NEWS: NPR U.S. NEWS
Setup News Ticker
   NEWS: NPR U.S. NEWS
NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Biden Pick To Head The Bureau Of Land Management Is Closer To Confirmation
Tracy Stone-Manning, who currently works for the National Wildlife Federation, has come under Republican fire for her ties to a radical environmental group when she was a graduate student 1989.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Transportation Tie-Ups Are Causing Headaches For The Export Business
The bottlenecks aren't just making it hard for Americans to get their hands on imported products. They're also hurting exporters whose containers may leave U.S. ports empty.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

The Afghan Government Retains Significant Military Capabilities, CIA Chief Says
In an exclusive NPR interview, CIA Director William Burns addresses Taliban advances in Afghanistan, and what U.S. intelligence can do once the U.S. military leaves the country.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Instagram Influencer Raises Money For Piano Player Who Needs Dialysis
When author/podcaster Carlos Whittaker met Tonee Carter, a piano player at Atlanta's airport, he learned Carter has kidney disease. With the help of his followers, Whittaker raised $60,000 for Carter.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Sulfur-Crested Cockatoos In Sydney Learn How To Pry Open Garbage Bins
The journal Science explains how Cockatoos are getting good at opening trash can lids. The birds learn from each other how to open the lid, hold it and walk along the side before flipping it over.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Georgia County Tried To Help Everyone Facing Eviction. Now A Crisis Looms
A federal moratorium on evictions ends next week. But $50 billion from Congress to help Americans behind on rent isn't reaching many who need it. One problem: local rules that deny people the help.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Their Nearly 50-Year Friendship Stays Strong Thanks To Simple Gestures
Greg Klatkiewicz and Gary "Zooks" Bezucha have been friends since 1972. At StoryCorps, the pair talk about how their bond has carried them through good times and bad.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

There Are Objections To The Proposed Flint Water Crisis Settlement
A federal judge is considering final approval of a $641 million settlement of lawsuits tied to the Flint Water Crisis, but some who are involved are raising objections to key elements of the deal.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

The Investigation Continues Into The Haitian President's Assassination
Jovenel Moïse will be mourned Friday in a funeral mass. The investigation into his killing has led to more than two dozen arrests, but no real answers as to who was responsible.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

When Your Book Publishes In A Pandemic — Authors Talk About Terrible Timing
A league of unfortunate writers had their books come out in the height of the coronavirus crisis — there are even several online support groups for authors who published mid-pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

How Unemployment Can Disproportionately Affect Neighboring States
The recovery from the pandemic-induced recession can differ from state to state. We dig into the reasons behind the vast disparities in jobless rates in New Hampshire and neighboring Massachusetts.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

News Brief: CIA's Afghan Operations, Moïse's Funeral, Tokyo Olympics
As the security situation devolves, the CIA will remain in Afghanistan to gather intelligence. There's a funeral mass for Haiti's assassinated president. Also on Friday, the Olympics officially begin.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Atlanta Teenagers Make History At Harvard Debate Competition
Two high school students from Atlanta made history at the prestigious Harvard International Debate Competition. Jayla Jackson and Emani Stanton are the first duo of Black females to win.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

A New Season Begins For The Much-Loved Sitcom 'Ted Lasso'
Emmy-nominated Ted Lasso begins its second season on Friday. Does it live up to Season One's hype?

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

A Shortage Of Aviation Fuel Temporarily Grounds Some Firefighting Efforts
Refineries are still ramping up after the pandemic tanked fuel demand. That's causing shortages at the airports where firefighting tanker planes and helicopters fill up.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Defense Attorneys Representing Capitol Riot Defendants Are Receiving Threats
The lawyers have been busy with court hearings, filings and talks with prosecutors. Some have had to deal with nasty emails, late-night phone calls and even death threats.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Farmers Look For Ways To Protect Their Livestock During Climate Change
As summers become hotter due to climate change, farmers are finding it more difficult to keep their animals cool. Some are investing in new facilities and technologies to keep livestock safe.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 23, 2021

Christone 'Kingfish' Ingram Reflects On Leaving - And Sharing - '622'
Clarksdale, Miss., where blues guitarist-singer Christone 'Kingfish' Ingram hails from, is "pretty much the mecca of the blues," Ingram says in an interview with NPR's A Martinez on Morning Edition.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

French Media Report President Macron's Cellphone Was A Spyware Target
Macron has ordered an investigation into reports that his phone was on a list of potential targets for the Pegasus spyware. At least 15 ministers in his government also may have been spied on.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

U.S. Surgeon General Is Confident The U.S. Will Move Past Vaccination Plateau
NPR's A Martinez talks to to U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy about the spread of COVID-19, and vaccine hesitancy. As case counts rise, the White House pushes for more Americans to get vaccinated.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

Delta Variant Grows Rapidly Inside A Person's Respiratory Tract, Study Says
A study from China offers clues as to why the delta variant of the coronavirus is spreading so quickly around the world. The highly contagious strain accounts for more than 80% of U.S. COVID-19 cases.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

Security Guards At Japan's Azuma Sports Park Spot A Brown Bear
Perhaps the bear is an Olympic softball fan and wanted to watch Japan play Australia. Or maybe it was looking for food. Organizers tried using loud music and firecrackers to shoo it away

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

'Hot Vax Summer' Is Here And People Are Ready To Date
Google tweeted that search interest in dating is at a five-year high in the United States. A lot of people are googling "virtual first date ideas" and "how to date."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

An Analysis Of New Books About Donald Trump's Presidency
Several books about the Trump administration's final year, some including interviews with the ex-president, are arriving in bookstores. How do they change what we know about the Trump White House?

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

ESPN's Maria Taylor Is Leaving The Network After A Colleague's Remarks About Race
Sports anchor Maria Taylor quit ESPN after contract talks broke down and a white colleague suggested that Taylor was promoted because she is Black.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

As The Taliban Capture More Territory, Afghan Journalists Face More Risks
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Najib Sharifi, president of the Afghan Journalists Safety Committee, about the dangers of being an Afghan journalist as the Taliban gain ground in Afghanistan.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

Families In Lebanon Aim To Celebrate Eid Despite The Steep Costs
The Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha finds people in Lebanon mired in an economic crisis that makes eating or paying rent difficult — let alone taking part in family celebrations.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

Funkadelic's 'Maggot Brain' At 50: R&B, Psychedelic Rock And A Black Guitarist's Cry
Aiming to make a record that fans would still listen to decades later, George Clinton and Funkadelic mixed R&B, psychedelic rock and a Black guitar hero's cry.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

House Panel To Probe Capitol Riot And What's Next For Infrastructure Bill?
Only one Republican will serve on a House committee charged with investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. And, the Senate had its first test vote on the bipartisan infrastructure package.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

Missouri's Daily COVID Cases Have More Than Doubled In The Last 2 Weeks
NPR's Noel King talks to Republican Rep. Billy Long of Missouri about what is driving vaccines hesitancy among his constituents as the delta variant continues to spread.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

News Brief: House's Jan. 6 Probe, Opioid Settlement, ESPN Departure
Two GOP nominees are rejected from a panel set to probe the Capitol riot. States reach a $26 billion national opioid settlement. Maria Taylor is leaving ESPN after a colleague's remark about race.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

Smoke Season Has Begun In Many Western States
Smoke from wildfires is driving people indoors in places where COVID-19 vaccination rates are low, potentially heightening the risk of more infections.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

States And Companies Reach A $26 Billion National Opioid Settlement
As overdose deaths climb, four of the nation's largest health corporations have agreed to a landmark $26 billion payout that state officials say will help ease America's deadly opioid epidemic.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

U.S.-German Deal Will Lead To The Completion Of Russian Gas Pipeline
The U.S. and Germany have reached an agreement that will allow a controversial Russian natural gas pipeline, Nord Stream 2, to be completed, without incurring American sanctions.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

Why Looking Back On The Past Makes You Feel Better In The Present
NPR's online Joy Generator draws on nostalgia to help you feel happy. There's evidence nostalgia can be a powerful tool for coping with stress. That's why NPR included nostalgia triggers in its app.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 22, 2021

The Indicator From Planet Money Probes Inflation's Sneaky Cousin: Shrinkflation
When companies don't want to directly raise prices, they often shrink the size of the product while keeping the same price. This tendency to downsize products has come to be known as shrinkflation.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Corporate Boards Find It Difficult To Limit Executives' Risk-Taking Hobbies
The risk calculus for companies whose leaders participate in perilous activities is more complicated today, as corporate titans Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos have completed their travels to space.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Health Care Workers Are Again Coping With Too Many COVID-19 Deaths
NPR's Noel King checks in with Dr. Jamil Madi, a critical care specialist at a hospital in Harlingen, Texas, about current levels of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and vaccinations.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

The National Zoo Needs Help Naming 3 Baby Black-Footed Ferrets
The public can vote on a list of names through July 25. Some options include Aster, Albus and Cottonwood. The ferrets, two males and one female, are living at a conservation unit in Virginia.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Facebook Flags Gardening Group For Violating Its Standards
WNY Gardeners in western New York has more than 7,500 members. The word "hoe" is what got them into trouble. Facebook's algorithms sometimes flag that word as "violating community standards."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Ex-Trump Adviser Is Charged With Acting As An Agent For A Foreign Government
Thomas Barrack, who chaired former President Donald Trump's inauguration committee, has been arrested on federal charges that he acted as an agent of the United Arab Emirates.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Florida Reports A Four-Fold Increase In COVID-19 Cases From A Month Ago
Florida is responsible for one in five new COVID-19 cases, according to the White House. In Miami, the number of those being hospitalized has doubled, and health officials are raising alarms.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Drought And Extreme Heat Conditions Challenge Efforts To Fight Bootleg Fire
The Bootleg fire burning in southern Oregon is growing by miles a day and generating its own weather. It is the largest wildfire currently burning in the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

As China's Communist Party Marks 100 Years, Why Has It Lasted So Long?
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to George Washington University Professor Bruce Dickson about the longevity of the Chinese Communist Party. He is the author of the new book: The Party and the People.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Biden's Bipartisan Infrastructure Package Faces 1st Test Vote In The Senate
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is pressing ahead with a procedural vote on the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal. Republicans want it delayed until work on a final bill is completed.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

A Fully Vaccinated White House Employee Tests Positive For COVID-19
Known as a breakthrough case, it underscores another messaging challenge for the Biden administration. Only after news of this case leaked out in the media, did the White House acknowledge it.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Possible New Cases Of The Havana Syndrome Are Reported In Vienna
The State Department is looking into new reports of the mysterious Havana Syndrome. NPR's A Martinez talks to Adam Entous of The New Yorker about health complaints from U.S. diplomats in Vienna.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Rain During Monsoon Season Is Becoming Less Reliable, Less Effective
It's monsoon season in the Southwest, a vital source of moisture that keeps pastures and rivers healthy and wildfires in check. But climate change is making it harder to count on the season's rain.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

The Milwaukee Bucks Are The New NBA Champions
The Bucks won their first NBA title in 50 years — beating the Phoenix Suns 105-98 in Game 6. After being down two games to none, the Bucks stormed back to take the next four straight.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Tokyo Olympic Games Grapple With Pandemic Safety Protocols
Competition got underway Wednesday in Tokyo for the pandemic-delayed Summer Olympics — two days before the Opening Ceremony. Participants are streaming into Japan under heightened COVID-19 concerns.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Study Suggests That India's Pandemic Death Toll Is Higher Than Official Data
NPR's Noel King talks to Arvind Subramanian of Brown University's Watson Center and former chief economic adviser to the government of India, about the likely undercount of COVID-19 deaths in India.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

Rwandan Activist's Phone Is 1 Of About 150,000 To Be Infected With Spyware
NPR's Noel King talks to activist Carine Kanimba whose phone was infected with spyware. Her father is an imprisoned dissident, whose story inspired the film Hotel Rwanda.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 21, 2021

The End Of The Afghan War Reawakens Painful Memories
Most U.S. troops are out of Afghanistan. The survivors of a deadly helicopter crash there 15 years ago reflect on the close of the 20-year war, and why for them, time does not heal all wounds.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

China Denies Cyberattack Accusations, And Says It Too Is A Victim Of Hacking
The U.S. and other Western powers accused China of widespread cyberattacks. Now China is accusing the U.S. of the same offense.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

A Hard-Line Jewish Nationalist Is Accused Of Stoking Anger Between Jews And Arabs
An extreme right-wing member of Israel's parliament is accused of stirring up violence. He, however, says he's standing up for his view of Israel as a Jewish state.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Even The Vaccinated Need To Mask Up, Urges Former U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams
With the highly contagious delta variant fueling a rise in cases, Dr. Jerome Adams says, "We cannot afford to send the message that if you're vaccinated you have no worries and no responsibilities."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

The Highly Contagious Delta Variant Is Pushing U.S. Coronavirus Cases Higher
NPR's A Martinez speaks to Dr. Jerome Adams, former U.S. surgeon general, who says a CDC decision to lift mask guidance for vaccinated persons may be "harmful."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

The CDC Must Rethink Its Mask Guidance, Says Former U.S. Surgeon General
Jerome Adams, who served under former President Donald Trump, once advised against mask-wearing. With cases rising, fueled by the delta variant, Adams says even the vaccinated may need to mask up.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

The Debate Over Wording In Bruce Springsteen's 'Thunder Road' Is Settled
The song begins: "A screen door slams, Mary's dress ... and, what is Mary's dress doing: swaying or waving. The Boss's co-producer Jon Landau told The New Yorker that the correct word is "sways."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Olympic Athletes Want Gold, But For Now They Have To Settle For Cardboard
The bed frames in the Olympic Village are made of recyclable cardboard. People online speculated that they were designed to prevent activities other than sleeping.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Residents Of Gates, Ore., Sue Pacific Power Over 2020 Wildfires
As wildfires rage in the West, one Oregon town is raising new questions about what caused last year's historic fires. Residents have filed lawsuits blaming the local utility for the devastation.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Former U.N. Adviser Says Global Spyware Is A Threat To Democracy
David Kaye, now a law professor at the University of California, Irvine, says privately sold software that's being used to spy on journalists, dissidents and others is a threat to democracy.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Kitamura Is Out With Another Novel That Transcends Languages And Borders
NPR's Noel King speaks to author Katie Kitamura about her new novel: "Intimacies."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

News Brief: Haiti's Prime Minister, Opioid Lawsuit Negotiations, Bezos Flight
The power struggle in Haiti has been resolved. Negotiators appear close to a settlement for opioid lawsuits. Blue Origin is set to make its first sub-orbital flight with passengers on board.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Global Settlement Would Resolve Ongoing And Future Opioid Crisis Lawsuits
Negotiators appear close to a final opioid settlement meant to resolve a tsunami of lawsuits against some of the nation's biggest drugmakers and distributors.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Global Spyware Is A Threat To Democracy, Former U.N. Advocate Says
NPR's Noel King talks to law professor David Kaye, a former U.N. rights expert, who calls privately sold software being used to spy on journalists, dissidents and others a "threat to democracy."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Haiti's Power Struggle Is Over: Ariel Henry Will Become Prime Minister
There appears to be a political truce between the two men who say they were the prime minister following the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse. Claude Joseph will step down.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Jeff Bezos Will Briefly Leave Earth Aboard Historic Blue Origin Flight
Billionaire Jeff Bezos and three crewmates are set to travel in the New Shepard spacecraft to the edge of space for what will be the inaugural flight of the Amazon founder's company Blue Origin.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Joy Generator: How Soothing Sounds Can Bring Inner Peace
NPR's Joy Generator offers calming sounds to put your brain and heart at ease. How can sounds bring inner peace? One answer might be something known as A.S.M.R.: autonomous sensory meridian response.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Bighorn Sheep Count In California Is Canceled After A Volunteer Dies
Extreme heat is causing problems for wildlife researchers. Outside San Diego, a volunteer died from heat stroke and the annual bighorn sheep count is now canceled.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

Sen. Warner Navigates Bipartisan Talks For Infrastructure And Spending Bills
For centrist Democratic Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, balancing two big negotiations — the bipartisan infrastructure bill and the Democrats' broader $3.5 trillion spending bill — is a challenge.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

There Is A New Effort To Target Gun Trafficking In Chicago
Law enforcement is targeting illegal guns as violent crime rises in cities across the country. Residents of hard-hit neighborhoods in Chicago are stepping up to fight gun violence, too.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 20, 2021

The Life Cycle Of A COVID-19 Vaccine Lie
Where do myths about coronavirus vaccines come from and why do they spread? NPR takes a look at how rumors about vaccines and fertility reached the public earlier this year.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

Female Soldiers Are Excited About New Body Armor That Is Designed For Them
The military says it's changing to make the nation's fighting force more inclusive. Among those changes, the design of body armour to fit women could also save lives.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

Sen. Klobuchar Is In Georgia To Get Evidence From Voting Rights Discussions
NPR's Noel King talks to Sen. Amy Klobuchar, chairwoman of the Rules Committee, who will preside over a field hearing in Atlanta about GOP efforts in Georgia to restrict voting access in the state.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

3 Women Found Out They Were Dating The Same Man. What Happened Next?
They became friends and fixed up an old bus, and went on a months-long road trip across the U.S. Their ex-boyfriend told The Washington Post, "I think the best thing right now is to say nothing."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

How Do You Define The Word Snack?
If you thought snack is slang for "a sexy and physically attractive person," you are correct. That's because Dictionary.com has added over 300 new words and definitions.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

News Brief: COVID Surge And The Unvaccinated, German Floods, DACA Ruling
The delta variant is sparking concerns of a new COVID-19 wave in the U.S. Historic flooding devastates parts of West Germany. And, a federal judge ruled last week that the DACA program is illegal.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

Private Spyware Was Used To Hack Cellphones Of Journalists, Activists Worldwide
NPR's A Martinez talks to Washington Post reporter Craig Timberg about a global media investigation into how spyware was used to hack the cellphones of journalists, human rights activists and others.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

A Federal Judge In Texas Rules Against The Obama-Era DACA Program
The White House plans to appeal a ruling that limits DACA protections for immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children, moving immigration higher on the president's list of priorities.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

'Morning Edition' Welcomes A Martinez As A New Host
Morning Edition welcomes a new host to its ranks Monday morning: A Martinez. NPR's Noel King asks him some get-to-know-you questions.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

A Major League Baseball First: An All-Female Broadcast Team
Tuesday night will be the first time that an all-female crew will broadcast a MLB game. The match-up between the Tampa Bay Rays and the Baltimore Orioles will be available exclusively on YouTube.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

Advocates Criticize Funding Program To Revitalize Indigenous Language Programs
COVID-19 relief funding includes $20 million for indigenous language programs. Critics say the money is spread too thin to make a difference. They say the investment is too little, too late.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

Biologist In Iraq Tracks Leopards Crossing The Border From Iran
Landmines make the northern part of the Iraq-Iran border forbidding for humans, but they also seem to have created space for what's thought to be a growing population of rare leopards.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

Back Together And Blown Away: The Boston Symphony Orchestra Returns To Tanglewood
The Boston Symphony Orchestra recently returned to its storied summer home, Tanglewood, after the pandemic canceled last season. With reopening comes normalcy, as well as an opportunity for growth.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

For The First Time, An All-Female Crew Will Broadcast A Major League Baseball Game
Melanie Newman, broadcaster for the Baltimore Orioles, will handle play-by-play duties. "At some point soon, I think we're on our way to this just being a normal day in a broadcast," Newman says.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

Churches Are Doing Christmas Over With Holiday Services In July
Many churches spent December under lockdown, canceling traditional holiday services. This summer, some congregations are using loosened restrictions to hold a do-over: Christmas in July.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

St. Louis Catholic Schools Try To Confront Their Associations With Slavery
At least two St. Louis schools are named after bishops who owned and purchased slaves. Students, alumni and parents weigh in on what they would like the Archdiocese of St. Louis to do.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

The Delta Variant Raises A Lot Of Question About The Latest COVID Surge
As COVID-19 cases rise due to the delta variant, we examine who is at risk, and what's the best way to protect yourself and others. Also, with a spate of outbreaks at camp, what parents need to know.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

The Flooding In Parts Of Germany Is The Worst There In 60 Years
Authorities are assessing the toll of historic floods that devastated parts of western Germany that killed more than 150 people. German Chancellor Merkel described the situation as "terrifying."

NPR U.S. News
Jul 19, 2021

Tour De France Champion: Tadej Pogacar Wins For The 2nd Time In A Row
Tadej Pogacar, 22, pulled ahead in the general classification standings on a rainy stage eight and never gave up the leading rider's yellow jersey, winning three of the race's 21 stages.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

18-Year-Old Will Join Jeff Bezos In Space
Oliver Daemen got the seat after another passenger, who paid 28 million dollars, had a scheduling conflict.The teen will become the youngest astronaut to go to space.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

Restaurant Gives Employees 'Day Of Kindness' After Customers Made Them Cry
Customers at Apt Cape Cod were not being kind. They berated the staff and even made some cry. So the restaurant closed its doors one morning.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

Restaurant Gives Employees 'Day Of Kindness' After Customers' Made Them Cry
Customers at Apt Cape Cod were not being kind. They berated the staff and even made some cry. So the restaurant closed its doors one morning.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

How The U.S. Withdrawal From Afghanistan Affects Pakistan
As Washington completes its military withdrawal from Afghanistan, NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Asad Khan, Pakistan's ambassador to the U.S., about diplomatic developments in the region.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

Morning News Brief
Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen wants Congress to make the new child tax credit permanent. Haitian police hold the former head of President Moise's security. And, South Africa sees a violent week.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

How A Group Of Dedicated Volunteers Are Keeping California's Wildfires At Bay
The Los Angeles Fire Department depends on help from amateur radio volunteers when fire threatens communications infrastructure. NPR looks at how ham radio operators are keeping residents safe.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

Jury Rejects Capital Gazette Gunman's Mental Illness Plea
A jury has found the gunman who killed five people at the Capital Gazette in Annapolis, MD, in 2018, criminally responsible. His lawyers at argued that mental illness drove him to commit the shootings.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

Haitian Police Hold President's Palace Security Chief In Assassination Investigation
The head of assassinated Haitian president Jovenel Moise's security detail has been arrested as the investigation increasingly focuses on the failure of Moise's guards to protect him.

NPR U.S. News
Jul 16, 2021

Hospitals Have Started Posting Their Prices Online. Here's How Consumers Will Benefit
NPR's Noel King talks to Julie Appleby, a senior correspondent with Kaiser Health News, about how patients can benefit from a new law that forces hospitals to post their prices.

  • CEOExpress
  • 1 Boston Place | Suite 2600
    Boston MA 02108
  • Contact
  • As an Amazon Associate
    CEOExpress earns from
    qualifying purchases.

©1999-2021 CEOExpress Company LLC