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Democracy Now
May 18, 2018

Daniel Ellsberg: Whistleblowing is Needed to Avert Catastrophic U.S. War with Iran & North Korea
Whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg is best known for leaking information about U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War in 1971, but he also drafted plans for nuclear war as a consultant to the Department of Defense and the White House as detailed in his book, "The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner." He joins us in Santa Cruz to discuss nuclear war, North and South Korea and Iran. He says Trump withdrawing from the Iran nuclear deal has "no imaginable benefit to anybody, except for those mad men who want to see Iran destroyed," referring to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Saudi Arabia.

Democracy Now
May 18, 2018

Whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg: Civil Disobedience Against Vietnam War Led Me to Leak Pentagon Papers
Whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg was a high-level defense analyst in 1971 when he leaked a top-secret report on U.S. involvement in Vietnam to The New York Times and other publications that came to be known as the Pentagon Papers and played a key role in ending the Vietnam War. We speak with Ellsberg about the recent 50th anniversary of one of the most famous acts of civil disobedience in the United States. On May 17, 1968, Catholic priests and activists broke into a draft board office in Catonsville, Maryland, and stole 378 draft cards and burned them in the parking lot as a protest against the Vietnam War. They became known as the Catonsville Nine. Ellsberg discusses the role nonviolent direct action can play in social movements. Ellsberg says that the ending of the war in Vietnam "relied on a lot of people doing unusual things."

Democracy Now
May 18, 2018

Trump's EPA Doesn't Want You to Know Chemicals in Teflon Are Poisoning Waterways & Firefighters
The Environmental Protection Agency is facing a major new scandal after it worked with the White House to bury an alarming federal study detailing widespread chemical contamination of the nation's water supply. One Trump administration official warned release of the study would create a "public relations nightmare." The study found chemicals commonly present in Teflon and firefighting foam are a threat to human health at levels the EPA had previously called safe. We speak with Robert Bilott, the attorney the New York Times calls the the "worst nightmare of DuPont," the manufacturer of Teflon. He successfully won compensation for his clients whose drinking water had been contaminated by toxic chemicals used to make Teflon. He is a recipient of the 2017 Right Livelihood Award.

Democracy Now
May 18, 2018

Headlines for May 18, 2018
Gina Haspel Confirmed as CIA Director, Despite Her Record on Torture, Trump Says North Korea's Kim Jong-un Could Suffer Same Fate as Gaddafi, Trump to Cut Funds to Women's Clinics, Reinstitute Abortion Gag Rule, House Farm Bill Would End Food Assistance to Over 2 Million People, Senate Intel Committee Republicans Cite Russian Interference in 2016, China Denies Trump Admin Claims of $200 Billion Trade Deal, Egypt to Reopen Gaza Border Crossing Until End of Ramadan, Congo: WHO Warns of "Urban Ebola" as Virus Spreads to Mbandaka City, Colombia Orders Thousands to Evacuate Amid Fears that Dam May Burst, In Reversal, NASA Administrator Says Humans Cause Climate Change, Republican Rep. Mo Brooks Blames Coastal Erosion for Rising Seas, New York Court Greenlights Summer Zervos Defamation Suit Against Trump, Fox News Names Longtime Roger Ailes Protégé Suzanne Scott as CEO, Hawaii: Geologists Warn Worst Could be Yet to Come as Kilauea Erupts, New York: Calls Grow for Disbarment of Lawyer Filmed in Racist Tirade

Democracy Now
May 17, 2018

Planned U.S.-North Korea Peace Talks in Jeopardy as Trump Adviser Bolton Pushes for Regime Change
North Korea is threatening to cancel the June 12 U.S.-North Korea summit, after President Trump's national security adviser, John Bolton, said on Sunday the U.S. should use the so-called Libyan model for denuclearization. In 2003, Libya negotiated sanctions relief from the United States in exchange for renouncing its nuclear program and welcoming international inspectors to verify the dismantlement. Eight years later, the U.S. and other nations attacked Libya, toppling and killing Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. We are joined by Christine Hong, an associate professor at University of California, Santa Cruz, and an executive board member of the Korea Policy Institute.

Democracy Now
May 17, 2018

50 Years Ago Today: Catonsville 9 Burned Draft Papers with Homemade Napalm to Protest Vietnam War
Fifty years ago today, on May 17, 1968, in the Baltimore suburb of Catonsville, Maryland, a group of Catholic priests and activists stood around a small fire, praying and singing. They had gone into the local draft board office and taken 378 draft records, for the young men in the 1-A category who were most likely to get drafted to go to war in Vietnam. They set fire to the draft records using homemade napalm, made from gasoline and laundry soap, to symbolize the U.S. military's use of napalm on Vietnamese civilians. Video of the act of civil disobedience was seen around the world. They became known as the Catonsville Nine, and in 1970 they were given prison sentences of up to three years behind bars. We feature interviews with Fathers Phil and Daniel Berrigan, who helped organize the protest, and speak to Margarita Melville, one of the last surviving members of the Catonsville Nine, during a ceremony to mark the unveiling of a new historical marker to commemorate the action.

Democracy Now
May 17, 2018

Meet Tarek Loubani, the Canadian Doctor Shot by Israeli Forces Monday While Treating Gaza's Wounded
As Palestinians vow to continue protesting against the Israeli occupation of Gaza, we speak to a Canadian doctor who was shot by Israeli forces in both legs Monday while he was helping injured Palestinians. Israeli forces shot dead at least 61 unarmed Palestinian protesters taking part in the Great March of Return Monday, including one doctor. Canada, Britain, Germany, Ireland and Belgium have called for an investigation into the killings. The United Nations Human Rights Council has announced that it will hold a special session Friday to discuss escalating violence in Gaza. We speak with Dr. Tarek Loubani, an emergency room medical doctor, one of 19 medical personnel shot in Gaza on Monday. Loubani is an associate professor at Western University in London, Ontario. He is a Palestinian refugee and a member of the Glia Project creating open-source medical devices for low-resource settings.

Democracy Now
May 17, 2018

Headlines for May 17, 2018
Trump on North Korean Threats to Cancel Summit: "We'll See", U.N. Human Rights Council to Review Israel's Massacre in Gaza, Under Trump, Refugee Admissions to U.S. at Lowest Level in Decades, President Trump Calls Undocumented Immigrants "Animals", DHS Sought Negative Info on Haitians Ahead of Canceling Protections, Senate Approves Bill to Restore Net Neutrality Rules, Trump Financial Disclosure Reveals Stormy Daniels Payment, WHO Ships Experimental Vaccine to Congo as Ebola Outbreak Kills 23, Chile: Thousands March Against Campus Sexual Violence, Michigan State to Settle Larry Nassar Sexual Abuse Lawsuit for $500M, EPA Chief Pruitt & White House Sought to Block Chemical Release Study, Whistleblower Says Steve Bannon Sought to Suppress Black Vote, CIA Cites Hacker Joshua Schulte as Suspect in WikiLeaks Release, North Carolina: Thousands of Teachers March for School Funding, Brooklyn Man Exonerated 27 Years After Murder Conviction

Democracy Now
May 16, 2018

Koch Brothers-Backed Effort to Sabotage Unions Uses Secret "Tool Kit" to Encourage Members to Quit
Internal documents obtained by The Guardian show how a network of right-wing think tanks have launched a nationwide effort to convince members of public sector unions to stop paying dues. The effort is backed by $80 million in funding from billionaires like the Koch brothers, who expect a favorable decision from the Supreme Court this month in a case that could let workers who benefit from union-negotiated contracts avoid paying union dues if they opt not to join the union. The campaign comes as North Carolina teachers staged a massive walkout today, shuttering hundreds of schools, on the heels of major strikes by teacher unions in West Virginia, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Arizona. For more, we speak with Ed Pilkington, chief reporter for The Guardian in the U.S. His new report is an exclusive look at "How rightwing groups wield secret 'toolkit' to plot against US unions."

Democracy Now
May 16, 2018

A Wake-Up Call for Dems? 4 Women Running on Socialist Platforms Unseat Male Incumbents in PA Primary
Four Pennsylvania state House candidates backed by the Democratic Socialists of America won their Democratic primaries Tuesday: Summer Lee, a lawyer and labor organizer; Elizabeth Fiedler, a former public radio reporter; Sara Innamorato, the founder of a women's advocacy group; and Kristin Seale, who works at an energy conservation nonprofit. All four female candidates unseated male state representatives in Tuesday's primaries. For more, we speak with Ryan Grim, D.C. bureau chief for The Intercept.

Democracy Now
May 16, 2018

A Wake-Up Call for Dems? 4 Women With Socialist Platforms Win PA Primary to Replace Male Incumbents
Four Pennsylvania state House candidates backed by the Democratic Socialists of America won their Democratic primaries Tuesday: Summer Lee, a lawyer and labor organizer; Elizabeth Fiedler, a former public radio reporter; Sara Innamorato, the founder of a women's advocacy group; and Kristin Seale, who works at an energy conservation nonprofit. Two of the women unseated male incumbent state representatives in Tuesday's primaries. For more, we speak with Ryan Grim, D.C. bureau chief for The Intercept.

Democracy Now
May 16, 2018

Key Democrats Back Gina Haspel's Confirmation as CIA Director, Despite Her Record on Torture
The Senate Intelligence Committee approved President Trump's nominee for CIA director, Gina Haspel, sending her confirmation to the full Senate floor. Haspel is a 33-year CIA veteran who was responsible for running a secret CIA black site in Thailand in 2002 where at least one prisoner was waterboarded and tortured in other ways during her tenure. She also oversaw the destruction of videotapes showing torture at the black site. A number of key Democrats have come out backing Haspel, after she said the CIA torture program should never have existed, even though she repeatedly refused to call the CIA's post-9/11 treatment of prisoners "torture," and declined to state whether she believes torture is immoral, during her confirmation hearing last week. For more, we speak with Ryan Grim, Washington bureau chief for The Intercept. His latest story is headlined "Ahead of Vote on Gina Haspel, Senate Pulls Access to Damning Classified Memo."

Democracy Now
May 16, 2018

Norman Finkelstein: Palestinians Have the Right to Break Free of the "Unlivable" Cage That Is Gaza
This spring's mass nonviolent protests in Gaza come as the human rights conditions in the "open-air prison" have even further deteriorated. Last year, the United Nations issued a report warning Gaza is already "unlivable." The majority of its water is contaminated, and electricity is limited to only a few hours a day. About half the population is children. Almost all are refugees who are prevented from ever leaving the tiny Gaza Strip, one of the most densely populated places on Earth. For more, we speak with Norman Finkelstein, author and scholar whose most recent book is titled "Gaza: An Inquest into Its Martyrdom."

Democracy Now
May 16, 2018

Norman Finkelstein: Outrage over Israeli Massacre Shows Power of Nonviolent Palestinian Resistance
The United States is refusing to criticize Israel after Israeli forces shot dead at least 61 unarmed Palestinian protesters taking part in the Great March of Return in Gaza Monday. More than 2,700 Palestinians were injured. At the United Nations, U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley has blocked a call for an international investigation into Israel's actions. On Tuesday, she repeatedly blamed the violence on Hamas while praising Israel for showing restraint. During her remarks, Nikki Haley refused to place any blame on Israel. She later walked out of the Security Council chamber when the Palestinian ambassador to the U.N., Riyad Mansour, addressed the council. Since Palestinian protests began on March 30, Israel forces have killed at least 112 Palestinians and injured more than 12,000. On Tuesday, the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court said she was closely following the situation in Gaza and would "take any action warranted" to prosecute crimes. Meanwhile, the United Nations human rights office has condemned the "appalling deadly violence" by Israeli security forces in Gaza. For more, we speak with Norman Finkelstein, author and scholar whose most recent book is titled "Gaza: An Inquest into Its Martyrdom."

Democracy Now
May 16, 2018

Headlines for May 16, 2018
U.S. Refuses to Criticize Israel's Massacre of 60 Palestinians During Nonviolent Protest, Key Democrats Back CIA Director Nominee Gina Haspel, North Korea Cancels Talks with South Korea over Joint U.S.-SK Military Drills, Trump Admin Exploring Holding Immigrant Children on Military Bases, Amnesty: Pakistani Human Rights Activists Targeted for Digital Attacks, Mexico: Radio Journalist Juan Carlos Huerta Killed in Tabasco, Fox Settles Racial and Gender Discrimination Lawsuits for $10 Million, Uber & Lyft Will Stop Forced Arbitration for Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, Blake Farenthold Won't Repay $84,000 Taxpayer Money Used in Sexual Harassment Settlement, North Carolina Teachers Walk Out of Class, Shuttering Hundreds of Schools, Planned Parenthood and ACLU Sue to Block Iowa's Harsh Anti-Abortion Bill

Democracy Now
May 15, 2018

While U.S. Refuses to Blame Israel, Int'l Court Could Launch War Crimes Probe Into Gaza Killings
The Israeli military's massacre of Palestinians Monday has sparked widespread international condemnation. South Africa has recalled its ambassador to Israel. Turkey has recalled both its ambassadors to Israel and the United States and has declared three days of mourning starting on Friday. Palestinian leaders have accused the Israeli military of committing war crimes, but the United States has blocked a U.N. Security Council statement calling for an independent investigation into the killings. Meanwhile, Israeli officials have tried to claim Hamas is behind the protests in efforts to justify the killings. For more, we speak with Tareq Baconi, author of the book "Hamas Contained: The Rise and Pacification of Palestinian Resistance." He is a policy member at Al-Shabaka: The Palestinian Policy Network and a policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

Democracy Now
May 15, 2018

"The Disaster of My Life": Nakba Survivor on the Day Israelis Bombed & Invaded His Village in 1948
Palestinians are staging a new round of protests in Gaza today to mark the 70th anniversary of the Nakba, or the Day of Catastrophe, when more than 700,000 Palestinians were forced to flee or were expelled from their homes. Today's protests come after the Israeli military killed 61 unarmed Palestinian protesters on Monday. In total, since the Palestinians launched the Great March of Return protests on March 30, the Israeli military has killed at least 109 Palestinians and wounded 12,000 people. For more, we speak with a Nakba survivor: 86-year-old Mahmoud Salah, who was born in a village just outside of Jerusalem that was bombed and invaded when he was a teenager in 1948.

Democracy Now
May 15, 2018

For Palestinians, New U.S. Embassy Is a Symbol for Gaza Protests—But Mass Oppression Is Root Cause
While the Israeli military was carrying out a massacre against Palestinian protesters in Gaza, senior members of the Trump administration gathered in Jerusalem for the opening of the U.S. Embassy. Among those who attended were President Trump's daughter, White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump; her husband, senior adviser Jared Kushner; and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. The Trump administration's decision to move the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem has sparked widespread condemnation, including in the city of Jerusalem itself, where demonstrators gathered Monday to protest the ceremony. For more, we speak with Budour Hassan, a Palestinian writer and project coordinator for the Jerusalem Center for Legal Aid and Human Rights.

Democracy Now
May 15, 2018

Gazan Writer: Protesters Are Seeking Freedom from World's Largest Concentration Camp
Funerals are being held across Gaza today for the 61 Palestinians killed by the Israeli military, which opened fire into crowds of unarmed demonstrators protesting the opening of the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem and the ongoing Israeli occupation. Among the victims shot dead by an Israeli sniper was 30-year-old Fadi Abu Salmi, who used a wheelchair and had both his legs amputated. Another victim was 8-month-old Laila al-Ghandour, who died early this morning after inhaling tear gas fired by the Israeli military, including tear gas dropped by Israeli drones. For more, we speak with Muhammad Shehada, writer and activist from Gaza and a student of development studies at Lund University, Sweden. He writes for Haaretz, The Forward and other publications. His latest article for The Forward is titled "All We in Gaza Want Is That Israel Recognize Our Humanity."

Democracy Now
May 15, 2018

Palestinians Mark 70th Anniversary of Nakba After Israel Kills 61 & Wounds 2,700 Protesters in Gaza
The Israeli military killed at least 61 Palestinians in Gaza and wounded 2,700 more for protesting Monday's opening of the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem and the Israeli occupation. It was the deadliest day for Palestinian protesters since they launched the nonviolent Great March of Return on March 30. Palestinian leaders are accusing the Israeli military of carrying out war crimes during Monday's crackdown. More protests and a general strike across the Palestinian territories are planned for today. We get an update from Gaza with Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous.

Democracy Now
May 15, 2018

Headlines for May 15, 2018
Death Toll in Gaza Rises to 61, After Israeli Military Massacres Protesters, South Africa & Turkey Recall Ambassadors to Israel over Murder of Palestinians, Jewish Activists March in D.C. to Protest Opening of U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem, Hundreds Arrested in Nationwide Day of Action for New Poor People's Campaign, NYT: DeVos's Education Dept. Stalls Probes into For-Profit Schools, Catalan Parliament Elects Pro-Independence Candidate as President, Report: Colombian Army Executed Up to 10,000 Civilians, Claiming They Were Rebels, NYT: Two Dozen People Killed by Carbon Monoxide After Leaving on Keyless Cars, Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Death Row Prisoner Robert McCoy

Democracy Now
May 14, 2018

Yanis Varoufakis on Lost U.S. Credibility in Middle East, from Iran Deal to Israel Embassy Move
In the latest economic fallout from President Trump's decision to pull the United States out of the landmark Iran nuclear agreement, top White House officials said Sunday that the Trump administration is prepared to impose sanctions on European companies that do business with Iran. We get response from former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varifoufakis, who was the chief negotiator of Greece's bailout with the European Union and International Monetary Fund. He also discusses the opening of the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem and calls it a "civil rights catastrophe." His new book is titled "Talking to My Daughter About the Economy: Or, How Capitalism Works—And How It Fails." Varoufakis served as finance minister in Greece in 2015, before resigning from the Syriza government. He is also co-founder of Democracy in Europe Movement 2025, known as DiEM25.

Democracy Now
May 14, 2018

Rev. Barber Slams Anti-Muslim, Anti-Semitic Pastors Trump Chose to Open U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem
While tens of thousands of Palestinians gathered near the heavily fortified border with Israel for nonviolent protests against the U.S. Embassy's opening in Jerusalem Monday, a new Poor People's Campaign launched in the United States. Rev. Dr. William Barber II, a co-founder of the movement, is bringing together low-wage workers, clergy and community activists around the country to advocate for the rights of the poor. People in 40 states are participating in actions and events starting today that will culminate in a mass protest in Washington, D.C., on June 23. We are joined by Rev. Dr. William Barber, president of Repairers of the Breach and distinguished visiting professor of public theology at Union Theological Seminary, to discuss human rights from Gaza to Washington, D.C., and the anti-gay, pro-Trump pastor from Dallas chosen by the Trump administration to lead the prayer at the opening of the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem.

Democracy Now
May 14, 2018

"It's Time for Moral Confrontation": New Poor People's Campaign Stages Nationwide Civil Disobedience
On Mother's Day 50 years ago, thousands converged on Washington, D.C., to take up the cause that Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had been fighting for when he was assassinated on April 4, 1968: the Poor People's Campaign. A little more than a week after her husband's memorial service, Coretta Scott King led a march to demand an Economic Bill of Rights that included a guaranteed basic income, full employment and more low-income housing. Half a century later, Rev. Dr. William Barber II and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis have launched a new Poor People's Campaign. Starting today, low-wage workers, clergy and community activists in 40 states are participating in actions and events across the country that will culminate in a mass protest in Washington, D.C., on June 23. We speak with Rev. Dr. William Barber and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, co-chairs of the Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival.

Democracy Now
May 14, 2018

Gaza: Israeli Soldiers Kill 30 Palestinians Protesting Nonviolently as U.S. Opens Jerusalem Embassy
We go to Gaza for a live update from Sharif Abdel Kouddous as tens of thousands of Palestinians have gathered near the heavily fortified border with Israel for nonviolent protests against the U.S. Embassy's opening in Jerusalem. At the time of our broadcast, the Israeli military had killed at least 30 Palestinians, and least 1,000 had been injured. "No one is carrying any weapons here. There are no bullets being fired by Palestinians on Israeli soldiers. … And yet these killings continue," Kouddous says. This comes as senior members of the Trump administration have gathered in Jerusalem for the embassy's opening.

Democracy Now
May 14, 2018

Gaza: Israeli Soldiers Kill 50 Palestinians Protesting Nonviolently as U.S. Opens Jerusalem Embassy
We go to Gaza for a live update from Sharif Abdel Kouddous as tens of thousands of Palestinians have gathered near the heavily fortified border with Israel for nonviolent protests against the U.S. Embassy's opening in Jerusalem. At the time of our broadcast, the Israeli military had killed at least 30 Palestinians, and least 1,000 had been injured. "No one is carrying any weapons here. There are no bullets being fired by Palestinians on Israeli soldiers. … And yet these killings continue," Kouddous says. This comes as senior members of the Trump administration have gathered in Jerusalem for the embassy's opening.

Democracy Now
May 14, 2018

Headlines for May 14, 2018
Israeli Soldiers Kill Dozens of Palestinians as U.S. Opens Embassy in Jerusalem, Trump Admin Threatens to Sanction European Firms Doing Business with Iran, In Reversal, Trump Trying to Save Chinese Company Hit by U.S. Sanctions, Report: Trump Admin Eliminates NASA Program to Monitor Carbon & Methane, Afghanistan: Taliban Kill More Than 100 Afghan Soldiers & Police in Last Week, Pakistan Prevents U.S. Diplomat from Leaving, After He Killed 1 in Car Crash, Burundi: 26 Killed in Attack on Village, Days Before Controversial Referendum, Iraq: Early Election Results Show Cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in Lead, Indonesia: ISIS Claims Responsibility for String of Attacks on Churches, 1974 CIA Memo: Brazil's Former Dictator Personally Approved Summary Executions, Trump Admin Rolls Back Protections for Transgender Prisoners, White House Refuses to Apologize for Aide's Comments Mocking John McCain, American Bishop Michael Curry to Deliver Sermon at British Royal Wedding

Democracy Now
May 11, 2018

Immigration Officials Are Using Pseudoscience to Justify Jailing Teenage Asylum Seekers with Adults
This week, the Trump administration announced it will detain asylum seekers and separate them from their children at the border. A case in California shows how some minors who arrived alone to seek asylum have been put in adult detention. Immigration authorities in California are refusing to release an Afghan asylum seeker from an adult detention center, even though a federal court had determined he is a child. His lawyers say the teenager, who has been held in adult detention for five months, is 17 years old. But ICE used a disputed "pseudoscience" age test based on a dental exam to insist he is over 18. The teen, who uses the name Hamid for privacy and protection, says he fled Afghanistan using a forged passport after the Taliban murdered his father. On Tuesday, Hamid spoke to Democracy Now! in his first phone interview from the Mesa Verde detention center in Bakersfield, California. We speak to his attorney Mariel Villarreal in New York.

Democracy Now
May 11, 2018

Black Mama's Bail Out Is Freeing Black Women from Jail for Mother's Day & Taking Aim at Cash Bail
It's Mother's Day this weekend, and racial justice groups around the country are bailing black women out of jail so they can spend the holiday with their families. For the second year in a row, "Black Mama's Bail Out Day" is raising money to bail out as many black women from jail as possible. The effort is taking place in dozens of cities to call attention to the injustice of cash bail. We speak to Mary Hooks, co-director of Southerners on New Ground and an organizer of National Black Mama's Bail Out Day.

Democracy Now
May 11, 2018

If Gina Haspel Is Confirmed at CIA, the U.S. Would Be Giving Other Nations Green Light to Torture
Former Vice President Dick Cheney said Thursday that the U.S. should restart torture interrogation tactics. Cheney's comment comes a day after President Trump's nominee to head the CIA, Gina Haspel, repeatedly refused Wednesday to call the CIA's post-9/11 treatment of prisoners "torture," and declined to state whether she believes torture is immoral. Haspel's prospects for confirmation remain in doubt, after Republican senators Rand Paul of Kentucky and John McCain of Arizona issued statements opposing her nomination. We speak to Laleh Khalili, professor at SOAS University of London and author of "Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies."

Democracy Now
May 11, 2018

Laleh Khalili: Palestinian "Gandhis" Are Marching Every Day for Freedom from Israeli Apartheid
For the seventh week in a row, Palestinian protesters are gathering in Gaza near the Israeli border as part of an ongoing nonviolent protest called the Great March of Return. Since the protests began, Israeli forces have killed at least 47 Palestinians and wounded nearly 7,000. The protests are leading up to a massive rally next week timed to mark the 70th anniversary of the Nakba, known as the Day of Catastrophe to Palestinians, when more than 700,000 Palestinians were forced to flee or were expelled from their homes. Still with us is Laleh Khalili, professor at SOAS University of London. She's the author of a number of books, including "Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies."

Democracy Now
May 11, 2018

Trump Withdrew from Iran Nuclear Deal. Now Israel May Be Trying to Provoke War
Tension is mounting between Israel and Iran in Syria. On Thursday, Israel bombed dozens of Iranian targets inside Syria in the largest attack by Israel since fighting began in Syria in 2011. Israeli authorities said the attack was in response to Iranian forces firing 20 rockets at Israeli forces in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Iran had "crossed a red line," though Israel has offered no evidence the rocket attacks were carried out by Iran. Earlier today, Iran's Foreign Ministry said Israel's claim about an Iranian rocket attack is "freely invented and baseless." Meanwhile, more evidence is emerging that it was Israel—not Iran—that began the escalation this week. The New York Times reports an Israeli missile strike on Wednesday hit a village in the Syrian Golan Heights. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights also reports Israel carried out a missile strike on Tuesday near Damascus, killing at least 15 people, including eight Iranians. That strike occurred just hours after President Trump announced the United States would pull out of the Iran nuclear agreement. To talk more about the rising tension between Israel and Iran, we go to London, where we are joined by the Iranian-American professor Laleh Khalili. She is a professor at SOAS University of London. She's the author of a number of books, including "Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies."

Democracy Now
May 11, 2018

Trump Withdrew from Iranian Nuclear Deal. Now Israel May Be Trying to Provoke War
Tension is mounting between Israel and Iran in Syria. On Thursday, Israel bombed dozens of Iranian targets inside Syria in the largest attack by Israel since fighting began in Syria in 2011. Israeli authorities said the attack was in response to Iranian forces firing 20 rockets at Israeli forces in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Iran had "crossed a red line," though Israel has offered no evidence the rocket attacks were carried out by Iran. Earlier today, Iran's Foreign Ministry said Israel's claim about an Iranian rocket attack is "freely invented and baseless." Meanwhile, more evidence is emerging that it was Israel—not Iran—that began the escalation this week. The New York Times reports an Israeli missile strike on Wednesday hit a village in the Syrian Golan Heights. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights also reports Israel carried out a missile strike on Tuesday near Damascus, killing at least 15 people, including eight Iranians. That strike occurred just hours after President Trump announced the United States would pull out of the Iran nuclear agreement. To talk more about the rising tension between Israel and Iran, we go to London, where we are joined by the Iranian-American professor Laleh Khalili. She is a professor at SOAS University of London. She's the author of a number of books, including "Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies."

Democracy Now
May 11, 2018

Headlines for May 11, 2018
U.S. and North Korea Set for June 12 Trump-Kim Summit in Singapore, Yemen: At Least 11 Civilians Killed in U.S.-Backed, Saudi-Led Airstrikes, Dick Cheney Urges Restart to Torture Program, Saying, "I'd Do It Again", CIA Director's Confirmation in Doubt as Sen. McCain Cites "Disturbing" Torture Role, Britain Formally Apologizes to Libyan Rendition Victims, AT&T Paid Trump's Lawyer $600K to Advise on Time Warner Merger, Rudy Giuliani Leaves Law Firm Amid Criticism of Hush Money Payments, U.S. Apologizes After Canadian Minister Ordered to Remove Turban, NYT: Kirstjen Nielsen Nearly Resigned over Trump's Reprimand, ICE Agents Raid San Diego Home, Mocking Demands to See Warrant, Hawaii Prepares Mass Evacuation Plans as Volcanic Eruption Grows, Beaumont, Texas: Bomb Explodes on Steps of Church, Sudan: Death Penalty for Teen Bride Who Killed Husband During Rape, Flight Attendants' Survey Finds Sexual Harassment Rampant on Flights, Junot Díaz Resigns as Pulitzer Prize Chair Amid Sexual Misconduct Claims, Spotify to Drop R. Kelly over Sexual Assault Accusations, FEC to Allow Candidates to Use Campaign Funds for Child Care, Mexico: Mothers of the Disappeared March for Drug War Victims

Democracy Now
May 10, 2018

Coming of Age in the Syrian War: Memoir by Journalist Marwan Hisham & Illustrator Molly Crabapple
Israel has bombed dozens of Iranian targets inside the country in the largest attack by Israel since fighting began in Syria in 2011. The bombing raid came a day after Israel accused Iranian forces in Syria of firing 20 rockets at Israeli forces in the occupied Golan Heights, a part of Syria that Israel has occupied since 1967. We spend the rest of the hour looking at the war in Syria with a Syrian journalist and a New York artist who have worked together for years. Marwan Hisham is a Syrian journalist from Raqqa, now living in exile in Turkey. He became a journalist after first taking part in the initial protests against Bashar al-Assad in 2011. His new book is illustrated and co-authored by the award-winning artist Molly Crabapple. They first started collaborating in 2014, when Hisham was still living in ISIS-occupied Raqqa. He would send her photographs of life under ISIS, and she would draw illustrations of them. Their book is titled "Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War" and is out next week.

Democracy Now
May 10, 2018

Jeremy Scahill: Obama Paved Way for Haspel to Head CIA by Failing to Hold Torturers Accountable
On Capitol Hill Wednesday, President Trump's nominee to head the CIA, Gina Haspel, announced she would not restart the CIA's interrogation program. But she repeatedly refused to call the CIA's post-9/11 treatment of prisoners "torture," and declined to state whether she believes torture is immoral. Haspel's comments came in testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee, as she made her case to become the first woman to head the agency. Haspel is a 33-year CIA veteran who was responsible for running a secret CIA black site in Thailand in 2002, where one prisoner was waterboarded and tortured in other ways. Haspel also oversaw the destruction of videotapes showing torture at the black site. At least two Republican senators have come out against her—Rand Paul and John McCain, who said her "role in overseeing the use of torture is disturbing & her refusal to acknowledge torture's immorality is disqualifying." But Haspel may still be confirmed with the help of Democratic lawmakers. Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia has already announced he will back Haspel. We speak with Jeremy Scahill, co-founder of The Intercept and host of the weekly podcast "Intercepted."

Democracy Now
May 10, 2018

Headlines for May 10, 2018
Israel Launches Massive Airstrikes on Syria, Targeting Iranian Forces, CIA Director Nominee Gina Haspel Won't Say If Torture Is Immoral, North Korea Releases 3 U.S. Citizens as Mike Pompeo Meets Kim Jong-un, U.S. Prepares Iran Sanctions After Trump Withdraws from Nuclear Deal, Hopes Fade for Release of U.S. Citizens Held in Iran, Michael Cohen Promised White House Access to Win $4.4 Million in Payments, Afghanistan: At Least 15 Dead in ISIS, Taliban Attacks, Nicaragua: Thousands Protest Bloody Crackdown on April Demonstrations, Argentines Protest as President Macri Prepares to Take on IMF Loans, Malaysia: Opposition Wins First Election Since Independence in 1957, Sen. Bernie Sanders' Workplace Democracy Act Would Strengthen Unions, California Will Require Most New Homes to Install Solar Panels

Democracy Now
May 09, 2018

Primary Day: Blankenship Out in WV; Consumer Watchdog Wins in Ohio; Pence's Brother Wins in Indiana
Voters in West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana and North Carolina headed to the polls Tuesday to decide a number of key primaries. In West Virginia, the state's Republican Attorney General Patrick Morrisey won a closely watched U.S. Senate primary, defeating U.S. Rep. Evan Jenkins and former coal baron Don Blankenship. Blankenship had served a year in prison after 29 miners died in the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster. He faced intense criticism after releasing an ad attacking Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his "China family." Patrick Morrisey will now face the conservative Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin in November. In Ohio, Richard Cordray defeated former Congressmember Dennis Kucinich in the state's Democratic primary for governor. Cordray served as the first director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. He will now face Mike DeWine in November to determine who will replace outgoing Ohio Governor John Kasich. In Indiana, Vice President Mike Pence's brother Greg Pence won the Republican primary for a congressional seat in eastern Indiana. Female candidates were also big winners on Tuesday. According to Politico, there were 20 open Democratic House primaries with women on the ballot Tuesday, and voters selected a female nominee in 17 of them. In Ohio, Rachel Crooks, one of at least 19 women who have accused President Trump of sexual harassment and assault, won an uncontested primary for a seat in the state's House of Representatives. For more, we speak with Tim Murphy, a senior reporter at Mother Jones, and Kevin Robillard, senior political reporter for HuffPost.

Democracy Now
May 09, 2018

Medea Benjamin: The Peace Movement Must Mobilize to Support Diplomacy in Iran & North Korea
President Trump announced Tuesday he is pulling the United States out of the landmark 2015 Iran nuclear deal, brokered by his predecessor, President Obama. That same day, Trump's new Secretary of State Mike Pompeo flew to North Korea to finalize plans for President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un to hold a landmark face-to-face meeting. For more on President Trump, the Iran nuclear deal and efforts to avoid nuclear proliferation and nuclear war, we speak with Media Benjamin, co-founder of CodePink, author of "Inside Iran: The Real History and Politics of the Islamic Republic of Iran." She has also participated in the peace delegation to North Korea, Women Cross DMZ.

Democracy Now
May 09, 2018

Trita Parsi: I Was Targeted by Black Cube in Dirty Ops Effort Attacking Supporters of Iran Deal
Trita Parsi, head of the National Iranian American Council, says he was targeted by an Israeli private intelligence agency over his support for the Iran nuclear deal. The agency, Black Cube, was hired to orchestrate a "dirty ops" campaign against members of the Obama administration who negotiated the nuclear agreement. The Guardian reports Trump's aides hired Black Cube; The New York Times says it's not yet clear who hired the intelligence firm. Among those Black Cube was hired to investigate and discredit were Obama's top national security aide Benjamin Rhodes and Vice President Joe Biden's national security adviser Colin Kahl. Black Cube is made up of former officials from the Mossad and other Israeli agencies. It is the same firm hired by disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein to stop publication of articles that exposed him as a sexual predator.

Democracy Now
May 09, 2018

Trump Pulls United States Out of Iran Nuclear Deal, Dramatically Escalating Threat of War with Iran
European nations are scrambling to save the landmark nuclear agreement with Iran, one day after President Trump announced he would pull the United States out of the deal and reimpose sanctions on Iran. The 2015 agreement was worked out by the United States, five other world powers and Iran. Former President Obama described Trump's decision to withdraw as a serious mistake and warned it could lead to another war in the Middle East. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani responded by saying Iran would continue to abide by the agreement and would not renew its nuclear program for now. For more, we speak with Trita Parsi, founder and president of the National Iranian American Council. His most recent book is titled "Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran, and the Triumph of Diplomacy." We also speak with Medea Benjamin, co-founder of CodePink. Her latest book is titled "Inside Iran: The Real History and Politics of the Islamic Republic of Iran." She is also the author of "Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection."

Democracy Now
May 09, 2018

Headlines for May 9, 2018
President Trump Pulls United States Out of Landmark Iran Nuclear Agreement, NYT: Russian Billionaire Funded Cohen Shell Company Used to Pay Stormy Daniels, CIA Director Nominee Gina Haspel Faces Senate Confirmation Hearings Today, NY Gov. Appoints Special Prosecutor to Investigate Claims Schneiderman Assaulted 4 Women, North Korea Frees 3 American Hostages During Mike Pompeo's Visit, Women Candidates Win Big in NC, WV, Ohio and Indiana Primary Races, Armenia: Parliament Elects Opposition Leader as Prime Minister, Israel Orders Deportation of Human Rights Watch Director Omar Shakir, John McCain Says He Doesn't Want Trump to Attend His Funeral, NYC: Journalists Protest Alden Global Capital for Decimating Newsrooms Nationwide, Louisiana Judge Rules Bayou Bridge Pipeline Permit Is Illegal, Police Cars & Helicopter Swam 3 Black Women Leaving Airbnb, "Black Mama's Bail Out" Action Seeks to Free Black Women from Jail Ahead of Mother's Day

Democracy Now
May 08, 2018

Journalists Rise Up Against Wall Street Hedge Fund Decimating Newsrooms Across the Country
Journalists are orchestrating a rising rebellion against censorship and layoffs implemented by the nation's second-largest newspaper chain, Digital First Media, and the New York-based hedge fund that controls it, Alden Global Capital. Reporters from Digital First publications around the country will rally outside outside Alden Global Capital's office here in New York City to demand that the hedge fund either invest in its newspapers or sell them. The hedge fund is known for slashing and downsizing its papers to maintain high profit margins. Since 2010, Digital First Media has cut budgets and staffs at newspapers across the country, including the Oakland Tribune, the San Jose Mercury News and the St. Paul Pioneer Press. In recent months, Digital First Media cut 30 percent of the newsroom at The Denver Post. Meanwhile, the private company reported profits of almost $160 million in 2017 and a 17 percent operating margin—far higher than other newspaper publishers. For more, we speak with Elizabeth Hernandez, a breaking news reporter for The Denver Post; Julie Reynolds, an investigative journalist who has been covering Alden Global Capital for years; and Dave Krieger, the former editorial page director at the Boulder Daily Camera before being fired last month for self-publishing an article critical of Alden Global Capital.

Democracy Now
May 08, 2018

"Make Trouble": Cecile Richards on Her Life Story, Reproductive Rights & Women-Led Activism
From the massive Women's March against President Trump's inauguration, to the wave of teachers' strikes sweeping across red states nationwide, to the #MeToo movement, women have been at the forefront of rising political and social mobilizations challenging the Trump administration's agenda and the entrenched gender-based violence and white supremacy in U.S. society. For more, we speak with Cecile Richards, who has just stepped aside as president of Planned Parenthood after 12 years. She's just published a new memoir, "Make Trouble: Standing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding the Courage to Lead."

Democracy Now
May 08, 2018

Cecile Richards on Attacks on Women's Health, from Iowa Abortion Ban to Rising Violence at Clinics
On Friday, Iowa's governor signed one of the nation's most restrictive abortion bills. The new law requires any woman seeking an abortion to undergo an abdominal ultrasound. The law bans abortion if a fetal heartbeat is detected, which often occurs at six weeks—before many women even know they are pregnant. Meanwhile, in South Carolina, Democratic lawmakers used a filibuster to defeat a Republican abortion ban that would have prohibited as many as 97 percent of abortions in the state. This comes as a federal appeals court ruled last month that an Indiana abortion law signed by Vice President Mike Pence when he was the state's governor in 2016 was unconstitutional. The law restricted a woman's ability to seek an abortion, including in cases where the child would be born with a disability. For more on the attacks to women's reproductive rights nationwide, we speak with Cecile Richards, who has just stepped aside as president of Planned Parenthood after 12 years. She's just published a new memoir, "Make Trouble: Standing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding the Courage to Lead." In the book, she writes, "For the first time in my life, I'm wondering whether my own daughters will have fewer rights than I've had."

Democracy Now
May 08, 2018

Headlines for May 8, 2018
NY AG Eric Schneiderman Resigns After 4 Women Accuse Him of Physical Abuse, Trump Slated to Announce Decision About Iran Nuclear Deal Today, New NRA President Is Oliver North, Key Figure in Iran-Contra Scandal, Newly Released Emails Show EPA Tried to Shield Scott Pruitt from Tough Questions, Trump Admin Ramping Up Criminal Prosecution of Migrants for Crossing Border, Giuliani: Trump to Decide by May 17 Whether to Testify to Mueller, Nigeria: 45 Killed in Attack on Village; Military Rescues 1,000 Captives from Boko Haram, Yemen: 6 Killed by Saudi-Led Coalition Bombing, Lebanon: Hezbollah and Allies Win Additional Seats in Parliamentary Election, HUD and Ben Carson to Be Sued for Suspending 2015 Fair Housing Rule, Melania Trump Unveils Kids' Health Platform; Trump Calls for $7B Cuts to Children's Health Insurance Program, Hawaii: Hundreds Evacuate Volcanic Eruption on Big Island, UNC Doctoral Student Maya Little Poured Red Paint on Confederate Statue in Protest

Democracy Now
May 07, 2018

Writer Arundhati Roy on Impunity for Rape in India & How Violence Is Used as a Tool of the State
We speak to world-renowned Indian author and activist Arundhati Roy about the increasing incidence of rape in India, as police there say they have arrested the main suspect in an alleged gang rape and murder of a teenage girl. Dhanu Bhuiyan and his accomplices are accused of burning the 16-year-old girl alive on Friday. She was reportedly murdered in the eastern state of Jharkhand after her parents complained to the local village council that she had been raped. The council told accused rapist Dhanu Bhuiyan to do 100 sit-ups and pay a 50,000 rupee fine—that's $750—as punishment. The men were allegedly so enraged by the penalty that they beat the girl's parents, then set her on fire. The attack is just one of the most recent of a series of brutal incidents of sexual violence against minors. Meanwhile, there were 40,000 rapes reported in India in 2016, and 40 percent of the cases involved child victims.

Democracy Now
May 07, 2018

Meet the 2018 Teacher of the Year Honored by Trump the White House Doesn't Want You to Hear
When Mandy Manning received her 2018 Teacher of the Year award at the White House Wednesday, the press was barred from her speech, and President Trump did not mention who she teaches: immigrant and refugee children. While she was at the White House, Manning handed President Donald Trump a stack of letters from her refugee and immigrant students, while billionaire Education Secretary Betsy DeVos looked on. She also wore six politically themed buttons as she accepted her award from Trump, featuring artwork from the 2017 Women's March, a rainbow flag and the slogan "Trans Equality Now!" Mandy Manning joins us from Spokane, Washington, where she is an English and math teacher at the Joel E. Ferris High School. She was named 2018 National Teacher of the Year by the Council of Chief School State Officers.

Democracy Now
May 07, 2018

Meet the 2018 Teacher of the Year Honored By Trump Who the White House Doesn't Want You to Hear
When Mandy Manning received her 2018 Teacher of the Year award at the White House Wednesday, the press was barred from her speech, and President Trump did not mention who she teaches: immigrant and refugee children. While she was at the White House, Manning handed President Donald Trump a stack of letters from her refugee and immigrant students, while billionaire Education Secretary Betsy DeVos looked on. She also wore six politically themed buttons as she accepted her award from Trump, featuring artwork from the 2017 Women's March, a rainbow flag and the slogan "Trans Equality Now!" Mandy Manning joins us from Spokane, Washington, where she is an English and math teacher at the Joel E. Ferris High School. She was named 2018 National Teacher of the Year by the Council of Chief School State Officers.

Democracy Now
May 07, 2018

Meet the 2018 Teacher of the Year Honored by Trump Whom the White House Doesn't Want You to Hear
When Mandy Manning received her 2018 Teacher of the Year award at the White House Wednesday, the press was barred from her speech, and President Trump did not mention who she teaches: immigrant and refugee children. While she was at the White House, Manning handed President Donald Trump a stack of letters from her refugee and immigrant students, while billionaire Education Secretary Betsy DeVos looked on. She also wore six politically themed buttons as she accepted her award from Trump, featuring artwork from the 2017 Women's March, a rainbow flag and the slogan "Trans Equality Now!" Mandy Manning joins us from Spokane, Washington, where she is an English and math teacher at the Joel E. Ferris High School. She was named 2018 National Teacher of the Year by the Council of Chief School State Officers.

Democracy Now
May 07, 2018

Nearly 90,000 Hondurans May Be Deported to Danger and Poverty as Trump Ends Their Protected Status
The Trump administration announced Friday it is ending temporary protected status for nearly 90,000 Hondurans now living in the United States, saying they must return home. TPS is an immigration status granted to foreign nationals who can't safely return to their home countries, and allows them to legally live and work in the United States. Hondurans were first given TPS in 1999 after Hurricane Mitch devastated the country. Critics note Honduras remains the one of the world's most violent countries. The Trump administration has also ended protections for El Salvador, Haiti, Nepal, Nicaragua and Sudan. Only South Sudan and Syria were renewed. An estimated 300,000 people will be impacted overall. We get response from Patricia Montes, an immigrant from Honduras and executive director of Centro Presente in Boston, Massachusetts, which has worked with members from Honduras and Central America since the 1980s. She also has family members who will lose their temporary protected status.

Democracy Now
May 07, 2018

CIA Nominee Gina Haspel May Testify for First Time in Public About Her Role in Torture at Black Site
The Trump administration's push to install the CIA's controversial deputy director, Gina Haspel, as the agency's new director faces mounting scrutiny as Haspel is set to begin a Senate confirmation hearing this Wednesday. The Washington Post reports the hearing almost didn't happen, after Haspel attempted to withdraw her name from consideration over opposition to her role in the CIA's torture program under George W. Bush. Wednesday's hearing will mark the first time Haspel has been forced to speak publicly about her role in the U.S. torture program and the destruction of CIA tapes documenting the torture. Haspel's nomination as CIA director has been "sold like a box of cereal" by the agency, says John Prados, senior fellow at the National Security Archive, but with no transparency about her record. As of now, says Prados, there's no public document listing Haspel's duties in her more than 30 years at the CIA.

Democracy Now
May 07, 2018

Headlines for May 7, 2018
Report: Trump Aides Hired Israeli Firm for "Dirty Ops" Targeting Supporters of Iran Nuke Deal, Giuliani: Trump to Reject Iran Deal & Supports Regime Change, Israeli Troops Shoot Dead Three Palestinians in Gaza, Trump Terminates TPS for Hondurans, At NRA Convention, Trump Slams Gun Control Laws in France & U.K., Report: Gina Haspel Sought to Withdraw as CIA Pick, Ex-Convict, Coal Baron Don Blankenship Soars Ahead in WV Senate Primary, Entergy Paid Actors to Support New Orleans Power Plant at Public Hearings, Mother & Daughter End 5-Week Tree Sit Protesting Virginia Pipeline, Tens of Thousands of University of California Workers Begin Strike, Pelosi Calls for Ethics Probe of Tony Cárdenas into Sexual Assault Allegations, Writer Junot Díaz Faces Accusation of Sexual Misconduct

Democracy Now
May 04, 2018

The Displaced: Refugee Writers Ariel Dorfman & Viet Thanh Nguyen on Migration, US Wars & Resistance
As dozens of migrants from Central America remain camped out at the U.S.-Mexico border attempting to seek asylum in the United States, we spend the hour with two of the nation's most celebrated writers, both refugees themselves. Viet Thanh Nguyen was born in Vietnam in 1971. After the fall of Saigon in 1975, he and his family fled to the United States. He is the author of three books, including "The Sympathizer," which won the Pulitzer Prize, and he teaches at the University of Southern California. He is also the editor of a new collection titled "The Displaced: Refugee Writers on Refugee Lives." We are also joined by the Chilean-American writer Ariel Dorfman, who has been described as one of the greatest Latin American novelists. Forty-five years ago, he fled Chile after a U.S.-backed coup displaced President Salvador Allende. Dorfman had served as Allende's cultural adviser from 1970 to 1973. Living in exile, he became one of Gen. Augusto Pinochet's most vocal critics, as well as a celebrated playwright and novelist. Dorfman, who teaches at Duke University, has just published a new novel, "Darwin's Ghost," and a new collection of essays titled "Homeland Security Ate My Speech." He also contributed an essay to "The Displaced: Refugee Writers on Refugee Lives."

Democracy Now
May 04, 2018

Headlines for May 4, 2018
White House Struggles With Trump's Explanations of Hush Money Payment, Trump's Shifting Accounts on Stormy Daniels Payment Sparks Backlash, President Trump and Vice President Pence to Address NRA Convention, NYT: Army Special Forces Are in Yemen, Contrary to Pentagon Claims, Syrian Rebels Evacuate Homs in Russian-Brokered Deal, Gaza: Palestinians Hit by Israeli Bullets as Mass Protests Continue, North Korea Set to Release Imprisoned U.S. Citizens Ahead of Summit, Former Volkswagen CEO Criminally Charged for Violating Clean Air Act, Arizona Public School Teachers Win 20 Percent Raise, Ending Strike, National Teacher of the Year Silently Protests as Trump Awards Prize, Hawaii: Mandatory Evacuation Ordered as Kilauea Volcano Erupts, India: Death Toll from Extreme Weather Rises to 127, Protesters Target Waffle House over Arrest of African-American Patron, After Long Silence by Trump, White House Reaches Out to "Waffle House Hero", Charlottesville, VA: White Nationalist Guilty of Beating Black Man, ProPublica: Active-Duty Marine Joined Violent Far-Right Protests, Georgia Set to Put Condemned Prisoner Robert Earl Butts Jr. to Death, New York City Mayor Backs Plan for Safe Drug Injection Centers, House Chaplain Rescinds Resignation Amid GOP Furor over Tax Bill Prayer, Catholic Plowshares Indicted over Protest at Kings Bay Naval Base

Democracy Now
May 03, 2018

Arundhati Roy's Latest Novel Takes on Fascism, Rising Hindu Nationalism in India & Abuses in Kashmir
We spend the rest of the hour with the legendary, award-winning author Arundhati Roy. She won the Booker Prize in 1997 for her novel "The God of Small Things." In 2017, 20 years after the publication of her first novel, she published another work of fiction, just out in paperback, titled "The Ministry of Utmost Happiness." The novel was longlisted for the Booker Prize and nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. The book has been hailed as "an elegy for a bulldozed world." Arundhati Roy received the 2002 Lannan Foundation Cultural Freedom Prize, and her journalism and essays have been collected in several books, including "The End of Imagination," "Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers" and "Capitalism: A Ghost Story."

Democracy Now
May 03, 2018

As Caravan of Migrants Begins Entry at U.S.-Mexico Border, Trump Admin Attacks Legal Asylum Process
A standoff continues on the U.S.-Mexico border, where scores of asylum seekers are attempting to cross into the United States after taking part in a month-long caravan that began more than 2,000 miles away in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. Many of the caravan participants are migrants fleeing violence in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. Around 100 have been accepted for processing, but scores remain camped out by the border near San Diego, California, as officials claim the border entry point has limited capacity. President Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions have attacked the migrants in statements and tweets. "It's very clear that President Trump and Attorney General Sessions do not understand this section of federal law," says attorney Nicole Ramos, director of the Border Rights Project of Al Otro Lado, who represents members of the caravan. "The caravan members that are camped out at the border are trying to access a legal process which has existed for decades." We speak with Ramos, who is in Tijuana, Mexico, and with Tristan Call, a volunteer with Pueblo Sin Fronteras, or People Without Borders, just back from spending time with the caravan.

Democracy Now
May 03, 2018

Headlines for May 3, 2018
Rudy Giuliani Says Trump Reimbursed Stormy Daniels Hush Money Payment, Trump Denies Affair, Accusing Stormy Daniels of Extortion, Trump Hires Lawyer Who Defended Bill Clinton Against Impeachment, Guantánamo Prisoner Ahmed al-Darbi Transferred to Saudi Arabia, Libya: 12 Dead as Suicide Bombers Strike Tripoli Electoral Office, U.S. Returns Looted Iraqi Artifacts Acquired by Hobby Lobby, Chilean Survivors of Clerical Sexual Assault Meet with Pope Francis, 9 Dead as Aging Puerto Rico Air National Guard Plane Crashes, Puerto Rico Anti-Austerity Protests Continue, Defying Police Violence, Iowa Lawmakers Approve Ban on Most Abortions, 27 More Women Accuse Charlie Rose of Sexual Abuses, Cambridge Analytica to Shut Down After Facebook Privacy Scandal, Two Black Men Who "Trespassed" at Philly Starbucks Settle Lawsuits, Harvard University Will Negotiate with Student Labor Union, Arizona Teachers' Strike Continues as State Budget Talks Stall

Democracy Now
May 02, 2018

Detained and Then Deported: U.S. Human Rights Lawyers Barred from Entry into Israel
Two U.S. human rights lawyers were detained Sunday for 14 hours at Tel Aviv's Ben Gurion International Airport before being deported back to the United States. Columbia University's Katherine Franke and Center for Constitutional Rights executive director Vincent Warren were repeatedly questioned about their associations with groups critical of Israel. They were part of a delegation of American civil rights activists heading to Israel and Palestine to learn about the human rights situation and meet with local activists. They arrived back in New York City early Monday. This comes just days after Israeli soldiers shot and killed three Palestinian protesters and wounded hundreds more on Friday, when the soldiers and snipers opened fire during the Palestinians' weekly nonviolent protest near the Gaza border. On Saturday, a fourth protester died after succumbing to his wounds. The nonviolent protests demanding the right for Palestinian refugees to return to their land began on March 30. Since then, the Israeli military has killed at least 42 Palestinians, including two journalists, and injured thousands more. For more, we speak with Vincent Warren, executive director of the Center for Constitutional Rights, and Katherine Franke, professor of law, gender and sexuality studies at Columbia University.

Democracy Now
May 02, 2018

With Labor & Immigrant Rights Under Attack, May Day Protesters Rally in New York City
Tuesday was May Day, or International Workers' Day, and hundreds of thousands of workers took to the streets worldwide. Major mobilizations were held across the globe, from San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Paris to Jakarta. We hear from May Day protesters here in New York.

Democracy Now
May 02, 2018

Arizona Joins Red State Revolt: Teachers' Strike Reaches Day Five
Schools are closed for a fifth day in Arizona, as thousands of teachers continue to strike demanding better funding for education. Crowds of striking teachers dressed in red T-shirts have rallied at the state Capitol this week and last to demand a 20 percent pay raise for educators and decreased class sizes, among other demands. The strike began Thursday, with teachers protesting the $1 billion funding cuts to education in the state since the 2008 recession. The teachers' strikes in West Virginia, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Arizona have been described by some as a "red-state revolt." In 2016, Donald Trump won all four states. The Arizona Legislature is expected to vote on a budget today, which organizers say will now include additional funding for education. If the budget passes, teachers say they will return to class tomorrow. We speak to Noah Karvelis, an elementary and middle school music teacher in Phoenix and one of the leaders of #RedForEd and Arizona Educators United. He helped start the teachers' protests in Arizona.

Democracy Now
May 02, 2018

Puerto Rico Needs Help: Unelected Fiscal Board Pushes Austerity as Island Continues Slow Recovery
It's been almost eight months since Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, and at least 30,000 homes in Puerto Rico still lack power. As anti-austerity protests hit San Juan, we speak to Giovanni Roberto, director of the Center for Political Development in Puerto Rico.

Democracy Now
May 02, 2018

May Day in Puerto Rico: Police Attack Anti-Austerity Protesters with Pepper Spray & Tear Gas
In Puerto Rico, thousands marked May Day by joining a general strike in the capital of San Juan to protest austerity measures, from the closing of public schools to increases in university tuition. When protesters tried to converge on the building where the federal oversight board has its offices, police fired tear gas and pepper spray. The board has called for the implementation of 10 percent pension cuts, eliminating mandatory Christmas bonuses, reducing required vacation and sick time, and allowing businesses to fire employees without having to first prove a just cause. This comes as at least 30,000 people still lack power almost eight months since Hurricane Maria devastated the island. Last month, an excavator downed a transmission line, blacking out the entire electrical grid. We air a report from the streets of San Juan filed by Democracy Now! correspondent Juan Carlos Dávila.

Democracy Now
May 02, 2018

Headlines for May 2, 2018
EPA's Scott Pruitt Faces New Scandals over Ties to Lobbyists, Spending, Foreign Trips, 17 States Sue to Block EPA from Weakening Fuel-Efficiency Car Standards, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement Leader Thomas Homan Resigns, Texas & Other States Sue Trump Administration to Force End of DACA, About 2 Dozen Caravan Members Allowed to Apply for Asylum in United States, Nigeria: Dozens Killed in Suicide Bombing Attacks on Mosque in Mubi, Central African Republic: Thousands Protest & Mourn Attack on Church That Killed 15, Armenia: Widespread Anti-Government Protests Continue, Official Autopsy for Stephon Clark Contradicts Family's Independent Autopsy, Kanye West Causes Widespread Outrage with Comments About Slavery, California Supreme Court Ruling Deals Blow to "Gig Economy" Companies, Workers March in Cities Across the World to Mark May Day, Martín Espada Becomes First Latino Poet to Win Prestigious Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize

Democracy Now
May 01, 2018

"Talking About History Is Way to Liberate America": New Memorial Honors Victims of White Supremacy
The National Memorial for Peace and Justice opened last week in Montgomery, Alabama—a monument to victims of white supremacy in the United States. The memorial's centerpiece is a walkway with 800 weathered steel pillars overhead, each of them naming a U.S. county and the people who were lynched there by white mobs. In addition to the memorial dedicated to the victims of lynching, its partner site, the Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, also opened last week. For more, we speak with Bryan Stevenson, the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, the nonprofit behind the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, the country's first-ever memorial to the victims of lynching in the United States.

Democracy Now
May 01, 2018

"Talking About History Is Way We Liberate America": New Memorial Honors Victims of White Supremacy
The National Memorial for Peace and Justice opened last week in Montgomery, Alabama—a monument to victims of white supremacy in the United States. The memorial's centerpiece is a walkway with 800 weathered steel pillars overhead, each of them naming a U.S. county and the people who were lynched there by white mobs. In addition to the memorial dedicated to the victims of lynching, its partner site, the Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, also opened last week. For more, we speak with Bryan Stevenson, the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, the nonprofit behind the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, the country's first-ever memorial to the victims of lynching in the United States.

Democracy Now
May 01, 2018

Worldwide Mourning as 10 Journalists Killed in Afghanistan's Deadliest Day for Reporters Since 2001
In Afghanistan, the funerals have begun for the 10 journalists killed on Monday—the deadliest day for journalists since the Afghan War began in 2001. Nine journalists died in a double suicide bombing attack in Kabul, including Agence France-Presse's celebrated photographer Shah Marai. Survivors of the bombing said the suicide bomber was posing as a cameraman. ISIS has claimed responsibility for that attack. A 10th journalist was shot dead Monday in the eastern city of Khost. For more, we speak with Ali Latifi, a freelance journalist based in Kabul, and Phil Chetwynd, editor-in-chief at Agence France-Presse.

Democracy Now
May 01, 2018

Headlines for May 1, 2018
Afghanistan: 10 Journalists Killed in Deadliest Day for Reporters Since 2001, South Korea Dismantles Propaganda Loudspeakers in Latest Step Toward Peace, Netanyahu Claims, Without Evidence, Iran Violated 2015 Nuclear Deal, 8 Migrants from Caravan Allowed to Enter U.S. and Seek Asylum, Reuters: EPA Granted Billionaire Carl Icahn a Financial Hardship Waiver for Refinery, NYT Obtains Mueller's List of Questions He'd Like to Ask Trump, NBC: John Kelly Repeatedly Called Trump an "Idiot", Stormy Daniels Sues Trump for Defamation, After Tweet, Roy Moore Sues 4 Women Who Accused Him of Sexual Assault, Harassment, #MuteRKelly: Women of Color Demand Companies Cut Ties with R. Kelly over Rape Claims, Arizona Teachers and Workers Across the World Set to Strike, Scholar and Activist Joel Kovel Dies at 81 in New York City

Democracy Now
Apr 30, 2018

Champion for Black Power & All the Oppressed: Dr. Cone, Founder of Black Liberation Theology, Dies
We look at the life and legacy of the founder of black liberation theology, Rev. Dr. James Cone. Starting in the 1960s, he argued for racial justice and interpreted the Christian gospel from the experience of the oppressed. He said he was inspired by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who gave black theology its Christian identity, and Malcolm X, who gave black theology its black identity. Dr. Cone died Saturday at age 79. We play excerpts of his speeches and speak with Rev. Dr. Serene Jones, president of Union Theological Seminary, where Dr. Cone taught for 50 years; Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglas, dean of the Episcopal Divinity School and professor at Union Theological Seminary and a former student of Dr. Cone; and another former student of Dr. Cone, Reverend Dr. Raphael Warnock, who serves as senior pastor of the Ebenezer Baptist Church, which was the spiritual home of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He is also the chair of the New Georgia Project, author of "The Divided Mind of the Black Church: Theology, Piety, and Public Witness," and on the board of Union Theological Seminary.

Democracy Now
Apr 30, 2018

Tim Shorrock on North Korea Nuclear Deal: Will the U.S. Drop Sanctions & Economic Embargo?
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has pledged to abandon his nuclear weapons if the United States agrees to formally end the Korean War and promises not to invade his country. The announcement came after a historic meeting Friday between Kim and South Korean leader Moon Jae-in in the truce village of Panmunjom. Then, on Sunday, North Korea's state media said Kim had vowed to immediately suspend nuclear and missile tests, and would dismantle its Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site. We discuss the potentially historic developments with Tim Shorrock, correspondent for The Nation and the Korea Center for Investigative Journalism in Seoul.

Democracy Now
Apr 30, 2018

Headlines for April 30, 2018
North Korea Pledges to Abandon Nuclear Arms If U.S. Agrees Not to Invade, 8 Journalists, Including Famed Photographer, Killed in ISIS Bombing in Afghanistan, Israeli Soldiers Kill 7 Palestinians in Gaza over the Weekend, Trump Admin Moves to Freeze Fuel-Efficiency Standards for Cars, John Bolton: Trump Has Not Yet Decided Whether to Withdraw from Iran Nuclear Deal, Parkland Students Cry Hypocrisy After Guns Are Banned for Pence's NRA Address, In Campaign-Style Rally in Michigan, Trump Attacks Migrants, Media, Democrats & FBI, Dr. Ronny Jackson Will Not Return to His Role as White House Physician, Migrant Caravan Attacked by Trump Arrives at U.S. Border to Seek Political Asylum, British Home Secretary Resigns Amid Scandal over Deportation of Windrush Generation, Arizona Teachers Continue Strike into Third Day, Sprint & T-Mobile Agree to $26.5 Billion Merger, Former Black Panther Herman Bell Freed from Prison, Dr. James Cone, Founder of Black Liberation Theology, Dies at Age 79

Democracy Now
Apr 27, 2018

Karen Korematsu: "My Father Resisted Japanese Internment. Trump's Travel Ban is Just as Unfair"
The U.S. Supreme Court looks poised to uphold President Trump's travel ban, which blocks most people from seven countries—including Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen—from entering the United States. During oral arguments on Wednesday, Justice Anthony Kennedy appeared to side with the conservative side of the court. Lower courts have repeatedly ruled against versions of Trump's travel ban, saying they were unconstitutional and in violation of federal immigration law. Among those who have asked the Supreme Court to rule the travel ban unconstitutional are the children of Japanese Americans who were interned during World War II. Joining us now is one of those children: Karen Korematsu, daughter of civil rights icon Fred Korematsu who was jailed for refusing orders to be sent to an internment camp set up for U.S. residents of Japanese ancestry. His case went all the way to the Supreme Court. Last year Karen Korematsu wrote an op-ed for the Washington Post headlined "My father resisted Japanese internment. Trump's travel ban is just as unfair." For more we speak with Karen Korematsu, founder and executive director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute.

Democracy Now
Apr 27, 2018

"You Really Should Resign": Lawmakers Slam EPA's Scott Pruitt over Mounting Ethics Scandals
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt was grilled by lawmakers Thursday on Capitol Hill about a slew of scandals over his spending habits and ties to industry lobbyists. Pruitt faces more than a half-dozen investigations. Among the scandals, he paid only $50 a night to live in a Capitol Hill condo owned by the wife of a prominent Washington energy lobbyist whose firm represents a roster of fossil fuel companies. Pruitt had a $43,000 soundproof phone booth installed in his office, which a government watchdog says violated spending laws. Pruitt had the EPA spend $3 million on his security detail, including 18 full-time agents. Pruitt routinely travels first- or business-class, reportedly because Pruitt was confronted by economy-class customers angry over his policies. For more, we speak with Emily Atkin, a staff writer at The New Republic. Her latest pieces include "Scott Pruitt Is Forced to Confront Reality" and "The EPA Is Acting Like Big Tobacco." We also speak with Michael Brune, the executive director of the Sierra Club.

Democracy Now
Apr 27, 2018

"You Really Should Resign:" Lawmakers Slam EPA's Scott Pruitt over Mounting Ethics Scandals
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt was grilled by lawmakers Thursday on Capitol Hill about a slew of scandals over his spending habits and ties to industry lobbyists. Pruitt faces more than a half-dozen investigations. Among the scandals: he paid only $50 a night to live in a Capitol Hill condo owned by the wife of a prominent Washington energy lobbyist whose firm represents a roster of fossil fuel companies. Pruitt had a $43,000 soundproof phone booth installed in his office, which a government watchdog says violated spending laws. Pruitt had the EPA spend $3 million on his security detail, including 18 full-time agents. Pruitt routinely travels first- or business-class; reportedly because Pruitt was confronted by economy-class customers angry over his policies. For more we speak with Emily Atkin, a staff writer at The New Republic. Her latest pieces include: "Scott Pruitt Is Forced to Confront Reality" and "The EPA Is Acting Like Big Tobacco." We also speak with Michael Brune, the executive director of the Sierra Club.

Democracy Now
Apr 27, 2018

"Our Dreams Are Coming True": Peace Activists Celebrate as Korean Leaders Vow to Officially End War
History has been made on the Korean peninsula today, as South Korean President Moon Jae-In and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un shook hands at the Demilitarized Zone between the two countries and pledged to work to denuclearize the peninsula and to declare the official end to the Korean War. Today's historic summit marks the first time a North Korean leader has ever set foot inside South Korea. During the meeting, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said "I came here to put an end to the history of confrontation." The North and South Korean leaders pledged to pursue talks with the United States aimed at negotiating a formal peace treaty to replace the uneasy 1953 armistice. For more we speak with Ann Wright, retired U.S. Army Colonel and former State Department diplomat. She is a member of Women Cross DMZ, a group of international peacemakers who have been calling for an end to the Korean War.

Democracy Now
Apr 27, 2018

Headlines for April 27, 2018
In Historic Move, North & South Korean Leaders Meet at DMZ and Commit to Peace, On Capitol Hill, Lawmakers Call on Scott Pruitt to Resign over Slew of Scandals, Senate Confirms Mike Pompeo as Secretary of State, Newly Released Docs Detail CIA Nominee Gina Haspel's Torture Record, Jury Convicts Bill Cosby Guilty of on 3 Sexual Assault Charges, NBC Anchor Tom Brokaw Accused Sexual Harassment, Thousands Protest in Spain After Court Clears Men of 2015 Gang Rape, Thousands of Arizona & Colorado Teachers Strike to Protest Cuts to Education Funding, In Rambling Interview, Trump Admits Cohen Represented Him in Stormy Daniels Payment, NYC: 14 Jewish Activists Arrested at Schumer's Office over Israel's Killing of Palestinian Protesters, Wisconsin: Tens of Thousands Forced to Evacuate after Refinery Explosion, Editorial Board of Montgomery Advertiser Apologies for Past Coverage of Lynching

Democracy Now
Apr 26, 2018

After Fleeing Genocide, a Million Rohingya Refugees Now Face Monsoon Season in Bangladesh
Aid agencies are scrambling to relocate tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees from crowded camps in Bangladesh ahead of the monsoon season in June. More than a million registered Rohingya refugees now live in the Cox's Bazar district in southeastern Bangladesh after fleeing a Burmese military campaign of rape, murder and arson that the U.N. has called a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing." Now the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees says at least 150,000 people are at "high risk from mudslides and floods" from the heavy rain in the next few months. Some could be moved to a recently formed island at the mouth of the Meghna River. This comes as more refugees are still crossing over from Burma. We are joined in our New York studio by Tun Khin, President of the Burmese Rohingya Organisation UK and a member of the Free Rohingya Coalition. He was born in Burma, but in 1982 he was rendered effectively stateless along with a million other ethnic Rohingya under a nationality law.

Democracy Now
Apr 26, 2018

After Fleeing Genocide, Over Half a Million Rohingya Refugees Now Face Monsoon Season in Bangladesh
Aid agencies are scrambling to relocate tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees from crowded camps in Bangladesh ahead of the monsoon season in June. More than a million registered Rohingya refugees now live in the Cox's Bazar district in southeastern Bangladesh after fleeing a Burmese military campaign of rape, murder and arson that the U.N. has called a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing." Now the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees says at least 150,000 people are at "high risk from mudslides and floods" from the heavy rain in the next few months. Some could be moved to a recently formed island at the mouth of the Meghna River. This comes as more refugees are still crossing over from Burma. We are joined in our New York studio by Tun Khin, President of the Burmese Rohingya Organisation UK and a member of the Free Rohingya Coalition. He was born in Burma, but in 1982 he was rendered effectively stateless along with a million other ethnic Rohingya under a nationality law.

Democracy Now
Apr 26, 2018

Senior Democrat Caught on Tape Pressuring Progressive Congressional Candidate to Drop Out of Race
A new exposé by The Intercept confirms how powerful Democratic officials have worked to crush competitive progressive candidates in primaries around the country, choosing instead to back moderate, business-friendly candidates. This comes after President Obama used his farewell address to encourage Americans upset about the outcome of the 2016 election to take action by running for office themselves. We speak with Levi Tillemann, a Colorado man who heeded Obama's call and found himself disappointed by the process, after he was repeatedly pressured by powerful Democrats not to run. In fact, he recorded a conversation in which he was directly told to drop out of the Democratic primary for Colorado's sixth Congressional district by none other than the second-ranking House Democrat, Representative Steny Hoyer of Maryland. We go to Denver to speak with Levi Tillemann, a candidate in Colorado's Democratic primary for the 6th Congressional District, which includes Denver. He is featured in the new exposé by Lee Fang, investigative journalist at The Intercept, "Secretly Taped Audio Reveals Democratic Official Pressuring Progressive to Bow Out of Election."

Democracy Now
Apr 26, 2018

Travel Ban Blocks U.S. Citizen From Bringing Yemeni Daughter with Cerebral Palsy to U.S. For Care
During Wednesday's oral arguments over President Trump's travel ban at the Supreme Court, attorney Neal Katyal made reference to how the ban has blocked a U.S. citizen named Nageeb al-Omari. Al-Omari has been prevented from bringing his 10-year-old daughter to the United States to receive medical care for cerebral palsy. The family's story was featured in a new Al Jazeera Fault Lines documentary, "Between War and the Ban: A Yemeni-American Story." We air an excerpt of the documentary and speak with two attorneys fighting the travel ban.

Democracy Now
Apr 26, 2018

Supreme Court Appears Set to Uphold Trump's Travel Ban Targeting Muslim Nations
The U.S. Supreme Court looks poised to uphold President Trump's travel ban, which blocks most people from seven countries—including Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen—from entering the United States. During oral arguments on Wednesday, Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is often seen as a swing vote, appeared to side with the conservative wing of the court. U.S. solicitor general Noel Francisco argued the travel restrictions were not a "so-called Muslim ban" and that the order fell within the president's executive authority. Francisco made the claim even though Trump campaigned for president calling for a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States." Lower courts have repeatedly ruled against versions of Trump's travel ban, saying they were unconstitutional and in violation of federal immigration law. We are joined by Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the ACLU's national Immigrants' Rights Project, who presented the first challenge to President Trump's travel ban order last year, and Diala Shamas, a staff attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights. She was in Djibouti last month speaking to Yemeni relatives of U.S. citizens attempting to come to the United States under Trump's travel ban.

Democracy Now
Apr 26, 2018

Headlines for April 26, 2018
Supreme Court Justices Suggest They'll Allow Trump Travel Ban, U.S. Cancels Protected Status for Nepali Immigrants on Earthquake Anniversary, Veterans Affairs Nominee Ronny Jackson Withdraws Amid Misconduct Claims, EPA Chief Scott Pruitt to Face Lawmakers' Questions About Ethics Scandals, Trump Attorney Michael Cohen to Take the Fifth in Stormy Daniels Lawsuit, French President Blasts Trump's Policies in Address to U.S. Congress, Second Palestinian Journalist Dies from Israeli Bullets in Gaza Strip, Afghan Journalist Abdul Manan Arghand Assassinated in Kandahar, Japan: Okinawans Protest Construction of U.S. Military Base, HUD Chief Ben Carson's Bill Would Triple Poorest Tenants' Rents, California Police Say They've Captured the "Golden State Killer", Philippines Activist Denied U.S. Entry, Claims Torture in CBP Custody, New Alabama Memorial Is Dedicated to Victims of White Supremacy

Democracy Now
Apr 25, 2018

Arizona Reproductive Justice Activist, Now Free from ICE Jail, Says She Was Targeted for Activism
Immigrant rights and reproductive justice activist Alejandra Pablos has been freed from the for-profit Eloy Detention Center, where she was detained for more than 40 days after she reported to a routine ICE check-in on March 7. Advocates say she was detained in retaliation for her activism, particularly for protesting outside the Homeland Security Department office in Virginia earlier this year. Pablos works for the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health. Pablos was a legal permanent resident who grew up in Arizona, but a conviction for driving under the influence nearly a decade ago has made her subject to deportation.

Democracy Now
Apr 25, 2018

Burying Fetal Remains: Court Strikes Down Indiana Law Signed by Mike Pence
According to reporting by Rewire.News, Catholic hospitals across the country are imposing dangerous and life-threatening mandates on their patients, including requiring fetal burial after a miscarriage and restricting access to contraception, abortion, fertility treatments and gender-affirming care for transgender patients. And now, right-wing politicians like Vice President Mike Pence are pushing to enshrine these dangerous practices into law. For more, we speak with Rewire investigative journalist Amy Littlefield.

Democracy Now
Apr 25, 2018

How VP Mike Pence Enshrined Life-Threatening Catholic Hospital Religious Practices into Indiana Law
According to reporting by Rewire.news, catholic hospitals across the country are imposing dangerous and life-threatening mandates on their patients, including requiring fetal burial after a miscarriage and restricting access to contraception, abortion, fertility treatments and gender-affirming care for transgender patients. And now, right-wing politicians like Vice President Mike Pence are pushing to enshrine these dangerous practices into law. For more, we speak with Rewire investigative journalist Amy Littlefield.

Democracy Now
Apr 25, 2018

Texas Mother Recalls Being Forced to Bury Fetal Remains After Miscarriage in "Horrific" Ordeal
Last week, a U.S. appeals court declared unconstitutional an Indiana law signed by then-Governor, now Vice President, Mike Pence, that requires fetuses to be buried or cremated. This comes as Texas passed a law last year saying all fetal remains had to be buried or cremated, and also banned donation of that tissue for research purposes. In January, U.S. District Judge David Alan Ezra temporarily halted the fetal remains law, but Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has vowed to continue fighting for it. For more, we speak with Blake Norton, who had a miscarriage in 2015 at the Seton Medical Center in Austin, Texas, and was forced to choose whether she would let the hospital bury the remains in a shared grave, or arrange for a "private burial" at her own expense. We're also joined by Texas Observer reporter Sophie Novack, whose cover story about Blake Norton is headlined "Indoctrinated: A Catholic hospital in Austin forces patients who miscarry to consent to fetal burials. For one woman, that made a painful loss even worse—and she worries it could soon become routine across Texas."

Democracy Now
Apr 25, 2018

Texas Woman: I Was Forced to Consent to Bury Fetal Remains After Miscarriage in "Horrific" Ordeal
Last week, a U.S. appeals court declared unconstitutional an Indiana law signed by then-Governor, now Vice President, Mike Pence, that requires fetuses to be buried or cremated. This comes as Texas passed a law last year saying all fetal remains had to be buried or cremated, and also banned donation of that tissue for research purposes. In January, U.S. District Judge David Alan Ezra temporarily halted the fetal remains law, but Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has vowed to continue fighting for it. For more, we speak with Blake Norton, who had a miscarriage in 2015 at the Seton Medical Center in Austin, Texas, and was forced to choose whether she would let the hospital bury the remains in a shared grave, or arrange for a "private burial" at her own expense. We're also joined by Texas Observer reporter Sophie Novack, whose cover story about Blake Norton is headlined "Indoctrinated: A Catholic hospital in Austin forces patients who miscarry to consent to fetal burials. For one woman, that made a painful loss even worse—and she worries it could soon become routine across Texas."

Democracy Now
Apr 25, 2018

Trump Decries Iran Nuclear Deal as He Fills Cabinet with Advocates Pushing Regime Change in Tehran
President Trump threatened to attack Iran on Tuesday if it restarts its nuclear weapons program, while at the same time hinting he plans to scrap the international deal to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear arms. Trump made his comments at the White House during a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron, who had come to Washington in an attempt to preserve the Iran deal. Trump must decide by May 12 whether the U.S. should stay in the deal. Macron said he opposes throwing out the existing nuclear deal but is open to a new agreement with Iran to address Iran's role in Syria and other issues. But advocates say Trump is likely to leave the deal and that the U.S. is trying to force Iran to be the party that ends up leaving the accord—and that Trump's National Security Adviser John Bolton and State Department Secretary nominee Mike Pompeo aren't "seriously interested" in further negotiations. "I think the United States has never abandoned the idea of regime change in Iran," says Jamal Abdi, the vice president for policy at the National Iranian American Council.

Democracy Now
Apr 25, 2018

Headlines for April 25, 2018
Federal Judge: U.S. Must Continue DACA Program, Lawmakers Suspend Confirmation Hearing for VA Secretary Nominee Ronny Jackson, CFPB Interim Head Mike Mulvaney to Bankers: I Only Met with Lobbyists Who Gave Me Money, U.N. Warns of Impending Humanitarian Catastrophe in Idlib, Syria, Amnesty: Iraqi Women with Perceived Ties to ISIS Face "Collective Punishment", Israel Scraps Plans to Forcibly Deport or Imprison 30,000 African Asylum Seekers, Mexico: Hundreds Protest Disappearance and Murder of 3 University Students, South Africa: Unions Call for Nationwide Strike to Protest Proposed Minimum Wage, New York City: ICE Arrests 225 People in 6-Day Raid, Judge in Spokane Blocks Trump from Defunding Planned Parenthood Program, Arizona: Republican Debbie Lesko Beats Out Democratic Challenger for U.S. House Seat, Columbia University Graduate Students Strike to Demand Right to Unionize, Rapper Meek Mill Freed from Prison in Pennsylvania

Democracy Now
Apr 24, 2018

Activists Demand Release of Manuel Duran, Prominent Latino Journalist in Memphis Jailed by ICE
Immigrants rights activists are demanding the release of Manuel Duran, a prominent Latino journalist in Memphis who has been in ICE custody since early April. Duran was detained by immigration officials after he was arrested while covering a protest against immigrant detention outside a county jail. Duran, who was born in El Salvador, is a well-known reporter on Spanish radio stations in Memphis. He also runs the online site Memphis Noticias. Duran issued a statement while detained about the conditions in the LaSalle Detention Center in Jena, Louisiana, where he is being held. He writes, "Through this experience I have learned first hand details about the treatment our immigrants receive before they are deported. How they keep the lights on day and night and you have to sleep with a towel over your eyes. How they make you lie in bed for 45 minutes, in what seems to be at random after roll calling, and you cannot use the phone or the bathroom during that time."

Democracy Now
Apr 24, 2018

The Untold Story of How Fidel Castro's Love Affair with ABC Journalist Altered U.S.-Cuban Relations
A new Politico cover story reveals how an ABC journalist named Lisa Howard conducted a secret liaison with Cuba's Fidel Castro, eventually establishing a secret back channel between Castro's office and the White House. For more, we speak with Peter Kornbluh, who directs the Cuba Documentation Project at the National Security Archive at George Washington University, and who wrote the piece in Politico, "'My Dearest Fidel': An ABC Journalist's Secret Liaison with Fidel Castro."

Democracy Now
Apr 24, 2018

As Cuba Gains a New President, Raúl Castro Steps Back, Not Down, from Power
For the first time since the Cuban revolution toppled dictator Fulgencio Batista, a president who does not have the last name Castro has taken power. Miguel Díaz-Canel was sworn in as president last Thursday. He succeeds Raúl Castro, who served two consecutive 5-year terms in office. Castro is now 86 years old and will remain head of the Communist Party. Fidel Castro handed over power to his brother Raúl in 2008 while his health deteriorated, and died in 2016. Thursday's session was held on the 57th anniversary of Cuba's 1961 defeat of a CIA-backed Cuban exile invasion known as the Bay of Pigs. Díaz-Canel began his term with a promise to defend the socialist revolution led by the Castro brothers. We speak to Peter Kornbluh, who directs the Cuba Documentation Project at the National Security Archive at George Washington University.

Democracy Now
Apr 24, 2018

No End in Sight for US-Backed Yemen War as Airstrike Kills At Least 20, Including Bride, at Wedding
At least 20 people died Sunday when a Saudi-led coalition airstrike hit a wedding party in northern Yemen. Most of the dead were reportedly women and children who were gathered in one of the wedding party tents. The bride was among the dead. Medics and residents said more than 46 others—including 30 children—were also injured. The attack on the Yemeni wedding party was one of at least three airstrikes over the weekend that killed Yemeni civilians. A family of five died in an airstrike in the province of Hajjah. And 20 civilians died on Saturday when fighter jets bombed a bus near the city of Taiz. Earlier this month, U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres said Yemen had become the world's worst humanitarian crisis. We speak to Shireen Al-Adeimi, a Yemeni doctoral candidate at Harvard University.

Democracy Now
Apr 24, 2018

Headlines for April 24, 2018
Yemen: U.S.-Backed, Saudi-Led Airstrike Kills At Least 20 at Wedding, Toronto Driver Plows into Pedestrians, Killing 10 and Injuring 15, Suspected Gunman in Waffle House Massacre Arraigned on Murder Charges, Senate Committee Recommends Mike Pompeo for Secretary of State, 109 Retired Military Leaders Oppose Gina Haspel to Head CIA, Veterans Affairs Nomination in Doubt over Alleged "Improper Conduct", Trumps Welcome French President Macron for Official State Visit, French Parliament Advances Immigration Bill Restricting Asylum Seekers, Greece: Neo-Nazis Attack Peaceful Demonstration of Asylum Seekers, White House Defends Trump Tweet Condemned as Racist Toward Immigrants, Tucson, AZ: Murder Acquittal for Border Agent Who Shot Mexican Teen, Armenia: Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan Resigns Amid Mass Protests, George H. W. Bush Hospitalized One Day After Barbara Bush's Funeral

Democracy Now
Apr 23, 2018

How Black Students Helped Lead the 1968 Columbia U. Strike Against Militarism & Racism 50 Years Ago
Fifty years ago today, on April 23, 1968, hundreds of students at Columbia University in New York started a revolt on campus. They occupied five buildings, including the president's office in Low Library, then students barricaded themselves inside the buildings for days. They were protesting Columbia's ties to military research and plans to build a university gymnasium in a public park in Harlem. The protests began less than three weeks after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The 1968 Columbia uprising led to one of the largest mass arrests in New York City history—more than 700 people arrested on April 30. It also inspired student protests across the country. Today, we spend the hour looking back at this pivotal moment. We are joined by Raymond Brown, former leader of the Student Afro-American Society; Nancy Biberman, a Barnard College student who joined the protests as a member of Students for Democratic Society; Mark Rudd, chair of the Columbia University chapter of SDS during the student strike; and Paul Cronin, editor of the new book "A Time to Stir: Columbia '68." We also feature excerpts from the 1968 documentary "Columbia Revolt" by Third World Newsreel.

Democracy Now
Apr 23, 2018

Headlines for April 23, 2018
North Korea to Freeze Nuclear Tests Ahead of Trump Summit, French President Macron in U.S. for Three-Day State Visit, Manhunt Underway for Tennessee Shooter Who Killed 4 People of Color, Afghanistan: Suicide Bomb Kills 57, Injures 119 at Voter ID Center, Israeli Snipers Kill 4 More Palestinians at Gaza's Militarized Border, Palestinian Engineer Assassinated in Malaysia; Family Blames Mossad, Syrian Military Bombards Last Opposition-Held Areas Around Damascus, Nicaraguan President Scraps Pension Rollback as Protest Death Toll Hits 26, Peru: Assassinated Forest Defender Olivia Arévalo Lomas Laid to Rest, Armenia: Thousands Protest Power Grab by Leader Serzh Sargsyan, Arizona Teachers Authorize a Strike, Demanding Public Education Funds, Harvard Student Teaching Assistants Vote to Unionize, Climate Denier Jim Bridenstine Narrowly Confirmed as NASA Chief, HSBC Pledges to Roll Back Financing of Fossil Fuel Projects, Women Claim 5 of 6 Goldman Environmental Prizes for 2018, Georgia: Police Arrest 10 Anti-Fascist Protesters as Neo-Nazis Rally, Herman Bell Set to Be Freed on Parole After 45 Years in Prison, Colin Kaepernick Wins Amnesty's Ambassador of Conscience Award

Democracy Now
Apr 20, 2018

Earth Day 2018: Ending Plastic Pollution in the Oceans, Land & Our Bodies
This Sunday more than a billion people will celebrate Earth Day. This year's theme: ending plastic pollution by Earth Day 2020. Of the nearly 300 million tons of plastic sold each year, about 90 percent ends up in landfills, in the oceans—and in our bodies. Part of the focus will be microplastics, those small bits of plastic that are seemingly everywhere. We speak to Marcus Eriksen of the 5 Gyres Institute, who has led 20 expeditions around the world to research plastic marine pollution, and Priscilla Villa of the #BreakFreeFromPlastics movement.

Democracy Now
Apr 20, 2018

Dilma Rousseff: The Rise of Brazil's Far Right Threatens Democratic Gains Since End of Dictatorship
The imprisonment of former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva has shaken up this year's presidential election. Lula is the front-runner but will likely be barred from running if he is not released from prison. Polling second is the far-right former military captain Jair Bolsonaro. We speak to former Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff about the rise of the far right and the recent assassination of Brazilian human rights activist and Rio City Councilmember Marielle Franco.

Democracy Now
Apr 20, 2018

Dilma Rousseff: Lula's Imprisonment Is Part of a Coup Corroding Brazil's Democratic Institutions
Protests are continuing in Brazil over the imprisonment of former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. Two weeks ago, Lula began serving a 12-year prison sentence for a highly controversial corruption conviction. Lula had been the front-runner in this year's presidential election. His supporters say his jailing is a continuation of a coup that began in 2016, when his close ally, Dilma Rousseff, was impeached as president. Both Lula and Rousseff are members of the left-leaning Workers' Party, which has been credited with lifting tens of millions of Brazilians out of poverty since Lula was first elected in 2003. Last month, Lula spoke on Democracy Now! in one of his final TV interviews before being jailed. Earlier this week, Lula was dealt another setback when Brazil's Fourth Federal Regional Court denied Lula's latest appeal. Meanwhile, hundreds of Lula supporters have set up an encampment outside the prison where Lula is being held in the the southern city of Curitiba. We speak to former Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff. Her impeachment in 2016 ended nearly 14 years of rule by the Workers' Party. Rousseff is a former political prisoner who took part in the underground resistance to the U.S.-backed Brazilian dictatorship in the 1960s. She was jailed from 1970 to 1972, during which time she was repeatedly tortured. She was elected president in 2010 and re-elected in 2014.

Democracy Now
Apr 20, 2018

Headlines for April 20, 2018
Released Comey Memos Show Trump Distracted by Rivalries, Fear, Rudy Giuliani to Join Trump's Legal Team, Nationwide Student Walkout Marks 19th Anniversary of Columbine Massacre, Dick's Sporting Goods to Destroy Assault-Style Rifles It Didn't Sell, Trump Admin Moves to Open Arctic National Wildlife Refuge for Oil Drilling, Trump Admin Aims to Expand Sale of Armed Drones Globally, GOP Voter Suppression Architect Kris Kobach Found in Contempt of Court, Cuba: Outgoing President Raúl Castro Gives Final Speech at National Assembly, Nicaragua: Thousands Protest New Pension Plan, 4 Reported Dead, Chile: Massive Student Mobilization Protests Privatization of Education, Detroit Threatens to Shut Off Water at 17,000 Homes for People $150 Behind on Bills, Wells Fargo to Be Hit with $1 Billion Fine over Financial Crimes, Natalie Portman Refuses to Go to Israel to Accept Award over "Recent Events", Reproductive Justice Activist Alejandra Pablos Freed from ICE Detention

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