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NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Veterans exposed to toxic chemicals say they've won a historic expansion of VA care
A bill known as the PACT Act, which will lend health care services and disability benefits to veterans exposed to toxic substances, looks likely to become law next month.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

The National Rifle Association begins its annual convention in Houston
Several hours east of Uvalde, the site of a mass shooting at an elementary school, the NRA is holding its annual convention and gun show. The NRA expressed its "deepest sympathies" over the shooting.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Some victims' families say Texas police didn't do enough to save their children
Many questions remain about some of the most basic facts of the mass shooting in Texas. Primarily, why law enforcement took so long to stop the shooter. Authorities have given contradictory accounts.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

A college education is a good thing but you don't have to rush to complete it
Betty Sandison, 84, this month earned her bachelor's degree from the University of Minnesota. She began in 1955, and then paused for family and work reasons. She reenrolled in 2018.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

The National Memorial Day Concert is making an in-person return this weekend
For the last two years, A Night of Remembrance has been been taped because of the pandemic. There will be special tributes for Gen. Colin Powell, Gold Star families and women who served in WWII.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

The tragedy in Uvalde has reignited the political fight over gun ownership
The killings revive a debate about gun control and who should and shouldn't have weapons. A husband and wife who work at a meatpacking plant in Uvalde talk about living with guns in Texas.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Ukraine claims victory in Kharkiv, but some nearby areas face relentless attacks
Even as conditions improve in Ukraine's second largest city, some people just outside Kharkiv continue living in basement bomb shelters.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Will the soundtrack to 'Top Gun: Maverick' stack up against the original?
The sequel to Top Gun opens in theaters over Memorial Day weekend. The soundtrack from the original movie was a major success. The music for Top Gun: Maverick has a lot to live up to.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

A survivor of the Columbine shooting returned to teach at the school
In this week's StoryCorps, we hear about a student who endured the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School and later returned to the school as a teacher.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Actor Ray Liotta, best known for 'Goodfellas,' dies at 67
Liotta was in the Dominican Republic shooting the movie Dangerous Waters when he died. He is perhaps best remembered for his role as Henry Hill in the 1990 Martin Scorsese movie Goodfellas.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Democratic senators call on Republicans to do something about gun safety
Another mass shooting and lawmakers talk tough about gun safety — yet possibly getting nothing done. As some in Congress try to find common ground on background checks, can this time be different?

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Discount stores Dollar Tree and Dollar General thrive in this turbulent economy
Dollar Tree and Dollar General reported quarterly earnings that beat expectations. NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Harvard business professor Willy Shih about shopping during high inflation.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Remembering the young victims of the Uvalde, Texas, school shooting
Twenty-one crosses stand outside Robb Elementary School where a gunman committed a massacre. Each cross honors a life taken. NPR profiles some of the victims of Tuesday's mass shooting.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Javelin missiles are in short supply and restocking them won't be easy
Ukrainian fighters have destroyed Russian fighting vehicles with U.S. supplied Javelins. But replacing the thousands of missiles could take years, largely because of a crimp in the supply chain.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Manchin and other senators are opposed to plans to overhaul VA health care
Sen. Joe Manchin spoke with veterans about a proposed overhaul to Veterans Affairs health care. Manchin and a group of bipartisan senators say it would drastically hurt the care veterans receive.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Moscow slashes interest rates in a bid to get the economy back on track
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Russian history professor Sergey Radchenko of Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, about whether President Putin is taking control of the economy.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

News brief: Uvalde shooting, NRA meeting, fighting in Ukraine's Donbas region
Local authorities contradict themselves on the details of how the Texas school shooting unfolded. The NRA holds its annual convention in Houston. And Russia makes inroads in eastern Ukraine.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2022

Why a strong U.S. dollar could be great for some and harmful to others
The U.S. dollar is appreciating in value against other currencies — an increase that comes with some benefits, but can also potentially be a drag on the economy.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Research shows policies that may help prevent mass shootings — and some that don't
The amount of resources devoted to studying gun violence is paltry compared to its public health impact. Still the evidence shows certain policies might help prevent mass shootings.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

How can mass shootings be prevented? Definitive answers are hard to come by
Gun violence has a huge impact on public health, but the amount of money and attention directed toward research on preventing mass shootings and firearm deaths doesn't reflect the scale of the crisis.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

A Texas arena for concerts and rodeos is transformed into a gathering for grief
A vigil was held in Uvalde for the people killed in Tuesday's shooting at an elementary school. Officials continue to probe for a motive from a gunman who killed 21 people in one school classroom.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Archaeologists have found something beautiful in a space with an ugly past
The team found a single pink rose in bloom at a former Japanese American internment camp. It's blossoming on an 80-year-old rose bush at Amache National Historic Site.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Texas grocery chain donates $500,000 to those affected by the Uvalde shooting
The chain H-E-B is also giving people the option to donate via its website or through its delivery app. The company's nonprofit arm — the Spirit of Giving Fund — will then disburse those donations.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Texas lawmakers have removed gun restrictions in recent years
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Travis Clardy, a Republican state lawmaker in Texas, about this week's school shooting in Uvalde, and the state's gun laws.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Social justice group examines how deeply the far-right has penetrated state politics
The results of a study released this month find that at least one in five Republican state legislators across the country are affiliated with far-right groups on Facebook.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Researchers offer suggestions for how to prevent the next school shooting
After several high-profile school shootings in recent years, school safety experts have centered on some important measures that communities and politicians can take to protect students.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

On 2nd anniversary of George Floyd's death, Biden signs police reform order
President Biden signed an executive order Wednesday on policing — two years after George Floyd was killed by a Minneapolis police officer.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Morning news brief
Authorities uncover more about the Texas gunman's activity leading up to the massacre. The town mourns the loss of 19 children and two teachers. Experts share tips on how to prevent the next tragedy.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has technical problems
Scientists and engineers are troubleshooting from 14 billion miles away, with a delay of 20-plus hours each way — trying to fix an antenna control system built 45 years ago.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Author examines the behavioral patterns of people who carried out mass shootings
NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Mark Follman about the behavioral patterns of mass shooters. Follman is the author of: Trigger Points: Inside the Mission to Stop Mass Shootings in America.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

After 19 seasons, 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show' is about to end
After more than 3,000 episodes, the finale one airs Thursday. The longtime talk show host is a pioneering voice who leaves behind a complicated legacy.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

How does a Texas teacher continue working on the day after a school shooting?
Imagine what it must be like to be a teacher in the schools around Uvalde, Texas. Following Tuesday's shooting, you have to go back to work, greet your students and try to make them feel safe.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

House lawmakers hold hearings into the baby formula shortage
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Rep. Rosa DeLauro about a House panel hearing that questioned why it took the FDA four months to issue warnings about baby formula that didn't meet safety requirements.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Encore: Get ready for another destructive Atlantic hurricane season
Federal forecasters predict 14 to 21 named storms will form in the Atlantic this hurricane season, which begins June 1. (This story first on on All Things Considered on May 5, 2022)

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Can Hollywood magic help fix the current Navy pilot shortage?
The Navy is hoping that the new Top Gun sequel can help rescue naval aviation from a pilot shortage. This comes nearly four decades after the original film helped to break recruiting records.

NPR U.S. News
May 26, 2022

Women who are denied abortions risk falling deeper into poverty. So do their kids
A large body of research shows being denied an abortion limits women's education, time in the workforce and wages. It also finds long-term negative impacts for their children.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

What, if anything, might Congress do about years of mass shootings?
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Rep. Joaquin Castro, who represents Texas' 20th District, following Tuesday's school shooting in Uvalde that killed 21 people.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

Callers find it is taking longer to get emergency services in Portland, Ore.
The city adopted a new 911 system to triage calls and streamline dispatching. But many people in need of help find themselves on hold. The same system has caused problems in other cities.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

The mass shooting in Texas is the latest tragic news involving a school
A gunman opened fire Tuesday at a rural elementary school in Uvalde. At least 21 people have been killed — 19 children and two adults.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

A gunman opened fire in a Texas school and killed 19 children, 2 adults
Children at a Robb Elementary in Uvalde were in their final week of school. Tuesday's shooting was the deadliest in a grade school since Sandy Hook a decade ago in Connecticut.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

Mackenzie Scott contributes record donation to Big Brothers Big Sisters of America
The organization fosters relationships between children pushing through adversity and adults looking to help them. It recently received a $122 million donation from philanthropist Mackenzie Scott.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

Wondering how to help after the latest school shooting? Give blood
The South Texas Blood and Tissue center in San Antonio sent 25 units to Uvalde, Texas. The organization planned a blood drive, and says there's a historic need to build-up blood supplies.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

Texas community turns to prayer for some type of peace after school shooting
In Uvalde, Texas, people gathered Tuesday night to mourn those who were killed at Robb Elementary School.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

There are protests along the U.S.-Mexico border after judge blocks ending Title 42
Along the U.S.-Mexico border, migrant groups seeking asylum are protesting a judge's ruling that keeps Title 42, Trump-era pandemic border restrictions, in place.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

Uvalde school shooting is another reminder of children's feelings of trauma
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Dr. Melissa Brymer of the UCLA/Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, about what to do for children after Tuesday's school shooting in Texas.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

The infant formula shortage is the focus of 2 Capitol Hill hearings
Lawmakers on Wednesday are expected to press the FDA and formula makers on how the U.S. got into this situation, and what is being done to relieve the shortage.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

A parent who lost her child to a mass shooting becomes a gun control advocate
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Sandy Phillips, whose daughter died in the 2012 movie theater mass shooting in Colorado. She's been in Buffalo supporting shooting survivors, now she heads to Texas.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

2 years after George Floyd's murder, many Black Minneapolitans do not feel any safer
Since Floyd was murdered by officer Derek Chauvin, what's changed for Black residents? NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to ex-state Sen. Jeffrey Hayden, who represented the district where Floyd was killed.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

2 years after George Floyd's murder, many Blacks in Minneapolis do not feel any safer
Since Floyd was murdered by officer Derek Chauvin, what's changed for Black residents? NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to ex-state Sen. Jeffrey Hayden, who represented the district where Floyd was killed.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

About half of the Republican campaigns for Michigan governor are in question
The Michigan elections bureau says five Republican candidates for Michigan governor can't appear on the ballot because of invalid signatures on their nominating petitions.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

After Texas shooting, Biden reiterates the U.S. has to stand up to gun makers
President Biden urged the nation to pray for the families of the children shot at their school in Ulvade, Texas. He says Congress needs to get a backbone and pass tougher laws.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

Another senseless act of gun violence hits an elementary school in Texas
NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with David Hogg, a survivor of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in 2018, about ending gun violence in the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

It's been 2 years since George Floyd was murdered by police in Minneapolis
On the second anniversary of George Floyd's death, Black people continue to be targets of hate. America's race issues are once again at the forefront after the mass shooting in Buffalo, New York.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

In Georgia, Trump's pick for governor, who ran on election lies, loses
The power of former President Trump's endorsement faltered in Georgia's closely watched primaries on Tuesday. His pick for U.S. Senate won, but so too did two of his biggest political foes.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

She lost her daughter in a mass shooting. Here's what she will tell parents in Uvalde
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Sandy Phillips, whose daughter died in the 2012 movie theater mass shooting in Colorado. She's been supporting shooting survivors in Buffalo, now she heads to Texas.

NPR U.S. News
May 25, 2022

News brief: Texas school shooting, Biden's response, Georgia primary elections
The U.S. reels from a deadly school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. President Biden makes a new push for gun control. And, Gov. Brian Kemp wins Georgia's GOP primary over Trump-backed David Perdue.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Songs of Remembrance: Dolly Parton's 'Dumb Blonde' was her grandmother's favorite
Kristin Ziegler of Denver, Colo., remembers her grandmother Elfriede Liselotte Matza Froisland. She died of COVID-19 in 2020.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

After forming a union, negotiating a contract can be an uphill battle
Workers are winning union elections across the country, but the next step might be more difficult. Collective bargaining can take years, and some workers never see a contract.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Georgia's primary is expected to be a litmus test for the Republican Party
The questions in the primary are whether former President Trump's endorsements can secure candidates' victories, and whether there are lingering effects from his 2020 election lies.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

A married couple turns an out-of-commission helicopter into a camper
Blake Morris and Maggie Morton, both Coast Guard pilots, saw the helicopter on Facebook Marketplace. After more than 900 hours of work, they took their "helicamper" out for its first trip.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

The last functioning public pay phone in Manhattan has been removed
The city has gradually been replacing payphones with public Wi-Fi hotspots where people can hop online and even charge a cell phone. The old pay phone is headed to the Museum of the City of New York.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Taiwanese Foreign Minister: China is putting more military pressure on Taiwan
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu about the threat his country faces from China, and how the U.S. is helping.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Journalist who wrote about gun violence was killed in mass shooting in Buffalo
The Challenger is a Black-owned, woman-owned newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y. One of its journalists, Katherine Massey, was killed in the grocery store attack this month that left 10 African Americans dead.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

A battlefield assessment — three months after Russia invaded Ukraine
When Ukraine was invaded, many expected a quick Russian victory. The war is three months old, with both sides digging in and no end in sight. Many analysts say the trends now favor Ukraine.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Elif Batuman's sequel 'Either/Or' follows a young woman's sexual awakening
Either/Or is Batuman's sequel to her bestselling Pulitzer finalist novel The Idiot.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Ukraine's stand is a model for fighting a Chinese attack, Taiwan's top diplomat says
Foreign Minister Joseph Wu tells NPR about the threat the island faces from China, and how the U.S. is helping Taiwan's military prepare.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

U.S. National Guardsmen trained Ukrainian soldiers and it seems to have paid off
Behind some of the success of the Ukrainian military against Russia is a little-known U.S. initiative, one built around state national guards.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

What is the future of abortion pills, if the Supreme Court lets states ban abortion?
Medication accounts for more than half of abortions, fueled in part by a greater reliance on telehealth. How would a Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade affect abortion pills availability?

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

The Pentagon investigates what are now called UAPs or Unexplained Aerial Phenomena.
Congress held a public hearing last week into Unexplained Aerial Phenomena. A professor at the University of Colorado Boulder wants to see more of the government's files.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

U.S., Australia, India and Japan to address China's dominance, Russian aggression
President Biden has met the leaders of Australia, India and Japan. The White House said they would pledge to work together on global health, the climate, infrastructure, technology and other areas.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Three months of war: Russia underachieves, Ukraine overachieves
When Ukraine was invaded, many expected a quick Russian victory. The war is 3 months old, with both sides digging in for a battle that could potentially be a long, drawn-out stalemate.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Twitch's reputation takes a hit when Buffalo shooter used it to livestream attack
The video streaming site Twitch, which is owned by Amazon, is in the limelight after the accused Buffalo shooter used it to livestream the massacre.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

Gender-affirming care may continue at Texas clinic while lawsuit heads to trial
A court ruling says trans youth in Texas may seek gender affirming care at a Dallas clinic, while a lawsuit makes its way to trial. But some families are crossing state lines to get treatment.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2022

News brief: Georgia primaries, Biden in Japan, Russia-Ukraine war
It's primary day in Georgia. In Tokyo, President Biden meets the leaders of Australia, India and Japan — a group known as the Quad. And, Russia's invasion of Ukraine began three months ago.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Pfizer says children under 5 can get 3 low-dose versions of its COVID-19 vaccine
Three shots of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines for kids 6 months to under 5 prompted a strong immune response. Preliminary data suggests the vaccine is effective and safe.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

More funerals will be held this week for victims of the mass shooting in Buffalo
In New York, residents of Buffalo are still in shock over a racially motivated mass shooting at a supermarket. Ten African Americans were shot to death, and three people were wounded.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Monkeypox likely isn't much of a threat to the public, a White House official says
Raj Panjabi, who leads the White House pandemic office, says that cases seen in the U.S. so far haven't been severe, and that even in larger outbreaks in poorer countries, few people have died.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

U.S. public health officials are monitoring suspected cases of monkeypox
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Raj Panjabi, senior director at the national security council, where he leads the White House pandemic office, about whether the U.S. is prepared for more cases.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Biden's launch of a trade pact is overshadowed by a Taiwan-China question
Biden was launching a trade pact in Tokyo with countries from the Indo-Pacific region. It was overshadowed by his response to a question about whether the U.S. would defend Taiwan if China invaded.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Dancing like nobody is watching can help overcome anxiety and other issues
That research has given rise to dance music therapy — a form of treatment used for a variety of health conditions ranging from depression to schizophrenia.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Luxury brand Balenciaga is leaning into the distressed look
You can buy "full destroyed" high top sneakers. The sneakers come shredded and dirty. For a mere $1,850, you too, can look like you don't care how you look.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

John Legend wants to transform the criminal justice system, one DA at a time
Musician John Legend is using his national platform to elevate local races for district attorney — endorsing progressive prosecutors who prioritize preventative solutions over incarceration.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Millions of Ukrainians rushed to leave — the line to return home stretches for miles
NPR's Ari Shapiro visits a border crossing between Poland and Ukraine to chronicle the journeys of Ukrainians returning to their homeland.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

If Roe v. Wade is overturned, the Catholic Church is against criminalizing women
Archbishop William Lori of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops talks with Rachel Martin about his call for church followers to step up care for mothers and babies if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Investigation shows how Southern Baptists responded to reports of sex abuse
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Russell Moore of Christianity Today about the results of an investigation showing top Southern Baptists stonewalled and denigrated sex abuse victims over almost two decades.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

A 2nd 'Downton Abbey' movie is out and there may be more to come
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to film critic Kenneth Turan, who reviews the new film: Downton Abbey: A New Era.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

A factory in Illinois has an innovative approach to employee wellness
A company in Arthur, Ill., allows workers to decide what they need to improve their health. The approach improved productivity and netted a big pay out for all employees.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

A federal judge rules that pandemic border restrictions must continue
President Biden on Monday planned to end the border restrictions known as Title 42, which prevented many migrants from seeking asylum. But a judge issued an injunction leaving the rules in place.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

The national average price for diesel is up 75% from a year ago
It now costs more than $5.50 to buy diesel. The surging price of the fuel is making everything even more expensive, and that's posing a major threat to the economy.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Ukrainian judge hands down a sentence in the first war crimes trial in that conflict
The court gave a life sentence to a 21-year-old Russian army sergeant for shooting and killing an unarmed Ukrainian man during the first days of the war. Its the first war crimes trial of the war.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

News brief: Biden on Taiwan, monkeypox cases, Ukraine-Polish border
Biden was asked whether the U.S. would defend Taiwan militarily if China invades. Epidemiologists investigate suspected U.S. cases of monkeypox. Long lines form as refugees try to return to Ukraine.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2022

Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space
For decades, U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts have lived side-by-side aboard the International Space Station. Now some are wondering whether that partnership can withstand the war in Ukraine.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2022

Another COVID surge strikes but vaccines are protecting people from the worst
An even more contagious omicron subvariant is fueling yet another surge of infections in the U.S. The number of hospitalizations is growing.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2022

Russia aims to capitalize on controlling the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol
More than a thousand soldiers were evacuated from the Azovstal steel plant, and Russia is consolidating control of Mariupol. It is making plans to annex the southwestern parts of the country.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2022

Finland has officially applied to join NATO and a brewery shows support
A Finnish brewery is making the case with a case of beer. The brew is called OTAN, a play on a Finnish expression that means "I'll have a beer." It's also the French abbreviation for NATO.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2022

Finland has officially applied to join NATO and a brewery wants to show support
The Finnish brewery is making the case with a case of beer. The brew is called OTAN, a play on a Finnish expression that means "I'll have a beer." It's also the French abbreviation for NATO.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2022

Paper airplane enthusiasts break record for farthest flight by a paper aircraft
The plane flew an impressive 252 feet. Chee Yie Jian created the prototype. He said his design and his partner's "rocket arm" had the winning combination.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2022

The House has approved a bill to fight domestic terror
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to House Democratic Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland about a newly passed bill targeting domestic terrorism, and the partisan divides that make Senate approval unlikely.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2022

Much of the U.S. could see power blackouts this summer, a grid assessment reveals
A grid reliability report says power outages are likely in parts of the Midwest, California and Texas. The Western drought and a mismatch between supply and peak summer demand are some reasons why.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2022

Voters in Forsyth County, Ga., discuss weighing their choices in midterm elections
As a new election season arrives, NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Georgian voters from Forsyth County, which leans toward Republican candidates.

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