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NPR U.S. News
Jan 23, 2020

Trump Administration Targets 'Birth Tourism' With New Visa Rule
Saying "birth tourism poses risks to national security," the State Department tells consular officials to deny a visa if they believe a potential visitor has the "primary purpose" of giving birth.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 23, 2020

Holocaust Survivor Returning To Auschwitz: 'It's Like Going To The Family Cemetery'
Vladimir Munk left Auschwitz 75 years ago after the concentration camp was liberated by Soviet soldiers. Now, for the first time, he's going back to a place he calls a burial ground for his family.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 23, 2020

At Michigan High School The Day Starts At 3 p.m. And Ends At 8 p.m.
As most students at the school are leaving, a second wave trickles in. They're part of a public school experiment: evening classes. The flex students are on the same track as their daytime peers.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 23, 2020

Utah Is Latest State To Ban LGBTQ 'Conversion Therapy'
This week, Utah became the 19th state to ban so-called "conversion therapy," a widely discredited practice that aims to change a person's sexual orientation or gender identity.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Juice WRLD Cause Of Death Was Accidental Overdose
The rapper's unexpected death at Midway International Airport was caused by an overdose of opioids, according to the medical examiner.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

New Jersey Mandates Severance Pay For Workers Facing Mass Layoffs
"Workers' performance and workers' dedication to the company were secondary. Now, they'll be moved more to the forefront," state Sen. Joe Cryan, a co-sponsor of the bill, said.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Amtrak Reverses Course On $25,000 Bill
The rail carrier Amtrak says passengers who use wheelchairs will no longer have to pay for the added cost of accommodating them.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Utah Becomes Latest State To Ban Discredited LGBTQ 'Conversion Therapy'
A host of medical experts have rejected the practice — aimed at changing a patient's sexual orientation — as "futile and destructive." In Utah, the ban took effect with a regulatory change Tuesday.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Architect Of CIA's Torture Program Says It Went Too Far
One of the psychologists who designed the CIA's torture program appeared again at war court in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, Wednesday. He testified about an inmate who was waterboarded more than 80 times.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

When Winter Hits Florida, Iguanas Fall From Trees — And Maybe Onto The Grill
"Verified the iguana warning," the National Weather Service office in Miami says. There are also reports that, much like in 2018, some people see the cold-stunned lizards as free meat.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

At San Francisco Airport, Caution Around New Coronavirus Screenings
This week, five U.S. airports will be screening passengers from flights originating in China for the new coronavirus. In San Francisco, people say they are cautious but not worried.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Impeachment Trial May Be Crucial For Reelecting Senators Like Martha McSally
The impeachment trial could be a political test for some senators up for reelection this fall. Among the vulnerable is Arizona Republican Martha McSally, who's tried to keep a low profile.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

New Boeing CEO Gives Pep Talk To Employees And Addresses Media
New Boeing CEO David Calhoun met with his employees in Seattle and then held a conference call with reporters in an effort to bolster confidence in the troubled airplane manufacturer.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

The Harvey Weinstein Trial: A Brief Timeline Of How We Got Here
For years, dark rumors swirled around the movie producer. So how did those whispered allegations result in a full-fledged criminal trial? Here's an abridged history.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

A History Of 'Pettifogging' For The Pettifoggers Among You
Chief Justice John Roberts trotted out an obscure term during impeachment proceedings yesterday; here's what it means.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Trump Says He'll Add 'A Few Countries' To Controversial U.S. Travel Ban
The president confirms a plan to expand one of the signature pieces of his immigration policy, in a move that could double the number of countries on the prohibited list.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Myth Busted: Turns Out Bankruptcy Can Wipe Out Student Loan Debt After All
Many Americans who get overwhelmed by student loan debt are told student debt can't be erased through bankruptcy. Now more judges and lawyers say that's a myth and bankruptcy can help.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Moms 4 Housing Celebrate Win In Battle Over Vacant House
Women who had illegally occupied a vacant house in Oakland, Calif., have reached an agreement with the property's owners. A nonprofit will buy the house and turn it into affordable housing.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Stabbing Trial Raises Questions About Mental Illness, Race-Related Violence
Jury selection is underway in the trial of a man charged in a deadly stabbing attack aboard a light rail train in Portland, Ore.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Philadelphia Teachers Sue Over Hazardous Buildings
The union representing public school teachers in Philadelphia announced it is suing the school district over its handling of asbestos, lead and mold problems in classrooms and buildings.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Psychologist Testifies About Torture Techniques In Sept. 11 Case
At the U.S. military court in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, a psychologist who waterboarded the alleged Sept. 11 mastermind is testifying as part of the case against five accused Sept. 11 terrorists.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

1st U.S. Case Of Coronavirus Confirmed In Washington State
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the first U.S. case of the coronavirus has been discovered in Washington. The patient traveled from China and was diagnosed earlier this week.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Northwest Salmon In Peril, And Efforts To Save Them Scale Up
With Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead on the brink of extinction, there are new efforts being brokered to save the famed fish.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Some Push To Change State Laws That Require HIV Disclosure To Sexual Partners
In more than 30 states, it is illegal for someone with HIV to have sex without first disclosing their status. Some are now trying to change that, arguing that those laws endanger public health.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 22, 2020

Gallup Poll: Dissatisfaction With U.S. Abortion Laws On The Rise
A new poll from Gallup finds increased dissatisfaction with the nation's abortion laws, mostly among Democrats, who want fewer restrictions.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 21, 2020

Supreme Court Allows Flint Water Lawsuits To Move Forward, Officials Not 'Immune'
In refusing to take up two cases involving the 2014 water crisis, the higher court has upheld earlier rulings saying neither city nor state officials are protected from being sued.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 21, 2020

Law Enforcement Officials Argue Rural Homeless Services Worsen Problem
Rural homelessness in Oregon isn't as visible as its urban equivalent, but it's a major problem. Even when money is available, local officials say providing resources could make the problem worse.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 21, 2020

2020 U.S. Census Kicks Off In Remote Alaskan Village
The first person counted today by Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham, in the official start of the 2020 census, is the oldest woman living in Toksook Bay, a tribal village in remote Alaska.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 21, 2020

Titanic Wreckage Now Protected Under U.S.-U.K. Deal That Was Nearly Sunk
On Tuesday, British Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani lauded a 2003 treaty that sat unratified for years but, after approval by the U.S., has recently been dredged from its would-be grave.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 21, 2020

New King Crowned At Disneyland's Sword In The Stone Display
The plaque reads: Whoso pulleth out this sword of this stone and anvil is rightwise ruler born of England. A tourist named Sam, who was described as burly, pulled out the sword. All hail Sam.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 21, 2020

More Data On The Midlife Crisis
An economist uses a broad range of data from 132 countries to understand why middle age is such a drag.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 21, 2020

Along The Rim of Alaska, The Once-A-Decade U.S. Census Begins In Toksook Bay
The 2020 census officially starts in an Alaskan fishing village along the Bering Sea. Starting the count there in January, when the ground is frozen, makes it easier to reach far-flung communities.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Political Unrest In Puerto Rico After Discovery Of Unused Hurricane Aid
Fed up with what they say is rampant corruption, protesters are demanding the resignation of Gov. Wanda Vázquez, who just months ago served as the island's Justice Secretary.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Amtrak To Drop $25,000 Ticket Price For 2 Wheelchair Users After Complaints
NPR reported on Friday that the ticket for a two-hour ride between Chicago and Bloomington-Normal, Ill., stations usually costs $16. Amtrak had based the higher price on adjustments to train cars.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Amtrak To Drop $25,000 Ticket Price For Two Wheelchair Users After Complaints
NPR reported on Friday that the ticket for a two-hour ride between Chicago and Bloomington-Normal, Ill., stations usually costs $16. Amtrak had based the higher price on adjustments to train cars.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Atlanta Church Commemorates Its Former Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
The Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta is where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was baptized and later led the congregation. On Monday, the church marked the holiday with a service.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Atlanta Church Commemorates Its Former Pastor, The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
The Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta is where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was baptized and later led the congregation. On Monday, the church marked the holiday with a service.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Gun Rights Activists Descend On Virginia Capitol
Thousands of people converged at the state Capitol in Virginia on Monday. At issue is an effort to curb gun laws in the commonwealth. Protesters and counterprotesters turned out in droves.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Philadelphia Holds Martin Luther King Day Of Service
Philadelphia hosts what's thought to be the country's largest day of service to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Super Bowl-Bound Chiefs Re-Energize Kansas City
For the first time in 50 years, the Kansas City Chiefs are headed to the Super Bowl. The Chiefs will face off against the San Francisco 49ers at Super Bowl LIV in Miami.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Sen. Duckworth Slams Amtrak Over $25K Price For Disabled Passengers
When two disability rights advocates tried to book a one-way train ride, Amtrak charged $25,000 in order to accommodate their wheelchairs. The ride from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill., is usually $16.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Newly Found Disaster Supplies Stoke Furor In Puerto Rico
In Puerto Rico, a warehouse full of disaster supplies from Hurricane Maria was discovered over the weekend, sparking widespread anger from residents.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Ken Starr Baylor University Scandal
Before his appointment to President Trump's impeachment defense team, Ken Starr was president at Baylor during a sexual assault scandal. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with ESPN reporter Paula Lavigne.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

White House Decries 'Rigged' Impeachment Process
President Trump's legal team offered a fiery response to the articles of impeachment in a legal brief on Monday, blasting Democrats one day before the Senate trial is expected to begin.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Women And The Legal Bounds Of Self-Defense
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Elizabeth Flock, of The New Yorker, about how far abused women can legally go to protect themselves.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Honolulu Police Search For Remains Of Suspect Who Killed 2 Officers, Set Homes Ablaze
Investigators are sifting through the remains of seven homes burned to the ground Honolulu. Authorities say a man facing eviction stabbed his landlord, set a fire and fatally shot the two officers.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Richmond Gun Rally: Thousands Of Gun Owners Converge On Virginia Capitol On MLK Day
"This is about losing one of the base freedoms that we have," a gun rights backer says in Richmond. The city is under a state of emergency, and some streets have been barricaded to prevent violence.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

'Just Mercy' Attorney Asks U.S. To Reckon With Its Racist Past And Present
Stevenson built a museum and monument in Alabama dedicated to slavery and its legacy. "We need to create institutions in this country that motivate more people to say 'Never again,' " he says.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Youth Teaching Tech To Seniors Fosters Generational Connections
Senior citizens who don't keep up with technology are at risk of social isolation. A New Mexico nonprofit pairs tech-savvy youth with seniors, and both generations benefit from the human connection.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Virginia Authorities Brace For Violence At Richmond Gun-Rights Rally
The mood in Richmond is tense as thousands of gun-rights activists arrive for a rally that's also attracting extremist factions. The annual event is part of a tradition known as Lobby Day.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

High School Play Honors Students Who Fought For MLK Holiday
Nearly 40 years after high school students in Oakland, Calif., campaigned to make Martin Luther King Jr. Day a holiday, students at the same school are taking inspiration from their predecessors.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

Boeing's 737 Max Crisis Weighs Heavily On Workers, Retirees
Boeing workers and retirees in Washington state are grieving. The pride they felt from designing and building airliners has been tarnished by the company's 737 Max crisis.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 20, 2020

News Brief: Trump Impeachment, Virginia Gun Rally, Royals Step Back
Senate impeachment trial of President Trump begins Tuesday. Virginia's capital prepares for a pro-gun rally. Buckingham Palace says Harry and Meghan are no longer working members of the royal family.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

Kansas City Chiefs To Play San Francisco 49ers In Super Bowl LIV
The Chiefs beat the Tennessee Titans 35-24 in the AFC Championship on Sunday. The 49ers followed with an NFC victory over the Green Bay Packers, 37-20. The Chiefs and 49ers will meet in Miami Feb. 2.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

Investigation Into Child Sex Abuse In Amish Communities
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with reporter Sarah McClure about her year-long investigation about child sexual abuse in Amish communities.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

San Francisco's New DA: 'What We Have Been Doing Is Not Working'
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Chesa Boudin, who was recently sworn-in as San Francisco's district attorney, about his vision for the office and using restorative justice in the criminal system.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

Florida Supreme Court Rules Convicted Felons Must Pay Fines To Vote
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Ari Berman, Mother Jones' voting rights reporter, about the latest news on Florida's legislation that allows former felons to vote.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

Virginia Governor Declares State Of Emergency Ahead Of Gun Rally
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Virginia State Senators Mark Obenshain and Scott Surovell about gun control and Monday's Lobby Day.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

Your Senate Impeachment Trial Questions
Impeachment historian Timothy Naftali joins NPR's Michel Martin to answer some of your questions about the Senate impeachment trial.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

U.S. Navy To Name Aircraft Carrier After WWII Hero Doris Miller
Miller was a mess attendant on the West Virginia when he jumped in to man a machine gun during the Pearl Harbor attack. He is the first African American to have an aircraft carrier named after him.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

How The Fight Over Guns Escalated In Virginia
In the state the NRA calls home, the issue of guns has been contentious between Republicans and Democrats for years.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

Election Security In Georgia
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Marilyn Marks of the Coalition for Good Governance about the reasons behind the lawsuit seeking to bar Georgia from using its paperless voting machines.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

Lawsuits Over Voting Machines In Pennsylvania
After an Election Day meltdown last year, two lawsuits in Pennsylvania could result in the state decertifying a popular voting machine ahead of of the 2020 elections.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

Worries Over Migrants' Mental Health
Aid workers are worried about a mental health crisis on the border. Thousands of migrants are camped out in Mexican border towns, waiting to ask for asylum in the U.S. Many are becoming despondent.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 19, 2020

$11 Billion And Counting: Trump's Border Wall Would Be The World's Most Costly
The costs keep piling up for Trump's border wall which has a current pricetag of $11 billion — nearly $20 million per mile. It's more expensive than any other wall under construction in the world.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

After A Fall At Baylor, Ken Starr Became A Fox Regular, And Then, A Trump Defender
Ken Starr was stripped of his presidency at Baylor University in 2016, accused of overseeing an administration that ignored a campus sexual assault scandal.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

Women's March Draws A Smaller, But Passionate Crowd
In its fourth annual iteration, the anti-Trump protest focused on climate change, reproductive justice and immigration.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

From Obscurity To Impeachment Figure: Who is Robert Hyde?
Hyde says he was joking when he messaged an associate of Rudy Giuliani that he was tracking former U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. Now, U.S. and Ukrainian authorities are investigating.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

Barbershop: Warren Vs. Sanders
NPR's Michel Martin talks about the disagreement that's emerged between Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders with journalists Connie Schultz, Clare Malone and Melanye Price.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

Elk Raise Tensions Between Tribes And Farmers In Washington's Skagit Valley
In Washington state's Skagit Valley, a conflict is unfolding between Native Americans and farmers. Elk are making a comeback there. Local tribes are thrilled, but the agriculture industry is not.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

Meals On Wheels Serves Up Breakfast, Lunch And Community At Local Diner
Meals on Wheels usually means home delivery or lunch at a senior center. But at a new project in Vancouver, Wash., it's a retro-hip neighborhood diner where seniors can get eggs, coffee and community.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Kids' Climate Case 'Reluctantly' Dismissed By Appeals Court
The court said the nearly two dozen young people who were trying to force action by the government on climate change did not have standing to sue. The judges said climate change is a political issue.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Defense Department To Overhaul Screening For Foreign Military Trainees
Officials said they want to "ensure the program continues." To that end, the department has reviewed "how we can use our resources to do enhanced vetting."

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Amtrak Asks 2 People Who Use Wheelchairs To Pay $25,000 For A Ride
It usually costs $16 to take Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. The company defended the $25,000 cost for the extra wheelchair users, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Amtrak Asks Two People In Wheelchairs To Pay $25,000 For A Ride
It costs 16 dollars to take the Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. But two people in wheelchairs were told they'd have to pay $25,000. Amtrak defended the cost, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Amtrak Asks Two People Who Use Wheelchairs To Pay $25,000 For A Ride
It usually costs $16 to take Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. The company defended the $25,000 cost for the extra wheelchair users, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

3 Alleged Members Of Hate Group 'The Base' Arrested In Georgia
This is the second trio of suspected members of The Base to be arrested this week. The group is trying to bring about the downfall of the U.S. government, according to law enforcement.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

3 Alleged Members Of Hate Group 'The Base' Arrested In Georgia, Another In Wisconsin
This is the second round of suspected members of The Base to be arrested this week. The group is trying to bring about the downfall of the U.S. government, according to law enforcement.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Supreme Court Takes Up Birth-Control Conscience Case
The high court will consider a case involving a challenge to a Trump administration rule that allows employers to opt out of providing contraceptive coverage for religious or moral reasons.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Indiana's Oldest State Worker Is Retiring At 102: 'I've Been A Pretty Lucky Guy'
Bob Vollmer, a land surveyor for nearly six decades, tells NPR he's got new projects in mind — like building a pool. And he's got some advice: "If anybody does anything for you ... say thank you."

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

U.S. Says 11 Service Members Were Injured When Iran Attacked Iraqi Base
Eight Americans were taken to Germany and three to Kuwait to receive medical care after Iran's missile strike last week, a Defense Department spokesperson says.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Amtrak Charged $25,000 To Travel With A Wheelchair
It costs $16 to take the Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. But people who use wheelchairs were recently asked to pay $25,000. Amtrak defended the cost, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

At $11 Billion And Counting, Trump's Border Wall Would Be The World's Most Expensive
President Trump's border wall comes at a staggering cost: $11 billion, or nearly $20 million per mile. It's already the most expensive border wall in the world, and the costs keep piling up.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Two Wheelchair Users Faced A $25,000 Fee To Travel On Amtrak
It costs $16 to take the Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. But people who use wheelchairs were recently asked to pay $25,000. Amtrak defended the cost, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

The Secret Star Of The Tennessee Titans: Their Punter
The NFL playoffs resume this weekend, when the Tennessee Titans aim to continue their surprising romp against some of football's best teams. One reason for their success? Brett Kern — their punter.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Earthquakes Revive Puerto Ricans' Mistrust of The Government
People across the island are collecting donations for those displaced by earthquakes. Rather than give them to the government, they're delivering the goods to the affected region themselves.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Rep. John Lewis' Fight For Civil Rights Began With A Letter To Martin Luther King Jr.
As a teenager growing up in Alabama, Lewis wrote a letter to Martin Luther King Jr. during a budding civil rights movement. In a letter back, King invited the 18-year-old to join the cause.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Legal Battle Over Terminally Ill Child Raises Sanctity Of Life Questions
In Ft. Worth, Texas, legal action over whether a hospital can remove a terminally ill, 11-month-old girl from life support is raising legal, medical and ethical questions.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

News Brief: Trump-Ukraine, White Supremacist Group, Puerto Rico Relief
Watchdog report says Trump broke the law withholding Ukraine aid. FBI arrests 3 alleged members of white supremacist group. Federal disaster declaration provides funds to quake-stricken Puerto Rico.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

3 Alleged Members Of White Supremacist Group Arrested By FBI
The FBI says it has disrupted an armed neo-Nazi cell that discussed bomb-making and attacks. They were charged in connection with their membership in a group called The Base.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

After Controversial Leaders Step Down, The Women's March Tries Again In 2020
For the fourth year, the anti-Trump Women's March will stage events in Washington, D.C., and other places. After years of controversy, the group now has new leadership and a new focus.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Trump Declares Major Disaster After Puerto Rico's Earthquakes
NPR's Noel King talks to Jennifer Gonzalez-Colon, who represents Puerto Rico in Congress, about the more than $3 billion worth of aid to help the island after a series of destructive earthquakes.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Puerto Rico Relief: Trump Declares Major Disaster After Series Of Earthquakes
Island officials were quick to thank the president for the designation, which makes residents eligible for more financial assistance from FEMA. They were just told aid for 2017 hurricanes is coming.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

U.S. Virgin Islands Officials: Epstein Trafficked Girls On Private Island Until 2018
The Virgin Islands Attorney General's Office says Epstein recruited and abused young women and girls over two decades on his two private islands. Some victims allegedly were as young as 11 years old.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Investigation Reveals Detroit Overcharged Homeowners On Property Tax After Recession
Mary Louise Kelly talks with Detroit News reporter Christine MacDonald about her investigation into the city of Detroit overtaxing homeowners after the recession, leaving scores of residents in debt.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Investigation Finds Mississippi's Restitution Centers Act Like Debtor's Prisons
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Anna Wolfe and Michelle Liu of Mississippi Today about their 14-month investigation into the state's restitution centers and how they function as debtors' prisons.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

New York Mets 'Part Ways' With Manager Carlos Beltrán Over Sign-Stealing Scandal
The fallout continues from a sign-stealing scandal involving the Houston Astros during the 2017 and 2018 seasons. Beltrán was part of the team in 2017, and a league investigation said he was involved.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Report Defends 'Thorough Work' Done Certifying Boeing 737 Max — But Suggests Changes
Amid difficult questions about the steps taken by Boeing and regulators, the review commissioned by the Department of the Transportation largely validated the process that put the jetliner in the air.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

FBI Arrests 3 Alleged Members Of White Supremacist Group Ahead Of Richmond Rally
A law enforcement official tells NPR that the three suspected members of The Base had discussed going to a pro-gun rally next week in Virginia.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

TSA Says It Seized A Record Number Of Firearms At U.S. Airports Last Year
The Transportation Security Administration said 87% of the guns taken at U.S. airport checkpoints in 2019 were loaded. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International had the most firearms confiscated: 323.

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