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NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

Trump verdict would likely move only a small number of votes, poll finds
A guilty or not-guilty verdict wouldn't change many voters minds, but it could make a difference for a smaller, crucial group of voters this election.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

Forget about political news and everything else -- it's time to focus on pandas
Cue the fanfare! A new set of pandas is headed to the National Zoo later this year. Why do people love these bamboo-munching creatures so much?

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

How much will voters consider the Trump criminal trial in November?
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Paul Begala, the former chief strategist of Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign, about the political implications of a verdict in Donald Trump's hush money trial.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

RFK's voters know they're not electing the next president. They're with him anyway
The winner of this year's presidential race could be decided by who shows up to support independent candidate Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. -- and who that means they aren't voting for.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

After the couple breaks up, can The Marias still make music together?
María Zardoya and Josh Conway founded The Marías as a couple. They talk to NPR's A Martinez about how their breakup has shaped their latest album, "Submarine." It comes out Friday.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

Sexual misconduct allegations against lawyers isn't uncommon. Punishment is tricky
Experts say much work still needs to be done to fix harassment and sexual assault problems in the legal profession.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

AI companies in China aim for innovation despite U.S. restrictions on access to parts
Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep visits an A-I company in Shanghai to find out how that company helps illustrate the larger tech war between the United States and China.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

Why do so many of us want our elected officials to love dogs?
NPR's Michel Martin talks with A.O. Scott, a critic with The New York Times, about the history of presidents and their pups.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

'The New Yorker': Do children have a "right to hug" their parents?
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with journalist Sarah Stillman, a writer for The New Yorker, about her reporting on efforts to grant children the "right to hug" their incarcerated parents.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

In Mexico's historic presidential election season it's down to 2 women
Voters in Mexico are likely to elect their first female president this weekend. Could that change anything for women in Mexico, which has the second highest rate of femicide in Latin America?

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

Activists hope other countries will follow Colombia's lead and ban bullfighting
Lawmakers in Colombia have voted to ban bullfighting, a centuries-old tradition in the South American country.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

Justice Samuel Alito declines to recuse himself in Jan. 6-related cases
Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito has declined to recuse himself from two Jan. 6-related cases despite calls to do so after news reports said controversial flags were flown outside his properties.

NPR U.S. News
May 30, 2024

People in Taiwan are divided over whether to remove statues of Chiang Kai-shek
A decades-long debate at the heart of Taiwan's identity and history is roiling once again: whether to remove hundreds of statues of former authoritarian leader Chiang Kai-shek.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Gangs mix another potent sedative into U.S. street drugs causing 'mass overdoses'
Medetomidine, a chemical long used by veterinarians and doctors, is now turning up in the street drug supply and triggering a new wave of overdoses.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Gangs mix another potent sedative into US street drugs causing "mass overdoses"
Medetomidine, a chemical long used by veterinarians and doctors, is now turning up in the street drug supply and triggering a new wave of overdoses.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Biden will hold a rally to launch his campaign's Black voter outreach effort
The Biden campaign wants to win North Carolina. Improving turnout among Black voters will be key.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

New Yorkers have had a chance to take in a spectacular sunset
For anyone in Manhattan, it's time to take in the striking sunset known as Manhattanhenge. For the last couple of days, the sun has set exactly along the cross streets of Manhattan.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

What is Manhattanhenge? Here's when and where you can see the phenomenon


NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

What is Manhattenhenge? Here's when and where you can see the phenomenon


NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Where is the Biden administration's red line when it comes Palestinian deaths in Gaza?
Did an Israeli airstrike on a refugee camp near Rafah cross a red line with the Biden administration? NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Aaron David Miller of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Major League baseball's record book is being shaken up
The league is expected to incorporate stats of around 2,300 players from the Negro Leagues from the years 1920 to 1948.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

In Texas, Cooke County was especially hard hit by severe weather
As Texas deals with the aftermath of a series of deadly storms, NPR's Steve Inskeep checks in with Cooke County Sheriff Ray Sappington.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Morning business brief
The Biden campaign plans a summer of outreach to Black voters. Pope Francis apologizes for using a homophobic slur to refer to gay men during a private meeting. South Africa holds national elections.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong and Count Basie are unsung heroes of the civil rights
A new book by Larry Tye -- The Jazzmen -- traces how the popularity of musicians Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong and Count Basie affected the civil rights movement.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Examining the success of sanctions on Russia after it invaded Ukraine
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with David Wessel about the effectiveness of U.S. sanctions against Russia. Wessel is director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Iran launches aggressive crackdown on women who defy strict Islamic dress code
Iran last month launched an aggressive new crackdown on women who defy the country's strict Islamic dress code.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Why are catalytic converters such an attractive target for thieves?
NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Benjamin Preston of Consumer Reports, about why catalytic converter thefts remain a nationwide problem.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Why China, and now Taiwan, are making their own chatbots using their own data
Taiwan aims to build its own ChatGPT-like model. Researchers say it is essential for national security -- highlighting how geopolitical competition over data and computing power is heating up.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Some of the oldest trees on Earth -- the giant sequoias -- are facing new challenges
Because of a change in the climate, giant sequoias have become more vulnerable to insects, disease and wildfire.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Pope Francis issued an apology for using a slur referring to gay men
Pope Francis is apologizing for a slur he used while referring to gay men during a meeting with Italian bishops earlier this month.

NPR U.S. News
May 29, 2024

Want to see more butterflies in your yard? Lazy gardening may be the answer
Need an excuse to do less yard work? It might actually help butterflies and other pollinators.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Fashionistas get ready: It's safe to break out the white clothing.
Memorial Day is over so it's time to break out your summer whites. Do the old rules about when to wear white still apply? And what's the story behind these clothing conventions?

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Closing arguments set to begin in former President Trump's historic criminal trial
Both sides present their final arguments to jurors in former President Donald Trump's hush money trial, paving the way for jury deliberations. We examine the prosecution's strategy.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Villagers are still rescuing people from last week's landslide in Papua New Guinea
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with U.N. humanitarian adviser Máté Bagossy about his recent visit to the site of a deadly landslide in Papua New Guinea and the need for aid there.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

A new Banksy Museum has opened in NYC … minus Banksy
A museum showcasing replicas of Banksy's work recently opened in New York City. But like its Paris sister location, the new exhibition lacks any approval or authorization from the artist, who has explicitly denounced any commercial use of his art-- and therefore raises a number of questions about who owns street art and who gets to profit from it.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Animals caught up in trading of illegal wildlife must be care for
When authorities find wildlife being illegally trafficked at ports or airports, the animals are often in terrible shape. A project in Southern California aims to get seized wildlife immediate care.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Animals caught up in trading of illegal wildlife must be cared for
When authorities find wildlife being illegally trafficked at ports or airports, the animals are often in terrible shape. A project in Southern California aims to get seized wildlife immediate care.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Voters in some states will have a say on abortion access through ballot initiatives
As many as 10 states could hold referendums on abortion rights this fall -- possibly redrawing the map for abortion access and influencing other presidential and congressional elections on the ballot.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Woodpeckers aiming to make a lot of noise, switch from wood to metal
If you've been hearing strange noises in your house lately -- like a loud metallic hammering -- it may be a certain creature exhibiting an unusual seasonal behavior.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

'Body Electric': How our headphone habits affect our hearing
The World Health Organization says more than 1 billion teens and young adults are at risk of permanent hearing loss due to "unsafe listening practices." Is it time to change our headphone habits?

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

The basketball world has lost one of its most colorful personalities. Bill Walton has died
Two-time NBA champion Bill Walton has died at the age of 71 after a prolonged battle with cancer.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

How the extraction of lithium in Chile is tearing communities apart
Chile is the worlds second largest lithium producer. Its discovery has been a welcome boon to the economy, but a disaster for many in the local communities.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Airstrike on Rafah leads to international outcry and condemnation of Israel
Fallout continues from an Israeli airstrike on Rafah that killed at least 45 Palestinians in a makeshift encampment for displaced people.

NPR U.S. News
May 28, 2024

Mexico could elect its first female president after this weekend's election
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to professor Brenda Estefan and Lila Abed of the Wilson Center's Mexico Institute, about the cross-border concerns framing Mexico's election.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

Why eagles have largely gone extinct from Western Europe
The war in Ukraine is causing a change in the migration path of the Greater Spotted Eagle. This makes conservation efforts more difficult.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

Russia moves to consolidate its influence globally
NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Alexander Gabuev, director of the Carnegie Russia Eurasia Center, about Russia's attempts to consolidate its influence around the world.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

Israeli strikes hit tents for displaced people in the southern Gaza city of Rafah
The Ministry of Health in Gaza says at least 35 Palestinians were killed and dozens more were injured by an Israeli air attacks on a camp in Rafah for displaced people.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

XU-Mass Dartmouth graduates got a surprise gift from a billionaire at graduation
A billionaire philanthropist surprised U-Mass Dartmouth graduates at commencement with $1,000 cash each. But there's a catch: They must give half away to a cause of their choice.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

Crews are searching for missing people after tornadoes hit multiple states
Authorities are assessing damage after powerful storms brought destruction to areas across Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. NPR's Michel Martin talks to Juan Betancourt of the Denton Record-Chronicle.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

A southwest Kansas newspaper printing press is an oasis in an expanding news desert
Newspapers across the country are closing or consolidating, creating vast news deserts, especially in rural communities. But one small town printing press has been able to buck this trend.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

The death toll is expected to climb from the landslide in Papua New Guinea
NPR's A Martinez talks to Stephen Dziedic of the Australian Broadcasting company about the deadly landslide in Papau New Guinea.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

One of India's most sacred animals is running into a very real problem: trains
India's dense population is threatening elephants, with more than 200 killed in train collisions over the last decade. Indian railways turned to artificial intelligence for help.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

Military repatriation: Accounting for the fallen and honoring their sacrifice
Efforts to find the remains of missing U.S. service members and reunite them with their families have shifted from Vietnam War-era cases to older ones from WWII and the Korean War.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

Researchers study how the German cockroach spread globally
A new study shows the origins of the most widespread cockroach in the world, the German cockroach.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

How the 1924 Immigration Act changed the course of history
It's been 100 years since the 1924 Immigration Act was signed into law. It shaped the U.S. immigration system and established racial quotas.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

Biden's China tariff decision isn't going over well with some members of his party
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Colorado Gov. Jared Polis, a Democrat who opposes President Joe Biden's tariffs on China.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

'The Hamilton Scheme: An Epic Tale of Money and Power in the American Founding'
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with historian William Hogeland about little-known facts he learned about founding father Alexander Hamilton while researching his new book, "The Hamilton Scheme."

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

South Africa's ruling party faces its greatest challenge yet in upcoming elections
If you really want to know what's going on in South Africa ahead of the election there, get in a minibus taxi, the main mode of transport in the country.

NPR U.S. News
May 27, 2024

Scientist blends climate change curiosity with his love of classical music
A professor who studies the effects of solar radiation on climate composed a string quartet piece using climate data converted to sound in a process called "sonification."

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Top U.N. court orders Israel to halt military assault on Rafah
The International Court of Justice ruled Israel must halt its assault on the southern Gaza city, calling the humanitarian situation "disastrous." Israel must report on measures to respect the order within one month.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Top U.N. court orders Israel to halt Rafah offensive
The International Court of Justice ruled Israel must halt its assault on the southern Gaza city, calling the humanitarian situation "disastrous."

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

A college baseball team vies for an NCAA title as the school prepares to close
It's postseason for college baseball and one team in Division 3 is playing without a school. The Panthers of Birmingham Southern College found out in March about the closure of their institution.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Campaigns are starting earlier than ever -- due, in part, to early voting
Not so many years ago, it was traditional for political pros to say the presidential campaign begins after Labor Day. Not anymore. Campaigns must start sooner.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Bill classifying abortion pills as 'controlled dangerous substance' OK'd in Louisiana
Louisiana lawmakers have voted to classify two drugs -- mifepristone and misoprostol --commonly used to induce abortions as "dangerous controlled substances."

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Life lessons from a father known as the cool dad
A father shares life lessons and dad jokes with his daughter

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

NCAA and 5 conferences agree to settle antitrust suits brought by ex-college athletes
The NCAA and the nation's five biggest conferences announced Thursday night that they have agreed to pay nearly $2.8 billion to settle a host of antitrust claims.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Justice Department sues concert ticket behemoth Live Nation-Ticketmaster
The Justice Department and 30 states sue to break up Ticketmaster and its parent company, Live Nation, accusing them of running an illegal monopoly and driving up prices for fans.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Delegates race to complete a global treaty on how to prevent the next pandemic
For over two years, negotiators from around the world have been trying to reach an agreement on a pandemic treaty. The deadline is approaching, and there remain many sticking points.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

It's been nearly 4 years since protests began after the killing of George Floyd
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Princeton professor Eddie Glaude Jr. about continued racial discrimination -- four years after George Floyd's death.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

14-time French Open champion Rafael Nadal goes into the tournament unseeded
NPR's A Martinez talks to Jon Wertheim of Sports Illustrated about Rafael Nadal's return to the French Open. The men's singles tournament starts Sunday.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Examining the legacy of Iran's late president Ebrahim Raisi
NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Tara Sepehri Far of Human Rights Watch about political dissent under Iran's late president.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Can decorum and civility be restored on Capitol Hill?
Attacks on personal appearance are becoming more common in today's political environment. NPR's Michel Martin talks to Democratic strategist Grisella Martinez about what's happening to decorum.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

Morning news brief
NCAA and others agree to settle antitrust suits. Louisiana lawmakers vote to classify two drugs used to induce abortions as dangerous controlled substances. DOJ sues concert ticket behemoth.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

A new wave of overdoses is triggered by a tranquilizer used on animals
Medetomidine a chemical long used by veterinarians, is now turning up in the street drug supply and triggering a new wave of overdoses.

NPR U.S. News
May 24, 2024

It's been 2 years since a gunman killed 19 students and 2 teachers in Uvalde, Texas
Two years after the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, many have lost interest in seeking accountability for the botched police response.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

A new Justice Department lawsuit aims to end the Live Nation-Tickemaster monopoly
The Justice Department and several states have filed a lawsuit against Live Nation, the parent company of Ticketmaster.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

New research suggests that microplastics could be affecting male fertility
It's the latest corner of the human body where tiny bits of plastic have turned up -- the testicles. Exposure to environmental toxins like microplastics are believed to be contributing to the global decline in sperm count in humans.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds warns damage from deadly tornado is extensive
Violent storms and tornadoes swept across Iowa on Tuesday, leaving multiple people dead and dozens injured. The city of Greenfield in southwestern Iowa took a direct hit from a powerful twister.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Prospective homebuyers must move fast because of a shortage of homes for sale
There aren't a lot of homes on the market. But those that are for sale are selling fast. And competition among would-be buyers is keeping prices high.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

A song praising North's leader Kim Jong Un is a surprise viral hit
The South Korean government has banned a music video praising North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The video has been a surprising global hit, going viral on TikTok and other platforms.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Russia is practicing nuclear drills near the border with Ukraine
Russia is carrying out drills with tactical battlefield nuclear weapons near the border with Ukraine. European leaders stated recently that they may be open to a more direct role in the conflict.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Flag displays at Justice Alito's homes concern judicial watchdogs
Flags like some of those carried by January 6th rioters have been spotted flying outside homes belonging to Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, raising concerns among judicial watchdogs.


NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

After the pandemic students are starting to come back to college, report shows
A new report finds college enrollment numbers, which plummeted during the pandemic, are slowly but steadily ticking back up.


NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Bronx rally is the latest example of Trump campaign balancing criminal trial demands
Former President Trump's criminal trial keeps him in New York City much of the week. This means campaign stops at a Harlem Bodega, and a rally in the Bronx.


NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Sean 'Diddy' Combs is accused of sexual assault a new lawsuit
Sean "Diddy" Combs is accused of sexual assault a new lawsuit. It's the latest case in a growing number of claims against Combs who was previously denied all allegations.


NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Sean 'Diddy' Combs is accused of sexual assault in new lawsuit
Sean "Diddy" Combs is accused of sexual assault a new lawsuit. It's the latest case in a growing number of claims against Combs who was previously denied all allegations.


NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Britain's Prime Minister Rishi Sunak announces elections in July
The U.K. will hold a general election in six weeks, much earlier than expected. The Conservative Party, which has ruled for 14 years, is trailing in the polls against the opposition Labour Party.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Fatah's view on the ICC prosecutor seeking arrest warrants for Israel-Hamas leaders
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Sabri Saidam, a senior official with Fatah, a rival political party of Hamas, who says he welcomes international scrutiny of Israel's actions in Gaza.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Trump rival, former S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley, says in November she'll vote for Trump
Former Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley says she'll vote for Donald Trump in the November presidential election.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2024

Why Zombie second mortgages are threatening thousands of Americans' homes
A new NPR investigation finds thousands of homeowners face foreclosure over so-called zombie second mortgages. The loans come back to life after they get bought up by debt collectors.



NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

Meet ZiG, Zimbabwe's latest baffling currency
The ZiG is Zimbabwe's latest currency — yet another attempt to unravel the economic catastrophes of the past decades. (Story aired on All Things Considered on May 21, 2024.)

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

3 European nations break with U.S. and formally recognize an independent Palestine
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to White House National Security Communications Adviser John Kirby about the countries recognizing Palestinian statehood. The U.S. has said it wants a two-state solution.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

Classified documents case: Lawyers for Trump will be in a Florida courtroom
The legal team for former President Donald Trump is asking a federal judge to dismiss charges against him for mishandling classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago resort.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

What do border politics look like along the U.S.-Mexico border?
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with two members of a political family in Nogales, Ariz., whose lives and careers have been shaped by immigration policy.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

A canned water brand says it's giving away a fighter jet — for real
The company Liquid Death is giving away a $400,000 L-39 Aero Jet nicknamed "The Dehydrator." Apparently because its thrust will relieve you of your bodily fluids. You know so you need water. Get it?

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

A popular place to see Japan's Mount Fuji used to be in front of a convenience store
Visitors named the spot in Fujikawaguchiko "Mt. Fuji Lawson" after the store's name. The town, however, put up black netting to block the view after residents complained tourists would break laws.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

UC Santa Cruz workers strike in solidarity with pro-Palestinian protesters
NPR's A Martinez talks to PK Hattis of the Santa Cruz Sentinel about academic workers at UC Santa Cruz, who are striking in solidarity with pro-Palestinian protestors.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

Vietnam's top security official is confirmed as president
To Lam, who oversaw police and intelligence operations at a time when rights groups say basic freedoms had been suppressed, was confirmed amid a major reshuffle of the country's top leadership.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

Spain, Norway and Ireland will recognize an independent Palestinian state
Norway, Ireland and Spain recognized a Palestinian state Wednesday in a historic move that drew immediate condemnation from Israel and jubilation from the Palestinians. Slovenia and Malta may follow.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2024

Summer fire season nears as many wildland firefighting jobs are vacant
The forecast for a hotter-than-normal summer has Westerners on edge, especially with up to a quarter of all U.S. federal wildland firefighter jobs currently unfilled.

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