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NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

FBI Director Testifies On Capitol Insurrection
FBI Director Christopher Wray is being questioned by lawmakers about the bureau's response to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol and the rising threat from domestic violent extremists.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

U.S. Announces Sanctions On Russia Over Poisoning Of Opposition Leader Alexei Navalny
The U.S. will join the EU in sanctioning Russian officials allegedly behind poisoning Alexei Navalny and his ongoing detention in a Russian prison, senior U.S. officials told reporters.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Sen. Coons Has Questions For FBI's Wray About White Supremacist Threat
NPR's Noel King talks to Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing with FBI Director Christopher Wray about the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Ben West Palm Hotel In Florida Launches Book Butler Program
Hotel guests dial 0, and the Book Butler arrives at their door with a copy of the selected book. There's even an option for guests to order specially paired meals with their book of choice.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Connecticut Man Finds Bowl From Ming Dynasty At Yard Sale
The man was browsing at a yard sale when a blue and white bowl caught his eye. He bought it for $35. CNN reports the antique bowl will be auctioned for up to a half a million dollars.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Belongings Sold At Auction As Missed Payments To Storage Sites Increase
Storage facilities are packed to capacity. But with the impact of the pandemic, a lot of people are failing to make payments. Every month, hundreds of them have their stored items auctioned.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Genealogy Website Uses AI Software To Bring Old Photos To Life
The genealogy website MyHeritage has launched a service called Deep Nostalgia. The feature makes old photographs move, and social media has gone crazy over it.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Genealogy Website Uses AI-Software To Brings Old Photos To Life
The genealogy website MyHeritage has launched a service called Deep Nostalgia. The feature makes old photographs move, and social media has gone crazy over it.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Novavax Vaccine Appears 86% Effective Against U.K's COVID-19 Variant
Vaccine maker Novavax is waiting for its COVID-19 vaccine to be approved in the U.K., and is hopeful that U.S. approval will follow. NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks to Novavax CEO Stanley Erck.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

NPR Podcast Hosts' New Book: 'The How And The Wow Of The Human Body'
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to two people who know a lot about channeling kids' curiosity and wonder. Guy Raz and Mindy Thomas — hosts of the NPR podcast Wow in the World — about their children's book.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?
Demonstrations have been going on for months. Pop stars and climate activists have pledged support for the farmers. What sparked the movement is less glamorous: New rules for wholesale markets.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Iran Rejects U.S. Offer To Hold Direct Nuclear Talks
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Trita Parsi of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft about the next steps the U.S. should take to get Iran back to the negotiating table.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Montana's Governor Says Conceal-Carry Law Bolsters Self-Defense Rights
A new law signed by Montana's Republican governor will soon give college students in the state the right to carry a concealed weapon on campus without a permit. The measure has been polarizing.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

News Brief: Insurrection Hearing, Ga. Election Bill, One Medical Probe
FBI's director will testify before Senate panel about the insurrection. Georgia House passes bill that would limit absentee and early voting. House panel investigates health care provider One Medical.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

U.S. Influence Wanes in Southeast Asia As China's Increases
The Biden administration made democracy a top foreign policy issue. Myanmar's coup represents an early test. The U.S. responded with tough talk and targeted sanctions, but will it be enough?

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

Since Its Discovery 20 Years Ago, Block Of Fossils Keeps Scientists Busy
In what's considered Utah's most spectacular dinosaur find, paleontologists believe the Utahraptor megablock could hold the fossils of dozens of raptors caught in quicksand millions of years ago.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

One Medical's Coronavirus Vaccine Practices Spark Congressional Investigation
The House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis is investigating One Medical after NPR reported the boutique healthcare provider allowed ineligible patients to skip the COVID-19 vaccine line.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 02, 2021

High Noon For The Future Of The Voting Rights Act At The Supreme Court
In 2013, the court gutted a key provision of the law, citing that Section 2 of the act still bars discrimination in voting nationwide. Now, Section 2 is in the conservative court's crosshairs.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Georgia House Passes Elections Bill That Would Limit Absentee And Early Voting
The Republican bill would enact more restrictions on absentee voting and cut back on weekend early voting hours favored by larger counties, among other changes.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Former French President Sarkozy Sentenced To 3 Year Jail Sentence For Corruption
Former French president Nicolas Sarkozy has been given a three-year prison sentence for corruption and influence peddling.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Remember Phone Books? Canadian Man Enjoys Collecting Them
Fred Meandro of Toronto started collecting phone books when a library was tossing out old ones. He has 50, dating back as far as 1891. He tells the CBC he loves to look up old hotels or theaters.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Family Of COVID-19 Victim Wants To See 'Orbisculate' In The Dictionary
Hilary and John Kriegler want to honor their father Neil, who made up the word "orbisculate." It means grapefruit juice squirting into your eye. They're petitioning to get it into the dictionary.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Golden Globes Kickoff Hollywood Awards Season
The 78th Golden Globes were held Sunday night, and it was a very different kind of awards ceremony due to the pandemic. Big winners included the TV series The Crown and the film Nomadland.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

How Fast Are Oceans Rising? The Answer May Be In Century-Old Shipping Logs
A century ago, the shipping industry recorded the daily ebb and flow of tides. Now, those records are becoming crucial for forecasting how fast sea levels are rising in a warming climate.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

In The Job For A Month, Haines Oversees All 18 U.S. Intelligence Agencies
Director of national intelligence Avril Haines has taken over after a turbulent time. Former President Donald Trump was frequently at odds with his handpicked national security team.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Disinformation Still Swirls Concerning Legitimacy Of Biden Administration
While conspiracy theories aren't new, experts say their reach is spreading — accelerated by social media, encouraged by former President Donald Trump and weaponized in a way that is unprecedented.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Biden Urges Senate To Move Quickly On COVID-19 Relief Plan
The House early Saturday passed President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. Now the measure heads to the Senate.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

NBA Criticized For Decision To Hold All-Star Gaming During Pandemic
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Washington Post columnist Kevin Blackistone about the NBA's decision to host this year's All-Star Game in Atlanta — as the country continues to battle COVID-19.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

News Brief: Relief Package, Cuomo Comments, Myanmar Protester Deaths
Senate takes up the COVID-19 relief package. New York Gov. Cuomo promises to comply with an investigation into allegations of workplace harassment. Myanmar marks its most violent day since the coup.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Myanmar Security Forces Kill More Than A Dozen Protesters
The U.N. human rights office says at least 18 people were killed in Myanmar on Sunday after police fired on protesters. It was the bloodiest day since the start of the protests in the country.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

N.Y. Gov. Cuomo Apologizes For Comments Amid Sexual Harassment Claims
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo agreed to an independent investigation of allegations by former staffers of sexual harassment, amid mounting criticism of his leadership style and handling of the pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Smithsonian Will Celebrate 175 Years With An Exhibit About The Future
The Smithsonian Institution will celebrate its 175th anniversary by opening the Arts and Industries building to the public with an exhibit called "Futures." It runs through Nov. 2021 to July 2022.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Some Houston Communities Feel Overlooked In Storm Recovery Effort
Two weeks after the severe storm crippled Texas, some Houston residents still have to use bottled water to bathe, cook and flush toilets. It's an example of how hard it has been to get back to normal.

NPR U.S. News
Mar 01, 2021

Vaccine Supply Will Be Joined By Johnson & Johnson's 1-Dose Vaccine
Johnson & Johnson's vaccine ships this week. It is 66% effective at preventing mild to moderate cases of COVID-19, and 93% effective at keeping people who do get the disease out of the hospital.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 28, 2021

A Race To Protect His Country — And His Mother
For this health expert based in Boston, the effort to get vaccines to his native South Africa was intensely personal.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

Hidden Message On Iconic 'The Scream' Painting Could Be From Artist Himself
Experts have long wondered who wrote "Could only have been painted by a madman!" on the painting. Now, they think it was the artist, Edvard Munch. The message could have been aimed at critics.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

Users Report 'Drunken' Roombas After Software Update
The convenient robotic vacuums got a software update, and now users are saying the device is hitting furniture and struggling to find charging stations.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

Jennifer Granholm Discusses The U.S.'s Energy Infrastructure
NPR's Noel King speaks with newly confirmed Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm about grid resilience, climate change and the administration's infrastructure plans.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

News Brief: Syrian Airstrikes, Johnson & Johnson Vaccine,
President Biden has launched his first military operation. The FDA to decide on another vaccine. And, a former USA Gymnastics coach dies by suicide shortly after facing sexual abuse charges.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

Kris Bowers Reflects On Coming 'Full Circle' In Composing The Score For 'Respect'
Aretha Franklin liked how Kris Bowers played piano at a competition in 2011. It was his big break — a fact that he says was with him while he scored a upcoming biopic about the late Queen of Soul.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

How Rhode Island Is Handling Vaccine Rollout
Rhode Island is one of the few states that from the start prioritized vaccinating communities with high infection rates. The strategy: to put out the fire where it's burning the hottest.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

Former USA Gymnastics Coach Charged With Sexual Abuse Dies By Suicide
John Geddert coached the women's gold medal team in the 2012 Summer Olympics. He was charged Thursday with two dozen criminal counts. An official says he took his life later the same day.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

For Some Restaurants, Closing Can Be Just As Stressful As Staying Open
We've heard a lot about how hard it's been for restaurants to stay open during the pandemic. But what we often don't hear is that closing can be just as tough.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

FDA Considers Emergency Authorization For Johnson & Johnson Vaccine
The Food and Drug Administration's vaccine advisory committee meets today to consider the emergency use authorization application from Johnson and Johnson for its COVID-19 vaccine.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

'We Don't Know What's Coming': Anthony Hopkins Plays 'The Father' With Dementia
At 83, Hopkins says he knew exactly how the play his role in the film The Father. "I just had a sense of it," he says. The film was directed by Florian Zeller, whose grandmother had dementia.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

'Worth Being Forgiven': A Father And His Son's Killer Bring Past And Present Together
Tony Hicks was a 14-year-old gang member when he killed Tariq Khamisa over 25 years ago. At StoryCorps, Tariq's father spoke with Tony about how they became friends — through pain and forgiveness.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

College Tuition Sparked A Mental Health Crisis. Then The Hefty Hospital Bill Arrived
A student sought counseling help after panicking over a tuition bill. A weeklong stay in a psychiatric hospital followed — along with a $3,413 bill. The hospital soft-pedaled its charity care policy.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

Why Is Facebook Launching An All-Out War On Apple's Upcoming iPhone Update?
Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Apple's Tim Cook are fighting over iPhone privacy rules. At stake is the future of how iPhone user data is used by data brokers and advertisers.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

Young Artist Honors Black Icons With Playing Cards
A 22-year-old Kansas City artist, Kearra Johnson, transforms a school art project into a tribute to Black history - a standard playing card deck with face cards that portray African American icons.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

U.S. Launches Military Airstrikes Against Syria
The U.S. launched an air attack in Syria Thursday. Pentagon officials say they targeted facilities used by Iranian-backed militias responsible for a deadly rocket attack on a U.S. base in Iraq.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 26, 2021

Texas Begin To See Financial Fallout Of Winter Storm
Some people in Texas have been shocked by the high bills they received after last week's power outages. But even families who haven't seen high bills may wind up paying for this crisis over time.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Senate Can't Vote On $15 Minimum Wage, Parliamentarian Rules
The Senate parliamentarian informed lawmakers that a plan to gradually increase the federal minimum wage to $15 by 2025 does not fit the complicated rules that govern budget bills in the Senate.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

GOP Rep. Mace Says COVID-19 Relief Plan Is A Spending Spree
As the House moves closer to voting on the Biden administration's relief bill, GOP Rep. Nancy Mace of South Carolina talks to NPR's Rachel Martin about objections to the $1.9 trillion price tag.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Democrats Say Relief Programs Could Become This Generation's New Deal
Democrats are using the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill to introduce measures they say will reduce poverty. People already at risk for falling behind have seen big setbacks over the past year.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Post Makes Custom Box Of Fruity Pebbles For Cereal-Loving Cat
A rescue cat named Trash Panda was adopted in Georgia by the head of Fulton County's disaster response agency. Memes of the cat were made, warning of bad weather and declaring love for Fruity Pebbles.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Teaching Students A New Black History
An innovative education startup is offering culturally responsive learning to Black students across the country.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Vandals In Canada Steal Cool Vancouver Park Sign — Again
The sign at Dude Chilling Park was first installed in 2012. This is the third time someone has made off with the sign — presumably to hang over their couch. It will cost $1,300 to replace it.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Victims' Families In Lebanon Aim To Keep Explosion Probe Going
The dismissal of the lead judge investigating last year's massive blast in Beirut is raising fears of political interference to protect the country's leaders. The blast killed dozens of people.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Was Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Involved In Jamal Khashoggi's Death?
The White House says President Biden will call the Saudi King soon and it could be to lay the ground work for the release of a U.S. report on the 2018 killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Texas Lawmakers To Hold 1st Hearing Into Devastating Blackouts
The massive failure of the Texas energy system has spurred a blame game and fresh calls for reform. Texas lawmakers are debating what went wrong, and how to keep it from happening again.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Transgender Military Recruits Wait For Policy Changes To Be Formalized
Drew Garza welcomed the Biden White House lifting a ban on transgender recruits. But Garza and other would-be transgender recruits are waiting for the formal requirements and rules for their service.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Songs Of Remembrance: 'The Impossible Dream'
More than 500,000 Americans have died of COVID-19. Dan Hunt remembers his grandfather Joseph Karszen with the song "The Impossible Dream" from the musical Man of La Mancha.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

News Brief: CDC Web Tool, Jamal Khashoggi Report, USPS Delays
CDC launches tool for people to find where to get vaccinated. Biden administration is expected to release a report on the killing of a Saudi journalist. House panel presses postmaster on mail delays.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

Iran Imprisons Emad Shargi, Ordeal Personally Affects Jason Rezaian
Jason Rezaian, a Washington Post columnist held captive in Iran for more than a year, talks to NPR's Steve Inskeep about another American sentenced to 10 years in an Iranian prison Emad Shargi.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

NASA's Mars Mission Goal: Find Evidence Of Past Life On The Red Planet
NPR's Noel King speaks with Nina Lanza, a geologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Adam Steltzner, chief engineer of the Perseverance Mars rover, about NASA's Mars Exploration Program.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

COVID-19 Variant Found In New York City Worries Researchers
Scientists have spotted yet another potentially worrisome coronavirus variant, a strain that has a mutation that may help it evade vaccines, and seems to be spreading fast in New York City.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

DeJoy Testifies Before House Panel, Biden Nominates 3 To USPS Board
Postmaster General Louis DeJoy faced lawmakers on Capitol Hill who wanted to know why Americans are still experiencing delays in getting their mail. Only the USPS board of governors can oust DeJoy.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

'Hunt, Gather, Parent' Offers Lessons Collected Around The World
NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff found that parenting books she read after becoming a mom left a lot out. When she went through a tough period with her daughter, she traveled the world in search of guidance.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 25, 2021

It's All About Trump: CPAC Seems Poised To Ignore Republican Identity Crisis
The former president will headline the annual conservative conference with a Sunday address, his first speech since leaving office. His baseless election fraud claims could also get heavy play.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

3rd COVID-19 Vaccine May Be Available Soon In The U.S.
The Food and Drug Administration has released its assessment of an application from Johnson & Johnson for emergency use authorization for its vaccine. It finds the vaccine safe and effective.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

New Evidence Shows Fertile Soil Gone From Midwestern Farms
One third of the cropland in the upper Midwest has entirely lost its fertile topsoil, according to a new study. Other scientists doubt that figure, but agree that soil loss is a big problem.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

For Black Families, Evictions Are Still At A Crisis Point — Despite Moratorium
"Black individuals make up about 21% of all renters, but they make up 35% of all defendants on eviction cases," says Peter Hepburn, a researcher for Princeton University's Eviction Lab.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Lawmakers Will Hold 2nd Hearing Regarding Capitol Insurrection
NPR's Noel King talks to Sen. Amy Klobuchar, the chair of the rules committee, which co-sponsored the first joint hearing concerning security during the Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

NASA's Mars Rover Sends Secret Message Back Home
Perseverance landed on Mars several days ago, and has sent some stunning pictures of the red planet. The secret message is in binary code and reads: "Dare Mighty Things."

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Koala, Born Missing A Foot, Thrives With Prosthetic Foot
Triumph's caretaker at a wildlife rescue center in Australia had been searching for a prosthetic foot for years. A local dentist figured out how to make one. Triumph is loving his new pink foot.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Scientists Say Fertile Soil Is Missing From Many Midwestern Farms
It's estimated a third of the Upper Midwest's cropland has lost all of its topsoil, which is vital for growing crops. Even if there's a dispute on the number, scientists agree the loss is a problem.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

News Brief: Capitol Security Hearing, N.Y. Grand Jury, Vaccine Line Jumpers
Ex-Capitol security chiefs recount insurrection events. No charges will be filed against Rochester police in the death of Daniel Prude. A health care provider allows people to jump the vaccine line.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Protest March Follows Decision Not To Indict Rochester Police In Black Man's Death
A grand jury in New York declined to bring charges against police officers involved with the death of Daniel Prude. Body camera footage of his death sparked weeks of protests last summer.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Sci-Fi Writer Octavia Butler Offer Warnings And Hope In Her Work
NPR's history podcast Throughline brings us a story about science-fiction writer Octavia Butler, and how she used what she saw during her lifetime to create stories of the future.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Sci-Fi Writer Octavia Butler Offered Warnings And Hope In Her Work
NPR's history podcast Throughline brings us a story about science-fiction writer Octavia Butler, and how she used what she saw during her lifetime to create stories of the future.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Haaland Would Be 1st Native American Interior Secretary, Cabinet Member
The hearing for Interior Secretary nominee Rep. Deb Haaland was must see TV for many Native Americans across the U.S. It's been an especially inspiring time for many younger tribal members.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Activist Stella Nyanzi Flees Uganda To Live In Exile In Kenya
An activist in Uganda, who has fought an authoritarian government with vulgar poetry, is now in exile. Fleeing a broad crackdown against the opposition in the country.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

After Undergoing Surgery For Car Crash, Tiger Woods 'Awake, Responsive'
Tiger Woods was involved in a single-car accident in Southern California. A rod was inserted into his tibia to stabilize injuries, and pins and screws were used to stabilize foot and ankle injuries.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Biden Executive Order Seeks Fixes For Shortfalls Of Foreign-Made Items
President Biden is expected to sign an order on Wednesday to kick off sweeping reviews of products that have run short in recent months, including semiconductors and pharmaceutical ingredients.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Biden Looks To Mayors To Help Make The Case For More COVID-19 Aid
President Biden is hoping mayors will help make the case for his COVID-19 aid bill, which mayors say is desperately needed to bolster their cities. But funding for local governments is a flashpoint.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

CDC Report: Educators May Be Central To In-School Transmission Of COVID-19
A CDC report finds teachers may be bigger spreaders of COVID-19 in schools than students. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Grant Rivera, superintendent of the Georgia district involved in the case study.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

High-End Medical Provider Let Ineligible People Skip COVID-19 Vaccine Line
Concierge health care provider One Medical has been allowing ineligible people to receive COVID-19 vaccines. Staff questioned what they saw as inappropriate, internal documents obtained by NPR show.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Rita Sekirka, 89: Judy Garland's 'Easter Parade'
The grandmother would belt out the song with her grandson in her nursing home.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 24, 2021

Biden's Straight-Talking CDC Director Has Long Used Data To Save Lives
Dr. Rochelle Walensky says scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were "muzzled" and "diminished" by the Trump team, especially during the pandemic. She aims to fix that.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

Perseverance's Video Cameras Capture Rover's Arrival On Mars
NASA has released video and audio of the Perseverance Mars rover as it descended through the Martian atmosphere and landed as planned in Jezero Crater last Thursday.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

Senate Panel Hearing Is The 1st To Delve Into Insurrection On Jan. 6
Ousted Capitol security officials are expected to testify. The hearing is just one of the ways lawmakers are continuing to investigate the events that led to last month's breach of the U.S. Capitol.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

With Record In Mind, Canadian Woman Assembles Puzzle With 40,000 Pieces
Maxine Olive spent about 150 hours assembling the Ravensburger Memorable Moments Puzzle depicting Disney animation characters. Video of her attempt was sent to Guinness World Record officials.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

Pandemic Thwarts British Couple's Plan To Relive Paris Honeymoon
Nick and Bernie Charman weren't able to travel so Nick brought France to their front yard. He built a 22-foot tall Eiffel Tower that lights up like the real thing. The town says it's a code violation.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

News Brief: Vaccine Equity, Insurrection Hearing, Storm's Effect On Minorities
Vaccination speed and racial equity don't always go hand in hand. Congressional hearing will delve into Capitol insurrection. Damaging winter storm delivers another blow to communities of color.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

HBO's 'Black Art' Indicts The Forces That Marginalize It
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to director Sam Pollard about the HBO documentary, Black Art: In the Absence of Light. The film celebrates the rich history of art by Black Americans.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

Wife Of Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán Arrested On U.S. Drug Charges
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Associated Press reporter Michael Balsamo about the wife of a jailed Mexican drug lord, who was arrested on charges of conspiracy to distribute drugs in the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

Who Wins Or Loses If There's An Increase In The Federal Minimum Wage?
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution, about Democrats' aim to pass a COVID-19 relief package with a hike in the federal minimum wage.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

Why Democrats Can't Take Latino Voters For Granted
Democrats did not do as well in the 2020 Election with Latino voters as they had hoped they would — particularly in South Florida, where the Latino vote is crucial. So what happened?

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

Virginia On Track To Be 1st Southern State To Abolish Death Penalty
Lawmakers in Virginia have voted to repeal the death penalty in part because of its disproportionate effect on Black residents. Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam says he will sign the bill.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 23, 2021

Warrick's 'Red Line' Examines Syria's Chemical Weapons Program
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Joby Warrick about his latest book: Red Line — The Unraveling of Syria and America's Race to Destroy the Most Dangerous Arsenal in the World.

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