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NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

McDonald's Facing New Charges Of Sexual Harassment
The incidents are alleged to have occurred at corporate and franchise stores in 20 cities. The company promises more training for employees and managers on its anti-harassment policy.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

U.S. Postal Service Is Testing Self-Driving Trucks
The two-week pilot program will put five autonomous semi-trucks on the road, making the journey between Phoenix and Dallas.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

New York Assembly Passes Bill Closing 'Double Jeopardy' Loophole As Rebuke To Trump
Top Democrats in the state are framing the change as a way to stand up against President Trump and allow for state prosecutions of those he pardons for federal crimes.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

With Workers Hard To Find, Immigration Crackdown Leaves Iowa Town In A Bind
Business leaders worry that tough laws against undocumented workers will discourage legal immigrants from coming to the state to work. Iowa's low jobless rate has left businesses struggling to hire.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Protests Held Across The U.S. In Response To States Passing Restrictive Abortion Laws
Coordinated protests in response to a raft of new state laws restricting abortion took place across the U.S. on Tuesday.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Floods That Hit The Midwest In March Continue To Affect The Farm Economy
Midwest Farmers are still cleaning up from record floods in March. The work may delay or even prevent planting for some, which will have ripple effects throughout the U.S. agriculture sector.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

How The Government Is Responding To A 5th Migrant Child Death At The Southern Border
Immigration officials have been under fire for months as five children have died after being apprehended crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. Officials say they need more resources to address the influx.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

ACLU Reacts To The Latest Death Of A Migrant Child In U.S. Custody
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with ACLU of Texas staff attorney Rochelle Garza about a complaint the organization filed regarding the treatment of migrants in border detention facilities.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

A Look At How To Ride Out Stock Market Storms
Escalating trade wars and volatile markets cause some investors to make hasty decisions that can lead to financially damaging decisions. But there are ways to ride out stock market storms.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Across The Country, Protesters Rally To Stop States' Abortion Bans
Protesters rallied outside statehouses and the Supreme Court, where some of the laws may eventually be considered. Hundreds of events were part of a national day of action called #StopTheBans.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Dressbarn, Women's Clothing Chain, To Close All Stores
The company's CFO, Steven Taylor, called it a difficult decision but said the "chain has not been operating at an acceptable level of profitability in today's retail environment."

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Republican Tennessee House Speaker To Resign After Lewd And Sexist Texts
Glen Casada announced that he will resign his state House speakership after inappropriate and offensive texts leaked weeks ago. He has served in the Legislature for nearly 20 years.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Tenn. Republican To Resign As House Speaker After Lewd And Sexist Texts
Tenn. Republican Glen Casada announced he will resign as house speaker after inappropriate and offensive texts leaked weeks ago. He has served in the legislature for nearly 20 years.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Alabama Faces Deadline To Address Dangerous And Deadly Prison Conditions
Critics say a plan to build new prisons won't solve the entrenched, underlying issues in the state prison system that have been found to be unconstitutional.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

My Driveway, My Rules: Some Chevys Won't Go (Temporarily) Until Teen Drivers Buckle Up
A new feature in some 2020 models will kick in if "Teen Driver" mode is on. If a driver turns on the car without wearing a seat belt, the car will temporarily refuse to shift out of park .

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Teens Who Don't Buckle Up: Chevy Has A Surprise For You
A new feature in some 2020 models will kick in if "Teen Driver" mode is on. If a driver turns on the car without wearing a seat belt, the car will temporarily refuse to shift out of park .

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Muslim Lawmakers Host Ramadan Feast At Capitol
The nonprofit Muslim Advocates, along with the three Muslims in Congress, held an iftar, the breaking of the daily fast during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan at the U.S. Capitol on Monday night.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Grounded Planes Expected To Interfere With Summer Travel
The grounding of one of Boeing's most popular planes has Southwest, American and United canceling some summer flights — fares may go up for travelers affected.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

2-Tiered Wages Under Fire: Workers Challenge Unequal Pay For Equal Work
For years after the Great Recession, employers were reluctant to boost wages. Now a tight labor market is giving workers the leverage they need to demand a larger slice of the nation's economic pie.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Ransomware Cyberattacks On Baltimore Put City Services Offline
Baltimore is just the latest municipality hit with a ransomware attack. Residents can't use the city servers they need to purchase homes, pay online bills or email city workers.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Teenage Boy Is The Latest Migrant Minor To Die In U.S. Custody
A 16-year-old migrant boy has become the fifth minor since December to die after being apprehended at the southern border. Officials said he was found unresponsive during a routine welfare check.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

With Roe V. Wade Threatened, Abortion Rights Supporters Rally
Abortion rights advocates have organized nationwide protests for Tuesday to push back against restrictive abortion bans passed in several states — including Alabama — in recent weeks.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

With Roe V. Wade Threatened, Abortion-Rights Supporters Rally
Abortion-rights advocates have organized nationwide protests for Tuesday to push back against restrictive abortion bans passed in several states — including Alabama — in recent weeks.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

With Rove V. Wade Threatened, Abortion Rights Supporters Rally
Abortion rights advocates have organized nationwide protests for Tuesday to push back against restrictive abortion bans passed in several states — including Alabama — in recent weeks.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

News Brief: Migrant Death, Huawei Ban, Iran Sanctions
A fifth migrant minor dies in U.S. custody. The White House eases a ban on Chinese company Huawei. And the U.S. tracks deals with Iran after it reimposed secondary sanctions against the country.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

Ransomware Cyberattacks Knock Baltimore's City Services Offline
Baltimore is just the latest municipality hit with a ransomware attack. Residents can't use the city servers they need to purchase homes, pay online bills or email city workers.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2019

After Grim Deaths In The Borderlands, An Effort To Find Out Who Migrants Were
More than 200 migrants die attempting to cross the Southwest border each year. Slowly, scientists at a Texas laboratory are seeking the story of their bones.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Top Reason For CEO Departures Among Largest Companies Is Now Misconduct, Study Finds
Nearly 40% of the 89 CEOs who departed in 2018 left for reasons related to unethical behavior brought on from allegations of sexual misconduct or other types of ethical lapses

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Whitney Houston Hologram Tour And New Album In The Works 7 Years After Her Death
The mega-star sold tens of millions of records and had 11 number 1 hits throughout her career. And in less than year, Houston, or at least a light-projected version of her, could be at it again.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Operation Identification Helps Repatriate Remains Of Migrants Who Don't Make It
Thousands of migrants continue to stream across the U.S.-Mexico border every day. Some try to evade capture. Operation Identification helps to repatriate the remains of those who don't make it.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Billionaire Robert F. Smith Pledges To Repay Loans For 2019 Morehouse College Class
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with American University professor Ibram X. Kendi about billionaire investor Robert F. Smith's pledge to the Morehouse College class of 2019 to repay their student loans.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Former Federal Prosecutor Lori Lightfoot Sworn In As Chicago's Mayor
After eight years under Rahm Emanuel, Chicago has a political novice as mayor. Former federal prosecutor Lori Lightfoot took the oath and has big plans to shakeup Chicago's way of doing business.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

What Abortion Was Like In The U.S. Before Roe V. Wade
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Karissa Haugeberg, assistant professor of history at Tulane University, about what it was like to get an abortion before Roe v. Wade.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Teenager Is Latest Migrant Child To Die In U.S. Custody
The 16-year-old boy was found unresponsive after a routine welfare check at a facility near the U.S. border with Mexico. He was the fifth migrant child since December to die after being detained.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

California Teachers Pay For Their Own Substitutes During Extended Sick Leave
A teacher battling cancer has to pay for her own substitute. Now some lawmakers are calling for a change in the state education code to eliminate this hardship.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

FCC Chairman Endorses T-Mobile Merger With Sprint
"This is a unique opportunity to speed up the deployment of 5G throughout the United States and bring much faster mobile broadband to rural Americans," said chairman Ajit Pai.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

First Named Storm Of Atlantic Hurricane Season Could Develop Monday Night
The low-pressure system is currently a few hundred miles southwest of Bermuda. It's expected to become a tropical storm well before the official hurricane season starts on June 1.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

1st Named Storm Of Atlantic Hurricane Season Could Develop Monday Night
The low-pressure system is currently a few hundred miles southwest of Bermuda. It's expected to become a tropical storm well before the official hurricane season starts on June 1.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Hot Job Market Is Wooing Women Into Workforce Faster Than Men
Over the past three years, women returned to the workforce at more than double the rate of men. Growth in industries that rely on women and heavy recruitment of women might help explain why.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

In Historic First, Chicago Inaugurates Lori Lightfoot As Mayor
Lightfoot is the city's first black female and first openly gay mayor. She has promised to put an end to Chicago's political machine "once and for all" and shine a bright light on corruption.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

In Historic First, Lori Lightfoot Inaugurated As Chicago's Mayor
Lightfoot is the city's first black female and first openly gay mayor. After her swearing in, she laid out a plan to make Chicago "a city that families want to move to, not run away from."

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Capping A Stunning Political Rise, Chicago To Inaugurate Lori Lightfoot As Mayor
Lightfoot will be the city's first black female and first openly gay mayor. She has promised to put an end to Chicago's political machine "once and for all" and shine a bright light on corruption.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

In Trump's Trade War, Americans Will Be Asked To Show Economic Patriotism
Americans like trade, in bigger numbers than ever. But they also believe China doesn't play fair in trade.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

Justice Department Forces Alabama To Address Deadly Prison Conditions
Alabama must address dangerous prison conditions this week or face a Justice Department lawsuit. Critics say plans to build new prisons won't solve issues that have been found to be unconstitutional.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2019

San Francisco Maneuvers To Buy Local Grid Owned By PG&E
San Francisco wants a divorce from its bankrupt utility PG&E. The city wants to set up its own municipal utility and is looking at cities that have tried it in the past — such as Boulder, Colo.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

'I've Been Able To Bridge Divides' Says 2020 Democrat Steve Bullock
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Montana Gov. Steve Bullock about his run for the 2020 Democratic nomination — and why he thinks he's best positioned to beat President Donald Trump.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

'We Were Speechless': Robert F. Smith Pledges To Clear Morehouse Grads' Student Debt
The billionaire surprised the Morehouse College Class of 2019 at their graduation by pledging to pay off their student loans. NPR's Michel Martin speaks with recent Morehouse graduate Kamal Medlock.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

Sutherland Springs Baptist Church Reopens After 2017 Mass Shooting
In 2017, a gunman entered First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, killing 26 and injuring 20. The church reopened Sunday, as the small town still struggles with what happened and why.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

Texas Baptist Church Opens New Sanctuary After 2017 Mass Shooting
In 2017, a gunman entered First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, killing 26 and injuring 20. A new church building opened, as the small town still struggles with what happened and why.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

Robert Smith Pledges To Pay Off Student Loans For Morehouse College's Class of 2019
The billionaire founder of investment firm Vista Equity Partners made the surprise announcement in front of roughly 400 students while delivering the college's commencement address on Sunday.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

Severe Weather Hits Central U.S.
The central U.S. has been hammered this weekend by severe weather including tornadoes, hail and heavy rain. Many affected areas were already coping with recent flooding.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

States Prepare 'Trigger Bills' To Outlaw Abortion If 'Roe' Overturned
Some states are passing laws to get ready for a possible future in which abortion is no longer protected on the federal level.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

#YouKnowMe: Twitter Users Share Abortion Experiences
Twitter users revealed their abortion experiences under the tag #YouKnowMe after actress and late-night host Busy Philipps shared hers.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

Academics Gather To Study Phish, Man
A first-ever academic conference on the meaning and impact of the jam band Phish is happening this weekend in Oregon.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

Deported After Living In The U.S. For 26 Years, He Navigates A New Life In Mexico
After losing protections under the DACA program, Gilberto Olivas-Bejarano was deported to his birth country. In the Mexican city of León, far from his former life, he says he has much to offer.

NPR U.S. News
May 19, 2019

Companies That Rely On Census Data Worry Citizenship Question Will Hurt
Lyft and Univision are among the critics of the citizenship question the Trump administration wants on the 2020 census. The businesses say it could harm the national head count and their bottom line.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

Escalating U.S.-Iran Tensions: Trump's Foreign Policy
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Lee Zeldin, a Republican congressman from New York, about what the week's events tells us about the president's approach to foreign policy.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

By Night, Oakland's 'Pothole Vigilanties' Repair Damaged Streets
An anonymous group has emerged in Oakland called the "Pothole Vigilantes". They go out in the dead of night to fill in potholes around the Bay Area.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

2 Women Discuss Their Shifting Views On Abortion Rights
Two women share why they changed their opinion on abortion rights.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

2020 Campaign Catch-Up
Former Vice President Joe Biden held a major campaign rally in Philadelphia on Saturday, with the Democratic field largely set and President Trump coming to Pennsylvania on Monday.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

Trump Biographer Interprets President's Foreign Policy Through His Business Mind
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Donald Trump biographer Timothy O'Brien about what the president's approach to business and trade tells us about how he handles international affairs.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

For One U.S. Bike-Maker, Tariffs Are A Mixed Bag
Detroit Bikes, a rare domestic maker of bicycles, could see business increase as a result of increased U.S. tariffs on Chinese bikes. But imported parts it relies on are also subject to higher taxes.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

The Trump Administration's Record On Immigration
President Trump unveiled a plan to overhaul immigration. This has been a key issue for the president. A look back at the administration's track record on immigration reform.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

Widows Of Police Suicide Speak Out
More police officers now die by suicide than in the line of duty. NPR's Scott Simon talks with the widows of four officers who took their own lives about losing their husbands to suicide.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

'Get Off The Boat' — Women In Commercial Fishing Industry Fight Sexual Harassment
Women make up roughly 15% of Alaska's commercial fishing industry, and sexual harassment is part of the job. Being on a boat for weeks at a time makes harassment hard to escape.

NPR U.S. News
May 18, 2019

Critics Say USDA Plan To Move Federal Agencies Could Hurt Research Vital For Farmers
A plan to move USDA research groups out of Washington D.C. has towns clamoring for high-paying jobs. But critics say it's part of an effort to gut objective research and cut jobs at the two agencies.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Customs And Border Protection Downplays Plan To Ship Migrants To South Florida
On Friday night, CBP said there are no plans at this time to follow through on the plan announced earlier this week to send migrants to the state as they await their day in immigration court.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Ohio State Doctor Sexually Abused At Least 177 Male Students, Investigation Finds
The independent investigation concluded that university personnel were aware of the abuse as early as 1979, but that Richard Strauss kept abusing students until he retired nearly two decades later.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Critics Say USDA Relocation Proposal Is A Political Move
A plan to move USDA research groups out of D.C. has towns clamoring for "700 high-paying jobs." But critics say it's part of an effort to gut objective research and cut many jobs at the two agencies.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Demystifying Kink
The kink community spends a lot of time talking about sex. So what can the rest of the world learn from those conversations?

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Experts Talk Best Practices For Facial Recognition Technology
San Francisco's move to ban facial recognition software has worried the industry, which would prefer regulation. But what should regulation look like? We talk to the experts on both sides.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Florida's Broward County Braces For Migrant Influx
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Broward County Mayor Mark Bogen about the notification from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection that the agency will be flying in more than 1,000 migrants to the area.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

U.S. Targets Huawei Amid Trade Talks With China
The Trump administration's blacklisting of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei could disrupt the company's supply, and slow down the rollout of global 5G networks.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Week In Politics: Iran, Immigration, 2020 Voters
NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne and New York Times columnist David Brooks about saber rattling with Iran, immigration and the generational split with Democratic voters.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

U.S. Agrees To Drop Steel, Aluminum Tariffs On Mexico And Canada
The tariffs had been a source of great tension between the U.S. and its two neighbors, who imposed retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exporters.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

The Anti-Abortion Demographic Gap
NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women in Politics, about the social gaps between the authors of new anti-abortion laws — and those most affected.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Trump Softens Escalating Iran War Rhetoric
The Trump administration is sounding warnings about Iran and building up force in the Persian Gulf, but the president's aversion to foreign intervention also weigh on his foreign policy.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

China's Luckin Coffee Tries To Conquer A Nation Of Tea Drinkers
In less than two years, the Chinese brand has opened 2,300 stores — second in China only to Starbucks. The company goes public on Nasdaq on Friday. And ... it's losing millions.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Grumpy Cat Dies; Her Spirit Will Live On, Family Says
The cat inspired books and won fans around the world, as fans identified with her permanently unsmiling — and yet adorable — features.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Trump Says His Immigration Plan Will Be 'Envy Of The Modern World'
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to White House adviser Brooke Rollins, about the new merit-based immigration plan that would dramatically reshape the legal immigration system. NPR's Joel Rose weighs in.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Self-Driving Shuttle Pulled Over By Police In Rhode Island
The six-person shuttle is called "Little Roady," and it was its first day taking people on a free, five-mile loop through Providence. An attendant minds the vehicle and can take the wheel as needed.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

'That Day Wasn't About Us': One Of The 1st Same-Sex Married Couples Looks Back
David Wilson and his husband Rob Compton were plaintiffs in a lawsuit that led to marriage equality in Massachusetts in 2004. At StoryCorps, they remember their wedding day.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Tracking Trump On Immigration: Despite Focus, Many Ideas Are Stalled Or Blocked
One of the Trump administration's top priorities is reshaping and restricting immigration. But many of the White House efforts have faced opposition from Congress, courts and local critics.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

The 1st Legally Married Same-Sex Couple 'Wanted To Lead By Example'
Fifteen years ago, Tanya McCloskey and Marcia Kadish were the first same-sex couple to be legally married in the U.S. Kadish reflects on their marriage and on her late wife.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Feds To Release Hundreds Of Migrants In Florida, Local Officials Say
Two Florida counties have been told that Customs and Border Protection will begin sending them more than 1,000 migrants a month, who will be processed and released into the community pending hearings.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Feds To Release Migrants Into Florida Communities, Local Officials Say
Two Florida counties have been told that Customs and Border Protection will begin sending them more than 1,000 migrants a month, who will be processed and released into the community pending hearings.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Administration To Release Hundreds Of Migrants To South Florida, Local Officials Say
Florida officials say they were informed of the migrant release plan by the federal government. They are scrambling to prepare for an influx of asylum-seekers.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Administration To Send Hundreds Of Migrants To South Florida, Local Officials Say
Florida officials say they were informed of the migrant release plan by the federal government. They are scrambling to prepare for an influx of asylum-seekers.

NPR U.S. News
May 17, 2019

Chelsea Manning Sent Back To Jail For Refusing To Testify Before Grand Jury
"Facing jail again, potentially today, doesn't change my stance," the former Army private said prior the hearing. The judge also ordered her to be fined every day she is in custody after 30 days.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Oil Spill Seeping Into Gulf Of Mexico Contained After 14 Years, Coast Guard Says
The Taylor Energy oil spill began after Hurricane Ivan triggered an underwater mudslide and caused the company's oil platform to topple and sink.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Authorities Dismantle Transnational Cybercrime Group
The members allegedly used malware in an attempt to steal $100 million from thousands of victims across the globe. Criminal prosecutions have begun in the United States, Ukraine, Georgia and Moldova.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Texas Residents Sue Army Corps of Engineers For Flood Damage During Hurricane Harvey
A group of property owners are suing the Army Corps of Engineers in Texas for flood damage during Hurricane Harvey. They were unaware that their property lies inside reservoir boundaries.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Former U.S. National Security Spokesman Says Trump Is Taking Precautions With Iran
NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Michael Anton, former National Security spokesman for the Trump Administration, about Iran and the potential for war.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

White House Spokesman Says Trump Wants To 'Attract Best And Brightest' To The U.S.
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with White House spokesman Adam Kennedy about the immigration plan announced by President Trump Thursday afternoon.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Busy Philipps' #YouKnowMe Protest Prompts Thousands Of Emotional Abortion Stories
Actress Busy Philipps is protesting anti-abortion bills by urging women to tell their stories on social media with #YouKnowMe. She discussed her own abortion on her late night show Busy Tonight.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Trump Administration Cancels Nearly $1 Billion In California High Speed Rail Funding
In a statement released Thursday, the Federal Railroad Administration says California has "repeatedly failed to comply" with the agreement and "failed to make reasonable progress on the project."

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Former NRA Staff Outraged Over Allegations Of CEO's Financial Misconduct
Leaked documents about National Rifle Association's CEO Wayne LaPierre's excessive spending on travel and clothing has outraged former staff of the gun rights organization.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Trump Wants More Merit-Based Immigration With New Proposal
President Trump announced an immigration proposal Thursday focused on reducing family-based immigration to the U.S. in favor of employment skill-based immigration.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Window Washers Rescued From Basket 'Swinging Violently' Atop Oklahoma Skyscraper
Video posted by the Oklahoma City Fire Department shows an out-of-control basket at the top of the skyscraper wildly twisting in the wind with two workers on board.

NPR U.S. News
May 16, 2019

Author Of Alabama Restrictive Abortion Bill Wants To Revisit Roe V. Wade Decision
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has signed a legislation that bans abortion in almost all cases. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Eric Johnson, Alabama Pro-Life Coalition president, who wrote the bill.

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