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NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

For Seventh Consecutive Year Visa Overstays Exceeded Illegal Border Crossings
A study also finds that the unauthorized population from Mexico has declined by 1.3 million people since 2010.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

The Latest In The Trial Of Notorious Drug Lord 'El Chapo'
Wednesday was another day of wild testimony in the trial of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Vice News editor Keegan Hamilton about the latest from the Brooklyn courtroom.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Will You Be Attending The Women's March On Washington This Year? Share Your Story
Two years in, the movement has fractured under accusations of anti-Semitism, lack of financial transparency and infighting. Has this affected your decision to attend?

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

U.S. Evangelicals Push Back Against Trump's Syria Pullout Plan
Christian leaders in the U.S. fear President Trump's decision to pull out of Syria will leave Christian minorities in the region vulnerable to attack.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly
Whether it's exercise or housework, older Americans who move their bodies regularly may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions and other signs of dementia.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Meet 'Black Girl Magic,' The 19 African-American Women Elected As Judges In Texas
Harris County, Texas, took a giant step toward representation this month when it sat 19 black women judges to the bench.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Head Of L.A. Teachers Union Discusses Ongoing Strike
As the massive teacher strike in Los Angeles enters its third day, NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with teachers' union president Alex Caputo-Pearl about the strike and its aims.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

MSU Interim President Resigns Amid Anger Over Remarks About Sexual Assault Victims
Interim President John Engler's efforts to try to shepherd the school through a turbulent time have been undercut by a year of scandal.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Resignation Calls After MSU President Says Nassar Victims Are 'Enjoying' Spotlight
Interim president John Engler's efforts to try to shepherd the school through a turbulent time have been undercut by a year of scandal.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Republicans Praise, Democrats Grill Andrew Wheeler In EPA Chief Confirmation Hearing
Wheeler has been serving as acting EPA administrator since Scott Pruitt stepped down amid ethics scandals in July. Prior to his work at the EPA, Wheeler worked as a lobbyist for the coal industry.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Shutdown Will Be Worse For Economy Than First Thought, White House Says
White House officials reportedly say that each week of the shutdown will subtract 0.1 percentage point from growth — double the administration's original estimate.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

How The 1965 Immigration Act Made America A Nation Of Immigrants
For many years, U.S. immigration favored immigrants from northern Europe. NPR correspondent Tom Gjelten explains how a 1965 law changed things — and led to the current debate about border security.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Real Fake News: Activists Circulate Counterfeit Editions Of 'The Washington Post'
The phony paper, distributed in Washington, D.C., "reported" that President Trump had resigned under pressure from female political activists.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

A Massive Moving Ice Disk Takes Center Stage, Mesmerizing Maine
Whether reminiscent of the moon's surface or "a big duck-go-round," a circle of ice entrances as it bobs and spins on a river in Maine.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Watch: Massive, Moving Ice Disk Takes Center Stage, Mesmerizing Maine
Whether reminiscent of the moon's surface or "a big duck-go-round," a circle of ice entrances as it bobs and spins on a river in Maine.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

U.S. Troops Killed By Blast In Syria; Islamic State Claims Responsibility
As many as four American soldiers are reported dead in a suicide bombing in northern Syria. The attack comes shortly after President Trump announced the U.S. would withdraw troops from Syria.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Arizona Is Buying Back Its Capitol Buildings
During the Great Recession, the state sold its capitol and other buildings in a sale-lease-back deal to raise money. Nearly a decade later, the state has a plan to reclaim the buildings.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

From A Cell To A Home: Ex-Inmates Find Stability With Innovative Program
A novel housing program in California links people recently released from long-term prison sentences with hosts willing to rent space in their homes.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

From A Cell To A Home: Newly Released Inmates Matched With Welcoming Hosts
A novel housing program in California links people who have served long-term prison sentences with those willing to rent space in their homes.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

What's Happening Inside LA Schools While Teachers Are Out On Strike?
On the first day of the LA teacher strike, public schools saw about a third of their regular attendance. Some families are torn between showing solidarity and keeping a good attendance record.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Veterans Claiming Illness From Burn Pits Lose Court Fight
Hundreds of veterans sued military contractor KBR Inc., alleging toxic smoke from burn pits at military bases made them ill. A federal appellate court said compensation must come from Congress.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 16, 2019

Federal Employees Moonlight To Pay The Bills
As the partial government shutdown continues, some federal workers and contractors are looking for temporary jobs to earn income.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

D.C. Judge Tells Furloughed Workers They Must Stay On The Job
About 400,000 federal workers are called "excepted" and are required to work without pay. They sued for an injunction that would end that requirement, but the judge said no.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Gunman Who Fatally Shot Chicago's Hadiya Pendleton Sentenced To 84 Years In Prison
Micheail Ward did not receive a life sentence as Hadiya's mother had asked the court but he is expected to spend the rest of his life in prison for the killing of the 15-year-old girl.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

IRS Recalling 46,000 Workers To Handle Tax Returns Despite Partial Shutdown
The union for the IRS workers criticized the Trump administration for forcing them to work "in exchange only for an IOU." Employees have been promised back pay when funding is approved.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Wait Times Normal At Most Airports, TSA Says, As More Agents Call Out Sick
Government workers, including TSA agents, missed their first paycheck of the year last Friday, as a result of the country's longest partial government shutdown.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

One Of The Last Navajo Code Talkers Dies At 94
Alfred Newman served from 1943 to 1945, transmitting codes in his native tongue which prevented the Japanese from gleaning U.S. intelligence during World War II.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Judge Throws Out Alabama Law That Protects Confederate Monuments
"The state has placed a thumb on the scale for a pro-confederacy message," Jefferson County Circuit Judge Michael Graffeo wrote in his opinion.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

L.A. Student Reporter Discusses Ongoing Teachers' Strike
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Carmen Gonzalez, a student reporter for Boyle Heights Beat, about the teachers' strike in Los Angeles.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Central Floridians Debate What People From Tampa Should Be Called
Central Florida is debating the question of what Tampa residents should be called. Tampanians, Tampans or is it Tampeños? NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with TV host Mario R. Núñez, who sparked this debate.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Traveling, Courage And Acts Of Kindness: A Human Story Of Illegal Border Crossing
In light of President Trump's plan to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, author Peter Behrens has this commentary and the story of one man who risked everything to come to the U.S. in 2017

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Some Travelers Expressing Gratitude For TSA Workers Amid Shutdown
As the shutdown continues, the number of TSA agents calling in sick continues to rise, meaning longer security lines. But some delayed travelers are mixing their frustration with gratitude.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

UNC Chancellor Announces Removal Of Remaining Silent Sam Monument, Then Resigns
The chancellor at the University of North Carolina announced that the rest of the Silent Sam Confederate monument is coming down. She then announced her resignation as chancellor.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Cotton Seed Sprouts In China's Lunar Lander
A mini biosphere was sent up in China's Chang'e-4, which landed on the far side of the moon in early January. Photos show the small, green shoot of a cotton plant in a container aboard the spacecraft.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Judge Orders Trump Administration To Remove 2020 Census Citizenship Question
A federal judge in New York has issued the first ruling out of multiple lawsuits over a question about U.S. citizenship status. The ruling is expected to be appealed all the way to the Supreme Court.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

On Her Way Out, UNC Chancellor Authorizes Removal Of 'Silent Sam' Pedestal
The Confederate statue known as "Silent Sam" had stood on a main campus quad from 1913 until it was torn down by protesters in August 2018.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

On Her Way Out, UNC Chancellor Orders Removal Of 'Silent Sam' Pedestal
The Confederate statue known as "Silent Sam" had stood on the main campus quad in Chapel Hill from 1913 until it was torn down by protesters in August 2018.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Bidding Farewell To 'Hello, Dolly!': Actress Carol Channing Dies At 97
Channing's big break came in 1949 when she was cast as Lorelei Lee in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. But she'll always be remembered for her role as a life-loving matchmaker and "meddler" in Hello, Dolly!

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Calif. Leaders Vow To Shield PG&E Customers From Bankruptcy Fallout
For the second time in two decades, California's largest utility, PG&E, is declaring bankruptcy — this time in the face of potentially massive wildfire liabilities.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

House GOP Leaders Remove Rep. King From Committee Assignments
GOP Rep. Steve King of Iowa was removed from two House panels as a punishment for his recent comments in a New York Times interview where he questioned whether "white supremacy" was an offensive term.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Government Shutdown Stalls Preparedness For Hurricane Season
Government meteorologists who work on hurricane modeling and forecast improvements have been furloughed as part of the shutdown. Also endangered: FEMA hurricane training exercises.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Government Shutdown Stalls Preparedness For Upcoming Hurricane Season
Government meteorologists who work on hurricane modeling and forecast improvements have been furloughed as part of the shutdown. Also endangered: FEMA hurricane training exercises.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Officials Hope Date Change Will Drive More Visitors To Detroit Auto Show
Once again, several big-name automakers won't have reveals or even exhibits at the North American International Auto Show. Organizers of the 54-year-old auto show are struggling to revive it.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

A Deadly Tsunami Of Molasses In Boston's North End
The Great Molasses Flood of 1919 in Boston resulted in a lawsuit that used expert witnesses for the first time, and was the catalyst for new regulations governing architects and engineers.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 15, 2019

Clinics Struggle To Resolve Fears Over Medicaid Sign-Ups And Green Cards
Should doctors warn patients of a policy threat that may not come to pass? That's the question pending, as the Trump administration weighs whether to deny green cards to immigrants on Medicaid.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Nursing Home Launches New Investigation After Woman In Vegetative State Gives Birth
A former prosecutor of Maricopa County, Ariz., "will have unfettered access to every facet of [Hacienda Healthcare's] business — including all the records related to this matter," the company said.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Government Shutdown Leads To A Spike In Canceled Immigration Hearings
The backlog of more than 800,000 immigration cases awaiting hearings, which has grown almost 50 percent under the Trump administration, is forecast to grow even larger.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

'Barely Treading Water': Why The Shutdown Disproportionately Affects Black Americans
As the government shutdown enters its fourth week, federal workers are struggling to make ends meet. But according to Jamiles Lartey, the shutdown is having a disproportionate effect on black workers.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Regulators To Ease Restrictions On Drones, Clearing The Way For More Commercial Uses
Federal regulations haven't kept up with technology, say drone operators and enthusiasts. Now the Department of Transportation is proposing to allow drones to fly over cities and at night.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Daughter Of Groveland Four Man Reacts To Posthumous Pardon
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with the daughter of Charles Greenlee — one of four black men accused of raping a white woman in Florida in 1949 about his posthumous pardon last week.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Police Say Wisconsin Man Confesses To Abducting Jayme Closs And Killing Her Parents
Jake Thomas Patterson allegedly told police he decided to abduct Jayme after spotting her board a school bus. Authorities say he controlled her with threats of "bad things."

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Facing Potential Liabilities From Wildfires, California's PG&E To File For Bankruptcy
California's largest utility plans to file for bankruptcy, facing potential liabilities of $30 billion from 2018 wildfires. What will this mean for shareholders, victims and 5.5 million customers?

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

How The Government Shutdown Is Impacting Airline Safety
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Todd Curtis, aviation safety and security analyst and founder of AirSafe.com, about the risks involved in air safety due to the partial government shutdown.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

In The Aftermath Of The Camp Fire, A Slow, Simmering Crisis In Nearby Chico
More than two months after the Camp Fire, the small city of Chico, Calif. is struggling to handle an influx of an estimated 20,000 new people from neighboring Paradise.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Chinese Court Sentences Canadian Man To Death, Escalating Tensions
Robert Lloyd Schellenberg, 36, had appealed a 15-year prison sentence for drug smuggling. Some experts say China is retaliating for the arrest of a Chinese tech executive in Canada.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Former White House Interpreter Weighs In On Possibility Of Subpoena
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with former White House interpreter Stephanie van Reigersberg about the possibility of Congress subpoenaing an interpreter or their notes.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Tourists In D.C. Head To Unlikely Places As Government Shutdown Continues
In the nation's capital, the partial government shutdown has left tens of thousands of federal workers shut out of their offices, and tourists shut out of museums.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Why The Government Shutdown Has A Disproportionate Effect On African-Americans
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Guardian reporter Jamiles Lartey about the shutdown's disproportionate effect on African-Americans, who make up more of the federal workforce than the workforce at large.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

In Speech To Struggling Farmers, President Trump Promotes Border Wall
President Trump addressed the Farm Bureau Federation on Monday, courting a constituency that was key to his 2016 election. He tried to reassure his audience that his trade policies will soon pay off.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Federal Workers Struggle To Stretch Their Money As Shutdown Lingers
Some banks and credit unions are waiving late fees or offering low-interest loans. But the longer the shutdown continues, the harder it becomes for furloughed workers and contractors to stay afloat.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

PG&E Plans To File For Bankruptcy Over Possible Liability In California Wildfires
The utility says it could be facing tens of billions in liability costs connected to the 2017 and 2018 Northern California wildfires. PG&E also says its CEO is stepping down.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Life-Size Cutouts Help Extend The Relationship With Lost Loved Ones In New Orleans
In New Orleans, the lifelike representations have become a part of the city's tradition of social grieving and are a source of healing, especially in communities that have suffered from gun violence.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

A Waiting Game For Immigrants And Border Agents On 2 Sides Of The Border Wall
While Border Patrol builds up its fences in San Diego to guard against a national security threat, Central American migrants waiting in Tijuana consider whether the journey was worth the effort.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

A Waiting Game For Immigrants And Border Agents On Both Sides Of The Wall
While Border Patrol agents build up fences in San Diego to guard against a national security threat, Central American migrants waiting in Tijuana consider whether the journey was worth the effort.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Suspected Kidnapper Of Wis. Teenager Is To Make First Court Appearance
People in Baron, Wis., are celebrating the return of Jayme Closs, who went missing three months ago after her parents were found shot to death in their home.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

News Brief: Russia Probe, May On Brexit, LA Teachers May Strike
Reports say the FBI was concerned about Trump's ties to Russia as early as 2016. Britain's prime minister speaks about Brexit. Public school teachers in Los Angeles are expected to strike Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

News Brief: Russia Probe, Brexit Speech, Los Angeles Teachers
Reports say the FBI was concerned about Trump's ties to Russia as early as 2016. Britain's prime minister speaks about Brexit. Public school teachers in Los Angeles are expected to strike Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

William Barr Supported Pardons In An Earlier D.C. 'Witch Hunt': Iran-Contra
The former attorney general, nominated to return to run the Justice Department, backed President George H.W. Bush's decision to pardon ex-Reagan officials caught up in an earlier imbroglio.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Child Care: 1 More Way Some Federal Workers Struggle During Shutdown
Many child care centers in federal buildings affected by the partial government shutdown are also shuddered, leaving parents few options when it comes to their kids.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 14, 2019

Report: Americans Are Now More Likely To Die Of An Opioid Overdose Than On The Road
Americans now have a 1 in 96 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to a new analysis from the National Safety Council.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Los Angeles Teachers Are Moving Forward With A Strike
Teachers in LA, the second largest school district in the country, are expected to go on strike Monday morning. Union members there have been working without a contract for more than a year.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Los Angeles Teachers Strike For Smaller Classes, More Nurses And Librarians
Teachers in LA, the second largest school district in the country, began a strike Monday morning. Union members there have been working without a contract for more than a year.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

1 Dead And 12 Hospitalized After Mass Drug Overdose In California
Police officers administered CPR after arriving at a home in Chico, California, where the drug overdose occurred. Four people are in critical condition.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Family Dips Into Retirement Savings To Make Ends Meet During Shutdown
During the longest government shutdown in history, essential federal employees are still working without pay. We hear how one family has been affected.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Government Shutdown Impacts Native American Tribes In Wyoming
Historic agreements require the government to supply basic needs to tribes like food, health care, road maintenance and police services. Tribes on central Wyoming's Wind River Reservation are feeling the pinch of the shutdown.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

House Foreign Affairs Chairman Pushes To Hold Hearings On Trump-Putin Relationship
NPR's Sarah McCammon talks with New York Rep. Eliot Engel, Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. He is pledging to hold hearings looking into accusations that President Trump hid details of his meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin from the public and his own staff.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

LA Students Prep For A Teacher Strike Monday: 'It's So Much Bigger Than A Pay Raise'
Teachers in Los Angeles plan to go on strike Monday morning for the first time in 30 years. The union is asking for increased salaries, smaller class sizes and more nurses and librarians.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Teachers In LA Prepare To Strike Monday: 'It's So Much Bigger Than A Pay Raise'
Teachers in Los Angeles plan to go on strike Monday morning for the first time in 30 years. The union is asking for increased salaries, smaller class sizes and more nurses and librarians.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Troll Watch: Study Shows Older Americans Share The Most Fake News
NPR's Sarah McCammon speaks with Andy Guess of Princeton University about a new study that finds that older Americans are more likely to share fake news than their younger counterparts.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Trump's AG Nominee William Barr Is 'A Strong Person Of Principle,' Ex-Colleague Says
Lawyer Harry Litman worked under Attorney General William Barr in the early '90s. He tells NPR's Sarah McCammon why, despite some reservations, he thinks Barr's a good choice to lead the Justice Department again.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Winter Storm Reaches Mid-Atlantic After Killing 5 In The Midwest
Missouri State Highway Patrol responded to thousands of calls and warned of hours-long delays, as officials across the region urged residents to stay home amid downed trees and snow-covered roads.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Deadly Winter Storm Reaches Mid-Atlantic After Hitting The Midwest
Missouri State Highway Patrol responded to thousands of calls and warned of hours-long delays, as officials across the region urged residents to stay home amid downed trees and snow-covered roads.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Formerly Incarcerated Floridians Register To Vote
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Keith Ivey, who served time in prison but was able to register to vote this past week. Florida had previously banned felons from voting.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

'This Is Our Life': LA Teachers' Union Set To Strike For Better Conditions, More Resources
On Monday, more than 30,000 Los Angeles teachers could go on strike — the result of failed negotiations between the LA teachers' union and school district. Half a million students would be affected.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

'Whatever It Takes': Government Workers Apply For Unemployment As Shutdown Drags On
Workers are now missing paychecks for the first time since the partial government shutdown began. That's causing many of them to do what once seemed unthinkable — apply for unemployment.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Remembering The Oldest Known Veteran In The U.S.
Family and friends gathered in Austin, Texas, to say goodbye to Richard Overton. He was America's oldest known veteran who died at the age of 112. He fought in World War II and served in Pearl Harbor.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Remembering The U.S.'s Oldest Known Veteran
Family and friends gathered in Austin, Texas, to say goodbye to Richard Overton. He was America's oldest known veteran who died at the age of 112. He fought in World War II and served in Pearl Harbor.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Voices From The Southern Border: Perspectives Of Those Who Live And Work There Every Day
President Trump has called what's happening on the U.S.-Mexico border a "crisis." But what is it like for the doctors, judges, mayors and border patrol agents who live and work there?

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Shutdown Could Have Long-Term Effects On Wildfire Disaster Response
Firefighters and forest managers are losing valuable time to prepare for the upcoming wildfire season. It's one of the long-term impacts of the government shutdown as it continues to linger on.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Texas Chapel In Path Of Trump's Proposed Border Wall
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Father Roy Snipes, whose chapel sits on the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas. The chapel may lose their land if President Trump's border wall plans move forward.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

As Shutdown Continues, Thousands Of Federal Workers Visit D.C.-Area Pop-Up Food Banks
The Capitol Area Food Bank says it distributed more than 30,000 pounds of fresh produce on Saturday to federal workers impacted by the ongoing partial government shutdown.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 13, 2019

Deaf And Unemployed: Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands
Deaf people struggle with high unemployment. So they are creating their own "deaf ecosystems" and pushing employers to better accommodate them.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2019

More than $20 Million Crowdsourced For Border Wall Will Be Refunded
Iraq war veteran Brian Kolfage had raised the money through GoFundMe. On Friday, he said donations would go towards a non-profit he created to build the wall, rather than the U.S. government.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2019

LA Teachers Demanding Better School Resources Prepare To Strike
Teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District are threatening to strike on Monday. NPR's Sarah McCammon speaks with sixth grade teacher Joel Laguna about his preparations for a potential strike.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2019

High-Tech Vibrator Ban From CES Show Stirs Claims Of Sexism
A robotic sex toy for women was pulled from the Consumer Electronics Show. NPR's Sarah McCammon speaks with Wired's Emily Dreyfuss about the controversy.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2019

Furloughed Workers In Hard-Hit Community Organize Potluck During Shutdown
Friday evening, as the shutdown bordered on becoming the longest in U.S. history, hundreds of furloughed workers gathered in Montgomery County, Md., to share a meal.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2019

Government Shutdown Hits Furloughed Families, Maryland Community At Large
Friday evening, as the shutdown bordered on becoming the longest in U.S. history, hundreds of furloughed workers gathered in Montgomery County, Md., to share a meal.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2019

TSA Worker: 'They're Forcing A Choice Between Aviation Security And Border Security'
Many federal employees are working without pay during what's become longest-ever government shutdown. NPR's Sarah McCammon talks with Mike Gayzagian, a TSA worker and local American Federation of Government Employees president.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2019

Pompeo Says The U.S. Troop Withdrawal From Syria Is Just A 'Tactical Change'
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is traveling through the Middle East as confusion mounts over U.S. policy in Syria.

NPR U.S. News
Jan 12, 2019

Private Landowners Along Trump's Proposed Border Wall Risk Losing Property
NPR's Scott Simon asks ProPublica reporter T. Christian Miller about past efforts to build walls along the Southern border and how private land could be seized in the process.

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