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NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Boosters will extend and enhance protections against COVID, Murthy says
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks to Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy about COVID-19 vaccine boosters, the mixing and matching of vaccines and the White House plan to vaccinate children.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

The CDC endorses the rollouts of vaccine boosters from Moderna and J&J
The centers for Disease Control and Prevention issues recommendations for how to mix-and-match COVID-19 boosters — marking the final step for making boosters widely available.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

The house from the movie 'A Nightmare on Elm Street' is up for sale
For $3.5 million, you can roam the halls of the Los Angeles house where Freddie Krueger murdered his victims. You have until Halloween to make an offer.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

U.S. coal production is up sharply after hitting a 50-year low last year
As the Biden administration prepares to negotiate reductions in fossil fuel use at the Glasgow climate summit at the end of the month, U.S. coal production is actually up significantly this year.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

We've heard about snakes on a plane. How about snake on a crane?
A video filmed in the Caribbean island of Dominica shows workers, who were clearing part of a rainforest, hoisting an enormous boa constrictor off the ground with the help of construction equipment.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Vienna museums post 'adult' art on OnlyFans to avoid censorship
When Austrian art museums found that social media companies were banning images of artwork featuring nudes, they partnered up with OnlyFans, an app known mostly for its association with sex workers.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

They refused to pay rent and stole the fridge. Landlords deal with pandemic squatters
Some landlords got hurt by squatters who took advantage of eviction bans during the pandemic. Now they can't get any help from a massive $47 billion federal rental assistance program.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

The Fed announces stricter rules on trading for policymakers and senior staff
The rules follow controversies surrounding trades by the presidents of two regional Fed banks. Critics say the rules don't go far enough.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

The head of the VA says the U.S. failed some veterans for 30 years
NPR's Steve Inskeep and Quil Lawrence speak to Secretary of Veterans Affairs Denis McDonough about how the agency is caring for veterans.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Rocker Randy Bachman's guitar was stolen 45 years ago. A fan tracked it down
In the mid-70s, Canadian musician Randy Bachman's favorite guitar went missing. Using the internet, a fan tracked down the stolen instrument.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

'Maya and the Three' features a star-studded cast of Latino voices
The new Netflix series Maya and the Three takes place in a world inspired Latin American folklore. It's the work of the husband-and-wife team Jorge Gutierrez and Sandra Equihua.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

'Maya and the Three' features a star-studded cast of Latino voices.
The new Netflix series "Maya and the Three" takes place in a world inspired Latin American folklore. It's the work of the husband-and-wife team.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Alec Baldwin fires prop gun on movie set killing a film crew member
Baldwin discharged a prop firearm on the set of Rust near Sante Fe, killing the film's director of photography and injuring the director, according to the sheriff's office of Santa Fe County, N.M.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Alec Baldwin fires prop gun on movie setting killing a film crew member
Baldwin discharged a prop firearm on a movie set near Sante Fe, killing the film's director of photography and injuring the director, according to the sheriff's office of Santa Fe County, N.M.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Broadway colleagues remember costume dresser who died of COVID-19
Jennifer Robin Arnold worked decades as a costume dresser with The Phantom of the Opera. Her colleagues came to StoryCorps to remember her. Audio produced for Morning Edition by Taylor Haney.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Just when more nurses are needed, it's more difficult to get into nursing school
Hospitals are in dire need of nurses. There's often 800 people applying to community college nursing programs offering 50 slots. One main reason is that there aren't enough people to teach nursing.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Manufacturers are having a hard time keeping up with vinyl record sales
Vinyl records are once again the highest-grossing physical format for the music industry. The sales of vinyl exploded during the pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Movie review: 'The French Dispatch'
Watching The French Dispatch is like seeing an issue of The New Yorker come to life. Wes Anderson's new film is based on articles of a fictional magazine published in a fictional city in France.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

News Brief: Booster approvals, need for nurses, VA Secretary Denis McDonough
CDC endorses booster doses of Moderna and J&J vaccines. Many people apply to nursing school, but there aren't enough teachers. An interview with the secretary of Department of Veterans Affairs.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Online game let's you experience the supply-chain crunch through beer sales
The Beergame App simulates the steps of selling beer from brewer to drinker — revealing a real world problem that can tangle the supply chain.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Online game lets you experience the supply-chain crunch through beer sales
The Beergame App simulates the steps of selling beer from brewer to drinker — revealing a real world problem that can tangle the supply chain.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 22, 2021

Randy Bachman fan tracks down the musician's stolen guitar in Japan
In the mid-seventies, Canadian musician Randy Bachman's favorite guitar went missing. Using the internet, a fan tracked down the stolen instrument.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

President Biden traveled to Pennsylvania to tout his domestic agenda
President Biden visited his hometown of Scranton, Pa., to promote the size and scope of his legislative agenda — saying his policies would create good paying jobs.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

FDA officials authorize Moderna and J&J COVID vaccine boosters
After the FDA weighed in, advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention meet Thursday to refine guidelines for boosters for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Doctors prepare to vaccinate kids once they're given the official OK
NPR's Scott Detrow speaks to Dr. Elizabeth Hawse, a pediatrician in Lexington, Ky., about how her office is preparing to administer COVID-19 vaccines to kids.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

New Hong Kong bus tour is meant to put people to sleep
The Sleeping Bus Tour is a 5-hour, 47-mile ride on a double-decker bus. It's designed for commuters who are easily put to sleep on moving vehicles. Passengers bring pillows and blankets.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Police investigate 4 year-old-boy's emergency call about toys
Police in New Zealand shared audio of the call on social media. While they don't encourage children to call the emergency number, they said the incident was "too cute not to share."

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Up for debate: How to protect W.Va. from climate change with hurting its economy
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Angie Rosser of the West Virginia Rivers Coalition about Sen. Joe Manchin's opposition to a climate bill that experts say would significantly reduce emissions.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Up for debate: How to protect W.Va. from climate change without hurting its economy
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Angie Rosser of the West Virginia Rivers Coalition about Sen. Joe Manchin's opposition to a climate bill that experts say would significantly reduce emissions.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

The film version of 'Dune' aims to remain true to the sci-fi author's vision
Director Denis Villeneuve's film Dune recreates the desert world of the 1965 sci-fi novel. He tells NPR's A Martínez that Dune has lived in his imagination since he was a kid.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Russia hosts a delegation from Afghanistan and other countries for talks
The Russian government has been holding a conference in Moscow for the Taliban, China, Pakistan and other states concerned with the future of Afghanistan. The U.S. in not participating.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

The biggest push by Democrats for action on voting rights fails in the Senate
Democrats' legislation to alleviate voting restrictions in some states was scaled back in order to get Republican senators on board. But in the end, no GOP lawmakers backed the bill.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Scientists are starting to understand the likely end game for COVID-19
Some scientists believe the current surge of COVID-19 has peaked and the pandemic, at least in the U.S., will ease over the winter months. But then what? Will the virus surge back again next year?

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Scientists are starting to understand the likely endgame for COVID-19
Some scientists believe the current surge of COVID-19 has peaked and the pandemic, at least in the U.S., will ease over the winter months. But then what? Will the virus surge back again next year?

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Louisiana Man, in prison on a Jim crow conviction, gets a new hearing
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to reporter Natasha Del Toro about her Al Jazeera documentary exploring the case of Brandon Jackson, who was sentenced to life in prison on a non-unanimous verdict.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

News brief: COVID boosters, voting rights failure, Russia hosts Afghan talks
The FDA authorizes Moderna and J&J COVID-19 vaccine boosters. Attempts by Democrats to shore up protections for voting rights have hit a wall. Russia hosts a delegation from Afghanistan.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Facebook's CEO is added to a Washington, D.C., privacy lawsuit
NPR's Scott Detrow talks to Washington, D.C., Attorney General Karl Racine, who has added Facebook COE Mark Zuckerberg to a consumer protection lawsuit that was originally filed in 2018.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

First responders in New York City have until Nov. 1 to get vaccinated
City officials say first responders have 10 days to get vaccinated or they'll be suspended without pay. Some union leaders have promised to fight the mandate.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

As shipping woes drag on, businesses search for alternatives
Delays for container ships at the nation's ports are forcing companies to come up with workarounds. Despite the poor reliability, shipping companies are making record profits.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 21, 2021

Long before Havana Syndrome, U.S. reported microwaves beamed at an embassy
In the 1970s and 80s, U.S. officials routinely referred to the Soviet use of microwave radiation against the American Embassy in Moscow. The Soviets were believed to be seeking intelligence.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

What Colin Powell's death can and can't tell us about COVID breakthrough cases
With high-profile stories of vaccinated people dying from COVID, how worried should you be about getting a serious breakthrough case? Here's how the data shake out.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Sen. Cortez Masto is among the Democrats meeting with Biden over his agenda
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Democratic Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada about her meeting with President Biden along with other moderate Democrats to reach a deal on the Build Back Better plan.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Adults have a lot to say about masks. How do students feel about them?
Elementary school teacher Katy Wright in Montana decided to ask her students how they feel about having to wear masks in school.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Democrats say there is new momentum for a budget package
Congress is back and trying to tackle a number of pressing issues before the end of the month, including negotiations over President Biden's infrastructure and social spending packages.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Hippos smuggled into Colombia by drug lord Pablo Escobar will be sterilized
The late drug lord Pablo Escobar smuggled four hippos into his private zoo. In the 27 years since his death, the hippos have multiplied to at least 80.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Black women's group makes history climbing Mount Kilimanjaro
Diana Kinard and Dawn Frazier started a climbing group with other Black women called Shades of Favor. In August they became the first Black American women to ascend the almost 20,000 foot peak.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Brazil's president should face homicide charges over pandemic, Senate report to say
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Jack Nicas of The New York Times about a panel in Brazil expected to recommend that the country's president be charged with homicide for his handling of the pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Author profiles workers who were laid off when their jobs went to Mexico
When an Indiana steel plant closed in 2017, hundreds of jobs went to Mexico. NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Farah Stockman about her book: American Made — What Happens to People when Work Disappears.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Elected officials in Detroit face a widening federal public corruption probe
Federal investigators have implicated much of Detroit's city hall in a corruption probe involving council members and their staffs. Bribery and campaign finance violations are central to the claims.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Climate researchers shed light on animal extinctions in Africa and Arabia Peninsula
In a study published earlier this month, a newly discovered climate event some 30 million years ago wiped out more than 60% of the species of mammals in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Dakota artist's piece stands where controversial sculpture sparked protests
Four years after the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis was rocked by protests over a sculpture that inflamed the indigenous community, a new structure by artist Angela Two Stars helps to make amends.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Recordings by pianist Lara Downes showcase overlooked Black composers
NPR's A Martínez talks to pianist Lara Downes about her recording a mini-album each month in an effort to highlight forgotten contributions of Black American composers.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Pianist Lara Downes re-centers the music of the Great Migration
Pianist Lara Downes' latest mini-album traces the story of the Great Migration of Black Americans from the south in the early to mid-20th century, with music by Florence Price and Harry T. Burleigh.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Palestinian protests turn deadly as Israel considers the future of a new settlement
Israeli settlers are pressing ahead with a new outpost on occupied West Bank land — closing it off to Palestinians and posing a test for Israeli leaders who will have to rule on it.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Palestinian protests turn deadly as Israel considers the future of Beita settlement
Israeli settlers are pressing ahead with a new outpost on occupied West Bank land — closing it off to Palestinians and posing a test for Israeli leaders who will have to rule on it.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

News brief: Capitol Hill agenda, Florida school shooting, school board elections
Democrats aim to wrap up their to-do list. A Florida school district will pay $25 million to the families of Parkland shooting victims. School board elections are the new political battlefields.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Netflix employees are staging a walkout today as a fired organizer speaks out
The Netflix employee resource group supporting trans and non-binary people is demanding better representation, both onscreen and in management.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

Why people in Houston struggle to pay bills more than people in other major cities
Paying bills during the pandemic can be difficult. A survey by NPR, Harvard and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found of the four largest U.S. cities, Houston feels the crunch the worst.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 20, 2021

School board elections will be an early test of what issues motivate voters
Local school board races are the newest battlefield in America's politics. In Centerville, Ohio, masks are a flashpoint.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

Albright And Powell, both secretaries of state, were part of a small club
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Madeleine Albright, the first female U.S. secretary of state about the legacy of Colin Powell who died Monday. In 2001, Powell became the first Black secretary of state.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

Kids' mental health crisis is at a critical point, Education Secretary Cardona says
The Education Department wants to revamp mental health access for students and awareness in schools. NPR's Scott Detrow talks to Secretary Miguel Cardona about the guidance.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

Trump files lawsuit to stop the release of documents related to the Capitol riot
Former President Donald Trump is suing the the National Archives and the House committee investigating the attack on the U.S. Capitol to try to block the release of documents.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

North Korea launches its eighth missile test of the year
The test appears to be its first submarine-launched ballistic missile in two years. It comes as the U.S. and Asian allies are meeting to discuss how to get North Korea back to the negotiating table.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

The breakout star of this Halloween season is a themed bratwurst
The SpookToberfest brat is a hot item. The featured ingredients are pork, beer and candy corn. You can pick up the treat at Jenifer Street Market in Madison, Wis.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

India may replace car horns with the sound of musical instruments
The country's transportation minister says he will introduce a measure to replace all vehicle horns with the sounds of traditional Indian musical instruments. He's also looking into changing sirens.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

Jury selection begins in the trial of 3 men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery
Jury selection has begun for the trial of three men accused in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery in southeastern Georgia last year. The trial is taking place in Brunswick, Georgia.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

News brief: Ga. murder trial, Trump sues over documents, mental health access
Jury selection begins in the trial of those accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery. Ex-President Trump tries to stop the release of Capitol riot documents. The latest on mental health needs for children.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

People in Hungary grapple with what it means to be European
Former Soviet block countries were elated when they were able to open to the West, but that emotion has been replaced by discomfort, as deeply conservative societies grapple with the EU's liberalism.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

Oregon city aims to alleviate homelessness with a village of tiny houses
Portland is using American Rescue Plan money to build tiny home villages for a growing number of homeless people. Not all communities, however, are embracing these villages.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

Boston Modern Orchestra Project is honored for championing overlooked American music
The Gramophone Classical Music Awards recognized the group known as BMOP for its extraordinary service to overlooked American composers of the 20th and 21st centuries.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

1 in 3 working families is struggling to find the child care they desperately need
And more than 1 in 3 adults in households with children say they have experienced serious problems meeting both their work and family responsibilities, according to an NPR poll.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

COVID-19 infections in Russia surge as well as the death toll
Russia continues a grim streak in nearly daily milestones related to the coronavirus. The government's task force on Monday reported 34,300 new infections — its highest number to date.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

I'm vaccinated. Is it OK to sing into a karaoke mic again?
During the pandemic, karaoke was stopped due to fears of viral spread. Is it safe yet to pick up a karaoke mic in public?

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

Immigrants push for better working conditions that were made worse by the pandemic
Jobs that became more dangerous during the pandemic were often performed by immigrants. These experiences have led some immigrants to push for better working conditions.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

Fentanyl is one reason why the U.S. drug addiction crisis is roaring back
Nationwide deaths related to black market fentanyl pills are rising. Many victims are people who got hooked on pain pills following medical procedures.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

The EPA moves to regulate industrial chemicals known by the acronym PFAS
After years of delay, the EPA is moving to regulate industrial chemicals linked to cancer and other health problems. Companies will have to disclose the amount found in many household items.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 19, 2021

This book of poetry says, 'I have fists,' and the world needs to know
Chinese American poet Jane Wong's new collection, How Not to Be Afraid of Everything, grapples with fear and anger at her family's silence about what they suffered in China's Great Leap Forward.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Ted Koppel remembers Colin Powell as a 'wise counselor' to presidents
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with veteran journalist Ted Koppel about Colin Powell's legacy. Koppel recalls both professional moments as well as personal ones, like their shared love of fast cars.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Gen. Wesley Clark remembers the legacy and leadership of Colin Powell
NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with retired four-star Gen. Wesley Clark about how history will remember Colin Powell. The former secretary of state has died at 84.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Reflecting on Colin Powell's legacy
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks to foreign policy expert Anthony Cordesman of the Center for Strategic and International Studies about how Colin Powell's work will be remembered.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Remembering former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who has died at 84
Powell was the first Black chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and the first Black secretary of state. His family said he died of COVID-19 complications, though he was fully vaccinated.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Colin Powell dies at 84 of COVID-19 complications
Former Secretary of State Colin Powell died early Monday due to complications from COVID-19.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Members of a missionary group are taken hostage in Haiti
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Jacqueline Charles, Caribbean correspondent for the Miami Herald, about 17 people, including children, who were kidnapped by a gang in Haiti on Saturday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

A squash grown by an Ohio husband-and-wife team captures world record
Donna and Todd Skinner grew a squash that stands about chest-high. It weighs 2,164 pounds. That's more than a ton — the same as an old Volkswagen Beetle or the Liberty Bell.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

The Chicago Sky are the new WNBA champions
The Sky defeated the Phoenix Mercury 80-74 in a comeback win. The team was led by superstar Candace Parker, a Chicago native, who returned to play at home after 13 seasons in LA.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

The consequences of when a hedge fund buys newspapers
NPR's A Martínez talks to McKay Coppins of The Atlantic about how a hedge fund, Alden Global Capital, is buying and then gutting newspapers — and the implications for democracy.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

The availability of COVID-19 boosters may soon expand dramatically
The Food and Drug Administration and the Center For Disease Control and Prevention are poised to sign-off on Johnson & Johnson and Moderna booster shots this week.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

When this hedge fund buys local newspapers, democracy suffers
NPR's A Martínez talks to McKay Coppins of The Atlantic about how a hedge fund, Alden Global Capital, is buying and then gutting newspapers — and the implications for democracy.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

'The Last Duel' was inspired by a real trial by combat in medieval France
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to film critic Kenneth Turan about The Last Duel, directed by Ridley Scott. The story takes place in 14th century France, based on true events about a trial by combat.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Amid a construction slowdown, China's economic growth weakens
Concerns about a faltering property company and widespread power shortages have resulted in China's slowest economic growth figures in a year.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Anti-Asian violence creates a void for non-Asian parents of Asian adoptees
Following the Atlanta spa shootings in March, many Asian adoptees reported feeling unable to express their fear and sadness to their white families. Adoption agencies are trying to bridge the gap.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

As Jane Goodall grieves climate change, she finds hope in young people's advocacy
The world-renowned primatologist explains how small acts to protect the planet can spiral upwards. She has a new book, co-authored by Douglas Abrams, called The Book of Hope.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Behind-the-scenes workers in Hollywood avert a strike
Crew members in the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees have reached a deal. A strike would have shut down much of the film and TV production across the country.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Firefighters get a grip on the Alisal Fire after extreme winds die down
In Southern California, the Alisal Fire has been burning for a week along one of the most scenic stretches of the coast north of Santa Barbara. It is now 78% contained.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

How life has changed for Afghan women and girls since the Taliban takeover
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Pashtana Durrani, a political rights activist based in Kandahar, Afghanistan, about what life is like for females under the Taliban regime.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

More nurses are quitting their jobs to try a lucrative stint as a traveling nurse
In many hospitals, the only thing keeping ICUs fully staffed is a rotating cast of traveling nurses. Hospitals are having to pay them so much that their staff nurses are tempted to hit the road too.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

Jane Goodall's 'The Book of Hope' explains how hope can grow with action
NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with primatologist Jane Goodall about her latest work, which is co-written with Douglas Abrams: The Book of Hope.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

News brief: Haiti kidnappings, China's economy slows, COVID boosters
A group of U.S.-based aid workers and their families are kidnapped in Haiti. The growth rate for China's economy has slowed. More big moves on COVID-19 vaccine boosters are expected this week.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

She barely made it out of Kabul. Now she's welcoming Afghans with a familiar meal.
A restaurant in Washington, D.C., is offering donated welcome meals of traditional food to newly arriving Afghans. The chef cooking those meals knows what it's like to leave home and family behind.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 18, 2021

What's at stake as Biden decides whether to stick with Jerome Powell as Fed chief
President Biden has a big decision to make: Whether to reappoint Jerome Powell to a second term as Federal Reserve chairman or choose someone else for one of the world's most powerful economic jobs.

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