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NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

China's Census Data Show Country's Birthrate Is Dropping
Information from China's census indicates the country's population has increased at the slowest rate since its one-child policy. At the same time, the proportion of senior citizens has expanded.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

DeWine Is 1 Of 6 Governors To Meet With Biden About Vaccination Rate
How can the U.S. encourage more vaccinations? NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine ahead of his meeting with President Biden about state strategies to increase COVID-19 vaccinations.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

FDA OKs Pfizer Shot For 12-15-Year-Olds. Vaccinations Will Start Soon
The Food and Drug Administration has extended authorization for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to include adolescents age 12-15. Those young people have missed months of school and time with friends.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Skateboard Competition Held At New Orleans' Old Airport
Planes don't fly anymore at the old Louis Armstrong International Airport in New Orleans. But over the weekend, skateboarders showed up, and were still able to catch some air.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Romanians Can Get Their Shot At Castle Bran In Transylvania
Castle Bran is more commonly known as Dracula's castle. The 14th century fortress was supposedly the source of inspiration for Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Researchers Say Md. Man's Cicada Work Was Ignored Because He Was Black
Maryland intellectual and free Black man Benjamin Banneker was one of the first to document cicadas' 17-year life cycle in the late 1700s. His work was rarely credited.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

States Call On Facebook To Stop Plans For An Instagram For Kids
A bipartisan group of 44 attorneys general is urging Facebook to abandon plans to build a version of Instagram for children under 13 because of fears it could harm children's mental health and safety.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

What The Ransomware Attack On Colonial Pipeline Means For The Industry
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks with Amy Meyers Jaffe of Tufts University's Fletcher School and author of the book Energy's Digital Future about the cyberattack on a critical U.S. fuel pipeline.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Why Support For Refugees Is Higher Than You Might Think In Parts Of 'Trump Country'
Some conservative, rural states have resettled refugees at the highest per capita rates. In Idaho, employers applaud President Biden lifting a Trump-era cap on refugee numbers.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

FBI Says Darkside Ransomware Is Reponsible For Attack On U.S. Pipeline
The Biden administration says cybercriminals in Russia are suspected in a ransomware attack on a gas pipeline. Yet this hack is very different from another big intrusion blamed on Russia last year.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

House GOP Moves Ahead With Plans To Remove Cheney From Leadership Post
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Jonah Goldberg, conservative columnist and editor-in-chief of The Dispatch, about the Republican Party's push to oust Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney from her leadership position.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Israeli Airstrikes Kill Gazans After Militants Fire Missiles Into Israel
A new round of Israeli-Palestinian violence continued to escalate Monday as Palestinian militants fired rockets from Gaza toward Jerusalem, and Israel responded with deadly airstrikes.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Jake Tapper's 'The Devil May Dance' Is A Sequel To 'The Hellfire Club'
CNN's Jake Tapper writes fiction when he's not anchoring the news. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Tapper about his historical thriller: The Devil May Dance.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

NBC Rebukes Hollywood Foreign Press Association, Won't Air 2022 Golden Globes
NBC says it will not broadcast the 2022 Golden Globe awards show — following an explosive investigative report from the LA Times alleging unethical actions from the group that bestows the awards.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

News Brief: Kids' Pfizer Shots, Gaza Tensions, Hacked Pipeline Status
FDA approves Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 12 to 15. A new round of Israeli-Palestinian violence escalated Monday. Pipeline hack is different from another big intrusion blamed on Russia.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Biden Warns Workers Not To Turn Down Jobs To Remain On Unemployment
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Washington Post financial columnist Michelle Singletary about President Biden's plan to reaffirm jobless benefits to ensure that Americans aren't turning down work.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Et Tu, Elise? Cheney Set To Lose Leadership Job To Rep. Who Nominated Her For It
Elise Stefanik, a four-term congresswoman, is working to remove Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., from her leadership post over her ongoing criticism of former President Donald Trump.

NPR U.S. News
May 11, 2021

Forgetting And Forgotten: Older Prisoners Seek Release But Fall Through The Cracks
Prisoners like Kent Clark who broke the law before 1987 should have a chance at parole, unlike more recent inmates. But there are dozens of men in their 60s and older who have little hope of release.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Taylor Swift Makes Cameo On High School Students' Year-End Exam
The Advanced Placement U.S. government and politics exam included a question about the singer encouraging voters to register on Instagram. CNN reports the surprise put a smile on some students' faces.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Bombing Outside Girls' School In Afghan Capital Kills At Least 50 People
The attack in Kabul comes as the U.S. and NATO are removing remaining troops from Afghanistan. President Biden says he is aiming to complete the drawdown by Sept. 11, marking the end of a 20-year war.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

43% Of Adults Are Vaccinated Against COVID-19. Shot Coming For Kids
The FDA might give its approval for kids age 12 to 15 to get a vaccine, but that doesn't mean their parents will. Pediatricians say they're working to help overcome hesitancy and logistical barriers.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

A Lobster Made It Out Of A Seafood Restaurant Alive
When a Virginia Red Lobster received its delivery, staff noticed an orange and black spotted lobster. The calico critter turned out to be an extraordinarily rare find. A one in 30 million chance.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Mugshots: They're Not Exactly The Gold Standard In Portraiture
An example is the Ohio man who was particularly miffed about his police photo circulating online. He snapped a selfie and sent it to police. Saying, "Here is a better photo — that one is terrible."

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

I Came Close To Dying: Wall Street's Most Photographed Man Is Ready For Normalcy
If 100% of a firm's traders are fully vaccinated, they can start sending more to the stock exchange floor. They can eat lunch in their booths again. Masks will be optional in some parts of the floor.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Violence Between Palestinians, Israeli Police Draws Global Concern
Days of clashes in Jerusalem have left hundreds wounded and drawn international concern over an attempt by Israel to carry out pending evictions.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Why Government Housing Vouchers Can Be Difficult To Use
The Biden administration will distribute $5 billion in emergency housing vouchers included in a COVID-19 relief bill. But it's not always easy for voucher holders to find a place to use them.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

The Offer Of Free Beer May Help Lagging Vaccination Rate
To counter slowing vaccine registration, Erie County, New York, is turning to the bars: your dose of Moderna could come with a free beer.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Turkey To Begin Work On Massive Canal Project
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is pushing ahead with a massive canal project through Istanbul — even though banks are afraid to fund it, and many think it is unnecessary.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Uproar Follows Howard University's Decision To Close Classics Department
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Anika Prather, an adjunct professor in Howard University's Classics Department, about the decision to dissolve the department.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Kentucky Derby Winner, Medina Spirit, Fails Drug Test
If the horse fails a second post-race drug test, it would be qualified from the derby. Trainer Bob Baffert, who had horses fail five tests in just over a year, was suspended. He denies wrongdoing.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

News Brief: COVID-19 Vaccine, Clashes In Jerusalem, Gene-Editing Experiment
The FDA is expected to authorize the Pfizer vaccine for 12 to 15-year-olds. Security ramped up for Jerusalem Day parade. Experiment could restore vision for some patients with genetic disorders.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Opioid Crisis: Filmmaker Details The Medical System's 'Crime Of The Century'
Documentary filmmaker Alex Gibney investigated the opioid crisis. He says it was created by pharmaceutical companies, distributors, pharmacists and doctors, all looking to profit.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Climate Change Effects Coastal Wetlands' Carbon Absorption
Coastal wetlands can absorb and store carbon even faster than forests do. Research questions whether that may be changing as the climate warms. (Story originally aired on WeSat on May 8, 2021.)

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Families Of Victims In Mexico Subway Crash To Be Compensated
It's been one week since a section of Mexico City's massive metro system crashed, killing 26 people. Officials say a foreign company has been hired to investigate the fatal collapse.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

A Look At The GOP From Inside A Matt Gaetz, Marjorie Taylor Greene Rally
The two members of Congress may not have much power on the Hill, but they get celebrity treatment from Trump supporters.

NPR U.S. News
May 10, 2021

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision
The unprecedented study involves using the gene-editing technique CRISPR to edit a gene while it's still inside a patient's body. In exclusive interviews, NPR talks with two of the first participants.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Justice Department Brings Federal Criminal Charges Against Derek Chauvin, 3 Others
Prosecutors accuse the former officer and others of using excessive force and violating George Floyd's rights. The rare federal charges follow state charges in a trial where Chauvin was convicted.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Planning An Outdoor Wedding In The Middle Of Cicada Season
When NPR producer Lauren Migaki realized that Brood X cicadas would likely overrun her June wedding, she decided to run with it. The couple will have chocolate cicada party favors on their big day.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Go Ahead, Sleep On The Job. This Company Will Pay You To Take Naps
EachNight.com is seeking five participants for a study on the effects of napping. They're paying $1,500 for participants to take 30 naps, 30 days in a row.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Florida State Senator Shevrin Jones On The State's New Election Laws
NPR's Noel King talks with Florida state Senator Shevrin Jones about his opposition to Florida's new elections law, which places more restrictions on early and mail-in voting.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

DeSantis Signs New Voting Law With More Restrictions In Florida
Florida's governor signed a new law that puts new restrictions on voting. Opponents have already filed lawsuits, saying it's aimed at suppressing the Democratic vote.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Morning News Brief
Florida Gov. DeSantis signed a strict new voting law. Indians are not happy with Modi as the COVID-19 crisis grows. And, advocates criticize Biden's immigration plans.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

For Mother's Day, Roll Up A French-Style Omelet As A Way To Say 'I Love You'
Jack Bishop of America's Test Kitchen describes the French omelet as "a nice way of saying 'Mom, Happy Mother's Day. I love you." It's an elegant alternative to its folded diner-style counterpart.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Environmental Concerns Arise Over Energy Needed To Mine Bitcoin
In one upstate New York community, a Bitcoin mining operation is drawing criticism from people who say the natural gas burned to make the cryptocurrency is causing too much pollution.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Modi Faces Anger, Criticism Over India's COVID-19 Crisis
Indians are angry. They can't get vaccines, hospital beds, or oxygen, and Prome Minister M Modi hasn't addressed the nation in weeks. How will India's COVID-19 collapse affect him?

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

More Good News Predicted For April's Jobs Report
Forecasters expect another strong month of hiring in April, as the U.S. continues its recovery from the COVID-19 recession. The unemployment rate could dip below 6%.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Anti-Government Protests Continue In Colombia
The proposed tax reform that sparked protests has been withdrawn. But Colombians are now demanding actions to tackle poverty, inequality and school reform. At least 24 people have died.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

April Jobs Gain Is Smaller Than Expected
U.S. employers added just 266,000 jobs last month — far below analysts' projections of nearly1 million — and the unemployment rate ticked up to 6.1%.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

'Searching For A Mom': A Foster Daughter Finds One - And A Voice Of Her Own
When Jade Rone was placed in Stacia Parker's care, she kept her feelings to herself: "I just felt like I didn't matter." But Parker had different expectations for her.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

1 Year Later, The Video Of George Floyd's Death Has Lasting Impacts
The video of George Floyd's death was critical evidence in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin. It's a video that may influence future trials and police training.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Vaccine Hesitancy Among Parents Could Be Vaccination Obstacle For Children
Steve Inskeep talks with researcher David Lazer of Northeastern University about new data around vaccine hesitancy among parents as the FDA prepares to approve the Pfizer vaccine for some children.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

U.S And 25 Other Nations To Participate In Huge Joint Training Exercise
Last year the pandemic derailed large-scale war gaming - this year it's back with a vengeance. The U.S. military is taking part in a massive joint training exercise across Europe and North Africa.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

Support For Guaranteed Income Programs Grows Due To Pandemic
The idea of giving Americans cash without conditions once seemed radical. But the pandemic has put a spotlight on income inequality and pushed the concept of a "guaranteed income" into the mainstream.

NPR U.S. News
May 07, 2021

This Mother's Day Is Extra Special As Vaccinated People See Family For First Time
Andi Stevenson and Marty Evans describe the significance of seeing loved ones this Mother's Day weekend, after not being able to do so for more than a year.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

The Pandemic Didn't Appear To Spur A Baby Boom, Rather A Bust
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released preliminary data on Wednesday showing the number of births in the U.S. has dropped to the lowest level since 1979.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Scotland May Once Again Try To Break Away From The United Kingdom
People in Scotland are voting in regional parliamentary elections. Victory for nationalist candidates will lead to calls for a referendum on Scottish independence and a possible split from the U.K.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

U.S. Backs Waiving International Patent Protections For COVID Vaccines
President Biden threw his support behind a World Trade Organization proposal that would waive intellectual property protections for COVID-19 vaccines — allowing countries to make their own vaccines.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

'Sponge Bob Square Pants' Popsicles Cost Mom A Small Fortune
Four-year-old Noah really wanted those popsicles. He used his mom's Amazon account to order $2,600 worth of popsicles. Somebody started a GoFundMe page to help her pay the non-refundable bill.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Retiree Finds Purpose Restoring Unwanted Bikes, Gives Them Away
About once a week, Manuel Vera hangs out in Silver Spring, Md., with a sign that reads "free bikes." The Washington Post reports he has given away 40 repaired bikes since November.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

What Kind Of Violence Causes Some People To Flee Honduras For The U.S.?
More families are fleeing Honduras than any other country for the U.S. southern border. They're escaping hunger, violence and catastrophic flooding.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Visitors Will Get Gladiator's Point Of View With Roman Colosseum's New Floor
Italy has approved plans to install a new floor for the Colosseum, the ancient arena in Rome. The new floor will give visitors the view gladiators once had.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

While Fasting During Ramadan, Muslims Question Whether To Get Vaccinated
Some Muslims have wondered if they should get the COVID-19 vaccine during Ramadan, when they're fasting. Islamic scholars and vaccine clinics have been offering reassurance and workarounds.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Doctor In India Says His ER Is So Crowded, It's Hard To Walk Through
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks to Dr. Sumit Ray, a critical care doctor in New Delhi, about the growing COVID-19 crisis in India, and what can be done to get it under control.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Doctor In India: Emergency Room Is So Crowded, 'It's Nearly Impossible To Walk'
Dr. Sumit Ray, critical care chief at a New Delhi hospital, is on the front lines of India's growing COVID-19 crisis. "As a system in different parts of the country, we have collapsed," he says.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Nancy Wilson's Solo Album Isn't Copying Heart's Signature Sound
Sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson were the core of the group Heart. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to guitarist Nancy Wilson about her career in music, and her new album called You And Me.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Neighbors Appreciate Canadian Woman's Bistro For Dogs
Kaya Kristina lives next to a huge park in Toronto. Several years ago she began putting water bowls outside for neighborhood dogs to enjoy. After the pandemic hit, she started putting out treats too.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Peloton, Reverses Decision, Agrees To Safety Recall Of Treadmills
NPR's Noel King talks to reporter Bethany Biron of Insider about Peloton recalling treadmills after customers reported more than 70 safety incidents — including the death of a child.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Researchers Find Glaciers Are Melting Faster Than Expected
A new study shows how much and how fast nearly every glacier is melting. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Bob McNabb, one of the study's authors, about what this means for the future.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

News Brief: Vaccine Patent Waiver, Eviction Moratorium, Scottish Election
Biden supports waiving intellectual property rights for COVID-19 vaccines. Judge strikes down federal eviction moratorium. Scottish voters cast ballots in an election that could lead to independence.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Deepening Drought Holds 'Ominous' Signs For Wildfire Threat In The West
After one of the most destructive and extreme wildfire seasons in modern history, residents of California are bracing again. Widening drought is creating conditions even worse than last year.

NPR U.S. News
May 06, 2021

Some Question Whether Hospital Visitation Bans During Pandemic Were Too Strict
For more than a year, people couldn't sit with loved ones as they died in hospitals. Those lonely deaths took a toll on families. Now some doctors are questioning whether the rules were too strict.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Judge Strikes Down Federal Eviction Moratorium, Setting Up High-Stakes Appeal
A federal judge has ruled the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention overstepped its authority by issuing a nationwide moratorium on evictions. The fate of millions of renters rests on appeal.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Netanyahu Opponent, Yair Lapid, Given 4 Weeks To Form New Government In Israel
Lapid, a former journalist and finance minister, is seeking to convince political opposites that their desire to end Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's hold on power outweighs ideological disputes.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Coloradans Worry About Mental Health Effects Of Some Pot Products
Reports of psychosis associated with new cannabis concentrates have half a dozen states proposing new regulations They're also proposing more taxes to fund research about the unknowns in concentrates.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Administration Plan Will Make It Easier To Get Access To Vaccines
NPR's Noel King talks to Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy about why vaccination rates are slowing, and how the administration plans to get 70% of adults at least partially vaccinated by July 4.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Local 'Trusted Messengers' Key To Boosting COVID Vaccinations, Surgeon General Says
Surgeon General Vivek Murthy says that while confidence in COVID-19 vaccines has risen, there's more work to do in convincing people, especially in rural communities, to get the shots.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Farmer Moves Giant Stone, Disrupts Belgian-French Border
A Belgian farmer on his tractor moved a giant stone out of his way, but it marked the Belgian-French border. The Belgian town of Erquelinnes grew by almost 8 feet. The stone will be put back.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Smithsonian's National Air And Space Museum Will Display X-Wing Starfighter
The Starfighter, with a wingspan of 37 feet, appeared in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, and is on loan from Lucasfilm. It will be displayed in the newly renovated building late next year.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Facebook Oversight Board To Announce Decision On Trump Ban
Facebook's Oversight Board will announce whether former President Donald Trump can return to the social network, which kicked him off in January after a mob of his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Facebook Oversight Board Upholds Ban On Donald Trump
Facebook's oversight board has upheld its ban of the former president, which was put in place after a mob of Trump supporters attacked the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Experts Weigh In On Mixing And Matching COVID-19 Vaccines
Researchers are exploring a mix-and-match strategy for vaccinating people against COVID-19. That means using two different kinds of vaccines instead of the same brand of vaccine twice.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Celebrating NPR's 50th Anniversary, We Revisit 'Ping-Pong Diplomacy'
Fifty years ago, a chance encounter at a table-tennis tournament opened the door for warmer relations between the U.S. and China, back when China was mostly isolated from the West.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Diplomacy Centers On Reviving Iran Nuclear Deal, U.S. Prisoner Releases
The U.S. and Iran appear to be inching back into the nuclear deal that the Trump administration abandoned. There is hope that Iran will release some foreign nationals it has been holding.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Africa Faces Vaccine Shortage, Challenges Administering Doses
While many African countries need more COVID-19 vaccines, others are struggling to administer the shots they have. Malawi and South Sudan have even had to throw out unused and expired doses.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

'Planet Money': The $100 Million Deli
In a small town in New Jersey, there is a deli. Just a little sandwich shop. But according to the stock market, this one deli is worth roughly $100 million. What's going on?

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

As NPR Celebrates 50 Years, We Look Back On 'Ping-Pong Diplomacy'
Fifty years ago, a chance encounter at a table-tennis tournament opened the door for warmer relations between the U.S. and China, back when China was mostly isolated from the West.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

As Pandemic Restrictions Ease, Restaurants Lack Workers
Now that people are beginning to dine out again, many restaurants are chronically short-staffed and have trouble hiring. Many laid-off workers have found other jobs or don't want to return.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

As U.S. COVID-19 Cases Drop, India Experiences A Crisis
India's count of COVID-19 cases has passed 20 million. Indian Americans are sounding the alarm that the surge demands global attention, and are raising money to help send supplies and aid to India.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

In Rhode Island, VP Harris Will Promote American Families Plan
NPR's Noel King talks to Meghan Hughes, president of the Community College of Rhode Island, about the state's Promise program that offers recent high school graduates two years of free tuition.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Huge Lake Sturgeon Has Been Lurking In The Detroit River
Imagine catching a really big fish — seven feet long and weighing 240 pounds and estimated to be 100 years old. Oh, and you caught it in the Detroit River.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

News Brief: Decision Day On Facebook's Trump Ban, Aid For India, Democracy Poll
Oversight board will announce if Trump will be allowed back on Facebook. Indian Americans raise money to help with India's COVID-19 crisis. Plus, the results of the latest Democracy Perception Index.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Oregon County In Extreme Risk Zone Makes Vaccination A Priority
Fifteen Oregon counties are designated "extreme risk" for COVID-19 due to high infection rates. Rural Linn County's public health office is working to convince people there to get vaccinated.

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Poll: Much Of The World Sees The U.S. As A Threat To Democracy
The U.S. and China are seen as the main threats to world peace in a new survey of international public opinion, but views of the U.S. are improving since President Biden's election

NPR U.S. News
May 05, 2021

Welcoming Leisure Travel, Airlines Inch Back Toward Profitability
More than a year after the pandemic seriously curtailed leisure air travel, airlines are focusing on the pent up demand for vacations. To lure vacationers, airlines are launching new routes.

NPR U.S. News
May 04, 2021

Vaccine Hesitancy Slows Pace For The Goal Of Herd Immunity
NPR's Noel King speaks to Dr. Ali Khan, dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, about the growing hesitancy concerning getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

NPR U.S. News
May 04, 2021

Baby Boy In Hawaii Hospital's NICU After Being Born On A Plane
Lavi Mounga was flying from Salt Lake City to Hawaii for a vacation when she started to go into labor at just 29 weeks pregnant. A doctor and three neonatal nurses happened to be on the same plane.

NPR U.S. News
May 04, 2021

5th Graders Are Obsessed With Jeff Goldblum After Seeing 'Jurassic Park'
After the kids were hooked, Missouri teacher Samantha Brown started assigning Goldblum-themed writing, math and art projects. The kids' parents even sent a letter to the actor and he replied.

NPR U.S. News
May 04, 2021

Rescuers Search For Survivors Of Mexico City Subway Collapse
An elevated subway train derailed in Mexico City after a concrete overpass it was crossing collapsed Monday night. There are dozens of casualties.

NPR U.S. News
May 04, 2021

High Demand For Songbirds Encourages Some To Attempt Smuggling
NPR's Noel King talks to freelance reporter Kimon de Greef about New York City's songbird competitions and why some people go as far as to try to smuggle finches into the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
May 04, 2021

Russian TV Show 'Fake News' Deconstructs Kremlin's Disinformation
Independent outlets that challenge the official line are coming under increasing pressure in Russia. But one Russian TV channel is taking Kremlin propaganda head on.

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