NEWS: DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NEWS
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Department of Homeland Security News
Dec 11, 2017

Statement By Secretary Nielsen On House Passage Of H.R. 3359 To Create The Cybersecurity And Infrastructure Security Agency
Release Date: December 11, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON - 'I commend the House of Representatives for passing H.R. 3359. I urge the Senate to pass similar legislation. As the events of this morning illustrate, our nation''s critical infrastructure can often be prime targets for adversaries of all types, including terrorists, nation state and other non-state actors, hackers, and ordinary criminals. As the threat landscape shifts and becomes more complex, our approach to security must evolve.

'I want to personally thank Chairman McCaul for his tireless work to reach this important milestone in furtherance of the Department of Homeland Security''s mission. This legislation, which has bipartisan support, has been a priority of this Administration from day one. I look forward to continuing to work with Congress to move this important legislation forward.'

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Keywords:  Legislation

Department of Homeland Security News
Dec 11, 2017

Statement By Secretary Nielsen On Attempted Terror Attack In New York
Release Date: December 11, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON - Today, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen M. Nielsen spoke with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department (NYPD) Commissioner James O''Neill regarding the details of the attempted terrorist attack in New York City. Secretary Nielsen released the following statement on the Department''s role in coordinating a federal response to terror-related incidents.

'The Department of Homeland Security is taking appropriate action to protect our people and our country in the wake of today''s attempted terrorist attack in New York City. We will continue to assist New York authorities with the response and investigation and we urge the public to remain vigilant and report any suspicious activity. More broadly, the administration continues to adopt significant security measures to keep terrorists from entering our country and from recruiting within our borders. The enemy we face is persistent and adaptive. But they should know this: Americans will not be coerced by terrorism, and we will not allow it to become the new normal. We will fight back aggressively and bring terrorists to justice.'

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Topics:  Preventing Terrorism, Transportation Security Keywords:  attack, federal response, new york, physical security measures, security measures, suspicious activity, suspicious behavior, terrorism,

Department of Homeland Security News
Dec 07, 2017

Secretary Nielsen Announces the Establishment of the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office
Release Date: December 7, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

DHS Undertaking Critical Reorganization to Protect the Homeland  

WASHINGTON -Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen today announced the establishment of the Department of Homeland Security''s (DHS) Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction (CWMD) Office.  The CWMD Office will elevate and streamline DHS efforts to prevent terrorists and other national security threat actors from using harmful agents, such as chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear material and devices to harm Americans and U.S. interests.

The office consolidates key DHS functions and will lead the Department''s efforts to counter WMD threats. It will also allow for greater policy coordination and strategic planning, as well as provide greater visibility for this critically important mission.

'The United States faces rising danger from terrorist groups and rogue nation states who could use chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear agents to harm Americans,' said Secretary Nielsen. 'That''s why DHS is moving towards a more integrated approach, bringing together intelligence, operations, interagency engagement, and international action.  As terrorism evolves, we must stay ahead of the enemy and the establishment of this office is an important part of our efforts to do so.'

The United States faces a rising danger from threat actors who could use chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear agents to harm Americans or U.S. interests.  Intelligence analysis shows terrorist groups are actively pursuing WMD capabilities, are using battlefield environments to test them, and may be working to incorporate these methods into external operations in ways we have not seen previously.  Certain weapons of mass destruction, once viewed as out-of-reach for all but nation states, are now closer to being attained by non-state actors.  A terrorist attack using such a weapon against the United States would have a profound and potentially catastrophic impact on our nation and the world.

The CWMD Office will be led by Mr. James McDonnell, who was appointed by President Trump in June 2017 to serve as the Director of the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO).

Next week, Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke will deliver remarks regarding the CWMD Office at The Hudson Institute. More information can be found here.

Topics:  Biological Security, Chemical Security, Explosives, Nuclear Security,

Department of Homeland Security News
Dec 07, 2017

Written testimony of DNDO, OHA, and S&T for a House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications hearing titled 'Examining the Department of Homeland Security's Efforts to Counter Weapons of Mass Destruction'
Release Date: December 7, 2017210 House Capitol Visitor Center

Chairman Donovan, Ranking Member Payne, and distinguished members of the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and Communications, thank you for inviting us to speak with you today. We appreciate the opportunity to discuss the Department of Homeland Security''s (DHS) work to bolster efforts to counter the threat of terrorist actors using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) against the Homeland. As the leaders of the organizations involved in the reorganization of WMD functions into one office within DHS, we appreciate your interest in this matter. We also appreciate the support from former Secretary John Kelly and Acting Secretary Elaine Duke in pursuing a Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction (CWMD) Office aimed at elevating and streamlining DHS''s role in the WMD mission and further unifying associated activities under one office.

Background As Acting Secretary Elaine Duke stated in her September 27, 2017 testimony to the Senate, our intelligence professionals have seen a renewed terrorist interest in WMD. The United States faces a rising danger from threat actors who could use chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) agents to harm Americans or U.S. interests. For instance, DHS believes terrorist groups are actively pursuing such capabilities, are using battlefield environments to test them, and may be working to incorporate these methods into external operations in ways we have not seen previously. Certain WMD, once viewed as out-of-reach for all but nation states, are now closer to being attained by non-state actors. A terrorist attack using a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear weapon against the United States would have a profound and potentially catastrophic impact on our Nation and the world.

Since the creation of the Department more than 15 years ago, DHS has lacked a focal point in the WMD threat space. Through presidential directives and legislation, various WMD-related programs and projects were established within the Department and across multiple components. In some cases, components were established through presidential directives and delegations of authority, but lacked full legislative authorization to carry out such vested responsibilities. This resulted in fragmented missions and uncoordinated activities across the Department, ultimately leading to a lack of strategic direction in this critical mission. Further, the current structure of CBRN functions within the Department resulted in a lack of visibility for the mission space, weak internal coordination and disjointed interagency cooperation.

DHS believes it is imperative to streamline and elevate its counter-WMD efforts. Multiple reviews in the last decade—both internal and external to the Department—have highlighted the Department''s shortcomings in this space, as well as the need for a focal point on CBRN matters. Five years ago, Congress required the Department of Homeland Security to study the issue, to rationalize its WMD defense efforts, and to report on whether a reorganization was needed. The previous Administration conducted such a study and made an affirmative determination to pursue changes

Department of Homeland Security News
Dec 06, 2017

Kirstjen M. Nielsen Sworn-in as the Sixth Homeland Security Secretary
Release Date: December 6, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON - Today, Ms. Kirstjen M. Nielsen was sworn-in as the sixth Secretary of Homeland Security. Secretary Nielsen was joined by White House and Department officials during a brief swearing-in at the White House. Secretary Nielsen is now the first former Department of Homeland Security (DHS) employee to become the secretary.

'It is my greatest honor to serve as Secretary alongside the remarkable men and women of DHS,' said Secretary Nielsen. 'Our nation faces a complex threat landscape that is constantly evolving. I will do my utmost to ensure that the Department meets the threats of today and tomorrow, and to ensure our frontline personnel have the tools and resources to accomplish their vital missions.

'I am humbled by the trust placed in me to lead our Department. I want to thank Deputy Secretary Elaine Duke for her exceptional leadership over the past four months - especially her work leading the response during the destructive Atlantic hurricane season. I look forward to continuing this Administration's work to raise the standards for the security of our homeland in all areas - including securing our borders, protecting Americans from terrorist threats, and securing our cyber networks.'

 


(DHS Official Photo/ Jetta Disco)

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Keywords:  department of homeland security, dhs, Secretary

Department of Homeland Security News
Dec 06, 2017

Written testimony of I&A for a Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs hearing titled 'Adapting to Defend the Homeland Against the Evolving International Terrorist Threat'
Release Date: December 6, 2017342 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Chairman Johnson, Ranking Member McCaskill and distinguished Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today - along with my colleagues from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC), and the Department of Defense (DOD) - to discuss how the U.S. Department of Homeland Security''s (DHS) Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) helps protect the homeland in today''s dynamic threat environment. In my testimony today, I will characterize the evolving threat and describe how I&A is working to share intelligence and information with our domestic and international customers in support of counterterrorism activities in the homeland and around the world.

Today, the threat we face from terrorism is much more diverse than during the 9/11 period. While we have made it harder for terrorists to execute large-scale attacks, changes in technology have made it easier for adversaries to plot attacks in general, to radicalize new followers to commit acts of violence, and to recruit beyond borders. The problem is compounded by the use of simple, 'do-it-yourself' terrorist tactics conveyed via highly sophisticated terrorist marketing campaigns to audiences across the world.

As Acting Secretary Duke testified before this committee in September, we at DHS are rethinking homeland security for this new age. In the past, we often spoke of the 'home game' and 'away game' in the context of protecting our country, with DHS especially focused on the former. But that line is now blurred. The dangers we face are becoming more dispersed, and threat networks are proliferating across borders. The shifting landscape challenges security, so we must move past traditional defense and non-defense thinking. This is why DHS is overhauling its approach to homeland security and bringing together intelligence, operations, interagency engagement, and international action in new ways and changing how we respond to threats to our country.

The rising tide of violence we see in the West is clear evidence of the serious threat. As our government takes the fight to groups such as Islamic State of Iraq and ash- Sham (ISIS) and al-Qa''ida (AQ), we will continue to see operatives disperse and focus more heavily on external operations against the United States, our interests, and our allies. While much of today''s hearing will focus on terrorist threats from Syria and Iraq, it is important to emphasize that the terrorist threat is fluid. Many terrorist groups continue to pose a risk to our security and safety.

Core AQ and its affiliates remain a major concern for DHS. Despite the deaths of many AQ senior leaders, the group and its affiliates maintain the intent, and, in some cases, the capability to facilitate and conduct attacks against U.S. citizens and facilities. The group and its affiliates have also demonstrated that capability to adjust tactics, techniques and procedures for targeting the West.

Likewise, we continue to monitor the evolving threat posed by ISIS. ISIS fighters'' battlefield experience in Syria and Iraq have armed it with advanced capabilities that most terrorist groups do not have. Even as the so-called 'caliphate' collapses, ISIS fighters retain their toxic ideology and a will to fight. We remain concerned that foreign fighters from the U.S. or elsewhere who have traveled to Syria and Iraq and radicalized to violence will ultimately return to the U.S. or their home country to conduct attacks.

In addition to the threat of foreign fighters overseas, the threat from ISIS also con

Department of Homeland Security News
Dec 05, 2017

Acting Secretary Duke Statement on the Senate Confirmation of Kirstjen Nielsen
Release Date: December 5, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON - Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke today released the following statement after the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Kirstjen Nielsen as the sixth Secretary of Homeland Security:

'Congratulations to Kirstjen Nielsen on becoming the sixth Secretary of Homeland Security. Ms. Nielsen is a homeland security expert with a deep understanding of the issues facing the Department and is well-positioned to lead us into the future. It has been an honor to serve as the Department''s Acting Secretary, and I look forward to working alongside Ms. Nielsen as her deputy as we continue to carry out the DHS mission of safeguarding the American people, our homeland, and our values.'

Incoming Secretary Nielsen will be sworn-in in the coming days.

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Keywords:  Acting Secretary Elaine Duke, Secretary, senate

Department of Homeland Security News
Dec 05, 2017

DHS Announces Progress in Enforcing Immigration Laws, Protecting Americans
Release Date: December 5, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

ICE and CBP Release End of Fiscal Year 2017 Statistics

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced its end-of-year immigration enforcement numbers, the results of a year-long return to enforcing the law, upholding the integrity of our lawful immigration system, and keeping America safe. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) reported 310,531 apprehensions nationwide, 303,916 of which were along the Southwest border, underscoring the need for a physical barrier at the border. Additionally, in FY 2017, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Removal Operations (ERO) conducted 143,470 arrests and 226,119 removals. While 2017 marked a successful year in border security efforts, reducing illegal cross-border migration, increasing interior enforcement, and dismantling transnational criminal enterprises, multiple challenges still remain in providing immigration officials with the tools needed to keep criminals off the streets, eliminate the pull factors for illegal immigration, and remove aliens who have violated our immigration laws from the country. The previously announced Trump Administration''s immigration priorities would address these challenges by enhancing border security, implementing a merit-based immigration system, and closing loopholes that encourage illegal immigration.

'We have clearly seen the successful results of the President''s commitment to supporting the frontline officers and agents of DHS as they enforce the law and secure our borders,' said Acting Secretary Elaine Duke. 'We have an obligation to uphold the integrity of our immigration system, but we must do more to step up and close loopholes to protect the American worker, our economy, and our communities.'

'We have seen historic low numbers this year - an almost 30 percent decline in apprehensions in FY17, but we are very concerned about the later month increases of unaccompanied minors and minors with a family member,' said Acting Deputy Commissioner Ronald Vitiello. 'We are also concerned about the significant uptick in the smuggling of opioids and other hard narcotics, including heroin and cocaine, which generally increase when illegal border crossings spike. The men and women of CBP, working along our borders and at the ports of entry protecting our great nation, are doing outstanding work. For us to truly have an operationally secure border, we must close loopholes in our laws that help fund the cartels.'

'These results are proof of what the men and women of ICE can accomplish when they are empowered to fulfill their mission,' said Thomas Homan, ICE Deputy Director. 'We need to maintain this momentum by matching the dedication and drive of our personnel with the resources they need to perform at even higher levels. We need to confront and address misguided policies and loopholes that only serve as a pull factor for illegal immigration. We must continue to target violent gangs like MS-13, and prevent them from rebuilding what we have begun to dismantle.  Finally, we need to find a solution to the dangerous sanctuary city policies and the politicians who needlessly risk innocent lives to protect criminals who are illegally present in the United States.'

Customs and Border Protection In FY17, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 30, 2017

As Historic 2017 Hurricane Season Comes to an End, Federal Support to Recovery Continues
Release Date: November 30, 2017For Immediate Release
FEMA News Desk
Phone: 202-646-3272

WASHINGTON - While Nov. 30 marks the end of a historic hurricane season, FEMA and its partners continue to work diligently in support of disaster survivors recovering from the devastating season.  Four hurricanes made landfall:  Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate (the first three were classified as major hurricanes, which affected roughly 25.8 million people). Also during this season, nearly two dozen large wildfires burned more than 200,000 acres of land in northern California. 

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma marked the first time two Atlantic Category 4 hurricanes made landfall in the Continental United States, in the same season.  Hurricane Harvey set a new record for the most rainfall from a U.S. tropical cyclone, with more than 50 inches of rain in some areas. The storm resulted in catastrophic flooding in Texas and western Louisiana.  Two weeks later, Hurricane Irma became the strongest Atlantic Ocean hurricane on record. Winds peaked at 185 mph, and Hurricane Irma remained a hurricane for 11 days. Irma was the longest-lived Atlantic hurricane since Ivan in 2004.  The public response to Hurricane Irma, as the storm approached, resulted in one of the largest sheltering missions in U.S. history.

Hurricane Maria devastated the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico soon after Hurricane Irma struck their shores. Hurricane Maria was the first Category 4 hurricane to make landfall on the main island of Puerto Rico in 85 years, and the resulting response became the longest sustained air mission of food and water in FEMA history. In addition to these hurricanes, prior to the 2017 season FEMA already had 17 Joint Field Offices working 28 presidentially-declared disasters.

Since Harvey made landfall in Texas on Aug. 25, the President has granted 16 Major Disaster declarations and 14 Emergency Declarations, while FEMA has authorized 25 Fire Management Assistance Grant declarations. Over a span of 25 days, FEMA and our partners deployed tens of thousands of personnel across 270,000 square miles in three different FEMA regions. 

So far, more than 4.7 million disaster survivors registered for federal assistance with FEMA - more than all who registered for hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Wilma and Sandy combined.  To respond to the historic demand, FEMA expanded its call center capacity by tenfold, and increased the number of home and property damage inspectors fourfold.

'This historic hurricane season should serve as a gut check and an opportunity for citizens, businesses, state, local, tribal and federal officials to re-evaluate how we prepare for and respond to any disaster,' said FEMA Administrator Brock Long. 'Response and recovery is dependent upon the whole community to be successful. While we continue to support the recovery from these storms, we must also take the opportunity to become better prepared for future disasters.'

To date, FEMA has placed more than $2 billion in disaster assistance into the hands of disaster survivors to help them recover from these events.  As of mid-November, National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policyholders filed approximately 120,000 claims, resulting in payments totaling more than $6.3 billion.

'State, local, tribal, and territorial governments, along with the residents in the impacted areas, are the true first responders,' said Administrator Long. 'FEMA alon

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 30, 2017

Acting Secretary Duke: We Are Rethinking Homeland Security For A New Age
Release Date: November 30, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

Says the Fundamentals of Terrorism Have Evolved

WASHINGTON - Today, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke testified before the House Committee on Homeland Security for a hearing on World Wide Threats: Keeping America Secure in the New Age of Terror.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is addressing the evolving threat landscape and moving past traditional defense and non-defense thinking. DHS is enhancing its approach to homeland security and bringing together intelligence operations, interagency engagement, and international action in innovative ways.

In her written testimony submitted to the committee, Acting Secretary Duke said, 'Acts of terrorism and mass violence against soft targets have become so frequent that we associate them with the names of cities that have been victimized: Paris, San Bernardino, Brussels, Orlando, Istanbul, Nice, Berlin, London, Barcelona, and most recently in New York City on Halloween.' As a result, DHS is enhancing coordination with state and local officials. In her oral testimony, Acting Secretary Duke stated, 'I also want to make clear today that DHS is not standing on the sidelines as these threats proliferate. And we will not allow frequent terrorism to become the new normal.'

Additionally, DHS is 'raising the baseline' of the United States'' security posture by examining everything from traveler screening to information sharing, and setting new standards to close security vulnerabilities. Acting Secretary Duke said, 'At the Department, we are building an action-oriented, results-centric culture. We are pushing our border security strategies and pressing foreign partners to enhance their security so that terrorists, criminals, and other threat actors are stopped well before they reach our shores.'

The Acting Secretary''s full written testimony can be found here, oral testimony as prepared here, and excerpts below.

Acting Secretary Duke on Rethinking Homeland Security for a New Age: 'We are seeing a surge in terrorist activity because the fundamentals of terrorism have changed. Our enemies are crowd-sourcing their violence online and promoting a 'do it yourself' approach that involves using any weapons their followers can get their hands on. We saw this just last month right here on our own soil when a terrorist killed and wounded pedestrians in New York City using a rented vehicle. But New Yorkers rallied, and they refused to be intimidated by this heinous attack.

'I also want to make clear today that DHS is not standing on the sidelines as these threats proliferate. And we will not allow frequent terrorism to become the new normal.

'The primary international terror threat facing our country is from global jihadist groups. However, the Department is also focused on the threat of domestic terrorism. Ideologically-motivated violence here in the United States is a danger to our nation, our people, and our values.

'We are tackling the overall terror threat to the United States head-on... [W]e are rethinking homeland security for a new age. There is no longer a 'home game' and an 'away game.' The line is blurred, and the threats are connected across borders.

'That''s why DHS is moving towards a more integrated app

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 30, 2017

Oral testimony of DHS Acting Secretary Elaine Duke for a House Committee on Homeland Security hearing titled 'World Wide Threats: Keeping America Secure in the New Age of Terror'
Release Date: November 30, 2017Chairman McCaul, Ranking Member Thompson, and distinguished members of the Committee:

It is my honor to testify on behalf of the men and women of DHS, who shield our nation from threats every single day, often times in increasingly dangerous environments. 

We were reminded of that this past week when we lost Border Patrol Agent Rogelio Martinez in the line of duty.

While we do not know for certain the circumstances of his death - we do know that he courageously chose a dangerous job with DHS because it is so important to our nation''s security.

When his father was asked why his son chose the Border Patrol his son told him 'I want to defend my country from terrorists … I want to prevent terrorists and drugs from coming into the country.'  And he loved his job. 

I want to begin by noting that right now the terror threat to our country equals, and in many ways exceeds, the period around 9/11. 

We are seeing a surge in terrorist activity because the fundamentals of terrorism have changed. 

Our enemies are crowd-sourcing their violence online and promoting a 'do it yourself' approach that involves using any weapons their followers can get their hands on. 

We saw this just last month right here on our own soil when a terrorist killed and wounded pedestrians in New York City using a rented vehicle.

But New Yorkers rallied, and they refused to be intimidated by this heinous attack.

I also want to make clear today that DHS is not standing on the sidelines as these threats proliferate.  And we will not allow frequent terrorism to become the new normal. 

The primary international terror threat facing our country is from global jihadist groups.  However, the Department is also focused on the threat of domestic terrorism.  Ideologically-motivated violence here in the United States is a danger to our nation, our people, and our values.  

We are tackling the overall terror threat to the United States head-on and in two ways. 

First, we are rethinking homeland security for a new age. 

There is no longer a 'home game' and an 'away game.'  The line is blurred, and the threats are connected across borders. 

That''s why DHS is moving towards a more integrated approach, bringing together intelligence, operations, interagency engagement, and international action like never before.

Second, we are raising the bar of our security posture across the board to keep dangerous individuals and goods from entering the United States.

That includes building a wall on the southwest border and cracking down on transnational criminal organizations that bring drugs, violence, and other threats into our communities. 

Illegal immigration puts our communities and country at risk, which is why our border security strategy is multi-layered and includes robust interior enforcement operations to deter and prevent illegal entry. 

We are also strengthening everything from traveler screening to information sharing. 

We now require all foreign governments to share critical data with us on terrorists and criminals—and to help us confidently identify their nationals.

We must know who is coming into our country and make sure they do not pose a threat.  That is why I recommended—and the President approved—tough but tailored restrictions against countries that pose a risk and which are not complying with our requirements. 

And we are trying to stay a step ahead of emerging threats.

We are planning next to launch a new Office of Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction next week,

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 30, 2017

Written testimony of DHS Acting Secretary Elaine Duke for a House Committee on Homeland Security hearing titled 'World Wide Threats: Keeping America Secure in the New Age of Terror'
Release Date: November 30, 2017210 House Capitol Visitor Center

Chairman McCaul, Ranking Member Thompson, and distinguished members of the Committee, I would like to thank you for inviting me to testify on the threats facing our great Nation and what we are doing to confront them. First though, I would like to recognize the service of former Secretary John Kelly. While his tenure at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) ended early, his impact was substantial. General Kelly visibly lifted the morale of the Department, set a new standard for leadership, and—most importantly—established the foundation for historic improvements in our Nation''s security. The Department has not missed a beat since his departure, and it is my honor to continue to advance the work he set in motion until such time as the Senate votes to confirm the President''s nominee, Kirstjen Nielsen.

Make no mistake, the threats our country faces are serious. Our enemies and adversaries are persistent. They are working to undermine our people, our interests, and our way of life every day. Whether it is the violent menace posed by international and domestic terrorists or the silent intrusions of cyber adversaries, the American people will not be intimidated or coerced. I am proud that the men and women of DHS are driven to address these challenges, and they are more than equal to the task.

I would like to stress three themes today.

First, we are rethinking homeland security for a new age. We sometimes speak of the 'home game' and 'away game' in protecting our country, with DHS especially focused on the former. But the line is now blurred. The dangers we face are becoming more dispersed, and threat networks are proliferating across borders. The shifting landscape is challenging our security, so we need to move past traditional defense and non-defense thinking. This is why DHS is overhauling its approach to homeland security. We are bringing together intelligence, operations, interagency engagement, and international action in new ways and changing how we respond to threats to our country.

Second, we are 'raising the baseline' of our security posture—across the board. DHS is looking at everything from traveler screening to information sharing, and we are setting new standards to close security vulnerabilities. Since 9/11, we have spoken too often of the weaknesses in our systems without taking enough decisive action to fix them for the long haul. This Administration aims to change that. At the Department, we are building an action-oriented, results-centric culture. We are pushing our border security strategies and pressing foreign partners to enhance their security so that terrorists, criminals, and other threat actors are stopped well before they reach our shores.

Third, this unprecedented hurricane season has truly tested us as a nation and tested many of our assumptions about what works in disaster response and recovery. While each year the hurricane season officially comes to an end on November 30, the lessons that we are learning from the response and recovery operations that we are performing this year, under the most difficult circumstances possible, will transform the field of emergency management forever.

Homeland Security in a New Age of Terrorism Today, the magnitude of the threat we face from terrorism is equal to, and in many ways exceeds, the 9/11 period. While we have made it harder for terrorists to execute large-scale attacks, changes in technology have made it easier for adversaries to plot attacks in general, to radicalize new followers, and to recruit beyond borders. The problem is compounded by the us

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 29, 2017

Written testimony of NPPD for a House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittees on Information Technology and Intergovernmental Affairs hearing titled 'Cybersecurity of Voting Machines'
Release Date: November 29, 20172154 Rayburn House Office Building

Chairman Hurd, Chairman Palmer, Ranking Member Kelly, Ranking Member Demings and members of the Subcommittees, thank you for inviting me to participate in today''s hearing on securing our elections from malicious cyber activity. This is an especially timely topic given the elections earlier this month. As you know, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) performs a critical mission focused on reducing and eliminating threats to the nation''s critical physical and cyber infrastructure, including how it relates to our elections.

Given the vital role that elections play in a free and democratic society, the Secretary of Homeland Security determined that election infrastructure should be designated as a critical infrastructure subsector. With the establishment of an Election Infrastructure Subsector (EIS), the DHS National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) and federal partners have been formalizing the prioritization of cybersecurity assistance for election infrastructure similar to that which is provided to a range of other critical infrastructure entities, such as financial institutions and electric utilities.

During the 2016 election period and since that time, the federal government and election officials have been meeting regularly to share cybersecurity risk information and to determine effective means of assistance. Recently, the EIS Government Coordinating Council (GCC) met to establish goals and objectives, to develop plans for the EIS partnership, and to lay the groundwork for developing an EIS Sector Specific Plan (SSP). The GCC framework provides a well-tested mechanism across critical infrastructure sectors for sharing threat information between the federal government and council partners, advancing risk management efforts, and prioritizing services available to sector partners in a trusted environment. EIS-GCC representatives include DHS, the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Federal Buruea of Investigation (FBI), the Department of Defense (DoD), and key state and local election officials. Participation in the council is entirely voluntary and does not change the fundamental role of state and local jurisdictions in overseeing elections

In addition to the work of the EIS-GCC, DHS continues to engage state and local elections officials - coordinating requests for assistance, risk mitigation, information sharing, and incident coordination resources and services. In order to ensure a coordinated approach across DHS, NPPD has brought together stakeholders from across the Department as part of an Election Task Force (ETF). The ETF increases the Department''s efficiency and efficacy in understanding, responding to, communicating, and sharing information related to cyber threats. The ETF serves to provide actionable information to assist states in strengthening their election infrastructure against cyber threats.

Within the context of today''s hearing, my testimony will provide DHS''s unclassified assessment of malicious cyber operations directed against U.S. election infrastructure during the 2016 elections, but not the overall Russian influence campaign covered in the January 2017 declassified Intelligence Community (IC) Assessment. My testimony will outline DHS''s efforts to help enhance the security of election infrastructure operated by state and local jurisdictions around the country.

Assessing the Threat DHS continues to robustly coordinate with the EAC, the intelligence community, and law enforcement partners. Amo

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 28, 2017

Written testimony of ICE for a Senate Committee on the Judiciary hearing titled 'S.1241: Modernizing AML Laws to Combat Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing'
Release Date: November 28, 2017226 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Chairman Grassley, Ranking Member Feinstein, and distinguished members of the Committee:

On behalf of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), thank you for the opportunity to testify before you today to discuss how U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), the largest investigative DHS Component, is combatting the money laundering efforts of transnational criminal organizations - what we refer to as 'TCOs.' ICE HSI''s primary mission is to promote homeland security and public safety through criminal and civil enforcement of federal laws governing border control, customs, trade, and immigration.

With more than 6,000 special agents working in 210 domestic offices and 50 foreign countries, HSI is uniquely positioned to combat transnational and cross-border financial crimes. HSI special agents work from the understanding that virtually all crime is financially motivated and, as such, our investigations focus on the financial aspects of transnational crime and how illicit funds are earned, moved, laundered and stored. One of our key responsibilities is to ensure that the U.S. financial system is not exploited to launder illicit funds and, as such, we work to eliminate vulnerabilities in our financial system and institutions. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, HSI initiated 4,059 financial crime investigations, effected 2,049 financial related criminal arrests, and seized $467,534,795 in illicit proceeds.

Because of the nature of the transnational crimes that HSI investigates, HSI money laundering investigations focus on a very broad array of money laundering threats and vulnerabilities, with varying degrees of sophistication and challenges. The money laundering techniques that HSI faces include Bulk Cash Smuggling, Trade-Based Money Laundering, criminal exploitation of Money Services Businesses, Third-Party Money Launderers, and most recently the use of virtual currency. I will talk about each of these threats and what HSI does to counter them along with some of our challenges.

The Cornerstone Program As I mentioned, one of HSI''s key responsibilities is to work with other Federal Government agencies and the U.S. financial sector to ensure that the U.S. financial system is not exploited to launder illicit funds. HSI recognizes that the financial industry is the frontline in detecting financial and money laundering crimes. HSI and other law enforcement agencies have a responsibility to partner with financial institutions and educate them about what law enforcement knows about how institutions are, or could be, exploited by money launderers. In 2003, HSI established the Cornerstone Program which serves as our national umbrella effort to engage and share criminal typologies and red flag indicators with financial institutions throughout the United States. The Cornerstone Program is aimed at anchoring HSI''s Anti-Money Laundering (AML) capacity building efforts. Internationally, HSI uses the Cornerstone Program to provide capacity building through training, including cash courier interdiction training, and technical assistance to various nations to encourage compliance with international standards as recommended by the Financial Action Task Force to combat money laundering and terrorist financing. The Cornerstone Program is administered at the Headquarters level by the HSI Illicit Finance and Proceeds of Crime Unit. In FY 2017, HSI Special Agents made Cornerstone presentations to 26,624 financial sector representatives.

Bulk Cash Smuggling With some exceptions that I will speak to later, tr

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 21, 2017

Acting Secretary Elaine Duke Announcement On Temporary Protected Status For Haiti
Release Date: November 20, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON— Today, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke announced her decision to terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for Haiti with a delayed effective date of 18 months to allow for an orderly transition before the designation terminates on July 22, 2019. This decision follows then-Secretary Kelly''s announcement in May 2017 that Haiti had made considerable progress, and that the country''s designation will likely not be extended past six months.

The decision to terminate TPS for Haiti was made after a review of the conditions upon which the country''s original designation were based and whether those extraordinary but temporary conditions prevented Haiti from adequately handling the return of their nationals, as required by statute. Based on all available information, including recommendations received as part of an inter-agency consultation process, Acting Secretary Duke determined that those extraordinary but temporary conditions caused by the 2010 earthquake no longer exist. Thus, under the applicable statute, the current TPS designation must be terminated.

Acting Secretary Duke met with Haitian Foreign Minister Antonio Rodrigue and Haitian Ambassador to the United States Paul Altidor recently in Washington to discuss the issue.

In 2017 alone, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services conducted extensive outreach to the Haitian communities throughout the country. These include but are not limited to community forums on TPS, panel discussions with Haitian community organizers, stakeholder teleconferences, regular meetings with TPS beneficiaries, news releases to the Haitian community, meetings with Haitian government officials, meetings at local churches, and listening sessions.

Since the 2010 earthquake, the number of displaced people in Haiti has decreased by 97 percent. Significant steps have been taken to improve the stability and quality of life for Haitian citizens, and Haiti is able to safely receive traditional levels of returned citizens. Haiti has also demonstrated a commitment to adequately prepare for when the country''s TPS designation is terminated.

In May 2017, then-Secretary Kelly announced a limited extension for Haiti''s TPS designation, stating that he believed there were indications that Haiti - if its recovery from the 2010 earthquake continued at pace - may not warrant further TPS extension past January 2018. At the time, then-Secretary Kelly stated that his six-month extension should give Haitian TPS recipients living in the United States time to attain travel documents and make other necessary arrangements for their ultimate departure from the United States, and should also provide the Haitian government with the time it needs to prepare for the future repatriation of all current TPS recipients.

To allow for an orderly transition, the effective date of the termination of TPS for Haiti will be delayed 18 months. This will provide time for individuals with TPS to arrange for their departure or to seek an alternative lawful immigration status in the United States, if eligible. It will also provide time for Haiti to prepare for the return and reintegration of their citizens. During this timeframe, USCIS will work with the State Department, other DHS components and the Government of Haiti to help educate relevant stakeholders and facilitate an orderly transition.

Haitians with TPS will be required to reapply for Employment Authorization Documents in order to legally work in the United States until the end of the resp

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 19, 2017

Statement by Acting Secretary Duke on Tragic Death of Border Patrol Agent Rogelio Martinez
Release Date: November 19, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON - Today, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke released the following statement on the tragic death of Border Patrol Agent Rogelio Martinez.

'Earlier this morning, I was notified that Border Patrol Agent Rogelio Martinez died as a result of serious injuries suffered while on patrol in the Big Bend Sector of our southern border in Texas,' said Acting Secretary Duke. 'Agent Martinez was responding to activity while on patrol with another agent, who was also seriously injured. We are fully supporting the ongoing investigation to determine the cause of this tragic event. On behalf of the quarter of a million frontline officers and agents of DHS, my thoughts and prayers go out to the family and friends of Agent Martinez and to the agent who is in serious condition.'

# # #

Topics:  Border Security Keywords:  Acting Secretary Elaine Duke, southwest border, U. S. Border Patrol

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 17, 2017

U.S. - EU Statement Following the U.S. - EU Justice and Home Affairs Ministerial Meeting
Release Date: November 17, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON - On 17 November 2017, the U.S - EU Ministerial Meeting on Justice and Home Affairs took place in Washington, D.C. The meeting reaffirmed the importance of the long standing partnership between the United States and the European Union in addressing common threats to security, and of practical outcomes of this cooperation.

The United States, hosting the meeting, was represented by Attorney General Jeff Sessions and by Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine C. Duke.

The European Union was represented by the Commissioner for Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship Dimitris Avramopoulos, the Union Security Commissioner Julian King, Estonia's Minister of Justice, Mr. Urmas Reinsalu, and the Minister of Interior, Mr. Andres Anvelt on behalf of the Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

The United States and the European Union discussed their shared efforts to combat terrorism. The discussion focused specifically on the importance of operational cooperation and effective information sharing. The two sides noted the importance of collecting, using, and sharing airline passenger information, including Passenger Name Record (PNR) data, to detect and disrupt threats, and discussed the state of play of the implementation of the EU PNR framework, which will be in place by April 28, 2018. Further, the two sides discussed progress in the implementation of joint measures to address threats from terrorism to aviation security and to raise the baseline for global aviation security. The issue of U.S.-EU cooperation in combating terrorism financing and money laundering, including within the Financial Action Task Force, was also emphasized. The EU side gave an update on its rules on beneficial ownership transparency, in line with G20 conclusions.

The two sides exchanged views on action to jointly counter the misuse of the internet for terrorist purposes, in cooperation with multiple stakeholders, including the private sector and civil society. The European Union provided updates regarding increased efforts to counter the use of the internet for terrorist purposes under the umbrella of the EU Internet Forum. The United States and the European Union agreed on the need to jointly address cybersecurity and counter cybercrime and, in this context, took note of the conclusions of the 14 November U.S. - EU Cyber Dialogue.

The two sides discussed the importance of ensuring swift cross-border access by law enforcement authorities to electronic evidence, in line with their respective legal provisions. In that respect, the two sides agreed to continue their regular dialogue, in order to update each other on legislative and judicial developments.

The United States and the European Union reaffirmed the need to counter the production and trafficking of cocaine and illicit opioids, including fentanyl and its analogues. Both sides noted good examples of joint U.S. - EU operations in this area, and welcomed their practical results.

The United States and the European Union noted the progress in cooperative discussions towards reciprocal and secure visa-free travel under their respective legal frameworks.

Underlining the progress made and the continued need to face terrorism and crime together, the United States and the European Union remain committed to continue common work and meet again in the first half of 2018 in Sofia, Bulgaria.
 



Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 16, 2017

Statement by the Senior Official Performing the Duties of Deputy Secretary Claire Grady on DHS Earning a Clean Audit for the Fifth Consecutive Year
Release Date: November 16, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON - Yesterday, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published its Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Agency Financial Report and I am pleased to announce that for a fifth consecutive year, DHS has earned a clean audit opinion on our financial statements. Our report outlines the Department''s financial information relative to our critical mission of protecting the Homeland while remaining good stewards of taxpayer dollars. This clean opinion demonstrates our steadfast transparency and accountability to the American public.

The report also highlights the significant progress the Department has made in strengthening and maturing our internal controls over financial reporting. A strong internal control system means the financial information we provide and use is more accurate and reliable. Led by Acting Chief Financial Officer Stacy Marcott, our other Management Line of Business chiefs and leadership throughout DHS, we have improved our processes and controls to account for and report the Department''s property—land, buildings, aircraft, vessels and equipment. In FY 2017, DHS made meaningful progress on our long-standing property internal control material weakness, advancing to a less severe assessment - a significant deficiency. The improvement in property controls is a direct result of the dedicated efforts by hardworking professionals across all of our components.

Our teamwork and shared commitment across the entire department, in multiple business areas such as finance, IT, procurement, human capital, and asset management, reflects the unified prioritization and collaboration that underpins our Department''s success. I am proud of this accomplishment, and all of the great work by the men and women of DHS who support our homeland security mission every day.

# # #

Keywords:  Agency Performance Financial Report, audit

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 16, 2017

Acting Secretary Duke Meets with Colombian Vice President Naranjo
Release Date: November 16, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

Discuss Cooperation on Border Security, Addressing Drug Production

WASHINGTON - Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke this week met with Colombian Vice President Óscar Adolfo Naranjo Trujillo in Washington, DC. Acting Secretary Duke and Vice President Naranjo discussed mutual concerns regarding coca production in Colombia, and reaffirmed their commitment to continue cooperation and information sharing. They also discussed border security, aviation security, and close cooperation with other key partners in the region on maritime activities.

'The Department of Homeland Security remains committed to working with our partners in Colombia to address illegal drug production which often funds transnational criminal organizations,' said Acting Secretary Duke. 'This week, we reaffirmed our commitment to addressing this issue as well as a variety of other shared interests between our countries.'

Earlier this year, DHS hosted the Conference on Prosperity and Security in Central America which brought together a diverse group of government and business leaders from the United States, Mexico, Canada, Central America, Colombia, and other countries to address economic, security, and governance challenges and opportunities. The participants dedicated the first day of the conference to advancing prosperity and economic growth in Central America, and the second day to achieving a stable and secure region. This week''s meeting continued the discussions from that conference. 

 



Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke meets with Colombian Vice President Óscar Adolfo Naranjo Trujillo in Washington, DC. (DHS Official Photo/Jetta Disco)

# # #

Topics:  Border Security Keywords:  aviation security, Border Security, illicit drugs

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 16, 2017

Written testimony of USCG Commandant for a Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries and Coast Guard hearing titled 'Coast Guard Readiness: How Far Can We Stretch Our Nation's Only Multi-Mission, Military F
Release Date: November 16, 2017253 Russell Senate Office Building

Good morning Mr. Chairman and distinguished members of the Committee. I appreciate the opportunity to testify today and thank you for your enduring support of the United States Coast Guard.

As the world''s premier, multi-mission, maritime service, the Coast Guard offers a unique and enduring value to the nation. The only branch of the U.S. Armed Forces within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), a federal law enforcement agency, a regulatory body, a first responder, and a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community - the Coast Guard is uniquely positioned to help secure the maritime border, combat transnational criminal organizations (TCO), and safeguard commerce on America''s waterways.

The Coast Guard''s combination of broad authorities and complementary capabilities squarely align with the President''s national security and economic prosperity priorities and offer an agile toolset to address the Nation''s most pressing challenges. Appropriately positioned in DHS, the Coast Guard is a military service and a branch of the Armed Forces of the United States at all times.[1] We are also an important part of the modern Joint Force[2] and currently have forces assigned to each of the five Geographic Combatant Commanders as well as Cyber Command.

As demonstrated in the 2017 record hurricane activity, the Coast Guard is the nation''s 'maritime first responder' and plays a leading role in executing the National Response Framework (NRF) for disaster situations. Our bias for action and ability to rapidly surge resources in response to emerging threats or contingencies distinguishes the Coast Guard and are critical to success across the spectrum of missions we prosecute.

1 14 U.S.C. § 1; 10 U.S.C. § 101
2 In addition to the Coast Guard''s status as an Armed Force (10 U.S.C. § 101), see also Memorandum of Agreement Between the Department of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security on the Use of Coast Guard Capabilities and Resources in Support of the National Military Strategy, 02 May 2008, as amended 18 May 2010.  

Agile Force The Coast Guard''s 88,000 active duty, reserve, civil service and auxiliary members offer a unique mix of authorities and extensive experience operating with both military and interagency response organizations. Beyond our statutory search and rescue requirements, which traditionally result in an average of 3,600 lives saved each year, the Coast Guard supports the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and states during nationally declared disasters by:

Saving lives in distress, and ensuring the survivability of our own forces and assets for immediate post-disaster response operations; Securing and reconstituting ports, waterways, and critical maritime infrastructure; Conducting environmental response operations (oil, chemical and hazardous material); and

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 15, 2017

DHS Acting Secretary Elaine Duke Visits Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers
Release Date: November 14, 2017For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON - Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke today traveled to Glynco, Georgia to visit the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers (FLETC) headquarters. She was joined by FLETC Director Thomas Walters and Deputy Director William Fallon.

Acting Secretary Duke received an operational briefing and tour of the FLETC facilities. She observed training programs, including basic tactics exercises, a tactical medical training demonstration, and Joint Test Action Group (JTAG) ChipOff for Smartphones Training, which teaches techniques for the acquisition and analysis of mobile devices. Acting Secretary Duke also observed the Uniformed Police Training Program Active Threat Response Tactics and received information on the weapons used by DHS trainees and officers.

'The trainings offered at FLETC prepare America''s law enforcement officers for the diverse challenges they will face in the field,' said Acting Secretary Duke. 'I appreciated the opportunity to participate in training exercises and meet with current officers, as well as trainees. Their work is critical to protecting our homeland.'

Acting Secretary Duke had lunch with Director Walters, Deputy Director Fallon, and Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) trainees to hear about their experiences at FLETC firsthand.

Director Walters said, 'It was our honor to host Acting Secretary Duke at FLETC today. We are grateful for her outstanding leadership of our Department, commitment to our law enforcement training mission, and eagerness to engage with the FLETC community.'

While at FLETC, Acting Secretary Duke also toured a Port of Entry training venue used by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and an Intermodal Transportation Check Site. She was briefed on the damage caused by Hurricanes Matthew and Irma and surveyed the damage.

FLETC trains the majority of federal law enforcement officers and agents in the United States. In addition to providing training for over 90 federal partner organizations, FLETC provides training to state, local, tribal, and international police in specialized and advanced programs, graduating more than 70,000 students annually. FLETC is the largest law enforcement training organization in the country.

 



Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke with personnel from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers (FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia. (DHS Official Photo/Jetta Disco)

 



Acting Secretary Duke is briefed on the training capabilities and equipment at FLETC. (DHS Official Photo/Jetta Disco)
 



Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 14, 2017

Written testimony of NPPD for a House Science, Space, and Technology Subcommittee on Oversight hearing titled 'Bolstering the Government's Cybersecurity: A Survey of Compliance with the DHS Directive'
Release Date: November 14, 20172318 Rayburn House Office Building

Good morning Mr. Chairman, Ranking Member, and distinguished Members of the Subcommittee. Thank you for your interest in this important issue and the opportunity to provide an update on the Department''s position regarding the Federal government''s use of Kaspersky Lab (KL) software. I am the Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications within the DHS National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD). NPPD executes many of the Department''s authorities related to cybersecurity of federal networks.

The Federal Information Security Modernization Act of 2014 (FISMA) authorizes DHS to develop and oversee the implementation of binding operational directives (BODs), that are consistent with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) policies as well as National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards, to federal departments and agencies. FISMA defines a BOD as a 'compulsory direction to an agency that is for purposes of safeguarding federal information and information systems from a known or reasonably suspected information security threat, vulnerability, or risk.' Federal agencies are required to comply with these DHS-developed directives.

A priority of DHS is to ensure the integrity and security of U.S. government systems, and in doing so must safeguard federal government systems by reducing potential vulnerabilities, protecting against cyber intrusions, and anticipating future threats.

On September 13, 2017, DHS Acting Secretary Elaine Duke signed BOD 17-01 to address the use of Kaspersky products, solutions, and services on federal information systems. After consultation with interagency partners, DHS determined Kaspersky products present a known or reasonably suspected information security risk to federal information systems. The BOD directs agencies to identify the use of these products within 30 days, provide a plan to remove them within 60 days, and, unless directed otherwise by DHS based on new information, to begin removing products at 90 days.

The Secretary''s decision to issue the BOD is based on expert judgments about risks to federal information and information systems, which directly impact U.S. national security. In a public statement, the Department explained that it is concerned about (1) the ties between certain Kaspersky officials and Russian intelligence and other government agencies, (2) requirements under Russian law that allow Russian intelligence agencies to request or compel assistance from Kaspersky and to intercept communications transiting Russian networks, and (3) the broad access to files and elevated privileges provided by anti-virus products and services, including Kaspersky products, that can be exploited by malicious cyber actors to compromise information systems. The decision to use an anti-virus product is an information security risk decision ultimately based in trust. Given the ties between the company and Russian government agencies, the structure of the law in Russia, and the broad access that these products and services have, the Department lacks the necessary trust to allow the deployment of these products and services on federal information systems. The action taken is a reasonable, measured approach to the information security risks posed by these products.

DHS is providing an opportunity for Kaspersky and any other entity that claims its commercial interests will be directly impacted by the BOD to submit to DHS a written response and any additional information or evidence supporting the response, to explain the adverse consequences, address the Department''s concerns, or mit

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 14, 2017

Written testimony of PLCY, CBP, and ICE for a House Committee on Homeland Security, Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security hearing titled 'Looking North: Assessing the Current Threat at the U.S.-Canada Border'
Release Date: November 14, 2017210 House Capitol Visitor Center

Chairwoman McSally, Ranking Member Vela, and distinguished Members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Homeland Security''s (DHS) assessment of threats on the Northern Border and our efforts to ensure its security.

The U.S.-Canada border separates two friendly nations with a long history of social, cultural, and economic ties, and a high volume of cross-border trade and travel. At 5,525 miles, 1,500 of which are shared by Alaska with British Columbia and the Yukon Territory in Canada, the border is the longest bilateral land boundary in the world. On average, more than 60 million international travelers and 27 million vehicles are processed at the more than 120 land ports of entry (POEs) and 17 ferry land crossings annually.

DHS has committed significant personnel to securing the Northern Border. More than 2,000 U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) Agents, 4,700 U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers, 310 Agriculture Specialists, 260 CBP Air and Marine (AMO) personnel, 1,300 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Special Agents, and more than 8,000 United States Coast Guard (USCG) personnel are currently stationed at or near the U.S.-Canada border. The Department also continues to invest in force-multiplying technological capabilities on the Northern Border, including sensor networks, surveillance cameras and aircraft, and non-intrusive inspection systems.

The Department''s personnel work every day with their Canadian counterparts and our state, local, tribal, and territorial (SLTT) partners to ensure the border is secure. We do so by deploying a multi-layered, risk-based approach to enhance the security of the Northern Border, while facilitating the lawful flow of people and goods entering the United States. This layered approach to security reduces the Department''s reliance on any single point or program, and leverages close coordination with U.S. interagency partners and with our Canadian counterparts to increase the security at our mutual border. Close coordination with our partners ensures our zone of security extends outward and that our physical border with Canada is not the first or last line of defense, but one of many.

Northern Border Threat Assessment In response to the reporting requirements set forth in the Northern Border Security Review Act (Pub.L. 114-267), DHS delivered a Northern Border Threat Assessment report to Congress in August 2017. To undertake this assessment, DHS convened a broad working group composed of representatives from DHS Components with Northern Border-related operational mission responsibilities, as well as DHS support Components. This working group, led by the DHS Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans (PLCY), included representatives from the Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A), CBP, ICE, USCG, the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), the Office of the General Counsel (OGC), the Office of Partnership and Engagement (OPE), and the Office of Legislative Affairs (OLA). The Joint Requirements Council (JRC) participated as an observer.

The working group developed the assessment through four primary methodologies: a formal threat analysis developed by I&A and Component intelligence elements; an open source literature review; a Component data call and interviews; and an expert workshop of Departmental subject matter experts.

The report describes the current threat landscape on the U.S.-Canada bo

Department of Homeland Security News
Nov 14, 2017

Written testimony of PLCY, CBP, and ICE for a House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security hearing titled 'Looking North: Assessing the Current Threat at the U.S.-Canada Border'
Release Date: November 14, 2017210 House Capitol Visitor Center

Chairwoman McSally, Ranking Member Vela, and distinguished Members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Homeland Security''s (DHS) assessment of threats on the Northern Border and our efforts to ensure its security.

The U.S.-Canada border separates two friendly nations with a long history of social, cultural, and economic ties, and a high volume of cross-border trade and travel. At 5,525 miles, 1,500 of which are shared by Alaska with British Columbia and the Yukon Territory in Canada, the border is the longest bilateral land boundary in the world. On average, more than 60 million international travelers and 27 million vehicles are processed at the more than 120 land ports of entry (POEs) and 17 ferry land crossings annually.

DHS has committed significant personnel to securing the Northern Border. More than 2,000 U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) Agents, 4,700 U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers, 310 Agriculture Specialists, 260 CBP Air and Marine (AMO) personnel, 1,300 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Special Agents, and more than 8,000 United States Coast Guard (USCG) personnel are currently stationed at or near the U.S.-Canada border. The Department also continues to invest in force-multiplying technological capabilities on the Northern Border, including sensor networks, surveillance cameras and aircraft, and non-intrusive inspection systems.

The Department''s personnel work every day with their Canadian counterparts and our state, local, tribal, and territorial (SLTT) partners to ensure the border is secure. We do so by deploying a multi-layered, risk-based approach to enhance the security of the Northern Border, while facilitating the lawful flow of people and goods entering the United States. This layered approach to security reduces the Department''s reliance on any single point or program, and leverages close coordination with U.S. interagency partners and with our Canadian counterparts to increase the security at our mutual border. Close coordination with our partners ensures our zone of security extends outward and that our physical border with Canada is not the first or last line of defense, but one of many.

Northern Border Threat Assessment In response to the reporting requirements set forth in the Northern Border Security Review Act (Pub.L. 114-267), DHS delivered a Northern Border Threat Assessment report to Congress in August 2017. To undertake this assessment, DHS convened a broad working group composed of representatives from DHS Components with Northern Border-related operational mission responsibilities, as well as DHS support Components. This working group, led by the DHS Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans (PLCY), included representatives from the Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A), CBP, ICE, USCG, the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), the Office of the General Counsel (OGC), the Office of Partnership and Engagement (OPE), and the Office of Legislative Affairs (OLA). The Joint Requirements Council (JRC) participated as an observer.

The working group developed the assessment through four primary methodologies: a formal threat analysis developed by I&A and Component intelligence elements; an open source literature review; a Component data call and interviews; and an expert workshop of Departmental subject matter experts.

The report describes the current threat landscape on the U.S.-Canada bo

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