most intense storms.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Orange County, Calif., School District Responds To Students' Offensive Social Media
When high school students in Orange County, Calif., formed cups into a swastika and did Nazi salutes, there was outrage — and shrugging — on social media. School officials are promising swift action.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

California's Governor Says The State Will No Longer Execute People
California's governor has placed a moratorium on executions, giving more than 700 people on death row a reprieve. It's part broader national trend where states are imposing the death penalty less.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Federal Aviation Administration Grounds Boeing 737 Max 8 And 9 Jets
The United States has grounded all flights of Boeing's 737 Max 8 and 9 planes in American airspace.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Why The Allied Pilots Association Still Has Confidence In Boeing's 737 Max 8 Jets
NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Captain Dennis Tajer of the Allied Pilots Association about why the group of 15,000 American pilots maintains confidence in the Boeing 737 Max 8 after recent crashes.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Pilots Voiced Concerns To Federal Database About Boeing 737 Max 8 Jets
NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Dallas Morning News reporter Cary Aspinwall about complaints from pilots who had problems flying the Boeing 737 Max 8 and reported them to a federal database.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Federal Government Grounds All Boeing 737 Max 8 Jets As Investigation Continues
President Trump called it a difficult decision to ground the Boeing plane involved in the deadly crash in Ethiopia. As the biggest U.S. exporter, Boeing carries a lot of weight in Washington.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

How Fairness Is Defined In Today's Hyper-Competitive College Landscape
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Natasha Warikoo, professor at Harvard's Graduate School of Education, about what is and isn't acceptable when applying for admission to elite colleges.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

College Students Say They're Not Surprised By Admissions Scandal
College students say they're not surprised by the cheating scandal that's rocking college admissions. They say wealthy parents using their power to get their kids an unfair advantage is not new.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

College Students See Nothing New In Admissions Scandal
Wealthy parents using their power to give their kids an unfair advantage in getting into college is not new, say college students.The bigger surprise is that now people are getting busted for it.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

U.S. Will Join Other Nations In Removing Boeing 737 Max 8 Jets From Service
President Trump announced Tuesday that the U.S. will ground all flights of the Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9. Other countries had already grounded the plane following a deadly crash in Ethiopia.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

In Midst Of An Oil Boom, New Mexico Sets Bold New Climate Goals
New Mexico lawmakers passed a bill this week mandating state utilities use 100 percent renewable energy by 2045. Meanwhile, oil production in the southeast corner of the state is breaking records.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

College Bribery Scandal Exposes Flaws In Admissions System
Alia Wong, staff writer at The Atlantic, talks to NPR's David Greene about the legal ways that wealthy parents have essentially tried to buy their kids' way into selective schools.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

New Mexico Lawmakers Aim For Carbon-Free Energy By 2045
New Mexico lawmakers are set to pass what could be the country's most aggressive push for 100 percent clean energy. It's happening even as the state is in the middle of a record-setting oil boom.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

College Admissions System Must Be Examined Post Scandal, Niles Says
David Greene talks to Stefanie Niles, vice president for enrollment and communications at Ohio Wesleyan University, about pressures of getting into college after an admissions scandal was made public.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

College Completion Rates Are Up, But The Numbers Will Still Surprise You
To unlock the benefits of going to college, you need to earn a degree. But average completion rates in the U.S. are surprisingly low and can vary widely depending on what type of school you attend.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Mississippi State Agency Spends $18,000 Defending $200 Fine
A lawmaker wanted a document from the Department of Public Safety, which declined to provide it. Another agency fined DPS. The Clarion Ledger reports DPS has spent thousands challenging the fine.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

Who Charges All Those Electric Scooters? Follow A Nocturnal 'Juicer'
Bird and Lime offer electric scooters for rent in cities across America. The companies pay a few dollars a pop to an army of people who prowl the streets for the scooters and take them home to charge.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

News Brief: College Admissions Scandal, Death Penalty, Pell Sentenced
Dozens of parents charged in the scandal. California governor to sign moratorium on the death penalty. Australian Cardinal George Pell issentenced to 6 years in prison for sexually abusing two boys.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

NYC Lawmakers Call For Less Piercing Emergency Vehicle Sirens
New York City lawmakers have introduced legislation to change the city's emergency sirens. The new sound would likely resemble tones used in Europe, lowering the frequency for a less shrill sound.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 13, 2019

FAA Insists There's No Basis To Ground Boeing's 737 Max 8 Aircraft
A growing number of countries are either grounding Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft or banning them from their airspace. The FAA is standing firm, allowing U.S. airlines to continue to fly the aircraft.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 12, 2019

Gov. Gavin Newsom Suspends Death Penalty In California
California voters are the only ones who can repeal the death penalty, something they've rejected twice in recent elections. The Governor's moratorium will spare the lives of over 700 inmates.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 12, 2019

U.S. Lawmakers Call To Ground The Boeing 737 MAX 8. FAA Says 'No' For Now
Sens. Warren, Cruz and Romney among lawmakers who want the FAA to ground Boeing's series of jets involved in recent crashes. About a dozen other countries already have.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 12, 2019

Trump Administration Seeks To Close International Immigration Offices
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is in "preliminary discussions" to shutter 23 field offices around the world to save millions. Critics say it will exacerbate a processing bottleneck.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 12, 2019

Georgia Woman Arrested And Accused Of Aiding ISIS Cyber Group That Made 'Kill Lists'
Kim Anh Vo, 20, was charged Tuesday with conspiring to provide material support for the terrorist organization. Prosecutors say she recruited online members, including a minor.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 12, 2019

At Least 50 People Charged In College Admissions Scandal
Dozens of people have been charged in a scam aimed at getting children of the rich and famous into elite colleges. The scam involved cheating on entrance exams and fake athletic credentials.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 12, 2019

Dozens Of Countries Ground Boeing's 737 Max 8 Following Deadly Crash In Ethiopia
Sunday's deadly crash of a Boeing 737 Max 8 in Ethiopia is spurring dozens of countries and airlines to ground the plane. In the U.S., the FAA is demanding design changes for the fleet.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 12, 2019

In These Divided Times, Is Civility Under Siege?
Civility is about more than simple politeness. It's a line of respect in public life. It's a comfort to some and repressive to others. And a majority of Americans believe it's in a state of crisis.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 12, 2019

Physician Discusses Treatment Of 6-Year-Old Boy In 2017 Tetanus Case
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Dr. Carl Eriksson, assistant professor of pediatrics at Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine, about treating a case of tetanus in a 6-year-old boy.

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