NEWS: NPR U.S. NEWS
Setup News Ticker
   NEWS: NPR U.S. NEWS
NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

The U.K. changes direction and abolishes plan to cut taxes on high earners
Under political pressure, the U.K. government has made an embarrassing U-turn on tax cuts for the highest earners, while the collapse of the pound compounds the misery of many British householders.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

The presidential election in Brazil heads to a runoff between Lula and Bolsonaro
Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, a left-wing former president, finished in first place Sunday, but failed to secure enough votes for an outright victory and will face right-wing incumbent Jair Bolsonaro.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Officials face questions over the late evacuation order in Florida's Lee County
Questions have been raised about the decision by Lee County officials to delay mandatory evacuation orders ahead of Hurricane Ian's landfall. Did that decision contribute to the rising death toll?

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Ian ravaged much of Sanibel Island but what's left is of historical significance
Still standing on Sanibel Island after the hurricane is the iconic lighthouse and its keeper's quarters. Along with the lighthouse, Thomas Edison and Henry Ford's winter homes remain intact.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

2 men are disqualified from a contest after their fish were stuffed with weights
The director of the fishing tournament in Ohio estimated the five walleye to be about 20 pounds total, and became suspicious when they weighed in at 34 pounds.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Actress, who gave Marlon Brando's Oscar rejection speech, dies at 75
Native American actress and activist Sacheen Littlefeather is best known for appearing in place of Marlon Brando on stage at the 1973 Oscars.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

How do you protect critical infrastructure against potential sabotage?
NPR's A Martinez speaks to Juliette Kayyem of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government about the challenges of securing energy infrastructure after last week's suspicious Nord Stream pipeline leaks.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Jury selection to begin in last year's deadly Christmas parade in Wisconsin
On Monday jury selection begins in the Waukesha Christmas Parade murder trial. The suspect is accused of killing six people after driving an SUV through last year's parade.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

The Nord Stream leaks are a wake-up call for countries with vulnerable pipelines
There are enough miles of pipelines around the world to circle the Earth 30 times — and many are vulnerable. That doesn't mean there aren't things countries can do to protect them, an expert says.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Pakistanis save their town from floodwaters by building an embankment
As unprecedented rains lashed Pakistan, residents built their own embankments to save a large town, took over public schools for shelter and set up a boat highway for transport.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Rescue efforts in Florida are still being hampered by floodwaters from Ian
The city of Arcadia, Fla., is 50 miles inland from the Gulf Coast, but it's still grappling with the water Hurricane Ian dumped last week. The flooded Peace River has cut off thousands of homes.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

The NPR podcast 'Throughline' examines how Korean culture went global
From BTS to Squid Game, South Korea reigns as a global exporter of pop culture. In the past two decades, government intervention has led the country to become a major driver of global soft power.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Transracial adoptees with different views on abortion agree on cultural trauma
Two transracial adoptees have different views on abortion, but both agree transracial adoptions can be traumatic. (This story first aired on All Things Considered on Sept. 23, 2022.)

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Unpaid medical bills are still harming people's credit scores despite new policies
Medical debt can ruin people's credit rating — making it hard to get a loan, mortgage or credit card. People of color are most impacted by this issue and programs designed to help are falling short.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

News brief: Florida evacuations, Brazil's election, Supreme Court preview
Did a Florida county wait too long to issue evacuation orders as Hurricane Ian loomed? Brazil's presidential election goes to a runoff later this month. The Supreme Court begins a new term Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

How Russian forces lost control of the Ukrainian railway hub of Lyman
Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy says the key railway hub is under his country's control. Russian forces had been using the rail lines to resupply their troops farther south in Ukraine.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

Hurricane damage in Florida is estimated to be tens of billions of dollars
Florida residents are assessing hurricane damage and insurance providers are expecting to see a rush of claims. NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Rich Gibson of the American Academy of Actuaries.

NPR U.S. News
Oct 03, 2022

The Supreme Court will begin a new term with more contentious cases on its docket
The fate of affirmative action programs in college admissions, redistricting, and elections are in the hands of the justices as the U.S. Supreme Court begins its new term.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Ginni Thomas, wife of Justice Clarence Thomas, testifies before Jan. 6 panel
GOP activist Ginni Thomas testified for several hours behind closed doors before the House Select Jan. 6 committee. Her lawyer released a statement that she answered all the panel's questions.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

The Tampa Bay region feels lucky that it didn't suffer severe damage from Ian
In Manatee County, Hurricane Ian spared residents in that part of Florida from severe devastation. The storm did knock out power to scores of people and the wind knocked down trees

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Fort Myers saw some of the worst destruction when Ian hit Florida
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Tracy McMillion, Fort Myers' fire chief, about the city being hit especially hard by Hurricane Ian, which caused catastrophic flooding and destroyed countless homes.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

10-year-old girl who fled Ukraine is reunited with her cat named Arsenii
Thanks to the kindness of a network of animal rescuers, Arsenii was vaccinated, microchipped and given a passport. After many months and 7,000 miles of travel, Agnessa and her cat have been reunited.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Comedian Trevor Noah is stepping down from 'The Daily Show' after 7 years of hosting
Noah, who took over after Jon Stewart left in 2015, said hosting the show has been one of his greatest challenges and greatest joys. It's unclear exactly when he's leaving and what he will do next.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Biden's plan to cancel some student debt turns into a legal fight
The Biden administration's efforts to cancel hundreds of billions of dollars in federal student loan debt is up in the air. There are two different lawsuits trying to prevent it from going through.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Economists consider the tradeoffs of fighting inflation and killing economic growth
The Federal Reserve has been extremely aggressive in its attempt to bring inflation down by quickly raising interest rates. Some economists continue to wonder whether it's too much too fast.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

A look inside the legal battle to stop Biden's student loan relief
The legal cases all face the same challenge: finding a plaintiff who will be clearly harmed by debt cancellation.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

After wreaking devastation across Florida, Ian is on track to hit South Carolina
When Hurricane Ian slammed into Fort Myers, Fla., it left a trail of destruction from high winds and storm surge flooding. As people get back into their communities, they're deciding what's next.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Ahead of Brazil's presidential election, officials say the voting system is sound
In the final days of the Brazilian presidential election campaign, all eyes are on one of the worlds largest democracies, in the hope that the voting concludes peacefully.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

I hated to be the guy who had to tell of the Watergate tapes, Butterfield says
Republican staffer Alexander Butterfield revealed during Watergate hearings that he had overseen the installation of a recording system that taped President Richard Nixon's White House conversations.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

How Russia's illegal annexation of Ukrainian regions could change the war
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Andrew Weiss of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace about Russia annexing four Ukrainian territories and how that could escalate the war.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Lawyers are lining up to participate in the Camp LeJeune water lawsuit claims
A new law makes it easier for people to sue the government for illnesses from contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. The legal action could become one of the largest mass civil cases in history.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

To fully embrace electric vehicles, the auto industry must adjust its workforce
The auto industry is undergoing a once-in-a-century transformation as it goes all in on electric vehicles. Certain white-collar workers may be among the first to feel the impact.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Russia will gain control of 4 Ukrainian regions, how will this change the war?
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Andrew Weiss of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about Russia annexing four Ukrainian territories and how that could escalate the war.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Putin plans to formally annex 4 regions from Ukraine Friday
President Putin will officially annex four regions in Ukraine that have become part of Russia, after holding a referendum that the international community broadly denounced as a sham.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

What it is like to fly into a hurricane from 8,000 feet in the air
Part of Nick Underwood's job is flying through hurricanes to collect data for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. He's been doing that for six years and says Ian was especially rough.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

News brief: Hurricane Ian, Russia claims Ukrainian regions, Brazil's election
Now that Hurricane Ian has moved on, Floridians are assessing damage. Moscow is officially annexing four Russian-occupied regions in Ukraine. Two ideological opposites aim to be Brazil's president.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

Harry Styles song, 'As It Was,' breaks Billboard record
The Harry Styles song has managed to stay No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for 15 weeks. That's a feat topped by only three other songs in history.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

A court in Israel recognizes online civil marriages as valid
Israelis seeking non-religious or same-sex weddings have been going abroad for years. Lately hundreds of couples got married over Zoom from Utah. An Israeli court ruled those marriages are valid.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 30, 2022

After staged referendums, Putin is annexing 4 regions in Ukraine
President Putin will officially annex four regions in Ukraine that have become part of Russia, after holding a referendum that the international community broadly denounced as a sham.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

The British economy is in freefall with a rare intervention by the Bank of England
Britain's currency weakened to a record low against the U.S. dollar, while government borrowing costs shot up. This happened after the new conservative government announced new economic proposals.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Crews are out in Naples, Fla., checking for damage after Ian's wrath
Naples saw flooding, property damage and power outages while taking the force of Hurricane Ian. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Naples City Manager Jay Boodheshwar about the impact.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Even though Ian is no longer a hurricane, flooding is still a major problem
After roaring ashore as a powerful category 4 hurricane, Ian has been losing steam. People on Florida's Gulf coast are beginning to assess the damage from the storm.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

NBA star LeBron James is buying a pickleball team
Pickleball, a mix of tennis, ping-pong and badminton, has exploded in popularity. LeBron James and his business partner Maverick Carter are among the newest owners of a pro pickleball team.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Dogs really do know when we're stressed. They can smell it on us
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast collected samples of human breath and sweat from volunteers working on a math problem. The pups could detect stressed-out samples with more than 90% accuracy.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

EU officials and others are concerned about explosions at Nord Stream pipelines
Some European leaders say the Nord Stream pipeline leaks are deliberate. There's growing concern about what it could mean for security at oil and gas installations around Europe.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

How climate change is making storms such as Hurricane Ian stronger
Hurricane Ian and Typhoon Noru strengthened quickly before landfall. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Princeton University professor Gabriel Vecchi about climate-fueled intensification.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Hunger in America: Millions of Americans didn't have enough food last year
The White House hosted a conference this week to focus attention on hunger, nutrition and health. Food banks are having a tough time — dealing with the pandemic and now inflation.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Moscow prepares to annex 4 Russian-occupied regions in Ukraine
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to PBS Newshour's Simon Ostrovsky about what the earlier annexation of Crimea might suggest for what happens now for the next areas Russia is trying to annex.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Anthony Christian Ocampo's latest book is 'Brown and Gay in LA'
NPR's A Martinez speaks with author Anthony Christian Ocampo about his book Brown and Gay in LA: The Lives of Immigrant Sons.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Casino mogul Steve Wynn is fighting a DOJ demand that he register as a foreign agent
The Justice Department has filed the first civil lawsuit alleging violations of the Foreign Agents Registration Act since 1991, against Steve Wynn, who is fighting the case.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

China's economy wobbles ahead of an important political meeting in October
As China gears up for a hugely significant political gathering next month, its economy is slowing down.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

A new generation is posing a challenge in the Israeli-occupied West Bank
Young Palestinian men — in their teens and twenties — are taking up guns and organizing into small militias with names like the Lion's Den.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

The CDC is looking into a stomach bug outbreak at the Grand Canyon
Hundreds of visitors to the Grand Canyon over the summer were sickened by a norovirus, which prompted the CDC to take a look at it. (Story aired on Weekend Edition Saturday on Sept. 24, 2022.)

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Rapper Coolio, who helped to shape hip-hop, has died at 59
Grammy-winning, rapper, producer and actor Coolio has died. He was best-known for hits "Fantastic Voyage" and "Gangsta's Paradise."

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

The body of a famed U.S. extreme skier has been recovered in Nepal
Hilaree Nelson went missing this week after falling from the world's eighth-highest mountain in Nepal. Her body was recovered Wednesday and transported to Nepal's capital.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

News brief: Hurricane Ian is downgraded, Baltic pipeline leaks, U.K. economic turmoil
Ian roared ashore in Florida as a Category 4 hurricane. EU officials are concerned about explosions at Nord Stream pipelines. Britain's pound weakens to a record low against the U.S. dollar.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 29, 2022

Migrant deaths at the U.S.-Mexico border hit a record high, in part due to drownings
This has been the deadliest year ever for migrants trying to cross the U.S.-Mexico border. Hundreds have drowned in the Rio Grande or perished from extreme heat in failed smuggling attempts.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

After knocking out Cuba's power grid, Hurricane Ian takes aim at Florida
Nearing the Florida Gulf Coast, Hurricane Ian is now a Category 4 storm. Forecasters call it an extremely dangerous storm with the potential for catastrophic winds and a life-threatening storm surge.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

What caused 2 key natural gas pipelines under the Baltic Sea to rupture?
European officials have raised "sabotage" concerns after seismologists say explosions preceded leaks in Russian-owned Nord Stream gas pipelines on Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

After playing a 200-year-old flute, Lizzo declares history is freaking cool
The Library of Congress invited Lizzo to play the crystal flute that was a gift to James Madison in the early 1800s. She got a chance to play it during her concert in Washington, D.C., Tuesday night.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

Conservationists are celebrating the comeback of Kemp's ridley sea turtles
The world's smallest and most endangered sea turtle is back on the Louisiana Gulf Coast. It's been 75 years since Kemp's Ridley sea turtles were last seen on a remote barrier island.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

Flight attendants picket airports — demanding that airlines fix chronic delays
Thousands of Southwest Airlines and United Airlines flight attendants picketed outside airport terminals Tuesday — calling for smoother operations, better pay and safety on the job.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

Encore: WWII veteran meets the man who found and returned his long-lost bracelet
A Czech hobbyist traveled halfway around the world to return a bracelet he found at a former World War II prison camp to a Colorado veteran. (Story first aired on ATC on May 15, 2022.)

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

Advocates say rules protecting outdoor workers from heat aren't being enforced
Washington state implemented new rules to keep farm workers safer when temperatures rise. But some of those workers say the state agency charged with enforcement is too sympathetic to industry.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

In addition to hunger, Sen. Cory Booker says the U.S. faces a nutrition crisis
NPR's A Martinez talks to Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey about the first White House conference on ending hunger in more than 50 years.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

How the war in Ukraine is affecting the world's supply of fertilizer
One of the effects of the war in Ukraine is a global shortage of fertilizer. Food supplies could be threatened if more fertilizer doesn't get to the world market.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

What science has to say about so-called COVID superdodgers
Throughout the pandemic, some people have avoided catching COVID — despite multiple exposures. Do their immune systems have some type of protection that others are missing?

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

White House conference will address the nation's food insecurity
President Biden is going to lay out his proposals to tackle hunger at a big conference, the first of its kind since 1969. But the solutions won't be easy to implement.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

White House hosts summit with leaders of Pacific Island nations
President Biden is rolling out the red carpet for leaders from Pacific Island nations, a recognition of the influence that China has had in the region as the U.S. tries to up its game.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

Parts of Asia are cleaning up after Typhoon Noru
Typhoon Noru has made landfall in Vietnam, after causing at least eight deaths and widespread flooding in the Philippines.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

Putin critic Yevgeniya Albats leaves Russia after a crackdown on independent media
The Russian journalist knew writing about the KGB and its successor the FSB was risky. Russia declared her a foreign agent, like her grandfather who was killed in the Stalin era.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

Russia claims its occupied territories in Ukraine voted to become part of Russia
Final results from so-called referendums in Russian-occupied areas of Ukraine indicate overwhelming support for joining the Russian Federation. The voting is widely condemned as a sham.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 28, 2022

Steep sell-offs in U.S. stocks have started to spread worlwide
The volatility in U.S. markets is rocking stock, bond and currency trading in other countries. Many blame the Federal Reserve for the wild swings.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

Moscow contends with violence over its plan to enlist reservists to fight in Ukraine
While waging the fight in Ukraine, Moscow confronts protests over its call-up of military reservists, an attack on a recruiting office and other incidents that include a deadly school shooting.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

The protests won't lead to regime change, Iran's foreign minister tells NPR
As protests intensify in Iran over the arrest and death in custody of a 22-year-old woman, the country's top diplomat promises an investigation into what happened but downplays the demonstrations.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

Didn't you always imagine the future would feature flying cars?
The wait is over — at least it was at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. The show included an air mobility experience — stuff like hoverbikes, jet suits and amphibious aircrafts.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

10-year-old boy's surrealist works sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars
Fifth grader Andres Valencia, 10, uses the money to buy Roblox coins or Nintendo Switch consoles for all his friends. He's also donated to AIDS research and children's charities.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

25 years later, looking back on the accomplishments of the Mars Pathfinder
More than two decades ago a small probe carrying an even smaller rover landed on Mars. Pathfinder and the Sojourner rover paved the way for sophisticated robotic explorers that have landed since 1997.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

A far-right group with neo-fascist roots wins big in Italy's election
NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Max Bergmann of the Center for Strategic and International Studies about far-right victories in Italy's election, and the rise of far-right political parties in Europe.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

A grand jury in Georgia is expected to hear from ex-Trump official Meadows
Former Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows is set to testify Tuesday before a grand jury in Fulton County regarding efforts to try to overturn the state's 2020 election.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

Amid climate change, water managers see promise in recycled wastewater
Las Vegas is prepared to pay Southern California $750 million to drink water recycled from sewage. It's because of the southwestern megadrought.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

After years of decline, the auto industry in Canada is making a comeback
Canada is one of the largest car producers in North America. The transition toward electric vehicles provides new opportunities to build on this legacy.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

Floridians in the hurricane's path don't need to go far to get to safety, mayors say
St. Petersburg and Tampa are preparing for what could be their first direct hit by a major hurricane in over a century. Officials there are urging people to comply with evacuation orders immediately.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

For the 1st time in a century, St. Petersburg could get a direct hit from a hurricane
Hurricane Ian is on a track to strike Florida as a Category 4 as early as Wednesday. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Ken Welch, mayor of St. Petersburg, about his city being in the likely path of Ian.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

Most Japanese opposed the state funeral for ex-Prime Minister Abe, polls show
A costly state funeral for former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who was assassinated in July, prompted protests in Japan.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

In the latest Jan. 6 case, Oath Keepers go on trial for seditious conspiracy
The founder of the far-right Oath Keepers antigovernment group, Stewart Rhodes, and four others go on trial Tuesday on charges of seditious conspiracy in connection with the Jan. 6 Capitol attack.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

Results of sham annexation votes in 4 occupied regions of Ukraine may be known soon
NPR's A Martinez talks to Thomas de Waal of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace about Russian-organized annexation votes that Ukraine's allies say violate international law.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

Protesters in Mexico City demand to know what happened to 43 college students
Ongoing demonstrations in Mexico are marking the anniversary of the massacre in 2014 that resulted in the murders and disappearances of 43 students from a college in a rural south-western state.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

The U.S. Forest Service is behind on prescribed burns in parts of California
The resort town of Big Bear is surrounded by land slated for fire mitigation, such as prescribed burns. But obstacles have prevented the crucial work and heightened the risk of disaster.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

News brief: Oath Keepers' trial, protests inside Russia, Iran's foreign minister
Some Oath Keepers go on trial for seditious conspiracy. Moscow confronts protests over its call-up of military reservists. Iran's foreign minister responds to the suppression of peaceful protests.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 27, 2022

Latino superheroes are saving the day in Hollywood
Many of the new movie superheroes star Latino actors or have Latino characters. Their origin stories are diverse.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

On little strips of land, Kenyans grow everything from roses to azaleas to gardenias
As he moves on from Africa to take up his next posting in Mexico, NPR's Eyder Peralta has one last love letter to a favorite part of Nairobi, Kenya: roadside plant nurseries.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

California struggles with who pays for public charging stations for electric cars
A California ballot proposition to tax the wealthy to pay for electric vehicle incentives has split the state's Democrats. Gov. Gavin Newsom made himself the face of the opposition campaign.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

Italy will soon be led by the most far-right government it's had since Mussolini
Giorgia Meloni's Brothers of Italy emerge as the single largest party. Her coalition will be able to form the next government, and Meloni is expected to become Italy's first female prime minister.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

Rihanna will perform in the Super Bowl halftime show in February
Rihanna is one of the best-selling female artists of all time with over 250 million records sold worldwide. She turned down the opportunity to perform in 2019 to show solidarity with Colin Kaepernick.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

You can now buy the longest book in existence, but it's not meant to be read
At 21,450 pages — think 15 copies of War and Peace stacked on top of each other — One Piece includes every panel of the long-running Japanese comic of the same name.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

Library of Congress acquires Jim Metzner's sound of the planet
Jim Metzner's life work has been to document the sounds of the globe. Now, his archives have been acquired by the Library of Congress.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

Marking 75 years, the CIA opens a new museum and launches a podcast
The CIA rarely seeks publicity, but has opened up a bit as it marks its anniversary. Director William Burns told the inaugural podcast that he wanted to 'demystify' some of the agency's work.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

NASA plans to hit an asteroid with a spacecraft to change its course
NASA is getting ready to give an asteroid a little push, in a test intended to ready Earth's defenses against a potential asteroid approach.

NPR U.S. News
Sep 26, 2022

Morning news brief
Italy is set to usher in its first far-right government since World War II. Military-age men flee Russia after a partial mobilization is enacted. Later today NASA is going to try to move an asteroid.

  • CEOExpress
  • c/o CommunityScape | 200 Anderson Avenue
    Rochester, NY 14607
  • Contact
  • As an Amazon Associate
    CEOExpress earns from
    qualifying purchases.

©1999-2022 CEOExpress Company LLC