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NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

Chicago Teachers Go On Strike
Chicago teachers will hit the picket line Thursday morning. The teachers' union voted to go on strike after delegates rejected the school district's contract proposals.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

Opioid Companies Try To Reach Settlements Before Trial
Negotiations are underway as the drug industry scrambles to avoid a high profile national opioid trial set to begin on Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

News Brief: Pence In Turkey, Gordon Sondland Profile, Chicago Teachers
Vice President Pence is meeting with Turkey's President Erdogan in Ankara, trying to convince him to stop the assault on the Kurds in Syria. Also, a look at the history of Gordon Sondland.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 17, 2019

4th Defendant Arrested In Alleged Campaign Contribution Scheme Linked To Giuliani
David Correia, who was listed as one of four defendants in a grand jury indictment issued last week, has surrendered to authorities after returning to New York following a trip to the Middle East.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday
The system will detect the beginning of a quake and send out alerts warning residents that they have a few seconds to prepare for a possibly deadly temblor.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Chicago Teachers Will Go On Strike, Capping Years Of Social Justice Activism
For the second time in seven years, Chicago Public Schools teachers will be on strike starting Thursday, walking out of class, they say, in the name of better schools.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

McConnell Prepares Senate For Trump Impeachment Trial As Inquiry Escalates
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell briefed his caucus on what a Trump impeachment trial could look like in the Upper Chamber. It could last weeks, and begin after the Thanksgiving holiday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

NASA's First All-Female Spacewalk Set For Friday
Astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir will replace a faulty power regulator on the International Space Station. Only 15 women have participated in spacewalks, and all were accompanied by men.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

United Automobile Workers And General Motors Reach Tentative Agreement
The United Automobile Workers and General Motors have reached a tentative agreement that is subject to a vote by the full membership.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Doctors Faced With Tough Decisions Due To Shortage Of Drug Used To Treat Cancer
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Yoram Unguru, a hematologist and oncologist in Baltimore, about a shortage of vincristine, a drug used to treat childhood cancer.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Family 'Ambushed' By Trump Suggestion To Meet With Woman Who Caused Fatal Crash
The president said his meeting with the parents of 19-year-old Harry Dunn "was beautiful in a certain way," before arguing that driving the wrong way in Europe "happens to a lot of people."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Family 'Ambushed' By Trump's Surprise Meeting With Woman Who Caused Fatal Crash
Trump said his meeting with the parents of 19-year-old Harry Dunn "was beautiful in a certain way," before arguing that driving the wrong way in Europe "happens to a lot of people."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Census Bureau Asks States For Driver's License Records To Produce Citizenship Data
The Census Bureau is gathering records on people's U.S. citizenship status as part of Trump administration efforts to produce data that a GOP strategist said could politically benefit Republicans.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Chicago Cancels Public School Classes As Teachers Prepare To Strike
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Wednesday that she expects the teachers union to move ahead with their strike after a contract agreement wasn't reached.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Chicago Cancels Public School Classes As Teachers Strike Looms
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Wednesday that she expects the teachers union to move ahead with their strike after a contract agreement wasn't reached.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Chicago Cancels Public School Classes As Teachers' Strike Looms
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Wednesday that she expects the teachers union to move ahead with a strike after a contract agreement wasn't reached.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Ex-Pompeo Aide Is Latest State Department Official To Talk In Impeachment Inquiry
Michael McKinley is the latest Trump official to testify before the House committees leading the impeachment inquiry. In a surprise move last week, McKinley quit his job at the State Department.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

GM And UAW Reach Tentative Agreement To End National Strike
When the UAW's GM national council reviews the deal's terms Thursday, it will decide whether nearly 50,000 workers should remain on strike or if they should go back to work immediately.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

Trees That Survived California Drought May Hold Clue To Climate Resilience
When it comes to surviving the warming climate, scientists are finding that some plants and animals have an edge. The hope is that these "super adapters" can help preserve their species.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

What The Killing Of A Fort Worth Woman Says About Police Training
The fatal shooting of Atatiana Jefferson in her home has renewed questions about why some police officers seem too quick to shoot, and why the issues continue, despite efforts to improve training.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

The Goldfish Tariff: Fancy Pet Fish Among The Stranger Casualties Of The Trade War
China is considered the motherland of aquarium goldfish, bred over centuries into rare forms. Now tariffs have some U.S. sellers of these goldfish in a tailspin.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change
As more people identify themselves as neither categorically male or female, some employers are making changes to neutralize references to gender in everything from name tags to bathrooms.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 16, 2019

School Districts File Lawsuits Against E-Cigarette Maker Juul Labs
Schools are so fed up with students vaping on campus that they're suing e-cigarette manufacturer Juul Labs. They argue Juul has taken a page from Big Tobacco by marketing to teenagers.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

3 Major Drug Distributors Reportedly Negotiating $18B Opioid Settlement
A new study estimates that the opioid epidemic has cost the U.S. economy about $631 billion due to health care costs and the unrealized lifetime earnings of people who died of overdoses.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Trump Administration Moves To Expand Logging In Nation's Largest National Forest
The U.S. Forest Service is proposing to end a nearly two-decade long limit on logging in Alaska's Tongass National Forest. Local officials have pushed for looser restrictions to boost the economy.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Instead Of Charging Per Drink, This St. Louis Bar Is Charging By The Hour
A new bar in St. Louis isn't charging by the drink, but by the hour. The all you can drink concept is raising concerns about excessive drinking. But two weeks in, the vibe is anything but wild.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Salvador Dalí Etching Stolen From San Francisco Gallery In 'Snatch And Run'
Surveillance footage shows a young man casually walking away with the $20,000 work, one in a series that's seen as poking fun at both Pablo Picasso and the Spanish tradition of bullfighting.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Fort Worth Officer-Involved Shooting Puts Strain On Police-Community Relations, Again
Relations between police and community members are once again being tested in Texas, after a Fort Worth police officer shot and killed a resident in her own home.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Then-National Security Adviser Called Rudy Giuliani 'A Hand Grenade' On Ukraine
Former White House aide Fiona Hill told impeachment investigators on Monday that she and former Trump adviser John Bolton were troubled by actions by the president's private lawyer.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Then-National Security Advisor Called Rudy Giuliani 'A Hand Grenade' On Ukraine
Former White House aide Fiona Hill told impeachment investigators on Monday that she and former Trump advisor John Bolton were troubled by actions by the president's private lawyer.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Fort Worth Interim Police Chief 'Deeply Sorry' For Fatal Shooting
Atatiana Jefferson, 28, was shot and killed in the confines of her own home by police officer Aaron Dean, who resigned Monday. Dean has been charged with murder.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

British Family Detained By ICE After Unlawfully Entering U.S. From Canada
Eileen and David Connors say they accidentally crossed the U.S.-Canada border while vacationing. The couple and their 3-month-old son have been in a federal immigration facility since Oct. 3.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Exclusive: Turf War Blocked CFPB From Helping Fix Student Loan Forgiveness Program
The Trump administration blocked the nation's top consumer protection agency from digging into problems with a program designed to help police, firefighters and other public service workers.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Your Guide To The Massive (And Massively Complex) Opioid Litigation
The largest-ever federal action related to the U.S. opioid crisis is on the cusp of its first trial next week — and it's complicated. So here's a brief(ish) explainer breaking it all down.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Relatives Of Texas Woman Killed By Police Demand Independent Investigation
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Betsy Price, mayor of Forth Worth, about the incident in which a former police officer, who's white, shot and killed a black woman in her home on Friday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

How Non-Profit Hospitals Are Driving Up The Cost Of Health Care
Recent reports and studies suggest that the outsized political power of hospitals is a big reason why American health care is so expensive.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

'Queer Gym' Empowers LGBTQ Clients, Both Physically And Mentally
A Massachusetts pop-up gym aims to strengthen the bodies and spirits of LGBTQ clients, who haven't always been made to feel comfortable in other workout spaces.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

Idaho Farmers Worry Early Cold Could Ruin Potato Harvest
Idaho's potato industry — which supplies more than 30% of the country's spuds — is in jeopardy. Cold weather has hit the region and not all of the potatoes have been harvested.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 15, 2019

News Brief: Sanctions On Turkey, Fort Worth Shooting, Presidential Debate
The U.S. imposes sanctions on Turkey for its Kurdish offensive. An ex-Fort Worth officer is charged in the fatal shooting of a woman in her home. And, a Democratic presidential debate tonight in Ohio.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 14, 2019

Former Fort Worth Officer Charged With Murder In Fatal Shooting Of Woman In Her Home
Aaron Dean fired through the window of Atatiana Jefferson's home and killed her after responding to a call that a neighbor placed about an open front door, authorities say.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 14, 2019

Code Switch: Saving The Endangered Hawaiian Language
By the 1980s, fewer than 50 Hawaiians under age 18 could speak their language. A handful of second-language speakers took it upon themselves to start a school where everything is taught in Hawaiian.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 14, 2019

Fort Worth Police Officer Resigns After Fatally Shooting Black Woman In Home
The chief of police in Fort Worth, Texas, says the white policeman who shot and killed a black woman in her home early Saturday has resigned from the department.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 14, 2019

Pumping Oxygen In A Lake To Try To Save Fish Facing Climate Change
As the climate warms, many U.S. lakes are seeing more algal blooms, low oxygen levels and stressed out fish species. One team in Oregon hopes that pumping oxygen into the water can help.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 14, 2019

Investigations Underway After Texas Police Officer Kills Black Woman Inside Her Home
Early Saturday morning, a white officer in Fort Worth, Texas, shot and killed Atatiana Jefferson inside her home. A worried neighbor had called to report that the door to Jefferson's home was open.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 14, 2019

Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?
More and more places in the United States are dropping Columbus Day in favor of Indigenous Peoples' Day, but the shift isn't happening without some pushback.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 14, 2019

Trump's Former Russia Adviser Set To Testify As Part of Impeachment Inquiry
Fiona Hill, a British-born American foreign affairs expert, resigned as the president's top Russia analyst just days before the president's controversial call with his Ukrainian counterpart.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 14, 2019

Trump's Former Russia Adviser Testifies As Part of Impeachment Inquiry
Fiona Hill, a British-born American foreign affairs expert, resigned as the president's top Russia analyst just days before the president's controversial call with his Ukrainian counterpart.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 13, 2019

Susan Rice On Trump's Decision To Take U.S. Out Of Syria
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Susan Rice, former National Security Adviser and U.N. ambassador, about U.S. strategy in Syria after President Trump's decision to withdraw troops.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 13, 2019

Off Script: Cory Booker
Democratic presidential contender, Sen. Cory Booker, sits down with NPR's Ari Shapiro and two undecided voters to answer their most pressing questions about his run for the White House.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 13, 2019

Simone Biles Becomes The Most Decorated Gymnast In World Championship History
Combining skills of unprecedented difficulty with flawless execution, the 22-year-old surpassed Vitaly Scherbo's record 23 world medals won in the 1990s. Biles copped five golds at the championships.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 13, 2019

Fort Worth Officer Kills Woman In Her Bedroom In Response To 'Open Structure Call'
Atatiana Jefferson, 28, was shot early Saturday morning after police in Texas responded to a neighbor's non-emergency call upon seeing her front door open. Community activists are demanding answers.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 13, 2019

Border Wall Rising In Arizona, Raises Concerns Among Conservationists, Native Tribes
The Customs and Border Protection agency says it is doing its best to reduce impact to the environment and tribal citizens. Conservationists and Native Tribes in the area are not appeased.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 13, 2019

'Exalting The Banal To The Monumental' Through California Skate Parks
The state that gave birth to modern skateboarding is home to concrete playgrounds that are works of art in the eyes of photographer Amir Zaki: "They become more imaginative and open as spaces."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Black Republicans Run For Virginia Legislature
Since Reconstruction, Virginia has only elected two African-American Republicans to the legislature. This year, two young black men are running against Democrats to try to change that.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Former U.S. Ambassador To Ukraine's Congressional Testimony
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Nicholas Burns, a former ambassador and professor at Harvard's Kennedy School, about Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch's prepared remarks to Congress.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Philadelphia Promotes Tap Water Amid National Distrust
Philadelphia is trying to convince residents to drink tap water. But national studies show low-income and minority groups are less likely to trust public water.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Southern California Wildfires Rage
Firefighters are battling several wildfires in California, including the Saddleridge fire in Los Angeles County, which has burned more than 7,500 acres.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Watergate Prosecutors Argue For Trump Impeachment
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to two former Watergate special prosecutors, Richard Ben-Veniste and Philip Lacovara, about their op-ed on mounting evidence for President Trump's impeachment.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Wildfires In Southern California
Wildfires in Southern California have burned over 47,000 acres and forced tens of thousands to evacuate. High winds and dry conditions are causing the fires to spread quickly.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Warren And Biden Compete For Black Voters
Joe Biden has a big lead among black voters, the core of his strength in the Democratic primary. Sen. Elizabeth Warren is appealing to African American voters with her message of economic justice.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Kurdish Americans React To U.S. Force Withdrawal
Syrian Kurdish families in San Diego are angry about President Trump's decision to pull troops from northern Syria. They say they feel betrayed after Kurdish fighters led efforts against ISIS.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Panama City, Fla., Struggles To Recover A Year After Hurricane
A year after Hurricane Michael slammed Panama City, Fla., the city is struggling to recover, with housing and sewer systems taking a beating. Nearly a quarter of the town's population has left.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Renaming The Dixie Classic Fair
This weekend marks the end of the Dixie Classic Fair in North Carolina. After decades, the Dixie name will no longer be associated with the fair because it evokes images of slavery and segregation.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Columbus Day's Meaning For Italian Americans
Joseph Sciorra of Queens College tells NPR's Scott Simon why some Italian Americans have an emotional connection to Columbus Day.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Religious Walking Tour Maps Out The History Of Muslims In New York City
As she leads free walking tours through Harlem, Katie Merriman highlights the ways in which the history of Muslims is part of the history of New York City.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 12, 2019

Eligible El Paso Walmart Shooting Victims Can Start Applying For Funding
More than $6 million so far have been raised to help the victims of the August massacre. On Saturday, One Fund El Paso is hosting a community resource fair to help those who qualify.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Ronan Farrow Stands By His Reporting On NBC's 'Corrosive' Secrecy Around Sexual Abuse
Farrow tells NPR powerful media executives went to great lengths to kill his story on sexual assault allegations, to the point where he thought, if it didn't see light, "more people would get hurt."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Boeing CEO Is No Longer Also Chairman As Company Board Wants Focus On 737 Fix
With all 737 Max jets grounded, the board voted to strip CEO Dennis Muilenburg of his dual role. Two of the planes crashed, killing 346 people, when an automated flight system malfunctioned.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Safety Experts Slam Boeing And FAA For Design And Approval Of 737 Max Jets
Two of the planes crashed, killing hundreds. The review panel finds that Boeing withheld critical details about a flawed new automated system, and the regulators lacked expertise to find the problem.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan Is Out
McAleenan "wants to spend more time with his family and go to the private sector," President Trump tweeted. He's the latest casualty at the massive agency responsible for protecting U.S. borders.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Wildfires Continue To Burn, Force Evacuations In Southern California
Wildfires in Southern California have burned dozens of homes overnight and are forcing mandatory evacuations. They're being fueled by dry conditions and fanned by 70 mph winds.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Intentional Blackouts In Northern California Continue
The intentional blackout in northern California is now in its third day. The longer it lasts, the harder it is for residents, businesses, and governments to cope.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

N.Y. Judge Blocks Trump Administration's Public Charge Rule
Under the rule, officials would weigh whether a green card applicant will be self-sufficient. The rule had been set to go into effect on Oct. 15. It's now blocked by a preliminary injunction.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Federal Judge In N.Y. Blocks Trump's 'Public Charge' Rule For Green Cards
Under the rule, officials would weigh whether a green card applicant will be self-sufficient. The rule had been set to go into effect on Oct. 15. It's now blocked by a preliminary injunction.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Federal Judge In N.Y. Blocks Trump's 'Public Charge' Rule On Green Cards
Under the rule, officials would weigh whether a green card applicant will be self-sufficient. The rule had been set to go into effect on Oct. 15. It's now blocked by a preliminary injunction.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Federal Judges In 3 States Block Trump's 'Public Charge' Rule For Green Cards
Under the rule, officials would weigh whether a green card applicant will be self-sufficient. The rule had been set to go into effect on Oct. 15. It's now blocked by three preliminary injunctions.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

25 Homes, More Than 4,700 Acres Burn In Saddleridge Fire Near Los Angeles
"This is a very dynamic fire," Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Ralph Terrazas said Friday morning . Some 100,000 people are under mandatory evacuation orders.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

25 Homes, More Than 7,500 Acres Burn In Saddleridge Fire Near Los Angeles
"This is a very dynamic fire," Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Ralph Terrazas said Friday morning . Some 100,000 people are under mandatory evacuation orders.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races
A mass shooting there this spring that left 12 dead has put the issue into sharp focus. Democrats — bolstered by large cash infusions from gun control groups — hope to flip the state legislature blue.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Wildfires North Of LA Gain Intensity
First responders in Los Angeles County are gathering at a staging area at Hansen Dam to coordinate how to keep the fires from creeping into neighborhoods.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

EPA Proposes New Regulations For Lead In Drinking Water
The new proposal is being criticized for not proactively replacing lead service lines across the nation. It also keeps the same threshold for lead in drinking water that the U.S. currently has.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

'A Great Burden Was Lifted': A Father's Made-Up Day Of Forgiveness
Bernie Feldstein created "Amnesty Day," a tradition he started so his kids could confess anything without punishment. "I just wanted you to feel that you could share anything with me," he told them.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Border Wall Construction In Arizona Bulldozes Cactus Columns
President Trump's border wall is going up between Arizona and Mexico, and it's generating controversy because of its proximity to the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument and Native Americans lands.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

PG&E's Backouts Panic California's Vulnerable Population
Planned power outages in Northern California are entering their third day. People who depend on electricity for medical devices are struggling to cope.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

PG&E's Blackouts Panic California's Vulnerable Population
Planned power outages in Northern California are entering their third day. People who depend on electricity for medical devices are struggling to cope.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Voters In Florida's Swing District Weigh In On Impeachment Inquiry
In 2016, Democrat Stephanie Murphy was elected in a Florida congressional district long-held by a Republican. She's hearing from constituents about her support of the House impeachment investigation.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 11, 2019

Advocates Try To Help Migrants Navigate Trump's Public Charge Rule
Advocacy groups are trying to help immigrants navigate the Trump administration's rule change that says legal immigrants will be less likely to be able to stay in the U.S. if they use public benefits.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

U.N. Warns Of Budget Crisis If Nations Don't Pay $1.3 Billion In Dues They Owe
"This month, we will reach the deepest deficit of the decade," the Secretary-General warned. If countries don't pay soon, the U.N. will struggle to pay staff and hold meetings, and will limit travel.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Florida Man Who Shot And Killed A Black Man In Parking Dispute Gets 20 Years
Michael Drejka was sentenced Thursday. Surveillance video from July 2018 shows Drejka shooting and killing Markeis McGlockton, who was unarmed. The men were arguing over a handicapped parking space.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Florida Man Who Shot And Killed A Black Man Over Parking Dispute Gets 20 Years
Michael Drejka was sentenced Thursday. Surveillance video from July 2018 shows Drejka shooting and killing Markeis McGlockton, who was unarmed. The men were arguing over a handicapped parking space.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Sen. Mitt Romney Continues To Be A Vocal Critic Of President Trump
Sen. Mitt Romney, often a critic of President Trump, told reporters Thursday that asking Ukraine and China to investigate Joe Biden was wrong and Trump's decision to pull out of Syria was "tragic."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Montgomery Elects Steven Reed, City's First-Ever Black Mayor
Voters in Montgomery, Ala., have elected the city's first-ever black mayor. Steven Reed will now lead Alabama's capital city that was once known as the cradle of the Confederacy.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Man Charged With Murder After Woman Finds Memory Card Filled With Graphic Images
The card was labeled "homicide at midtown Marriott," and it contained 39 images and 12 videos depicting a strangulation. Police say it helped them make an arrest linked to a violent death.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Alaska Woman Finds SD Memory Card With Graphic Images That May Have Solved A Murder
The card was labeled "homicide at midtown Marriott," and it contained 39 images and 12 videos depicting a strangulation. Police say it helped them make an arrest linked to a violent death.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

How The Trump Administration Uses 'Workarounds' To Reshape Legal Immigration
The White House wanted sweeping changes on legal immigration. Congress didn't bite. Now critics say the administration is using "backdoor" rules and regulations to keep low-income immigrants out.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Thousands of Californians Are Powerless On Second Day Of PG&E's Intentional Outages
PG&E says the decision to unplug some customers' power "was based on forecasts of dry, windy weather including potential fire risk." California is currently at the peak of its wildfire season.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Thousands of Californians Are Powerless On 2nd Day Of PG&E's Intentional Outages
PG&E says the decision to unplug some customers' power "was based on forecasts of dry, windy weather including potential fire risk." California is currently at the peak of its wildfire season.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Power Is Gradually Restored To Thousands of Californians After 2nd Day Of Outages
PG&E says the decision to unplug some customers' power "was based on forecasts of dry, windy weather including potential fire risk." California is at the peak of its wildfire season.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Simone Biles Becomes Most Decorated Gymnast In World Championship History
Biles surpassed Vitaly Scherbo with a dominant performance Thursday. She now stands alone with 26 medals on the world championship stage.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 10, 2019

Simone Biles Wins Fifth All-Around World Championship Medal
Biles got closer to surpassing Vitaly Scherbo on the all-time list with a dominant performance Thursday. She could pass him this weekend.

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