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NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

Family Of Pensacola Navy Base Shooting Says Victim 'Saved Countless Lives'
The victim's brother said in a Facebook post that his sibling was shot multiple times. "He died a hero and we are beyond proud but there is a whole in our hearts that can never be filled."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

Pensacola Gunman, Victims Identified
The Navy has named the three sailors killed during an active shooter incident at Naval Air Station Pensacola on December 6th.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

American Student Freed In Prisoner Swap After 3 Years In Iran Jail
President Trump said on Saturday that Xiyue Wang, an American held in an Iranian prison, has been released. The release was secured with help from the Swiss government.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

Author Says Hostility Toward Expert Witnesses Rooted In Narcissism, Lack Of Trust
Michel Martin speaks with Tom Nichols, author of The Death of Expertise, about the treatment of expert witnesses during the impeachment proceedings.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

Authorities Investigate Florida Navy Base Shooting
Federal authorities are in Pensacola, Fla., investigating Friday's fatal shooting at a Naval Air Station. A gunman killed three people before deputies killed the suspect.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

Barbershop: Kamala Harris Suspends Presidential Campaign
NPR's Michel Martin discusses Sen. Kamala Harris' decision to suspend her presidential campaign with three analysts: Malaika Jabali, Kelly Dittmar and Jennifer Riley Collins.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

Zimmerman Lawsuit Against Trayvon Martin's Family Alleges Defamation
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with the Southern Poverty Law Center's Heidi Beirich about attorney Larry Klayman, who is representing George Zimmerman in a suit against Trayvon Martin's family.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

West Virginia Corrections Employees Fired, Suspended Over Nazi Salute Photo
Two West Virginia corrections officers and a cadet have been fired after about two dozen trainees were photographed giving an apparent Nazi salute. Thirty-four others have been suspended.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

FBI Investigating Pensacola Shooting
The FBI is investigating a deadly shooting Friday at a military base in Florida. Officials say the gunman was a member of the Saudi Air Force in training at Naval Air Station Pensacola.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

Biden Doubles Down On Heated Town Hall Where He Called Voter A 'Damn Liar'
"The fact of the matter is, this guy stood up and he was, in fact, lying," Biden said in an interview Friday evening with NPR Morning Edition host Rachel Martin.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

A Day For Shipbuilders: Caroline Kennedy Christens The USS John F. Kennedy
The ship's high-profile christening marks a day of recognition for the thousands of workers that have participated in the project over more than five years.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 07, 2019

PG&E Announces $13.5 Billion Settlement Of Claims Linked To California Wildfires
The utility hopes the settlement will help it emerge from bankruptcy proceedings by the end of the year. When it declared bankruptcy in January, the company faced potential liabilities of $30 billion.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Tony And Emmy Award Winning Actor Ron Leibman Dies At 82
Leibman, who played a wide range of roles in films, the stage and television, is perhaps most popularly known for his role as the father of Jennifer Aniston's Rachel Green on Friends.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Tony And Emmy Award Winning Actor Ron Liebman Dies At 82
Liebman, who played a wide range of roles in films, the stage and television, is perhaps most popularly known for his role as the father of Jennifer Aniston's Rachel Green on Friends.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Los Angeles Jury Finds No Defamation In Elon Musk's 'Pedo Guy' Tweet
The Tesla CEO was embroiled in a Twitter spat with one of the rescuers of 12 boys and their soccer coach in Thailand last year.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Authorities Investigating A Shooting At The Naval Air Station In Pensacola, Fla.
In Florida, authorities are investigating a shooting at the Naval Air Station Pensacola. Four people died, including the gunman. It's the second shooting at U.S. Navy base this week.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Trump Declines to Take Part in 'Baseless' House Impeachment Inquiry
Democrats had offered to allow Trump to have attorneys representing him at future impeachment hearings in the House.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

White House Rules Out Participating In House Impeachment Inquiry Process
Democrats had offered to allow the president to have attorneys representing him at future impeachment hearings in the House.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Massachusetts' Wilson's Department Store Is Shutting Its Doors After 137 Years
A family-owned department store in western Massachusetts is shutting its doors after 137 years. For shoppers and employees, these last days have been like a reunion, and a wake.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Pearl Harbor Veteran Expected To Be Last USS Arizona Survivor Interred On Ship
Lauren Bruner died in September and on Saturday, his remains will return to the USS Arizona. He is expected to be the final USS Arizona survivor to be interred on the sunken warship.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Virginia Governor Suspends Policy Allowing Strip Searches Of Children At Prisons
An 8-year-old girl was strip searched at Buckingham Correctional Center last month. A prison spokesperson says the prison staffer who approved the search didn't have the authority to do so.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

4 Dead After Armed Robbers Hijack UPS Truck
Police officers in South Florida exchanged gunfire with two armed robbers Thursday. The resulting skirmish ended with both suspects dead, along with a hostage and a bystander.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Shooting At Naval Air Station Pensacola
Early Friday morning, authorities responded to an active shooter at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida. Four people were killed — including the gunman.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Attacker And 3 Others Dead After Shooting At Naval Air Station Pensacola In Florida
Seven people were injured and remain in the hospital. Deputies who responded to the scene engaged the attacker in a shootout that transpired over two floors of a classroom building.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Navy Says Shooter And 2 Other People Are Dead In Violence At Pensacola Navy Base
The U.S. Navy says an "unknown number" of people were transferred to local hospitals due to injuries from the shooting.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Gunman In Naval Air Station Pensacola Attack Is A Saudi Aviation Student
Four people are dead and eight people were injured in the shooting. Deputies who responded to the scene engaged the attacker in a shootout in a classroom building.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Gunman In Naval Air Station Pensacola Attack Was A Saudi Aviation Student
Four people are dead and eight people were injured in the shooting. Deputies who responded to the scene engaged the attacker in a shootout in a classroom building.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Hiking Wheelchair Opens Up Outdoor Lifestyle To People With Serious Disabilities
Geoff Babb — a stroke survivor — found that most wheelchairs couldn't take him where he wanted to go. So, he invented a new way to hike with friends and family: an all-terrain wheelchair.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Nature's 'Brita Filter' Is Dying and Nobody Knows Why
A mysterious die-off of freshwater mussels has scientists scrambling to find a cause. Freshwater mussels clean water and provide habitat to countless other species.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

A Daughter Talks With Her Father About Coping With Her Mother's Suicide
Sylvia Grosvold was 5 years old when her mother died by suicide. At StoryCorps, Sylvia, now 16, tells her dad how she's processed the loss. "I guess I'm stronger than I think I am," she says.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 06, 2019

Whistleblower Speaks About Former Buffalo Bishop
After mounting pressure over his alleged cover-up of sexual abuse claims, Buffalo Bishop Richard Malone is stepping down. NPR's David Greene speaks to Siobhan O'Connor, Malone's former assistant.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Orange County Sheriff's Kept Evidence Booking Crisis Secret For Nearly Two Years
Assistant Public Defender Scott Sanders suggested prosecutors covered for law enforcement, helping to keep systematic mishandling of evidence out of public view. "The implications are massive."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Orange County Sheriff's Department Kept Evidence Scandal A Secret For Nearly 2 Years
Assistant Public Defender Scott Sanders suggested that prosecutors covered for law enforcement, helping to keep systematic mishandling of evidence out of public view. "The implications are massive."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Orange County Sheriff's Dept. Mishandled Evidence; Kept It Quiet For Nearly 2 Years
The public defender in the Calif. county suggested that prosecutors covered for law enforcement, helping to keep the scandal from public view.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

'Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words' Reveals The Real Person Behind The Icon
The Alabama woman's civil rights activism did not begin or end with her famous refusal to move to the back of a bus in segregated Montgomery, a new exhibit of her writings, documents and photos shows.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Cockfighting Is About To Become Illegal In Puerto Rico
In the rural communities of Puerto Rico's central mountains, cockfighting has been a way of life for centuries. But on Dec. 20, the practice will become illegal on the island.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

UAW Names Rory Gamble As President, The First African American To Lead Union
Gamble, 64, will serve the remainder of the term of former head Gary Jones, who has been implicated in a federal embezzlement and bribery scheme at the union and resigned his post last month.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

White House Names Controversial Pick To Head Homelessness Office
Advocates for the homeless worry that Robert Marbut, a consultant who has been hired by many cities, will roll back the successes of arranging housing for the homeless.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

GM And LG Chem Plan $2.3 Billion Electric Battery Venture In Ohio
The two companies expect to create more than 1,100 jobs in northeast Ohio. The new plant will be built near GM's Lordstown facility that was shuttered earlier this year.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Lawmakers Call For Investigation After NPR Report On Troubled Student Loan Program
NPR found the vast majority of student loan borrowers with disabilities aren't getting the debt relief they're owed. Now, a bipartisan group of lawmakers is asking for an investigation.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Port Neches Residents Asked To Leave Their Homes Near Site Of Plant Explosion
Officials in the Southeast Texas city have issued a voluntary evacuation order, citing potentially unhealthy levels of a chemical detected more than a week after the blast at the local facility.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

When Miami Temps Plunge Below 60, It's Time For Hot Churros
"Chilly" by Miami standards isn't really all that cold. But any sign of sweater weather is enough to get the long lines forming for fried sticks of dough dipped in thick hot chocolate.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Russian Hacking Group Evil Corp. Charged By Federal Prosecutors In Alleged Bank Fraud
Officials say Evil Corp. developed and distributed a type of malware that infected computers around the world and harvested banking credentials in order to steal some $100 million.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Why Nashville's Police Still Don't Have Body Cameras
The Nashville Police Department still doesn't have body cameras for its police officers — despite three different mayors saying it should. Now members of the public are asking why that's the case.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Exhibit Shows Different Side Of Rosa Parks
A new exhibit at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., shows a very different Rosa Parks from the woman many people learned about in history class.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Navigating The Fallout Of Alleged Abuse And Betrayal In A Sacred Muslim Space
An American Muslim organization severed ties with its founder over allegations of abuse. It reignited a conversation among American Muslims about how to hold faith leaders accountable.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

'It's A Fluid Process': Republicans Huddle With White House On Senate Trial
During a House impeachment hearing President Trump rebuked, White House officials huddled with Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill to plot a potential trial in the upper chamber.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Sailor Kills 2, Wounds 1 Before Taking Own Life At Hawaii's Pearl Harbor Base
The U.S. Navy says the gunman was assigned to a nuclear-powered attack submarine currently in port. No motive has been identified.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 05, 2019

Sailor Kills 2, Wounds 1 Before Taking Own Life At Pearl Harbor Base
The U.S. Navy says the gunman was assigned to a nuclear-powered attack submarine currently in port. No motive has been identified.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Bishop Richard Malone Of Buffalo Resigns Because Of Role In Clergy Abuse Crisis
Bishop Richard Malone of Buffalo, N.Y., has resigned in the wake of allegations that he failed to deal properly with abusive priests under his charge.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Noeel: Electric Eel Lights Up Christmas Tree In Tennessee
Every time the electric eel named Miguel Wattson releases a jolt of electricity, a festively decorated Christmas tree next to his tank at the Tennessee Aquarium flickers and glows.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Instagram Now Requires Users To Provide Their Age
The Facebook-owned social media giant will use the information to ensure a safer platform for younger users and more accurately targeted ads across the board.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

The Who Returns To Cincinnati 40 Years After Concert Tragedy
Forty years ago, 11 concert-goers were killed in a stampede to see The Who in Cincinnati. The group just announced it will return to play another concert there all these years later.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Trump Names Robert Marbut To Head Federal Agency Focused On Homelessness
The Trump administration has named Robert Marbut to head the federal agency focused on homelessness, but the nominee is controversial and some worry he'll move away from prioritizing housing.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

How Appalachian Music Is Helping A Rural Kentucky Town Deal With Opioid Addiction
Beating an opioid addiction is difficult. But in a rural Kentucky town, a time-honored tradition of Appalachian music is starting to make a difference.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Calls Grow In California To Protect Inmates At Women's Lock Ups From Sexual Abuse
At least six California prison guards were fired for sexual misconduct between 2014 and 2018, according to records released under a new state law. Advocates say more inmate protections are needed.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Calls Grow In California To Protect Inmates At Women's Lockups From Sexual Abuse
At least six California prison guards were fired for sexual misconduct between 2014 and 2018, according to records released under a new state law. Advocates say more inmate protections are needed.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

'Walking Wall' Enters Kansas City Art Museum As Permanent Addition
In Kansas City, Mo., a stone wall has been "walking" into the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. A British sculptor started it in a nearby lot. Now, it will enter the museum as a permanent addition.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

George Zimmerman Sues Trayvon Martin's Family For More Than $100 Million
Zimmerman and his lawyer, Larry Klayman, allege that a key witness for the prosecution was an impostor. Martin's family calls it an "unfounded and reckless lawsuit."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Former President Jimmy Carter Discharged From Hospital
Carter, 95, has suffered a string of health challenges in recent months. He was released from a Georgia hospital Wednesday after receiving treatment for a urinary tract infection.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Against Trump's Wishes, Georgia Gov. Appoints Kelly Loeffler To Fill Senate Seat
Loeffler is the CEO of the financial platform Bakkt, as well as co-owner of the WNBA franchise the Atlanta Dream. The president reportedly wanted Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp to appoint someone else.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Nearly 700,000 SNAP Recipients Could Lose Benefits Under New Trump Rule
The Trump administration has finalized a rule to limit food stamp benefits for single able-bodied adults who can't show that they work more than 20 hours a week, though legal challenges are possible.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Buffalo Bishop Resigns Amid Mounting Controversy Over Clergy Abuse
Richard Malone had come under fire for allegedly mishandling of sexual abuse claims against the priests in his diocese. He announced Wednesday that the pope had accepted his request to "retire early."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Buffalo, N.Y., Bishop Resigns Amid Controversy Over Clergy Abuse
Richard Malone had faced scrutiny for allegedly mishandling sexual abuse claims against the priests in his diocese. He announced Wednesday that the pope had accepted his request to "retire early."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning From Portable Generators Proves Predictable, And Deadly
Portable generator use increases in winter, raising the risk of deadly carbon monoxide exposure. Safety advocates say the issue transcends user error, but legislative and regulatory efforts stall.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Carbon Monoxide Poisonings Spike After Big Storms. Portable Generators Are A Culprit
Portable generator use increases in winter, raising the risk of deadly carbon monoxide exposure. Safety advocates say the issue transcends user error, but legislative and regulatory efforts stall.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot Fires City's Police Superintendent
Chicago's mayor says there must be honesty and integrity in government. Activists and legal experts say the shake-up in the country's second-largest police department provides a time for change.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 04, 2019

On The Oregon Coast, Turning Pollution Into Art With A Purpose
A local artist is turning the mountains of plastic garbage that wash up on beaches into dramatic sculptures of the very marine life threatened by the deluge of plastics.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

Rep. Adam Schiff: 'The Uncontested Facts Show This President Solicited A Bribe'
The House intelligence chairman told NPR that President Trump should also be charged with obstruction: "It is difficult to imagine a more iron-clad case of obstruction of Congress than this one."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

Stocks Slide As Trump Says China Trade Deal Might Wait Until After 2020 Election
"A China trade deal is dependent on one thing — do I want to make it," the president said, adding, "In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

At Harvard, Grad Students Form A Picket Line Over Wages, Health Care And Protections
Union leaders and university officials have been negotiating for over a year, yet a contract has not been agreed to. Grad students began an indefinite strike on the university's last day of classes.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

Banks Must Provide Trump's Financial Records To Congress, Federal Appeals Court Rules
Lawmakers want information stretching back nearly a decade from Deutsche Bank and Capitol One on President Trump, his family members and businesses. Trump is expected to appeal to the Supreme Court.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

Jimmy Carter Hospitalized For Urinary Tract Infection
The 39th president has had a string of recent health challenges. He was released from the hospital last week following an operation to relieve pressure on his brain following two recent falls.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

A More Constitutional Way To Tax The Rich?
Over the last year, the media has focused on a wealth tax. But there's another type of wealth taxation also on the table, and it might stand a better chance of surviving judicial review.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

Dean Foods Declares Bankruptcy. Milk Co-Op May Take Over Dean's Plants
A decline in milk consumption has helped to drive a giant U.S. milk company into bankruptcy. A dairy cooperative may buy most of Dean Foods "to make sure all that milk keeps flowing."

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

For A 2nd Year In A Row, Mortality Rate Is High For Grizzlies In Montana
A record number of grizzly bears were killed this year near Glacier National Park. They're dying at record levels — at the same time the White House wants to remove them from the endangered list.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

Montana Residents Ask Supreme Court To Allow Cleanup Beyond Superfund Requirements
Montana property owners are suing BP to clean up arsenic pollution leftover from mining. The case is now before the U.S. Supreme Court and businesses worry it could open them up to huge new costs.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

U.S. Muslims Debate How To Hold Abusive Faith Leaders Accountable
A popular Muslim preacher was accused of spiritual abuse. It's reignited a debate about how to hold accountable American Muslim faith and community leaders who abuse their positions.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 03, 2019

Installing Free Wi-Fi To Help Count Rural Communities Of Color In 2020 Census
A nonprofit organization has been installing Internet hot spots around Georgia to make sure rural residents, especially in communities of color, can complete census forms and apply for census jobs.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Major Medical, Legal Groups Oppose Louisiana Abortion Law Before U.S. Supreme Court
In new amicus briefs, the American Medical Association and American Bar Association are among groups opposing the law, which is scheduled for oral arguments in March.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Chicago Mayor Fires Police Superintendent, Citing 'Ethical Lapses'
Just last month Mayor Lori Lightfoot praised the reform-minded Eddie Johnson. On Monday, she accused him of intentionally lying to her and the public about being discovered asleep in his car.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Doorbell Cameras Are Popular, But Should We Be Sharing The Videos Online?
Amazon's Ring doorbell cameras are popular — as is the Neighbors social platform. But are we ready for a society in which everyone shares videos of "suspicious people" with the internet — and police?

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

All For Naught? Supreme Court Indicates Gun Case May Be Moot
At issue was a New York City law that allowed residents to have a permit for a gun at home, but barred them from transporting the gun elsewhere except to seven shooting ranges inside the city.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

As Miami Faces Threats From Sea Level Rise, Some Worry About Climate Gentrification
As flooding grows worse in Miami's upscale beachfront areas, black residents living on higher ground worry they'll be displaced. The city is studying this climate gentrification.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

DOJ: Judge Was Wrong To Rule That House Has Right To See Secret Mueller Docs
The Justice Department is asking a federal appeals court to keep secret Mueller probe grand jury documents confidential, saying a judge misread the law in ordering that the House can see the material.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

South Carolina Magistrate Judges Don't Need Law Degrees To Handle Lower-Level Cases
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Joseph Cranney of the Post and Courier about South Carolina's magistrate judges, a position that does not require a law degree and has become a source of corruption.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Setting Up Free Internet Around Georgia Ahead Of Primarily Online 2020 Census
A nonprofit organization has been installing free Wi-Fi hotspots around the state of Georgia to make sure communities of color, especially in rural areas, can go online to complete next year's census.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Why It's Getting More Expensive For Some Immigrants To Become U.S. Citizens
The Trump administration has proposed a number of ways to collect more money through citizenship application fees. Immigrant advocates see this as part of a broad effort to reject poor applicants.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Georgia Governor Sparks Fight With Trump Allies Over Senate Appointment
Gov. Brian Kemp intends to appoint businesswoman and Republican donor Kelly Loeffler to fill the seat held by Sen. Johnny Isakson, who plans to retire Dec. 31 for health reasons.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Prosecutors: More Charges Possible In Case Of Giuliani Associates Parnas, Fruman
The pair of Soviet-born business contacts were indicted in connection with alleged campaign finance violations. They had a status conference in their case in New York City on Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Winter Storm Reaches Northeast, Smothering Region With 1st Major Snow Of The Season
The post-Thanksgiving travel rush has ended, but the winter storm continues to bear down in the New England region, causing hundreds of flight cancellations and delays.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

As Climate Warnings Grow Dire, Energy Companies Face A 'New Frontier Of Threats'
Natural disasters, protests and stark scientific reports are heightening concern over climate change. And companies are under pressure from banks and investors to green their corporate images.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

The Subject Of A Coast Guard Search Wasn't Missing After All
On Thanksgiving Day, people in New Jersey reported a kite surfer being carried out to sea. The Coast Guard looked for 16 hours. The surfer, who didn't know he was missing, called to say he was safe.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

1st Supreme Court Gun-Rights Battle In 10 Years May Transform Legal Landscape
With Justice Brett Kavanaugh replacing Anthony Kennedy, a clear conservative majority could make regulating guns very difficult.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Remembering Slain Alabama Sheriff 'Big John' Williams
In Alabama, funeral services are set Monday for "Big John" Williams. He was a popular sheriff allegedly killed by the son of a deputy from a neighboring county. His death has resonated nationwide.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 02, 2019

Snowstorm Causes Headaches For Post-Thanksgiving Travelers
Thanksgiving weekend began and ended with delayed or canceled flights throughout the country. The worst of the weather is now hitting New England.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 01, 2019

White House Says President Trump Won't Participate In Wednesday Impeachment Hearing
The inquiry into Trump's dealing with Ukraine is moving from fact-gathering to considerations of law. House Republicans are knocking the process as rushed, unfair and guided by anti-Trump fervor.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 01, 2019

Supreme Court Takes Up Case On Gun Laws
NPR's Don Gonyea speaks with law professor Joseph Blocher, co-director of the Duke Center for Firearms Law, about an upcoming Supreme Court case that could determine how gun laws are made.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 01, 2019

In Virginia, Sacagawea Gets Her Own Statue
City leaders in Charlottesville, Va., will remove a statue of Lewis and Clark because their guide, Sacagawea, is portrayed as weak. They will replace it with one that highlights her importance.

NPR U.S. News
Dec 01, 2019

'Immigrant Food' Restaurant, Trump's New Neighbor
NPR's Don Gonyea speaks with the co-owners of Immigrant Food, Chef Enrique Limardo and Peter Schechter, about their new restaurant, which is located one block from the White House in Washington, D.C.

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