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NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

After A Fall At Baylor, Ken Starr Became A Fox Regular, And Then, A Trump Defender
Ken Starr was stripped of his presidency at Baylor University in 2016, accused of overseeing an administration that ignored a campus sexual assault scandal.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

Women's March Draws A Smaller, But Passionate Crowd
In its fourth annual iteration, the anti-Trump protest focused on climate change, reproductive justice and immigration.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

From Obscurity To Impeachment Figure: Who is Robert Hyde?
Hyde says he was joking when he messaged an associate of Rudy Giuliani that he was tracking former U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. Now, U.S. and Ukrainian authorities are investigating.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

Barbershop: Warren Vs. Sanders
NPR's Michel Martin talks about the disagreement that's emerged between Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders with journalists Connie Schultz, Clare Malone and Melanye Price.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

Elk Raise Tensions Between Tribes And Farmers In Washington's Skagit Valley
In Washington state's Skagit Valley, a conflict is unfolding between Native Americans and farmers. Elk are making a comeback there. Local tribes are thrilled, but the agriculture industry is not.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 18, 2020

Meals On Wheels Serves Up Breakfast, Lunch And Community At Local Diner
Meals on Wheels usually means home delivery or lunch at a senior center. But at a new project in Vancouver, Wash., it's a retro-hip neighborhood diner where seniors can get eggs, coffee and community.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Kids' Climate Case 'Reluctantly' Dismissed By Appeals Court
The court said the nearly two dozen young people who were trying to force action by the government on climate change did not have standing to sue. The judges said climate change is a political issue.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Defense Department To Overhaul Screening For Foreign Military Trainees
Officials said they want to "ensure the program continues." To that end, the department has reviewed "how we can use our resources to do enhanced vetting."

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Amtrak Asks 2 People Who Use Wheelchairs To Pay $25,000 For A Ride
It usually costs $16 to take Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. The company defended the $25,000 cost for the extra wheelchair users, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Amtrak Asks Two People In Wheelchairs To Pay $25,000 For A Ride
It costs 16 dollars to take the Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. But two people in wheelchairs were told they'd have to pay $25,000. Amtrak defended the cost, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Amtrak Asks Two People Who Use Wheelchairs To Pay $25,000 For A Ride
It usually costs $16 to take Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. The company defended the $25,000 cost for the extra wheelchair users, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

3 Alleged Members Of Hate Group 'The Base' Arrested In Georgia
This is the second trio of suspected members of The Base to be arrested this week. The group is trying to bring about the downfall of the U.S. government, according to law enforcement.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

3 Alleged Members Of Hate Group 'The Base' Arrested In Georgia, Another In Wisconsin
This is the second round of suspected members of The Base to be arrested this week. The group is trying to bring about the downfall of the U.S. government, according to law enforcement.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Supreme Court Takes Up Birth-Control Conscience Case
The high court will consider a case involving a challenge to a Trump administration rule that allows employers to opt out of providing contraceptive coverage for religious or moral reasons.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Indiana's Oldest State Worker Is Retiring At 102: 'I've Been A Pretty Lucky Guy'
Bob Vollmer, a land surveyor for nearly six decades, tells NPR he's got new projects in mind — like building a pool. And he's got some advice: "If anybody does anything for you ... say thank you."

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

U.S. Says 11 Service Members Were Injured When Iran Attacked Iraqi Base
Eight Americans were taken to Germany and three to Kuwait to receive medical care after Iran's missile strike last week, a Defense Department spokesperson says.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Amtrak Charged $25,000 To Travel With A Wheelchair
It costs $16 to take the Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. But people who use wheelchairs were recently asked to pay $25,000. Amtrak defended the cost, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

At $11 Billion And Counting, Trump's Border Wall Would Be The World's Most Expensive
President Trump's border wall comes at a staggering cost: $11 billion, or nearly $20 million per mile. It's already the most expensive border wall in the world, and the costs keep piling up.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Two Wheelchair Users Faced A $25,000 Fee To Travel On Amtrak
It costs $16 to take the Amtrak from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill. But people who use wheelchairs were recently asked to pay $25,000. Amtrak defended the cost, saying it reflects a new policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

The Secret Star Of The Tennessee Titans: Their Punter
The NFL playoffs resume this weekend, when the Tennessee Titans aim to continue their surprising romp against some of football's best teams. One reason for their success? Brett Kern — their punter.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Earthquakes Revive Puerto Ricans' Mistrust of The Government
People across the island are collecting donations for those displaced by earthquakes. Rather than give them to the government, they're delivering the goods to the affected region themselves.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Rep. John Lewis' Fight For Civil Rights Began With A Letter To Martin Luther King Jr.
As a teenager growing up in Alabama, Lewis wrote a letter to Martin Luther King Jr. during a budding civil rights movement. In a letter back, King invited the 18-year-old to join the cause.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Trump Declares Major Disaster After Puerto Rico's Earthquakes
NPR's Noel King talks to Jennifer Gonzalez-Colon, who represents Puerto Rico in Congress, about the more than $3 billion worth of aid to help the island after a series of destructive earthquakes.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

3 Alleged Members Of White Supremacist Group Arrested By FBI
The FBI says it has disrupted an armed neo-Nazi cell that discussed bomb-making and attacks. They were charged in connection with their membership in a group called The Base.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

After Controversial Leaders Step Down, The Women's March Tries Again In 2020
For the fourth year, the anti-Trump Women's March will stage events in Washington, D.C., and other places. After years of controversy, the group now has new leadership and a new focus.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

Legal Battle Over Terminally Ill Child Raises Sanctity Of Life Questions
In Ft. Worth, Texas, legal action over whether a hospital can remove a terminally ill, 11-month-old girl from life support is raising legal, medical and ethical questions.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 17, 2020

News Brief: Trump-Ukraine, White Supremacist Group, Puerto Rico Relief
Watchdog report says Trump broke the law withholding Ukraine aid. FBI arrests 3 alleged members of white supremacist group. Federal disaster declaration provides funds to quake-stricken Puerto Rico.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Puerto Rico Relief: Trump Declares Major Disaster After Series Of Earthquakes
Island officials were quick to thank the president for the designation, which makes residents eligible for more financial assistance from FEMA. They were just told aid for 2017 hurricanes is coming.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

U.S. Virgin Islands Officials: Epstein Trafficked Girls On Private Island Until 2018
The Virgin Islands Attorney General's Office says Epstein recruited and abused young women and girls over two decades on his two private islands. Some victims allegedly were as young as 11 years old.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Investigation Finds Mississippi's Restitution Centers Act Like Debtor's Prisons
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Anna Wolfe and Michelle Liu of Mississippi Today about their 14-month investigation into the state's restitution centers and how they function as debtors' prisons.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Investigation Reveals Detroit Overcharged Homeowners On Property Tax After Recession
Mary Louise Kelly talks with Detroit News reporter Christine MacDonald about her investigation into the city of Detroit overtaxing homeowners after the recession, leaving scores of residents in debt.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

New York Mets 'Part Ways' With Manager Carlos Beltrán Over Sign-Stealing Scandal
The fallout continues from a sign-stealing scandal involving the Houston Astros during the 2017 and 2018 seasons. Beltrán was part of the team in 2017, and a league investigation said he was involved.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Report Defends 'Thorough Work' Done Certifying Boeing 737 Max — But Suggests Changes
Amid difficult questions about the steps taken by Boeing and regulators, the review commissioned by the Department of the Transportation largely validated the process that put the jetliner in the air.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

FBI Arrests 3 Alleged Members Of White Supremacist Group Ahead Of Richmond Rally
A law enforcement official tells NPR that the three suspected members of The Base had discussed going to a pro-gun rally next week in Virginia.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

TSA Says It Seized A Record Number Of Firearms At U.S. Airports Last Year
The Transportation Security Administration said 87% of the guns taken at U.S. airport checkpoints in 2019 were loaded. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International had the most firearms confiscated: 323.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Coaxing Cops To Tackle Cybercrime? There's An App For That
Local police often don't feel equipped to investigate cybercrime. The NYPD is trying to teach patrol officers to ask the right questions about IP addresses, Bitcoin and phone spoofing.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Senate OKs North American Trade Deal To Replace NAFTA, Giving Trump A Much-Needed Win
With the renegotiated pact and Wednesday's signing of an initial trade deal with China, the president can say he fulfilled a key campaign pledge to get tough on trade.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Indiana State Employee To Retire Next Month At Age 102
After nearly six decades at the Department of Natural Resources, Bob Vollmer told WXIN-TV, "your body tells you when it's time to go." He joined the state agency in 1962.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Even After Virginia's Passage, ERA Is On Uncertain Legal Grounds
Lawmakers in Virginia voted to make it the pivotal 38th state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, decades after the first deadline. The fight to get the amendment into the Constitution isn't over.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Bruce Springsteen's Son Is 1 Of 15 New Firefighters In Jersey City
In New Jersey Tuesday, rock icon Bruce Springsteen's son Sam was sworn in as a firefighter. He is one of 15 new firefighters in Jersey City.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Federal Judge Temporarily Blocks Trump's Refugee Order
A federal judge in Maryland has blocked the Trump administration's executive order letting state and local governments turn away refugees from resettling in their communities.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

FEMA Seeks Billions In Reimbursement For Calif. Fire Expenses
To recoup money it spent during California wildfires, FEMA may go after some of the $13.5 billion that bankrupt PG&E set aside for victims. The utility struck the deal after being found at fault.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2020

Tattoo Removal Programs Help Former Inmates Wipe The Slate Clean
For people who have been incarcerated, head and neck tattoos are often a barrier to reentering society and getting jobs. Some former inmates are removing their tattoos to help leave the past behind.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

After Debate, Warren Told Sanders: 'I Think You Called Me A Liar'
Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders shared a tense moment after Tuesday night's Democratic debate. Now, CNN has released audio of the exchange.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Virginia Man Charged In Neo-Nazi-Affiliated 'Swatting' Ring
Swatting is harassing a target by drawing extreme law enforcement responses with fake bomb or shooting reports. The government says the suspect bragged about it in a white supremacist chatroom.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Impeachment Manager Jason Crow Not A Usual Suspect For Job
Freshman Colorado Democrat Jason Crow did not vote for Nancy Pelosi to be Speaker of the House. She chose him anyway for the House impeachment management team.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Months After Blowing Deadline, Trump Administration Lifts Hold On Puerto Rico Aid
HUD says it is releasing more than $8 billion in aid to Puerto Rico aid. The deadline to do so was in September. The aid is for rebuilding after devastating Hurricanes Maria and Irma struck in 2017.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Kentucky Coal Miners Block Railroad Track Demanding Missing Wages — Again
In Kentucky, coal miners are blocking a railroad track, demanding to be paid wages they say they're owed. They staged a similar blockade last summer and eventually won back pay.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Around The Country, Statehouses Expect Another Busy Year For Abortion Legislation
After a historic year for abortion legislation in statehouses in 2019, the stakes have only increased for advocates on both sides of the issue as legislatures reconvene this year.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Kentucky Coal Miners Striking To Demand Missing Wages End Their Protest
In Pike County, Ky., coal miners blocked a railroad track, demanding to be paid wages they said they were owed. After three days, they were paid and left the tracks.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Despite Findings Of 'Negligent' Care, ICE To Expand Troubled Calif. Detention Center
A previously confidential report obtained by NPR found major failings at the Adelanto ICE Processing Center in California, one of the nation's largest immigration detention centers.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Virginia Governor Declares State Of Emergency Ahead Of Gun Rights Rally
Gov. Ralph Northam said that "there are groups with malicious plans" and raised concerns about a reprise of the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville in 2017.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Virginia Governor Declares State Of Emergency Ahead Of Pro-Gun Rally
Concerned about a reprise of the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville in 2017, Gov. Ralph Northam says he's declaring a state of emergency ahead of a pro-gun rally and lobby day on Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Virginia Ratifies The Equal Rights Amendment, Decades After The Deadline
The ERA's provisions include a guarantee that "equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged ... on account of sex." But its legal status is uncertain.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

For These Women, The Equal Rights Amendment Has Been A Decades-Long Battle
Women who fought for and against the Equal Rights Amendment decades ago — sometimes as teenagers — are watching the votes in Virginia. If

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Judge Blocks Trump's Executive Order Allowing Local Officials To Reject Refugees
The judge's order is blow for the White House, which essentially tried to give state and local government officials power to veto resettlement. The judge says it violates the Refugee Resettlement Act.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

New Lev Parnas Documents Suggest U.S. Ambassador Was Under Surveillance In Ukraine
"They are moving her tomorrow," U.S. congressional candidate Robert F. Hyde wrote on WhatsApp in March. He added, "The guys over [there] asked me what I would like to do and what is in it for them."

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Lev Parnas Steps Back From Texts Alleging Surveillance Of U.S. Ambassador In Ukraine
"They are moving her tomorrow," U.S. congressional candidate Robert F. Hyde wrote on WhatsApp in March. Parnas, a Rudy Giuliani associate, said he didn't believe Hyde was credible.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

24 Hour Fitness Closes For The Day, Utah Man Trapped Inside
When Dan Hill finished a late-night swim, he found himself alone. While 24 hours is in the gym's name, this 24 Hour Fitness closed at midnight. That's according to a sign on the door.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Members Of Moms 4 Housing Evicted From Vacant Bay Area Home
A group of moms occupying an empty house in Oakland, Calif., have been evicted and arrested. They were squatting to draw attention to the city's housing and homelessness crisis.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Virginia Lawmakers Renew National Debate Over ERA
Lawmakers in Virginia are set to take important votes on the Equal Rights Amendment amid a renewed push to ratify it. Activists from across the country, who remember the fight decades ago, look back.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Tribal Attorney In Maine Posthumously Pardoned For 1968 Pot Charge
Maine's governor issued what's believed to be the state's first posthumous pardon — acknowledging that state officials had framed a lawyer for trying to win legal rights for one of the state's tribes.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2020

Convicted Sex Offenders' Ministry Housing Too Close To Playground, City Says
A group of registered child sex offenders in Aurora, Ill., may have to move out of their ministry-run home or face felony charges.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Red Sox Manager Alex Cora To 'Part Ways' With Boston After Sign-Stealing Scandal
"Given the findings and the commissioner's ruling, we collectively decided that it would not be possible for Alex to effectively lead the club going forward," the team said in a statement.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Foxconn's Promises Slow To Materialize In Wisconsin
Foxconn was touted as part of a new revival in U.S. manufacturing, and state officials offered nearly $4 billion to lure the company to Wisconsin. Things haven't gone quite as planned.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

LAX-Bound Aircraft Dumps Fuel On 4 Elementary Schools, Minor Injuries Reported
Emergency units treated students and staff members after a Delta Airlines plane dumped fuel on its way to a safe emergency landing, fire and aviation authorities said.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

LAX-Bound Aircraft Dumps Fuel On Elementary School, Minor Injuries Reported
Emergency units treated 17 children and 9 adults after an LAX-bound aircraft dumped fuel on its way to a safe emergency landing, fire and aviation authorities said.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Delta Plane Dumps Fuel On 4 Elementary Schools Over LA, Minor Injuries Reported
Emergency units treated students and staff members after a Delta Airlines plane dumped fuel on its way to a safe emergency landing, fire and aviation authorities said.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

St. Louis Prosecutor Sues City And Police Union, Citing Racist Conspiracy
St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner is suing the city, saying there's a racist conspiracy to stop her from enacting reforms. But others point to her controversial conduct in an investigation.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Supreme Court Hears Arguments On New Jersey 'Bridgegate' Case
The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in the "Bridgegate" case. The high court's ruling on the New Jersey scandal could prove more consequential if criminal convictions are thrown out.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Wisconsin, Foxconn And The Lure Of State Tax Incentives
Wisconsin's $4.5 billion deal with Taiwanese tech giant Foxconn is the largest a state has ever signed with a foreign company. Are such tax-incentive deals effective ways to gain much-needed jobs?

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Racist Housing Practices From The 1930s Linked To Hotter Neighborhoods Today
A study of more than 100 cities nationwide shows neighborhoods subjected to discriminatory housing policies nearly a century ago are hotter today than other areas.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

St. Louis Chief Prosecutor Accuses City, Police Union Of Racist Conspiracy In Lawsuit
Kim Gardner, the city's first black prosecutor, alleges the city, police union and others are trying to force her out of office and block her reform agenda.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Moving Beyond GDP
After 75 years, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis is developing alternative measures of economic well-being.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Virginia County Rebuffs West Virginia's Request To Join Them
The West Virginia Senate adopted a resolution to remind residents of Frederick County, Va., that they have a standing invite from 158 years ago to become part of West Virginia.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

'Tightrope' Implores America To Make Changes To Save Itself
A new book by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn is an agonizing account of how apathy and cruelty have turned America into a nightmare for many less fortunate citizens. But it is not without hope.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Border Wall Threatens National Wildlife Refuge That's Been 40 Years In The Making
Construction of the Trump administration's border wall has been slowed by difficulties acquiring private land, so the government is prioritizing construction inside federal nature sanctuaries.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Hopi Look To Tourism, Ranching For Income After Coal Power Plant Closure
The coal power plant that provided about 80% of the Hopi Nation's budget closed last month. Tribal leaders are now trying to figure out how to replace the revenue, which was their economic lifeline.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Iowa's Howard County Vote Reflects Swing From Obama To Trump
Across the country, dozens of counties voted for President Obama and then in 2016 elected President Trump. In Iowa, almost one-third of the state's counties flipped from Obama to Trump.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

At Supreme Court, Another Potential Loss For Prosecutors Fighting Public Corruption
The "Bridgegate" scandal infuriated motorists and endangered public safety, but if the past is prologue, the high court could treat it as much ado about nothing.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2020

Fear Of Aftershocks Keep Many Puerto Ricans Out Of Their Homes
NPR's David Greene talks to Oxfam America's Adi Martinez-Roman, who has visited the areas most affected by the quakes, about how stalled aid funding is affecting Puerto Rico.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Esper: U.S. Could Strike Iran Or Proxies 'Where Legally Available And Appropriate'
In an interview with NPR on Monday, Defense Secretary Mark Esper said if U.S. troops or interests are threatened, the U.S. will have the right to retaliate.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

After Quakes, Puerto Rico's Electricity Is Back On For Most, But Uncertainty Remains
Puerto Rico's public utility, PREPA said 99% of its customers' electricity has been restored following last week's 6.4 earthquake. Thousands remain in makeshift camps unsure when they can return home.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Foxconn Promised Wisconsin 'Innovation Centers,' But Hasn't Yet Delivered
When tech giant Foxconn said it would build a massive manufacturing facility in Wisconsin, it promised to open "innovation centers" — one of many side benefits that so far appear to be illusory.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Houston Astros Dismiss Team Manager, General Manager Over Sign-Stealing Scandal
MLB ordered the team to pay a fine of $5 million — the highest amount allowable under league rules. The Astros also will forfeit first- and second-round selections in player drafts in 2020 and 2021.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

DOJ Says 21 Saudi Cadets Being Expelled From U.S. Over Extremist, Child Porn Content
The announcement comes a month after a Saudi national opened fire at a naval base in Pensacola, Fla., killing three sailors. Attorney General William Barr called the shooting an act of terrorism.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

U.S. Driver's License Network Goes Down, Slowing DMV Offices Across The Nation
The network that motor vehicle agencies around the U.S. use to verify critical information went down Monday morning. It took roughly four hours to fix the problem.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

U.S. Driver's License Network Goes Down, Slowing DMV Offices Around The Nation
The network that motor vehicle agencies across the U.S. use to verify critical information went down Monday morning. It took roughly 4 hours to fix the problem.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Outspending Every Other State On The Census, California Starts Its Own Count Too
This year, some homes in California may be asked to participate in two head counts. To check the accuracy of the 2020 census, the state is sending out its own workers to survey certain neighborhoods.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Foxconn Promised 13,000 Jobs To Wisconsin. Where Are They?
For nearly three years, President Trump has touted a plan to build a huge high-tech manufacturing plant in Wisconsin. But the much-hyped effort hasn't gone quite as planned.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

As New CEO Takes Charge, Boeing's Challenges Remain
David Calhoun, Boeing's new CEO, has served on the company's board of directors since 2009, leading to skepticism he is enough of an outsider to produce significant reform.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Voters Face A Big Decision In 2020: Could A Lesson From Frederick Douglass Help?
In 1856, Frederick Douglass had a choice to make: support the big change he believed in — abolition of slavery — or settle for a less sweeping shift from a candidate better positioned to win.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Pharmaceutical Executives Face Prison Time In Case Linked To Opioid Crisis
John Kapoor, the former billionaire who founded drugmaker Insys Therapeutics, is among the executives to be sentenced for racketeering.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

News Brief: U.S.-Iran Tensions, Puerto Rico Aftershocks
Protests in Iran after the government admitted it accidentally shot down a Ukrainian airliner. What was behind the U.S. order to kill a top Iranian general? And, aftershocks rattle Puerto Rico.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Dozens Of Earthquakes Continue To Shake Puerto Rico
It's an anxious time for people in Puerto Rico. Saturday's 5.9 magnitude earthquake was the latest of both large and small tremors that have rattled the island for more than two weeks.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

Sprawling Homeless Camps — Modern 'Hoovervilles' — Vex California
The wrangling over what to do about a sprawling homeless camp in Santa Rosa, Calif. highlights how hard it is to find answers for what is a growing crisis across California and much of the West.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2020

In Tennessee, Tourists Rediscover The First President Who Was Impeached
Former President Andrew Johnson's home in Greeneville, Tenn., has seen a recent surge in visitors, similar to a spike observed after former President Bill Clinton was impeached in the late 1990s.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2020

Jewish Perspectives On Recent Anti-Semitic Violence
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with a group of diverse Jewish voices — Sarah Hurwitz, Eli Steinberg and Rebecca Pierce — about the types of conversations they've had in the wake of anti-Semitic attacks.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2020

NFL's Coaching Diversity Problem
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with N. Jeremi Duru, who teaches sports law at American University, about the lack of head coaches of color in the NFL.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2020

Ahead Of Primary, New Hampshire Voters Looking More Decisive
Democratic presidential campaigns are spending more time and resources on get out the vote efforts. NPR followed the Biden campaign on the ground in New Hampshire.

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