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NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2018

Doctoral Student Compiles Database Of Indigenous Women Who've Gone Missing
A Southern Cheyenne woman found no solid data on the many indigenous women in the U.S. and Canada who have gone missing or been killed under suspicious circumstances. So she compiled it herself.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2018

After Trump's Helsinki Comments, Ohio County GOP Chairman Resigns With 'No Regrets'
Chris Gagin, former chairman for the Republican Party in Ohio's Belmont County, tells Scott Simon he stands by his choice to resign after President Trump appeared to back President Putin in Helsinki.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2018

Illinoisans Working To Reduce Number Of Female Inmates
A new group in Illinois is hoping to reduce the number of women in prison. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to one of the group's members, state Supreme Court Justice Anne Burke.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2018

Attorney Robert Driscoll Defends Client Maria Butina
NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Robert Driscoll, attorney for accused Russian spy Maria Butina.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2018

Grappling With Native American Homelessness
Native Americans make up an outsized percentage of the homeless in places like New Mexico.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2018

Masses Of Seaweed Threaten Fisheries And Foul Beaches
A floating, smelly mass of seaweed called sargassum is covering beaches in the Caribbean and along the Gulf of Mexico.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

More Than 100 Former Ohio State Students Allege Abuse By School Doctor
Officials said the allegations of inappropriate touching and harassment date from 1979 to 1997. They include students who were varsity players in 14 sports and patients of Student Health Services.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

3-Year-Old Saves Her Ailing Father By FaceTiming Her Mother
The toddler recognized something strange was happening when she saw her father lying on the floor. So she picked up his smartphone and called her mom, who knew what to do next.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Paramount President Fired Amid Allegations of Racially Charged Comments
Amy Powell's five-year run as head of Paramount's television division has come to a halt. She is alleged to have made insensitive remarks regarding black women.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Denied Asylum, But Terrified To Return Home
Immigration lawyers say they're seeing an alarming spike in the number of asylum claims that are being rejected at the earliest stage, known as the credible fear interview.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

What The Interpreter's Code Of Ethics Says About Conversations In Private Meetings
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Barry Slaughter Olsen, an interpreter who has worked with the State Department, about the interpreter's code of ethics and not talking about what was said in private meetings.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

'Chicago Tribune' Restaurant Critic Reveals His Identity After 30 Years
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Chicago Tribune restaurant critic Phil Vettel, who revealed his identity after 30 years of keeping it secret. He says he's already noticed restaurants treating him differently.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

17 People Dead After 'Duck Boat' Accident In Missouri
17 people died when a tourism Duck Boat sank in a sudden storm in a lake outside of Branson, Mo. Investigators are trying to ascertain why the boat didn't heed storm warnings before launching on its cruise.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Critics Say Calls To Change 'Duck Boat' Designs Have Gone Unheeded
The deadly boating incident near Branson, Mo., is not the first involving a "duck boat." They've been involved in several fatal incidents on both water and on land over the years.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Young People Adapt To A Changing Life At The Texas-Mexico Border
Growing up, young residents in the region didn't sense much of a divide between the two countries. But crossing the border these days, says Kenia Guerrero, 23, of Mexico, "You are sometimes afraid."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Capital Gazette Hasn't Missed A Day Of Publication Since Deadly Shooting
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Andrew Green, editorial page editor at The Baltimore Sun, about the callout to journalists to help put out the Capital Gazette's daily paper in the wake of the shooting that killed five staffers.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

What Could Come Of The Indictments Of Russian Agents For Election Interference
The 24 Russians indicted for election interference in 2016 will probably never face trial in the U.S. So, other than to present the public with evidence of the Russian government's campaign to undermine democratic institutions, what are other reasons to make the names of those Russian operatives known?

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Voters In Florida's Panhandle Still Have Faith In Trump's Foreign Policy
President Trump has faced backlash this week as he's tried to clarify his talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Republicans in Congress say he's making a mistake by cozying up to an American enemy. But in the conservative Florida panhandle, voters still have faith in Trump's foreign policy.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Why Heat Waves Are More Challenging For Pregnant Women
Forecasters say Friday should be the hottest July 20 ever in North Texas with temperatures reaching at least 107 degrees. Think you're hot? Think about if you were a pregnant mom.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Father Of 2 Parkland Shooting Survivors Is Shot And Killed In Robbery
Ayub Ali was working at his Florida convenience store when a man with a gun walked in. Two of his four kids were in class during the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in February.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Starbucks To Open First 'Signing Store' In The U.S. To Serve Deaf Customers
The store will be in Washington D.C., and will not only focus on hiring employees fluent in American Sign Language, but also on lighting and design that makes it easier for the deaf to communicate.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Deported Guatemalan Man Desperately Awaits Return Of 9-Year-Old Son From U.S. Custody
The Ramirez family tried to seek asylum in the U.S. The dad says he was deported, but his son and wife are being held in the U.S. in separate facilities.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Dive Teams Search Missouri Lake For More Bodies After Tour Boat Capsizes
The death toll is 13 after a tour boat capsized and sank Thursday in a lake in Missouri. Rescue divers worked until late in the evening and resumed their search Friday morning.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Divers Find More Bodies In Missouri Lake After Tour Boat Accident
A duck boat carrying 31 people on a Missouri lake sank in a sudden storm on Thursday night. Officials say 13 are dead, including children, and four people are still missing.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Judge Vacates Terrorism Convictions Of Man Who Had Trained With Paintball Group
A federal judge says Seifullah Chapman should be released rather than serve out the rest of his 65-year prison term, citing a shift in how the law defines violent crime.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Trump Is Ready To Go All In On Trade War With China
In a wide-ranging interview with CNBC, President Trump threatened to accelerate and expand tariffs on all goods that come from China.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Update On Duck Boat Accident In Missouri
At least 13 people are reported dead after an amphibious tourist boat capsized and sank in Missouri. Four more people are missing.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

He Was Wrongly Convicted When They Were Teens. Now They're Building Their Lives Together
De'Marchoe Carpenter spent 22 years in prison for a murder he didn't commit, which pulled him away from a new romance. Although he was exonerated, he struggles with anxiety from his time in prison.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

News Brief: Trump Invites Putin To Washington, Comic-Con Preview
Top Trump administration officials publicly diverge from their boss. A new surprise: Trump invites Vladimir Putin to Washington. And Comic-Con in San Diego brings costumes, cameos and creativity.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

A World War II Unit Asks For An Honor
One of the most storied units of World War II never received a presidential citation, the highest honor a unit can get. Its few surviving veterans have been petitioning the Army for the honor.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Trump Administration Defends Campus Sexual Assault Rules
Trump administration lawyers were in federal court Thursday defending their new rules on how schools should handle cases of sexual assault.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

EPA Inspector General Blames 'Management Weakness' In Flint Response
The EPA's internal watchdog says "management weakness" delayed the federal government's response to the Flint, Mich., water crisis.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

Doctors Raise Alarm About Shortages Of Pain Medications
Hospitals across the country are reporting significant shortages of pain medication. A survey of anesthesiologists found that 95 percent say it is impacting patient care.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

At Least 11 Dead, Others Missing After Tour Boat Sinks In Missouri Lake
At least seven others from the amphibious duck boat carrying 31 people were being treated at a local hospital. The incident occurred during a severe storm that produced gusts up to 80 mph.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

At Least 8 Dead, Others Missing After Tour Boat Sinks In Missouri Lake
At least seven others from the amphibious duck boat carrying 31 people were being treated at a local hospital. The incident occurred during a severe storm that produced gusts up to 70 mph.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

17 Dead After Amphibious Tour Boat Sinks In Missouri Lake
The duck boat carrying 31 people capsized during a severe storm that produced gusts of at least 60 mph. Divers worked through the night on rescue and recovery operations.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2018

At Least 13 Dead, Others Missing After Tour Boat Sinks In Missouri Lake
Divers were still searching for four people missing after the duck boat carrying 31 capsized during a severe storm that produced gusts of at least 60 mph.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

5 Things To Know About Migrant Family Reunification
The Trump administration policy to separate children from their parents at the border has been rescinded but the government is still facing a court-ordered deadline of July 26 to reunify families.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

5 Facts To Know About Migrant Family Reunification
The Trump administration policy to separate children from their parents at the border has been rescinded but the government is still facing a court-ordered deadline of July 26 to reunify families.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

American Baby Trump Blimp Set To Breeze Onto Namesake's Home Turf
Activists aimed to bring one balloon to the president's backyard; they overshot their fundraising goal and now say they will create more than one replica.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Spy Boss Coats, Once Eager To Get His Name Before Voters, Now Prefers The Shadows
The director of national intelligence is back in the headlines after a rare public statement contradicting the president about Russian interference in U.S. elections.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Spy Boss Coats, Once Eager For The Spotlight, Now Prefers The Shadows
The director of national intelligence is back in the headlines after a rare public statement contradicting the president about Russian interference in U.S. elections.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Russia Says Agreements Were Discussed With Trump On Syria. The U.S. Is Silent
The Trump administration has offered no information about supposed "specific" proposals that Russian officials have mentioned publicly.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Florida Couple Settles Legal Battle To Keep 'The Starry Night' House
The homeowners were fined thousands of dollars by Mount Dora officials for making their two-story house and surrounding wall look like Van Gogh's famous painting. On Tuesday, the mayor apologized.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

'Brady Bunch' House Is Ready For A New Story
Does this house look familiar? It appeared during the beginning and ending credits of The Brady Bunch and is now for sale.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Washington, D.C., Is Counting All Its Cats. It Will Take 3 Years And $1.5 Million
The nation's capital has a cat problem. And the first step toward fixing it, apparently, is to quantify it.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

VA Whistleblowers 10 Times More Likely Than Peers To Receive Disciplinary Action
A new report by the Government Accountability Office also found that nearly two-thirds of individuals who filed formal complaints did not work for Veterans Affairs the following year.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

In California, Big Sur Is Finally Fully Reconnected To The Rest Of The World
Now that a segment of the Pacific Coast Highway off Big Sur has reopened, we return to artist and resident Erin Gafill for a chat.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Explosion At Pa. Army Depot Injures Four
Officials said the victims suffered burns and three were airlifted to the hospital with serious injuries. Terrorism in not suspected.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Black Lung Rate Hits 25-Year High In Appalachian Coal Mining States
In central Appalachia, one in five working coal miners with at least 25 years experience underground now suffers from the deadly disease black lung, according to a new study.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

California Supreme Court Squashes Bid To Split State Into Three
The court ruled that the proposal to divide California can't be placed on the November ballot. A venture capitalist has spent years arguing the state would be better off as several smaller states.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Reporter Shows The Links Between The Men Behind Brexit And The Trump Campaign
Carole Cadwalladr's investigation into Cambridge Analytica's role in Brexit led her to Russian connections and the Trump campaign. She says British investigators are working "closely with the FBI."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

More Than 140 'Sister Survivors' Of Larry Nassar Abuse Are Honored At ESPYS
"I'm here to tell you, you cannot silence the strong forever," said one of the women who was onstage to accept the Arthur Ashe Courage Award.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Trump Plans To Invite Putin For Autumn Visit, Top Spy Boss Coats Caught Off Guard
The White House said it is negotiating with Moscow over President Trump's invitation for Vladimir Putin to visit. Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats was surprised.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

White House, Following Backlash, Rules Out Russian Interrogation of Americans
Politicians argued almost with one voice that the White House reject any notion about granting Russian investigators access to Americans facing accusations by Vladimir Putin. It agreed on Thursday.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Who Knew The World Bank And The U.N. Are Emoji Lovers?
Charities and nonprofit agencies are embracing the symbols to communicate about tough topics like global hunger, poverty and disease.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Can A Community Hospital Stick To Its Mission When It Goes For-Profit?
After 130 years as a nonprofit hospital with deep roots in North Carolina, Mission Health is seeking to be bought by HCA Healthcare, the nation's largest for-profit hospital chain.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Behind The Campaign To Get Teachers To Leave Their Unions
Conservative groups are spreading the word: Teachers no longer have to support the union that represents them.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Louisiana's New Approach To Treating Hepatitis C
Louisiana and Gilead Sciences are working on a deal that would change how the state pays for expensive hepatitis C drugs, with the goal of eliminating the disease in that state.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Michael Isikoff On Maria Butina And Russia
The indictment against Maria Butina is the latest update in the Russia probe. NPR's Noel King speaks to journalist Michael Isikoff, co-author of the book Russian Roulette.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

News Brief: GOP Lawmakers React To Russia Statements, VA Purges, New Israeli Law
We look at how Republican lawmakers are responding to President Trump's inconsistent statements about Russian election interference. Also, The Washington Post's Lisa Rein discusses purges at the VA.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Pacific Coast Highway Portion Reopens After Landslide
After well over a year of closure, the road through Big Sur is reopening in California. A giant landslide kept visitors from the rugged and popular vacation site.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2018

Why Did Russia Attack The 2016 Election? This Week's Whirlwind Offers New Clues
Russian President Vladimir Putin's preoccupation with two individuals he has singled out for blame suggests how strongly the Russian leader viewed his 2016 attack on the U.S. as simple turnabout.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

FBI Director Says Russia Still Seeking To Interfere In U.S. Democracy
"Russia attempted to interfere with the last election and ... it continues to engage in malign influence operations to this day," Christopher Wray said at a national security forum.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

White House Names Steven Dillingham To Head Census Bureau
The agency has not had permanent leadership since July 2017. If confirmed by the Senate, Steven Dillingham will oversee the 2020 census and inherit six lawsuits challenging a citizenship question.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Ex-Teacher Sentenced To Prison After Firing Gun In Georgia High School
Jesse Randall Davidson pleaded guilty to charges related to the shooting that occurred just two weeks after the Parkland, Fla., massacre. Davidson's attorney said he didn't want to hurt any kids.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Student Walked Over A Dozen Miles To New Job, Admirers Give Him Car And Cash
Walter Carr's car broke down. He set out to make a grueling 20-mile walk to his first assignment. It turned into an odyssey of kind gestures and generosity.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

MGM Resorts Sues Victims Of Las Vegas Shooting Over Liability Claims
MGM Resorts is suing victims of the 2017 Las Vegas shooting. NPR's Ari Shapiro discusses the case with Catherine Lombardo, an attorney representing a number of the victims.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

How Drug Companies Are Controlling How Their Drugs Are Covered By Medicaid
NPR's Alison Kodjak and The Center for Public Integrity have been looking at all the ways the drug industry tries to keep Medicaid money flowing. Here they examine how the drug industry's massive lobbying effort in every state has blocked efforts to control Medicaid costs.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Midwest Facing A Skilled-Worker Shortage As Warehousing Boom Continues
Southwest Ohio is in the midst of a warehousing boom, with new, often high-tech distribution centers opening around the region. It's part of the state's economic development strategy to lure companies like Amazon. The influx of jobs is a boon to many Ohio cities, but with thousands of new logistics jobs anticipated over the next few years, are employers facing a skilled-worker shortage.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

How Drug Companies Control How Their Drugs Are Covered By Medicaid
NPR's Alison Kodjak and the Center for Public Integrity have been looking at how the drug industry tries to keep Medicaid money flowing. Here they examine the industry's massive lobbying efforts.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Physicists Go Small: Let's Put A Particle Accelerator On A Chip
A tiny accelerator could be useful in medicine as well as basic science. Instead of speeding up beams of electrons through giant tunnels, the aim here is to build accelerators on semiconductor chips.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

'Lifeline' Stretch Of California's Highway 1 Reopens Months After Massive Mudslide
The road in the rugged Big Sur area is back in business 14 months after more than 1 million tons of earth collapsed. Motorists can now drive uninterrupted along the coast between LA and San Francisco.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

'Lifeline' Stretch Of California's Highway 1 Reopens 14 Months After Massive Mudslide
More than 1 million tons of earth had come crashing down on the road in the rugged Big Sur area. Motorists can now drive uninterrupted along the coast between LA and San Francisco.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

'Alternatives To Detention' Are Cheaper Than Jails, But Cases Take Far Longer
The Trump administration faces the same challenge as its predecessors: if you cannot detain immigrant families, how do you ensure they show up for hearings and deportation?

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Furnishing Homes For A New Life After Domestic Violence
Interior designer Julie Davis says she wants domestic violence survivors to "feel like somebody cared, and ... feel like they have hope."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Financial Costs Are Mounting As HHS Tries To Reunite Families
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Mark Greenberg, senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, about the cost of housing and reuniting families separated at the border.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Muslim Americans Running For Office In Highest Numbers Since 2001
As many as 100 Muslims filed to run for office this year, according to Muslim political groups, the most since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. About 50 of those candidates remain in the running.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Justice Department Calls Russian Woman, Maria Butina, A Flight Risk
The Russian grad student living in the U.S. has been charged with working as an unregistered foreign agent. The Justice Department wants her detained until trial.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Maria Butina Was In Contact With Russian Intelligence, Feds Say In New Documents
A Russian woman charged this week with serving as an unregistered agent also "offered sex" in exchange for a job in an organization she targeted, prosecutors allege.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Judge Orders Maria Butina, Linked To Russian Spy Agency, Jailed Ahead Of Trial
A federal magistrate judge ordered a Russian woman charged with serving as a foreign agent into custody ahead of her trial after prosecutors said she was a flight risk.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Alabama's GOP Rep. Martha Roby Wins Primary Runoff
She faced a number of primary challengers last month over a pledge she made in 2016 not to vote for then-candidate Trump. The president endorsed her in the runoff against challenger Bobby Bright.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Empowering Kids In An Anxious World
Teen depression and anxiety rates have been rising for years, and two new books offer advice to parents and caregivers.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

News Brief: Trump Walks Back Comments, Russian Student Charged, Migrant Detentions
President Trump takes that Helsinki comment back. Another thread in the story of alleged Russian influence in U.S. affairs. And disturbing stories from migrant detention facilities, from those inside.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Maria Butina To Appear In Court
Maria Butina, a Russian graduate student living in the U.S., has been charged with working as an unregistered foreign agent. She is scheduled to appear in court Wednesday.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Trump Supporters React To Helsinki Comments
As condemnation of the summit between Trump and Putin mounts in Washington, we head to rural Texas to hear how Trump supporters in Burnet County are reacting to criticism of the president.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

The Economic Integration At The Northern Border
Few American and Canadian businesses are as tightly linked as Twin Rivers Paper's mills. Its mill in Edmundston, New Brunswick, makes pulp for its paper mill just over the river in Madawaska, Maine.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Migrants Describe Unsanitary And Overcrowded Detention Conditions
As young children are reunited with their parents after being separated at the border, there are fresh concerns about the way they are treated inside the detention centers.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Lawsuit Says Migrants Were Subjected To Dirty Detention Facilities, Bad Food And Water
In interviews that appear in the suit filed by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, detainees also reported not being allowed to shower for days and sleeping in overcrowded rooms.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 18, 2018

Lawsuit Says Migrants Subjected To Dirty Detention Facilities, Bad Food And Water
In interviews that appear in the suit filed by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, detainees also reported not being allowed to shower for days and sleeping in overcrowded rooms.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

Hutterites: The Small Religious Colonies Entwined With Montana's Haute Cuisine
The peace-driven Anabaptist sect, made up of families who live and work together, has built a relationship with high-end resorts, supplying poultry, produce and bread for chefs.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

Texas Man Found Guilty Of Hate Crime For Burning Mosque
When fire devastated the Victoria Islamic Center last year, an outpouring of support followed, with neighboring Jewish and Christian congregations offering to host Muslim services.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

Scientists Hunt A Test For Chronic Injury In Living Brains
Doctors are closer to a test in living people that could help diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease that's been linked to concussions and other repeated brain assaults.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

Scientists Hunt For A Test To Diagnose Chronic Brain Injury In Living People
Doctors are closer to a test in live brains that could help diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease that's been linked to concussions and other repeated brain assaults.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

MGM Files Lawsuits Denying Liability Over Las Vegas Shooting
In October 2017, a gunman fired from his room at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds. Now MGM, which owns the hotel, is asking the courts to declare it not liable.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

NYPD Will Pursue Internal Charges Against Officers In Eric Garner's Death
Four years after Eric Garner died after being put in a chokehold by a police officer in Staten Island, the New York Police Department says it will pursue disciplinary actions.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

Insurers And Government Are Slow To Cover Expensive CAR-T Cancer Therapy
Treatment costs for the immunotherapy can run to more than $1 million. Some state Medicaid programs aren't paying for the treatment, and Medicare's complicated payment rates have hospitals worried.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

Arms Control Surfaced In Helsinki, But It's Likely Just Talk
The U.S. and Russia still inspect each other's nuclear arsenals and have sharply curtailed the number of weapons poised to launch. That's thanks to two arms control treaties, which are now at risk.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

GOP Sen. Sasse On The Consequences Of Trump's Remarks In Helsinki
President Trump will meet with lawmakers Tuesday, a day after he stood next to Vladimir Putin and appeared to question U.S. intelligence findings. Lawmakers and intel officials have expressed shock.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 17, 2018

Mike Rogers, Former House Intel Committee Chairman, On Trump-Putin
The president's whirlwind week undercut U.S. intelligence agencies, challenged alliances and forced Republicans to confront him. Former GOP Rep. Mike Rogers explains how political norms are no more.

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