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NPR Headline News
Mar 06, 2021

Musician Semler Talks New Album 'Preacher's Kid'
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Semler about her new album. On Preacher's Kid, Semler reckons with her faith and queerness.

NPR Headline News
Mar 06, 2021

Far-Right Misinformation Is Thriving On Facebook. A New Study Shows Just How Much
Research from New York University found that far-right accounts known for spreading misinformation drive engagement at higher rates than other news sources.

NPR Headline News
Mar 06, 2021

After Crippling Winter Storm, Recovery Neglects Underserved Mississippians
Mississippi endured a winter storm that knocked out power and water to hundreds of thousands of residents. Black Mississippians say their needs continue to be ignored.

NPR Headline News
Mar 06, 2021

As U.S. Vaccine Rollout Speeds Up, Inequality Stunts Progress Worldwide
More and more countries are getting shipments of vaccines and starting to inoculate their populations. But it's an unequal picture across the globe.

NPR Headline News
Mar 06, 2021

Author Explores Preacher Father's Silence On Racial Injustice In 1960s Alabama
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist John Archibald about his book, Shaking the Gates of Hell: A Search for Family and Truth in the Wake of the Civil Rights Revolution.

NPR Headline News
Mar 06, 2021

Senate Passes Milestone Coronavirus Relief Package. What Happens Next?
After 24 hours of debate, the Senate in a 50-49 vote passed the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package. The measure now moves back to the House which must pass an identical version.

NPR Headline News
Mar 06, 2021

Biden Infrastructure Plan Aims To Please Both Labor And Environmentalists
President Biden is enlisting union support for his plan to rebuild infrastructure. Labor leaders say he'll have a difficult balancing act if he wants to be the most labor-friendly president ever.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

For The First Time In 56 Years, A 'Bloody Sunday' Without John Lewis
Sunday's anniversary of the day marchers were beaten by police in Selma, Ala., will honor the late civil rights icon. Some 56 years later, former state Sen. Hank Sanders says his work isn't done.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Pope Francis Welcomed With Red Carpet And Military Band On First Ever Trip To Iraq
The Vatican has sought to make a papal trip to Iraq, the traditional home of Abraham and now a shrinking Christian minority, since 2000. Pope Francis ended his first day there with religious leaders.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Bipartisan Bill In Kentucky Might Keep Voter Access Expansions After COVID-19
While lawmakers in other states battle over voting reforms, Kentucky may pass a bipartisan bill that would keep some of the policies put in place last year that expanded voting access during COVID-19.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Author Kazuo Ishiguro Explores Love, Loneliness And Connection In 'Klara And The Sun'
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Kazuo Ishiguro about his new novel, Klara and the Sun, a story about a small AI girl robot created to keep teens from becoming lonely.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

The Last Picks For NBA All-Star Game, Utah Jazz Players May See Finger Jams After All
In Thursday's draft for the NBA All-Star Game, the last two picks were the two players from the Utah Jazz. It's not the only indignity Jazz fans have endured in their time supporting the franchise.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

There's A History Of Inequality In The Courtroom Ahead Of George Floyd Murder Trial
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Sonia Gipson Rankin, law professor at the University of New Mexico, on jury selection and the history of bias and discrimination in the system ahead of the Chauvin trial.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

U.S. Added More Jobs Than Expected Last Month, But Still Not Enough
U.S. employers added 379,000 jobs in February — more than most forecasters predicted. Despite this increase in jobs, the Biden administration says the country is still a long way from full employment.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Andra Day On Portraying BilIie Holiday And The Enduring Strength Of 'Strange Fruit'
The song "Strange Fruit" is the powerful and thematically horrifying centerpiece of the new film The United States Vs. Billie Holiday, which positions music as a powerful force for change.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Cancer Survivor Hayley Arceneaux To Be The Youngest American To Visit Space
SpaceX is planning the first all-civilian space mission in a global shift toward more accessible space travel. Hayley Arceneaux will be one of four on board and the youngest American to visit space.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Republican Lawmakers Across The Country Push For Abortion Restrictions
In legislatures around the country, Republican lawmakers — encouraged by the confirmation of Judge Amy Coney Barrett — are pushing a new round of abortion restrictions.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Twitter Tests New Products And Experiments Like 'Super Follows'
Twitter hasn't changed much over the years, unlike other social media companies that seem to always be rolling out new features. But recently, Twitter announced some new moves of its own.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

What China's 'Total Victory' Over Extreme Poverty Looks Like In Actuality
China's ruling Communist Party has declared "total victory" over extreme poverty. Did that really happen, and if so, how?

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

One Cuomo Accuser's Experience Of Taking On The Sitting Governor Of New York
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Debra Katz, attorney for Charlotte Bennett, one of three women who are accusing N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo of sexual harassment.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Pokémon Goes In A New Direction With Open-World Video Game
For years, open-world video games, where players can explore all around the map rather than following a set path, have been hugely popular. The Pokémon franchise is finally catching up.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

Asylum Seekers Are Allowed Into U.S. For Their Day In Immigration Court
The Biden administration is allowing asylum seekers who have been waiting in Mexican border towns into the U.S. for their day in immigration court. Now more migrants are surging to the border.

NPR Headline News
Mar 05, 2021

The Capitol Siege: The Arrested And Their Stories
More than 250 people have been charged in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. NPR is looking at the cases. Each provides clues to questions surrounding the attack: Who joined the mob? What did they do? And why?

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

U.N. Official: Biden Plan To Boost Refugee Resettlement 'Sends Important Signal'
U.N. Deputy High Commissioner for Refugees Kelly Clements says she's pleased the U.S. plans to raise the cap on refugees to 125,000 per year. Work is already underway at the U.S.-Mexico border.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

How Canada Post Is Encouraging Folks To Reach Out And Write With Free Postcards
Canada Post is distributing prepaid postcards to 13.5 households in an effort to encourage people to connect with others through a handwritten note in its #WriteHereWriteNow campaign.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Myanmar Military Used Live Ammunition To Quell Protests
Myanmar's military has used live ammunition to quell ongoing protests, which are trying to restore democratic rule, killing scores of protesters in recent days.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

A Writer's Memoir About Her Clerical Job Becomes The Movie 'My Salinger Year'
A young writer gets a clerical job with the book agent representing J.D. Salinger in My Salinger Year, a movie based on the memoir by Joanna Rakoff.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Should Have Stayed Mum: Interview With Queen Of Talk Lands Royals In Hairy Situation
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Elizabeth Holmes, writer and longtime royal watcher, about the fallout from Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex's interview with Oprah Winfrey.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

'Reclaimers' Broke Into Empty Houses And Got To Stay — But Others Haven't Since
In March of 2020, a group of homeless and housing-insecure people broke into empty government-owned homes in a neighborhood of Los Angeles, and occupied them. They called themselves "Reclaimers."

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Being Vaccinated Doesn't Mean It's Safe To Take Off The Mask
What newfound freedoms can people who have been vaccinated feel safe about? With only about 20% of U.S. adults vaccinated against COVID-19, experts explain why some restrictions remain in place.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Long-term Unemployment Remains High Despite American Jobs Returning
The U.S. job market is starting to show signs of recovery. Though unemployment has been falling, around 4 million people had been unemployed for over six months in February.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Mississippi Has No Mask Mandate Or Enough Vaccines — And Some Still Have No Water
In Mississippi, some residents still don't have running water after a winter storm weeks ago. It's another frustration as the governor lifts the mask mandate among limited COVID-19 vaccination supply.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

The New Head Of the FDA On COVID-19 Tests And Vaccines
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, about coronavirus tests and the future of COVID-19 vaccines.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Vaccine Disparity Hits Home For Many Foreign-Born Doctors
Many U.S. doctors have received their COVID-19 vaccines, but nearly a third are foreign-born with family in countries facing no access to it — a disparity that troubles many as they fight the virus.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

With Trump Out Of Office, Disinformation Online Is On A Decline
By almost any metric, the scope of disinformation in America has gotten steadily worse in recent years. But the deplatforming of Trump, and a subsequent dip in lies online, gives room for optimism.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Secretary Of State Described China As Biden's Biggest Political Test
In a speech, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken described China as the Biden administration's biggest political test.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

A Small Choral Group Is Betting Big On Tokenizing Their Art With Blockchain
A choral group in Dallas hopes to use blockchain to monetize their new recording. Instead of making pennies from streams, they can sell a single copy for thousands of dollars... if they find a bidder.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Sao Paulo Prepares For Lockdown After Record COVID-19 Deaths In Brazil
Brazil is seeing a record number of coronavirus deaths as a new variant overwhelms the health care system. Over 1,900 deaths on Wednesday marked the second day in a row of record deaths.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

House Cancels Session After Another Militia Threat
Capitol Police said they had intelligence of a militia group plotting to try to breach the Capitol again on March 4. The threat prompted the House to cancel its session for the day.

NPR Headline News
Mar 04, 2021

Some Want 1 Shot, 2 Shots Or None At All: A Neighborhood Deliberates Vaccines
People in a diverse Seattle neighborhood consider the new Johnson & Johnson vaccine, particularly who is and isn't getting it and why.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

'Now Is Not The Time To Stop Wearing A Mask,' Says CDC Director Rochelle Walensky
With new cases teetering at about 60,000 to 70,000 per day, new hyper-transmissible variants and state rollbacks of coronavirus restrictions, the CDC chief urges Americans to remain vigilant.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

How 2 Skiers Conquered Yosemite's Half Dome
Last month, Jason Torlano and Zach Milligan skied and rappelled down Yosemite National Park's iconic Half Dome in a death-defying journey of nearly 5,000 feet from summit to valley floor.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

How Two Skiers Conquered Yosemite's Half Dome
Last month, Jason Torlano and Zach Milligan skied and rappelled down Yosemite National Park's iconic Half Dome in a death-defying journey of nearly 5,000 feet from summit to valley floor.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

How California Is Trying — And Struggling — To Reach Vaccination Equity
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Dr. Paul Adamson, a physician and a fellow in infectious diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA on why vaccine equity has been hard to reach in California.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

Pushing The Envelope — New Mail Truck Has A Stamp Of Approval For Safety
The new U.S. Postal Service truck design might look a little silly, but many of the new features actually make it safer and more efficient — something other delivery vehicles might benefit from.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

New Compilation Of Old Tunes Is 'An Alternate History Of The World's Music'
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Jonathan Ward on his new 100-track compilation of early recordings from around the world called Excavated Shellac: An Alternate History of the World's Music.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

Officials Testify To Senate On What Took The National Guard So Long On Jan. 6
A joint Senate panel heard testimony Wednesday from military and national security officials to try to understand the military and intelligence failures during the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

A Question Of Ethics As The Resale Sneaker Industry Grows
How much money is too much money to spend on a pair of sneakers? NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Michael Sykes, staff writer with For The Win from USA TODAY Sports, on sneakerhead culture wars.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

Committee At Brigham Young University Has 26 Ideas To Tackle Race Issues On Campus
Brigham Young University's race committee has released a study assessing race issues on campus. Committee member and BYU law professor Michalyn Steele breaks down their findings and recommendations.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

Unvaccinated Frontline Workers In Texas Could Be At Risk With Lifting Of Mask Mandate
Texas has lifted its mask mandate and is opening up restaurants and other venues to full capacity. Frontline workers in the state do not have priority access to vaccines and many say they're nervous.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

What's Safe Once Someone's Gotten A COVID-19 Vaccine? Director Of The CDC Advises
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Rochelle Walensky on COVID-19 vaccine rollouts, school reopenings, and what vaccinated people should and shouldn't do.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

Christian Groups Resist Johnson & Johnson Vaccine For Using Abortion-Derived Cells
Because abortion-derived cell lines were used in its development, some Christian groups are advising against using the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine if other vaccines are available.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

Colonial Schoolhouse Discovery Is An Opportunity For U.S. Racial History Lesson
The Williamsburg Bray School was an 18th-century, pro-slavery school for educating enslaved and free Black students. A new partnership is calling to educate the public about this history.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

'Life's A Vapor, A Very Fragile Thing': Grief And Rebuilding A Year After Tornadoes
A year after tornadoes roared across Tennessee, killing 25 people and destroying over 1,6oo buildings, the rebuilding continues — and the toll of the storms weigh heavily on those still recovering.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

As State Mandates Lift, How San Antonio Mayor Will Keep City Safe Amid COVID-19
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg about the governor's announcement to lift coronavirus restrictions and his options while the virus is still widespread in his city.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

Colombia's President On Amnesty For Venezuelans: 'We Want To Set An Example'
"We want to demonstrate that although we're not a rich country, we can do something that is humanitarian ... but at the same time is an intelligent and sound migration policy," Iván Duque tells NPR.

NPR Headline News
Mar 03, 2021

Progressives Show Patience With Biden, At Least Until Relief Bill Passes
President Biden vowed to govern as the most progressive chief executive since Franklin Roosevelt. But progressives in Congress are skeptical, especially after a recent letdown over the minimum wage.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Neera Tanden Withdraws Her Office Of Management And Budget Nomination
Neera Tanden has withdrawn her nomination to lead the Office of Management and Budget, the first big loss for the Biden administration in Congress.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Stacey Abrams On Why Securing Voting Rights Is As Necessary Now As In The Past
In the wake of the historic 2020 election turnout, state legislatures across the U.S. are considering bills to make it harder to vote. Activist Stacey Abrams warns of a return to Jim Crow-era laws.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Supreme Court Seems Ready To Uphold Restrictive Voting Laws
The court heard arguments in a case that could allow state legislatures to make it more difficult for some to vote. The arguments centered on a key portion of the Voting Rights Act.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Looking Again At A Doctor's Old Rhymes, Seuss Works Haven't Kept Up With The Times
Dr. Seuss Enterprises has announced it will end publication of six titles deemed to contain racist imagery. The books include And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street and If I Ran the Zoo.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Arizona Republicans Fight Before SCOTUS For 2 Voting Laws That Would Inhibit Voting
The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a voting rights case that could allow state legislatures to make it more difficult for some to vote. At issue are two Arizona laws.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Album Review: Julien Baker Embraces Struggles With Addiction In 'Little Oblivions'
Tennessee songwriter Julien Baker's new album "Little Oblivions" reveals new folds in the musician's road to recovery from addiction.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Stacey Abrams' Voter Suppression Documentary Lands On Oscar Shortlist
Stacey Abrams' efforts registering voters played a key role in Georgia electing Biden and two democratic senators. Now, her documentary about voter suppression has been shortlisted for an Oscar.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Where The U.S. Stands With France Now That Biden Is In Charge
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Philippe Etienne, France's ambassador to the U.S., about Iran, climate change, and what hopes he has for the U.S.-France relationship in the Biden administration.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Why Some Powerful Men, Like Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Haven't Learned The Lessons Of #MeToo
Three years into #MeToo, three women have raised allegations against Gov. Andrew Cuomo. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Vox senior reporter Anna North on how some men's behavior hasn't changed.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Vaccine Misallocations Sparks One Medical Congressional Hearing
One Medical is seeing the shutoff of vaccine allocations, new reports of wrongdoing, and a congressional hearing as fallout deepens following NPR's investigation of its COVID-19 vaccination practices.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Normally Competitors, Merck To Produce Vaccines For Johnson & Johnson
Pharmaceutical giant Merck has not had success with its own COVID-19 vaccine, but has entered a deal to produce vaccines for Johnson & Johnson, who could use the help after production shortfalls.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

FBI Director Defends Agency In Testimony, Calls Jan. 6 Attack 'Domestic Terrorism'
Testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, FBI Director Christopher Wray called the Jan. 6 insurrection "domestic terrorism" and defended the FBI's handling of intelligence prior to the attack.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Experts In Cult Deprogramming Step In To Help Believers In Conspiracy Theories
With disinformation spreading on an unprecedented scale, experts in cult deprogramming are turning their expertise to those who have fallen down the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Biden's Picks For Financial Regulators Appear Before Senate In Double Hearing
Biden's picks for the watchdogs protecting Americans from financial wrongdoing will face the Senate Banking Committee. If confirmed, they will be much tougher on Wall Street than their predecessors.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Vernon Jordan, Power Broker And Former Presidential Advisor, Dies At 85
Vernon Jordan, for years an influential power broker in Washington and a close advisor to former President Bill Clinton, has died at 85.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Unprecedented Security Measures Surround Court For George Floyd Murder Trial
Highly abnormal security measures like barricades, fencing, and concertina wire surround the courthouse where the trial of the police officer charged with the murder of George Floyd will take place.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Bunny Wailer, Iconic Reggae Singer And Wailers Co-Founder, Has Died At Age 73
The last founding member of The Wailers died Tuesday in Kingston, Jamaica. After leaving the group in 1974, Bunny Wailer cultivated a distinguished solo career.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Reading A Letter That's Been Sealed For More Than 300 Years — Without Opening It
A signed, sealed but not delivered letter from 1697 has finally been read with the help of a high-tech scan that looked inside without breaking its seal.

NPR Headline News
Mar 02, 2021

Bitcoin: Mother Of All Bubbles, Or Revolutionary Breakthrough
From 21st century carmaker Tesla to 170-year-old life insurer MassMutual. From banks to the auction house Christie's. They have all opened their doors to cryptocurrency, bringing it to the mainstream.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

As Yemenis Starve To Death, Humanitarian Relief Group Pleas For International Help
Jan Egeland of the Norwegian Refugee Council is on the ground in Yemen. The United Nations is asking for funding as tens of thousands are already starving to death and millions more go hungry.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

As Yemenis Starve, Humanitarian Relief Group Pleads For International Help
Jan Egeland of the Norwegian Refugee Council is on the ground in Yemen. The United Nations is asking for funding as tens of thousands are already starving to death and millions more go hungry.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

An Unknown Number Of People Remain Under Boil Orders In Mississippi
An unknown number of people are still without drinking water in Jackson, Miss., after a winter storm two weeks ago. In some areas, service has been restored but they're still under boil water notices.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

Connecticut Breaks Federal Guidelines By Vaccinating People Based On Age
Grocery store employees, janitors and other essential workers will no longer have priority under the state's new vaccination plan, which is based on age.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

Director Of National Intelligence Avril Haines On The Challenges Ahead
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Avril Haines, the director of national intelligence, on the reports on the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, domestic terrorism and her approach to her role.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

In Pope Francis, Biden Has A Potential Ally — Who Shares The Same Catholic Detractors
The pope and the president share liberal stances on climate change and economic disparity. A theology scholar argues U.S. Catholic Church leadership is increasingly allied with the political right.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

The Capital Gazette: What The Newsroom Looks Like 2 Years After Shooting
In 2018, a gunman killed five staff members of the Capital Gazette after blasting his way into their Annapolis, Md., offices. The remaining staff has seen both traumas and triumphs in the years since.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

Two Determined Mothers Clash Over Integration Efforts In 'What's Mine And Yours'
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Naima Coster about her novel 'What's Mine And Yours,' about a North Carolina high school in the middle of an integration program in the early 2000

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

Florida Democrats Try To Regroup After Big November Losses
Although Joe Biden won, Democrats in Florida lost big in November, giving up seats in Congress and the state legislature. They face tough races in next year's election and the state party is broke.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

Hospitals Struggle To Steer Clear Of Counterfeit Masks
Federal agents and others have seized more than 11 million counterfeit masks, including the N95 masks used in hospitals. What are some indicators of a fake mask?

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo Faces 2 Sexual Harassment Allegations And Calls To Resign
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Democratic New York State Sen. Alessandra Biaggi about the allegations of sexual harassment against N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

Biden Draws Criticism For Failing To Hold Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Accountable
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof about the Biden administration's role in holding Saudi Arabia's crown prince accountable for Jamal Khashoggi's killing.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

2 Determined Mothers Clash Over Integration Efforts In 'What's Mine And Yours'
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Naima Coster about her novel What's Mine And Yours, about a North Carolina high school in the middle of an integration program in the early 2000.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

Could A Single-Dose Of COVID-19 Vaccine After Illness Stretch The Supply?
People who have been sick with COVID-19 may need only one dose of the normally two-shot vaccines. If that became policy it could extend vaccine supplies, but logistical challenges are daunting.

NPR Headline News
Mar 01, 2021

FDA Clears The Way For Another COVID-19 Vaccine To Go Into Circulation
The Food and Drug Administration authorized Johnson & Johnson's vaccine for emergency use Saturday, a day after a panel of advisers to the agency voted unanimously in its favor.

NPR Headline News
Feb 28, 2021

Journalist Explores Challenges For 'Power Moms' In New Book
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with journalist Joann Lublin about her new book, Power Moms: How Executive Mothers Navigate Work and Life.

NPR Headline News
Feb 28, 2021

Producer Talks New Film, 'The United States Vs. Billie Holiday'
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with writer and producer Johann Hari about the new movie, The United States Vs. Billie Holiday, which is based in part on his book, Chasing the Scream.

NPR Headline News
Feb 28, 2021

At CPAC, Trump Returns To Public Stage
Donald Trump makes his first post-presidency speech at the annual CPAC conference.

NPR Headline News
Feb 28, 2021

With 'Rightly,' Al-Jazeera Targets Conservative Audience In New Online Platform
Al Jazeera, the Qatar-financed media giant, launched a new online platform aimed at a conservative American audience. It's called "Rightly."

NPR Headline News
Feb 28, 2021

Demetria Bannister, 28: Kirk Franklin's 'The Storm Is Over Now'
Demetria or "Demi" Bannister had a powerful voice — singing or not — that could touch the heart of anyone she encountered.

NPR Headline News
Feb 28, 2021

A Chapter In U.S. History Often Ignored: The Flight Of Runaway Slaves To Mexico
As the U.S. Treasury considers putting Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill to honor her role in the northbound underground railroad, new attention is being paid to the often overlooked southbound route.

NPR Headline News
Feb 27, 2021

Democratic Strategists Talk Ongoing Fight To Raise Minimum Wage
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Maria Cardona and David Sirota about the divide in the party over how to pursue a federal minimum wage increase.

NPR Headline News
Feb 27, 2021

Tracking Police Misconduct Settlements That Cost Cities Millions
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux, a data journalist who's been analyzing public records to see whether police settlements have changed how cities approach police misconduct.

NPR Headline News
Feb 27, 2021

TV Series Review: 'Soul Of A Nation'
On Tuesday, ABC is launching a six-part series, Soul of a Nation. It's the first time a major broadcast network is dedicating a primetime news magazine to Black life.

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