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NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Overturned Truck Flips Commuters The Bird, Spilling 40,000 Lbs. Of Feathers
The semi scattered nearly 2,300 chickens' worth of feathers across an interstate highway Wednesday, according to authorities in Washington state. Oh, and reader beware: There be puns in this post.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Milwaukee Police Disciplined For Using Stun Gun On, Arresting NBA Player
Police confronted Sterling Brown, a rookie with the Milwaukee Bucks, in January over a parking violation. On Wednesday, Milwaukee's police chief said that the officers had acted inappropriately.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

On Capitol Hill, USA Gymnastics President Apologizes To Nassar's Victims
Executives from the U.S. Olympic Committee and the governing bodies of swimming, taekwondo and volleyball also testified about changes their organizations are making to protect athletes from abuse.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Senate Reaches Agreement On Changes To How Congress Handles Sexual Harassment Claims
Senate leaders announced a deal on legislation to overhaul how Congress investigates allegations of sexual harassment. The measure makes lawmakers personally liable for settling claims and streamlines the process for filing complaints. Top Republican and Democratic leaders hailed the deal and promised quick action.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Southern Baptist President Removed Over Language On Sexual Abuse Of Women
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary has removed its president over past advice he gave women regarding sexual abuse. He advised women to pray for their abuses and not report them to authorities.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Most States Don't Require Guns To Be Locked Up
The latest mass school shooting in Texas rekindles a debate over gun storage laws, after it was revealed the alleged shooter used his father's guns. The National Rifle Association also favors tightening how owners handle guns, but actual laws and regulations are a mixed bag.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Milwaukee Basketball Player Sues Police After Being Tased
In January, Milwaukee Buck Sterling Brown was tased by Milwaukee police who were checking on his car. Brown was arrested but not charged and questions were raised at the time about what prompted the police to tase him. Brown is now suing police as the body cam footage is about to be released.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Texas Gov. Continues Roundtable Discussions On School Shooting Prevention
In the wake of the school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott has convened a series of roundtable discussions about how to prevent and respond to school shootings. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Allen Banks, the police chief in Round Rock, Texas, about the discussion he participated in.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

'I Hope This Will Set A Precedent,' Says Trans Teen Who Won Case Over Bathroom Access
Gavin Grimm was a high school student in Virginia when his local school board denied him access to the boys' bathroom. His case has stretched for years; now a federal judge has decided in his favor.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

After Rallying At The Capitol, A Dozen Teachers Win Primary Races In Kentucky
A math teacher ousted one of Kentucky's top Republicans in a primary race. Forty-one current and former teachers were on the ballot and this is just one state where educators are running for office.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Under Trump, Family Planning Funds Could Go To Groups That Oppose Contraception
Several groups that promote natural family planning and abstinence education say newly-proposed guidelines could open the door for them to receive federal family planning funds for the first time.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Federal Court Rules In Favor Or Transgender Student In Bathroom Case
A federal court in Virginia ruled in favor of Gavin Grimm, a transgender teen who's been fighting for the right to use the school bathroom that aligns with his gender identity.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

NFL Says Players Must Stand During Anthem Otherwise Teams Will Face Fines
The NFL announced Wednesday it will require players who are on the field to "stand and show respect for the flag and the Anthem." This comes after months of debate that initially started as protests against police brutality.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Olympic Officials Grilled By Congress About Sexual Abuse Scandals
Some of the nation's top Olympic officials face tough questioning in Congress Wednesday. The sexual abuse of young athletes and their coaches is leading to some changes.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

How Opioids Are Coming Into The U.S. By Mail And Why It's So Hard To Stop
Congressional investigators say hundreds of millions of dollars of fentanyl is coming into the U.S. by mail. But why is it so hard to stop?

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

James Clapper Weighs In On What Role The Intelligence Community Serves
During his tenure, former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper presided over a tumultuous time for the intelligence community. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Clapper about his new book, Facts and Fears, and what he sees as the future of the intelligence community.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Anthem Policy Discouraging 'Avoidable' Emergency Room Visits Faces Criticism
Under the health insurer's policy, Anthem can retroactively restrict or deny coverage if the company decides that a visit to the emergency room could have been avoided.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Senate Passes $55 Billion Veterans Affairs Reform Bill
The bill will change how the VA pays for private care, expand a VA caregiver program and start a review of the VA's aging infrastructure. President Trump has said he will sign it.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

My Father Stood For The Anthem, For The Same Reason That Colin Kaepernick Sits
As a child, I found my father's love of the national anthem utterly bewildering. His was the generation of men born free but shackled by bigotry. So why did he sound so proud, singing that song?

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

For Troubled Kids, Some Schools Take Time Out For Group Therapy
A growing number of schools are offering training for emotional and social skills that can benefit kids in school and throughout their life.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Trump Son-In-Law Kushner To Regain Top Clearance Following Mueller Interview
White House senior adviser Jared Kushner met with the special counsel's office for 7 or 8 hours and may now be out of the woods legally — or on his way.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Prosecutors Defend Manafort Warrants Following Challenges Over Evidence
Paul Manafort's lawyers have challenged the warrants used by the Justice Department and FBI in raids against him. Prosecutors say the paperwork was all in order.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Echoes Of Cuba? U.S. Employee In China Hit With 'Sensations Of Sound And Pressure'
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said "the medical indications are very similar and entirely consistent" with symptoms reported by American diplomats in Cuba, where there were reports of sonic attacks.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

All NFL Players 'Shall Stand And Show Respect' For Flag And Anthem, League Says
Anyone who doesn't want to stand can stay in the locker room — but teams will be fined if athletes or staff on the field don't stand, the NFL says in its new policy.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids
A study of patients with low back pain finds that those who got physical therapy first needed fewer pricey scans and surgeries and had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs" for treatment overall.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Famed Vegas Casinos Could Be Hobbled As Thousands Of Workers Authorize Strike
The union representing the hospitality workers says they could walk out as early as June 1 if their demands, including protection against sexual harassment and technology advances, are not met.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Trump Intensifies Push On What He Calls Improper Snooping With 'Spygate' Brand
President Trump argues the story about the FBI investigating his campaign's potential conspiracy with Russia actually is a story about unlawful surveillance.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Judge Backs N.Y. Parents, Saying Their 30-Year-Old Son Must Move Out
"I don't see why they can't just, you know, wait a little bit for me to leave the house," Michael Rotondo told the judge in the case.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Missouri May Be First State To Get Serious About The Definition Of Meat
A bill that awaits a signature by the state's governor would restrict "meat" labeling on anything that doesn't come from livestock or poultry. The topic is also being considered at the federal level.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Head Of Southern Baptist Seminary Removed Over Remarks On Rape, Abuse Of Women
Paige Patterson has been under fire for past counsel to women of abuse to simply pray for their husbands. On Tuesday, a new allegation surfaced that he advised a student not to report a rape.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Southern Baptist Leader Removed Over Remarks On Rape, Abuse Of Women
Paige Patterson has been under fire for past counsel to women of abuse to simply pray for their husbands. On Tuesday, a new allegation surfaced that he advised a student not to report a rape.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Texas Governor Holds Discussion After School Shooting
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott held a meeting in response to Friday's shooting at Santa Fe high school. Dallas County Schools Superintendent Dr. Michael Hinojosa talks with Rachel Martin.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Lawsuit Challenges Laws Barring Israel Boycott
Many states have laws requiring any company contracting with the state to agree to not boycott Israel. A federal lawsuit in Arizona is the first to challenge these "anti-BDS" laws.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

News Brief: Hopes Dwindle For North Korea Meeting, Southern Primary Results, Olympics Scandal
President Trump sounded a lot less optimistic on Tuesday when asked about plans for a summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. Also, we look at primary election results in several states.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Reports: Former Cohen Business Partner To Cooperate With Prosecutors
Former federal prosecutor Renato Mariotti tells Steve Inskeep about what it means that a former business partner of Trump lawyer Michael Cohen is reportedly cooperating with the Mueller investigation.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Olympic Officials Testify On Sexual Abuse Scandal
Top U.S. Olympic and sporting officials will testify before Congress. They're expected to get tough questions about a widening sexual abuse scandal that has victimized hundreds of athletes.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Court Sides With Transgender Student In Bathroom Case
A federal court has ruled in favor of a transgender student in Virginia who wanted to use the boys' restroom at school. The school had blocked him from doing so.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

Coming To Terms With Texas School Shooting
Residents in Santa Fe, Texas are trying to make sense of last week's school shooting, which left 10 people dead. A 17-year-old student allegedly opened fire on classmates.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

VA Bill Set To Expand Support For Veterans' Caregivers
A Veterans Affairs funding bill expected to pass Congress includes an expansion of a program to pay family caregivers.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

California's Message To Hospitals: Shape Up Or Lose 'In-Network' Status
Covered California, the state's health insurance exchange, will exclude hospitals from insurance networks if they don't reduce their numbers of C-sections, back scans and opioid prescriptions.

NPR U.S. News
May 23, 2018

American Novelist Philip Roth, Author Of 'Portnoy's Complaint,' Dies At 85
Roth, one of the most influential novelists of the later part of the 20th Century, is the author of American Pastoral, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and 1969's Portnoy's Complaint.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Hunt For Escaped South Carolina Inmate Intensifies As Second Wanted Man Is Captured
After a 2 1/2-day manhunt across three states only one of the three inmates who escaped on Saturday night is still on the lam. The men escaped when a system glitch unlocked the doors to their cells.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

20 Years Ago, Oregon School Shooting Ended A Bloody Season
A year before Columbine, a streak of school shootings had America debating whether they were a blip or a trend. The last fatal mass shooting of the 1998 school year was in Springfield, Ore.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

New Studies Confirm A Surge In Coal Miners' Disease
Confirming what NPR reported in 2016, new studies show the rate of the advanced stage of the deadly disease black lung growing in central Appalachia, including more demand for lung transplants.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Brandi Chastain's Hall Of Fame Plaque Looks Like Basically Anyone But Her
The bronze depiction of the U.S. soccer legend called to mind Jimmy Carter, Eleanor Roosevelt or Gary Busey. Chastain took it in stride: "It's not the most flattering, but it's nice."

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

White House To Set Up Russia Investigation Meeting Between DOJ and Congress
The White House is brokering a meeting between the Justice Department and Congress at which lawmakers will receive highly secret information about the Russia investigation. No one, however, seems to know yet when it will take place, who will attend or what materials will be presented.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

USC Professors Call for For Resignation Over Alleged Sexual Abuse By Gynecologist
Six women are suing the University of Southern California, alleging they were victimized by a campus gynecologist who was allowed to practice for decades despite complaints.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

What The Primaries In Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky And Texas Mean For Democrats
Democrats will be tested Tuesday night, with primaries in four states. Some activists are concerned the party could nominate candidates who are too liberal just as President Trump's popularity is rising in the polls.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott Holds School Safety Discussions After Deadly Shooting
Not long after the shootings at Santa Fe High School, Texas Governor Greg Abbott said he would host a series of roundtable discussions on school safety — saying more needs to be done than just "prayers."

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

'LA Times' Investigation Finds USC Doctor
Six women are suing the University of Southern California, alleging they were victimized by a campus gynecologist who was allowed to practice for decades despite complaints.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Education Secretary DeVos Acknowledges Problems With Teacher Grant Program
In response to exclusive NPR reporting into a troubled federal grant program for public school teachers, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos told Congressional leaders Tuesday that she is aware of the program's problems and has taken steps to fix it.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Democrats Hope To Compete In Deep Red Parts Of Texas This Year
Democrats are on offense in this year's congressional campaign. The party is putting up candidates in districts where Democrats haven't even bothered to challenge Republicans in recent years.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

New Details Emerge About Suspect In Texas School Shooting That Killed 10
Authorities in Texas have said little about the suspect accused of killing 10 people at Santa Fe High School last Friday. People who knew the 17-year-old are helping to fill in the details.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Senators Reach Tentative Deal On Sexual Harassment Legislation
A Democratic and a Republican senator announced Tuesday that they reached a tentative deal to address sexual harassment in Congress.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

USC Faces Lawsuits, Calls For Resignation Over Alleged Sexual Abuse By Gynecologist
Last week, the LA Times reported that students at USC had repeatedly complained of a former campus doctor's inappropriate touching and comments, to no avail. Now, at least six women have sued.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

A Woman Has Been Named As NYSE CEO. It Only Took 226 Years
Stacey Cunningham, who started her career at the exchange as a summer intern on the ground floor, has been appointed to lead the Big Board starting Friday.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

A Woman Has Been Named As NYSE President. It Only Took 226 Years
Stacey Cunningham, who started her career at the exchange as a summer intern on the ground floor, has been appointed to lead the Big Board starting Friday.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Judge Orders Boy Who Started Oregon Wildfire To Pay $36 Million In Restitution
The judge acknowledged that the boy is unable to pay the full amount. The boy admitted throwing fireworks that started the Eagle Creek Fire, burning nearly 47,000 acres last year.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Kilauea's Wrath Threatens Power Plant — And Hawaii's Most Powerful Industry
The volcano's lava has crept near a geothermal energy plant, risking the release of dangerous fumes. Meanwhile, the fiery flow is already hurting a major tourist stop and the locals who rely on it.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Artist Robert Indiana Dies At 89: The Story Behind 'LOVE'
Fifty years ago, his LOVE painting made Robert Indiana a worldwide sensation. But for the artist, the work also had an intensely personal meaning.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Orlando Police Testing Amazon's Real-Time Facial Recognition
The low-priced, cloud-based facial recognition can track and identify people as they walk down the street. U.S. police have generally held off on using Amazon's service in real time.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Residents Of Lake Worth, Fla., Are Warned About Zombies
During a power outage Sunday, a local alert system texted residents with an advisory blaming the outage on "extreme zombie activity." The prank is being investigated.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

This Salvadoran Woman Is At The Center Of The Attorney General's Asylum Crackdown
Attorney General Jeff Sessions is personally intervening in the case of one woman from El Salvador. He is questioning whether she and other domestic violence survivors deserve asylum in the U.S.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Nothing Certain In Search For 'Regulatory Certainty' At EPA
Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt often cites the need for "regulatory certainty." But even some supporters of his sweeping rollbacks say they're creating the opposite.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

In 'Facts And Fears,' Ex-Spy Boss Clapper Comes In From The Cold, Badly Chilled
Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper recalls a lifetime of service in the spy business as he perceives Washington, D.C., crumbling around him.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Routine DNA Screening Moves Into Primary Care
The Pennsylvania-based health care chain Geisinger Health System plans to soon offer DNA sequencing as part of routine care for all patients. Is there a downside?

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Scientific Studies Confirm A Spike In Black Lung Disease
Studies, prompted in part by NPR's reports of an epidemic of advanced stages of the disease, provide further evidence of growing rates of the disease — including a bigger demand for lung transplants.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Texas Roundtable Will Discuss Ways To Address Gun Violence
After a second mass shooting this year, Gov. Greg Abbott surprised some in this pro-gun state by saying the reaction to the nation's latest school shooting needs to be more than prayers.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

Hey, Salad Lovers: It's OK To Eat Romaine Lettuce Again
The romaine that sickened 172 people in 32 states came from Yuma, Ariz., and is likely completely gone from the food supply. What's now for sale is fresh supplies from California.

NPR U.S. News
May 22, 2018

CDC Gives The All-Clear To Start Eating Romaine Lettuce Again
The warning went on for weeks, as the CDC documented 172 cases of E. coli. Fresh supplies of lettuce, harvested in Salinas Valley, Calif, are being shipped to restaurants and stores nationwide.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Crowdfunders Left Hanging By 3D Headphone Startup's Abrupt Closure
"To fail at the five-yard line is a tragedy," the company said in a statement. More than 10,000 people had shelled out $200 or more for Ossic X headphones on Kickstarter and Indiegogo.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

German Families Playing Hooky Stopped By Police At Airports, May Be Fined
Officers have launched investigations into more families caught skipping school ahead of a three-day weekend. Parents could face fines up to $1,177. U.S. parents can be fined for kids' truancy too.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Another Cause of Doctor Burnout? Being Forced To Give Immigrants Unequal Care
Undocumented patients with kidney disease often can't get treatment unless they are in a state of emergency — this bothers clinicians who want to treat all patients equally.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

For Vegas Oddsmakers, Home Team's Fairy Tale Season Becomes A Frightfest
The odds of the Vegas Golden Knights winning the Stanley Cup hovered as high as 500-to-1 last fall. Now, the team has made the final in its first season — and some bettors stand to win big.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

'We Were Expecting That She Will Return Alive': Family Mourns Slain Pakistani Student
Sabika Sheikh's family was aware of U.S. school shootings, but didn't think it would happen to their daughter. "We were confident that Sabika will be very much safe there," her great-uncle tells NPR.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Foreign Investors Shrug Off Miami's Rising Sea Levels
Sea-level rise is so acute in South Florida that local governments are eyeing hundreds of millions in spending to mitigate floodwaters. But wealthy foreign investors don't seem fazed.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Deputy AG Rosenstein Says DOJ Will Look Into Surveillance Of Trump Campaign
The President has asked the Justice Department to look into whether it improperly surveilled his campaign after published reports that a U.S. intelligence source had contact with people in the Trump campaign during the summer of 2016. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein says the department's inspector general will do that.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Luci Baines Johnson Receives Honorary Nursing Degree From Georgetown University
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Luci Baines Johnson, daughter of President Lyndon Johnson, about receiving an honorary nursing degree from Georgetown University more than half a century after she left school because the nursing school had a policy against married students.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

How Schools Across The Country Are Working To Detect Threats Made On Social Media
Some schools are working with outside technology companies to scan social media for threats against them and their students, in hopes of preventing mass shootings and student suicide.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Family Of Pakistani Exchange Student Killed In Shooting Says She Wanted To Be A Diplomat
One of the victims of the school shooting last Friday was a Pakistani exchange student. She came from a country where militants have attacked schools and killed students. And so her killing in the U.S. shocked many people in Pakistan.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Secretary Of State Mike Pompeo Has 12 Demands For A New Deal To Counter Iran
Now that the U.S. is out of the Iran nuclear deal, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is laying out his next steps. He wants European countries to work with him to pressure Iran on its other bad behavior, but the Europeans are fuming about Trump's decision to walk away from the nuclear deal.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Santa Fe Community Mourns Those Killed In Texas School Shooting
Across Texas people stopped for a moment of silence Monday to honor those killed and injured in Friday's school shooting in Santa Fe. While there are many questions about that day, many are asking, why?

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Richard Goodwin, Crafter Of Johnson's Famous 'We Shall Overcome' Speech, Dies
Speechwriter Richard Goodwin, a driving force in American politics during the upheavals of the 1960s and the husband of Doris Kearns Goodwin, has died at age 86.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Justice Department To Expand Internal Inquiry After Top-Level Meeting With Trump
Top leaders from the Justice Department, the FBI and the intelligence community met at the White House amid a new dust-up about the FBI's use of confidential informants.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Justice, FBI, Intelligence Bosses Meet At White House Amid Snooping Standoff
Top leaders from the Justice Department, FBI and the intelligence community headed for the White House amid a new dust-up about the FBI's use of confidential informants.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Trump Hints At Plan To Create 'Space Force' As Sixth Military Branch
While the Pentagon opposes the measure, the military has conducted operations in space for 50 years.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

VA's Caregiver Program Still Dropping Veterans With Disabilities
An NPR investigation last year revealed that a number of VA centers were ejecting hundreds of caregivers from the program. The VA promised reform, but a year later few have returned to the program.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

A Texas Town Mourns, And A Nation Struggles To Find New Ground In Gun Debate
Public schools in Santa Fe, Texas, are closed as the community grapples with how to move on. But authorities in Texas disagree about whether guns are to blame for the violence.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Hawaii Volcano's Lava Spews 'Laze' Of Toxic Gas And Glass Into The Air
Lava from the Kileaua volcano is pouring into the Pacific Ocean, generating a plume of "laze" — hydrochloric acid and steam with fine glass particles — into the air.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Ohio Police Help Man Who Was Being Followed Home By A Pig
The North Ridgeville Police Department received a call early Saturday morning from what they thought was an "obviously drunk guy." Turns out, the pig just wanted to be petted.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Levees Make Mississippi River Floods Worse, But We Keep Building Them
For more than 150 years, scientists have known that levees increase flood risk on the Mississippi River. That hasn't stopped local officials from building up levees in response to more severe floods.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Supreme Court Decision Delivers Blow To Workers' Rights
The high court ruled for the first time that workers may not band together to challenge violations of federal labor laws.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Bipartisan Group Of DOJ Veterans Calls For Confirmation Of Criminal Unit Nominee
A bipartisan group of former Justice Department officials is urging the Senate to confirm President Trump's nominee for the job. Brian Benczkowski performed work for a controversial Russian bank.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Bipartisan Group Of DOJ Veterans Calls For Confirmation Of Nominee
Five former Justice officials are urging senators to advance the nomination of Brian Benczkowski to head the criminal division. Benczkowski performed work for a controversial Russian bank.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

'I Don't Want To Leave My House': Santa Fe's Invisible Wounds
A gunman killed eight students and two teachers at Santa Fe High School — and scarred hundreds, perhaps thousands more.

NPR U.S. News
May 21, 2018

Is Sleeping With Your Baby As Dangerous As Doctors Say?
Many doctors in the U.S. say the practice puts an infant at risk of sleep-related death. A close look at the research reveals a different picture.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2018

To Pressure Lawmakers On Gun Control, A Push To Boycott School
The recent school shooting in Texas has reignited the debate over gun control. NPR's Don Gonyea speaks with former Education Secretary Arne Duncan about his idea to boycott school until reforms are made.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2018

South Korea Works With U.S. To Preserve Trump-Kim Meeting
South Korea's president heads to Washington this week to help president Trump keep his summit with North Korea's leader on track despite threats from the North to cancel.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2018

Trump Wants Justice Department To Probe Claims Of FBI Campaign Surveillance
President Trump says he wants the Department of Justice to open an investigation into itself and the FBI about its handling of the investigation into the Trump campaign's conduct in 2016.

NPR U.S. News
May 20, 2018

U.S., China Step Back From Trade Dispute
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says the U.S. has put a trade war with China on hold, even as the administration races to renegotiate NAFTA. Mnuchin says the U.S., Mexico and Canada remain far apart.

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