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NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Search and rescue teams from all over the world are descending on Turkey
It's a highly coordinated effort, but war and complicated politics can hamper progress. Dozens of countries have offered to help, including Taliban-ruled Afghanistan.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

House Speaker Kevin McCarthy oversaw his first State of the Union address
The role puts him in charge of a fractured Republican party with the slimmest of majorities. Residents of McCarthy's district are split between backing him and the party's more conservative members.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Biden's State of the Union address focused on middle and working-class voters
While President Biden was addressing Congress, his message was also for people watching at home — voters whose support he will need to secure a run for a second term.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Pest control technician finds 700 pounds of acorns in the wall of California home
After getting a call about an insect problem, Nick Castro cut into a wall to find tens of thousands of acorns. Castro thinks woodpeckers spent years collecting, storing and snacking on the acorns.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

A woman in England has finally returned an overdue library book
Lesley Harrison, 70, of North Tyneside borrowed the German language textbook in the 1960s. Without an amnesty on late fees, she would have had to pay over $2,400.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

After blocking Wikipedia over blasphemous continent, Pakistan lifts ban
Pakistan briefly blocked Wikipedia for what officials described as "sacrilegious" content. It was lifted after it attracted international attention, but other sites remain blocked in Pakistan

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

AMC Theatres will soon set ticket prices according to where you choose to sit
AMC is changing the way that it prices tickets, and it will be based on where you sit in a movie theater.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

A Texas group that wants to ban abortion nationwide is targeting New Mexico
A nationwide movement to enact local ordinances against abortion drugs has New Mexico's attorney general taking action. A fight in the courts may be just what abortion opponents want.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Antarctic cruises are gaining popularity, though 4 Americans recently died on them
The Coast Guard and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the deaths of four Americans during cruises to Antarctica. (Story first aired on All Things Considered on Feb. 6, 2023.)

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Biden speech acknowledges immigration and pathway to citizenship issues
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Yalidy Matos, assistant professor of at Rutgers University, who specializes in Latinx politics, about President Biden's State of the Union address.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Conductor Gustavo Dudamel will leave Los Angeles for the New York Philharmonic
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Deborah Borda, CEO of the New York Philharmonic, about conductor Gustavo Dudamel leaving the Los Angeles Philharmonic to lead New York's top orchestra.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Microsoft and Google enlist artificial intelligence to heat up search rivalry
Microsoft has announced it will use the AI tool known as ChatGPT in its Bing search engine, and Google has unveiled a competitor to ChatGPT — this could profoundly change how we use technology.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

In Hong Kong, people who took part in a primary election go on trial
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Michael Davis, a global fellow at the Wilson Center, about the trial of 16 pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

In Turkey, a mother tries to save a son trapped in the rubble
The effort to rescue a man under the rubble in the Turkish city of Antakya is just one story of thousands playing out in the vast path of the earthquake that hit Turkey and Syria.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

LeBron James holds NBA's career scoring record, passing Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
LeBron James is now the NBA's all-time scoring leader. He passed the record of 38,387 points held by Hall-of-Fame center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar since 1984. James did it in fewer games and minutes played.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

How to avoid being scammed when you want to donate to a charity
With the devastation in Turkey and Syria mounting, people around the world are sending financial donations to the region. But how can you identify the best and more reputable charities?

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Search and rescue operations in Antakya, Turkey, are incredibly dangerous
One of the worst hit parts of the earthquake zone, is the southern Turkish city of Antakya. Building after building is flattened, and one of the city's hospitals is on its side.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 08, 2023

Turkey and Syria face multiple challenges as they try to rescue quake survivors
The death toll continues to climb in Turkey and Syria after Monday's catastrophic earthquake. Rescue teams have worked around the clock, against freezing temperatures, trying to find survivors.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

State of the Union will give Biden a chance to reset the White House agenda
President Biden delivers the annual State of the Union address Tuesday night. What do we expect to hear from the president on how the country and his administration are doing?

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

Earthquake hits areas of Syria already devastated by the country's civil war
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Ammar Samo, a volunteer with White Helmets, which has been pulling victims out buildings destroyed by the war, about rescue efforts in northwestern Syria after the quake.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

A stowaway frog triggered an alarm at Harrisburg's International Airport
A TSA official said the amphibian, which was found inside a piece of checked luggage, would be forgiven. The traveling public was reminded that live animals should never go into checked luggage.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

What caused Monday's major earthquake in Turkey? Here's what we know
A devastating earthquake has struck southern Turkey and Northern Syria. It's a seismically active part of the world known for big quakes. (Story first aired on All Things Considered on Feb. 6, 2023.)

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

Audiences are asked to not sing out loud during the musical 'The Bodyguard'
Whitney Houston is known for the song "I Will Always Love You." King's theatre in Scotland asks audiences not to out-sing performers during the show, which is based on the film starring Houston.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

A Black church in Louisiana aims to educate people on how to be healthy
A new study looks at whether placing health care workers in churches can help eliminate health disparities that disproportionately affect Black communities in the South.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

A preview of the economic backdrop for this year's State of the Union address
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution, on how President Biden is likely to address the economy at Tuesday evening's State of the Union.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

Crews in Ohio successfully release toxic chemicals from derailed tankers
Authorities in Ohio conducted a controlled release of chemicals in derailed train cars to avert a catastrophe from occurring in a region near the Ohio-Pennsylvania state line

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

How car buyers can become entrapped in what's known as a 'yo-yo' sale
The Federal Trade Commission is drafting new rules for car dealers in an effort crack down on so called a "yo-yo" sales that can entrap people in bad deals.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

Fenkl's 'Skull Water' delves into friendship, belonging and displacement
NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with author Heinz Insu Fenkl about his novel Skull Water, which is based on many of his own experiences in South Korea in the 1970s.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

Hong Kong's biggest national security trial to date kicked off this week
Some of Hong Kong's most high-profile political activists went on trial Monday. The 16 defendants could face up to life in prison if convicted under the controversial national security law.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

It's been a year since the biggest debacle at the Beijing Winter Olympics
Tuesday marks a year since a fiasco at the Winter Olympics involving the team figure skating competition. Russia won but it was marred by a positive doping test. Medals still haven't been awarded.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

Ticketmaster faces a big test: Beyoncé's Renaissance tour
Beyonce tickets are on sale, but after the Taylor Swift debacle there are questions about whether Ticketmaster is up to the challenges.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

South Africa's power grid is collapsing and outages are disrupting the economy
South Africa's power crisis is crippling one of Africa's biggest economies and threatening the reelection prospects of the ruling party: the African National Congress.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

Rescuers search for survivors after a major quake hits Turkey and Syria
Damage from Monday's earthquake stretches for hundreds of miles in the two countries. Crews are searching for survivors, and offers of aid are pouring in from across the world.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 07, 2023

Residents evacuated from the Ohio train derailment scene still haven't returned home
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine about the derailment of a freight train carrying hazardous chemicals that forced the evacuation of at least 1,500 residents.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

How the chip shortage is affecting the credit card business
It used to take seven to 10 business days to get a new credit card. Because of an ongoing chip shortage, deliveries can take almost two months, and that could be the case through the end of the year.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

What we can learn about a Chinese balloon now that the U.S. has shot it down
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Dennis Blair, former director of national intelligence, after a suspected Chinese spy balloon was shot down over the Atlantic Ocean.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Earthquake strikes Turkey and Syria: Buildings collapsed for hundreds of miles
Search-and-rescue efforts were underway as the death toll soared from the powerful earthquake that hit southeastern Turkey and northern Syria early Monday.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

An Eurasian eagle-owl named Flaco has escaped New York's Central Park Zoo
Flaco got out after his enclosure was vandalized. He's been spotted on a Fifth Avenue sidewalk and around Central Park. The Zoo is attempting to lure the large owl back with some favorite treats.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Astronomers studying Jupiter discovered it has 12 additional moons
Scientists with the International Astronomical Union used telescopes based in Hawaii and Chile to see the moons, which may be fragments of larger moons that collided with one another in the past.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Beyoncé has now captured more Grammy awards than any other artist
Beyoncé is now the Recording Academy's GOAT. She won four Grammy awards Sunday night for her album RENAISSANCE — bringing her career total to 32. Harry Styles won album of the year.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

A court in Kansas is reconsidering the death penalty
The ACLU plans to make a case against capital punishment in a Kansas hearing on Monday. Prosecutors there are seeking the death penalty for a man accused of a double murder.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Does more policing make Black communities safer? Rep. Summer Lee responds
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Democratic Rep. Summer Lee of Pennsylvania about police reform — following the death of Tyre Nichols, who was severely beaten by police in Memphis, Tenn.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Examining the Wagner Group, a private military company that Russia has relied on
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to András Rácz of the German Council on Foreign Relations, about the Russian-allied paramilitary organization Wagner Group, which is operating in Ukraine.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Maine home can stay at 70 degrees without a furnace, even when it's freezing out
In the middle of a Maine winter, a super insulated house keeps its family warm. There's no furnace — just a small heat pump. The same heat pump is used to cool the home in the summer months.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Feud over ancient statue highlights historical divide between Japan and South Korea
A court battle over a centuries-old Buddhist statue illustrates how Japan and South Korea are tussling over their shared cultural heritage, and the artifacts that symbolize it.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

How former presidents have tried to use the State of the Union address in their favor
Past presidents have used their post-midterm State of the Union address to try to propel their agenda through a divided Congress — and use it as a springboard for an eventual re-election message.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

How a young musician inspired Jazz Hands for Autism nearly a decade ago
Jazz Hands for Autism is a Southern California-based nonprofit that provides music training, vocational development and job placement assistance for musicians with autism.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Gen Z's political power: new data gives insight into America's youngest voters
Generation Z, which turned out in large numbers along with millennials last election, is still new to politics. A report exclusively obtained by NPR adds more context to the youngest voting block.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 06, 2023

Theater never recovered from COVID — and now change is no longer a choice
With ticket sales way down and government relief mostly at an end, business as usual is not an option for nonprofit performing arts groups.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 05, 2023

Eggs prices drop, but the threat from avian flu isn't over yet
After months of eye-popping prices, egg lovers are finally seeing some relief. Wholesale prices in the Midwest fell by 58 cents at the end of January, but the days of a $1.50 a dozen may not return.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 05, 2023

Ex-Pakistan leader Pervez Musharraf, who aided U.S. war in Afghanistan, has died
Gen. Pervez Musharraf, who seized power in a bloodless coup and later led a reluctant Pakistan into aiding the U.S. war in Afghanistan against the Taliban, has died. He was 79.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

China says balloon spotted over U.S. is a 'civilian airship' that blew astray
The State Department announced Secretary of State Antony Blinken is no longer traveling to China, after the surveillance balloon was detected over U.S. airspace Thursday.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Tensions continue to increase between the United States and China
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to David Finkelstein, vice president of the Center for Naval Analyses, about the Pentagon saying a Chinese surveillance balloon is floating over Montana.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Spy balloon is spotted over Montana. Will it interfere with Blinken's China trip?
Secretary of State Antony Blinken will be the first Cabinet secretary in the Biden Administration to visit China. His trip this weekend comes as tensions between the U.S. and China continue to boil.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame has announced its 2023 nominees
The list includes Missy Elliot and New Order. A Tribe Called Quest is nominated for a second time. The winners will be announced in May.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Retired quarterback Tom Brady has an offer to come back out of retirement
Patriots owner and Brady superfan Robert Kraft says he'd sign Brady for one day, so he can retire as a New England Patriot. Brady won six Super Bowls with the Patriots before moving to Tampa.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Why some Democrats are on board with busing migrants away from border states
Republican governors have been transporting migrants out of states near the southern border. Some Democrats who first opposed it are now saying it's a humanitarian service, not a political statement.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Climate change and a population boom could dry up the Great Salt Lake in 5 years
Utah leaders are under pressure to end water diversions and enforce tougher restrictions in order save the drying Great Salt Lake. A recent report predicted it will completely dry in five years.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Economic forecasters think hiring slowed a little bit in January
The U.S. job market remains tight, with unemployment at or near a half-century low. The Labor Department reports Friday morning on job gains for the month of January.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

'Morning Edition' co-host Rachel Martin is moving to another role at NPR
After six years as a Morning Edition host, Rachel Martin is stepping away from her day-to-day presence on the show.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Artists file class-action lawsuit saying AI artwork violates copyright laws
Artificial intelligence has advanced enough to create a seemingly original artwork in the style of living artists within minutes. Some artists argue that these AI models breach copyright law.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Did the College Board cave to pressure to revise African American studies curriculum?
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Teresa Reed, dean of the University of Louisville's School of Music and a member of the committee that developed the College Board's AP African American studies class.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Novel 'Let It Be Morning' is turned into a movie by Israeli filmmaker Eran Kolirin
The film Let It Be Morning tells the story of a Palestinian Israeli citizen who, after Israel imposes an arbitrary blockade, becomes stuck in his home village.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Novel 'Let It Be Morning' is turned into a movie by Israeli filmmaker Erin Kolirin
The film Let It Be Morning tells the story of a Palestinian Israeli citizen who, after Israel imposes an arbitrary blockade, becomes stuck in his home village.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Remembering Wendell Scott, first Black man to compete in NASCAR's highest category
This week's StoryCorps tells the story of Wendell Scott, who drove during the Jim Crow era and was the first African American to win a race at NASCAR's elite major league level.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Parents worry that their children might struggle with anxiety, Pew report finds
NPR's A Martinez talks to Dr. Pamela Cantor, founder of Turnaround for Children, about a Pew report that finds U.S. parents' biggest concern is the mental health of their children.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Parents worry that their kids might struggle with anxiety and depression, report says
NPR's A Martinez talks to Dr. Pamela Cantor, founder of Turnaround for Children, about a Pew report that finds U.S. parents' biggest concern is the mental health of their children.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Pakistani man who was tortured by the CIA is released from Guantanamo Bay
A prisoner at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp in Cuba, who sued the Biden administration for unlawful imprisonment, has been released, and is now living in Belize.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Another whale washes up on shore along the Atlantic coastline
A humpback whale — 35 feet long — washed up on New York's South Shore this week. It was the eighteenth whale incident on the East Coast since early December.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 03, 2023

Ukraine needs more support even though Russia has fought poorly, Polish diplomat says
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Polish Ambassador to the U.S. Marek Magierowski about Poland's support of Ukraine, and its call for more military aid in the war against Russia.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Family and civil rights leaders honored Tyre Nichols at a public funeral in Memphis
Tyre Nichols' funeral was held Wednesday, roughly three weeks after he died following a beating by police that was caught on video and sparked protests and calls for accountability nationwide.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Should the U.S. worry that assistance to Ukraine could end up in the wrong hands?
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Conor Savoy of the Center for Strategic and International Studies about Ukraine's efforts to root out corruption to ensure allies their money is going to the right places.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

A knockoff of ChatGPT speaks in a different language: cat
It's called CatGPT. Ask a question, and it replies "meeeeeeeeow." A Dutch data-journalist says he started the project while learning how to make a basic website.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Michigan couple recently learned a valuable lesson: child lock your apps
They say their six-year-old son ordered nearly $1,000 worth of takeout while playing with their phone. Some of the orders were stopped by the bank.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Lara Downes' Season 3 of 'Amplify' launches with the theme Renaissance
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to pianist Lara Downes about her NPR music interview series Amplify, which will examine the Harlem Renaissance, and how artists today might be in a new Renaissance.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Haiti is in the midst of one of the worst political crises in its history
An increasing power vacuum is making things worse. There is not a single elected official with a valid term, and many people are asking: how long will the defacto prime minister cling to power?

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

How Groundhog Day came to the U.S. — and why we still celebrate it 137 years later
Punxsutawney Phil predicts more winter ahead. Groundhogs may not have a great track record when it comes to weather forecasts, but experts say the tradition sheds light on our culture and environment.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

How Punxsutawney Phil came to be an authority on the weather
It's Groundhog Day! And while groundhogs aren't always accurate weather prognosticators, they can teach us something about our climate and culture.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

FBI searched Biden's vacation home as part of the classified document probe
The FBI searched another home owned by President Biden, and took away some handwritten notes. We take a closer look at what this means for the ongoing classified documents investigation.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

California dance hall hero wants to use his platform to help his community heal
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Brandon Tsay, who disarmed the gunman at the dance hall in Monterey Park, and Chun-Yen Chen of the Asian Pacific Community Fund, about what support the AAPI community needs.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Daughter starts checking off things on her deceased father's bucket list
Thirteen years after Laura Carney's dad died, she found out about his list: Things I would like to do before I die. There were 60 items on the list, but only 5 were checked off. She got to work.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Russia and Ukraine battle daily in the sky. So where are the pilots?
Russia and Ukraine are waging a fierce war in the sky involving missiles, drones and air defense systems. Yet one thing makes this fight distinctive from previous air wars: pilots are extremely rare.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Scientists race to detect new pathogens before they can spark another pandemic
Disease researchers from South Africa were the first to identify the omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus. Scientists there are racing to detect new pathogens before they can spark another pandemic.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Tom Brady ends his football playing days but he's not done with the sport
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Michael McCarthy of Front Office Sports about Tom Brady's upcoming broadcast career. He signed a contract with Fox last year to be their lead NFL analyst.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Widespread strike in Britain was coordinated to have the greatest impact
Roughly half a million workers went out on strike in the U.K. Wednesday, the largest single day of industrial action in Britain in more than a decade.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

Lara Downes' Season 3 of 'Amplify' launches with a theme of renaissance
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to pianist Lara Downes about her interview series Amplify, which examines how Black artists today might find themselves in a new cultural renaissance.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 02, 2023

We asked the new AI to do some simple rocket science. It crashed and burned
Computers traditionally excel at rocketry, so why do new artificial intelligence programs get it wrong?

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

In first GOP-led hearing about the border, witnesses paint sharply different pictures
Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee blamed Biden administration policies for the record number of migrant apprehensions. Democrats accused them of fear-mongering and spreading misinformation.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

Tom Brady announces his retirement from the NFL (again)
Quarterback Tom Brady has announced he's retiring from professional football. He retired from the sport a year ago - but returned for one more season with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

Does the IRS audit some people more often than others?
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Evelyn Smith, an author of a new study that concludes Black taxpayers face Internal Revenue Service audits at a much higher rate compared to other demographic groups.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

Debt ceiling stalemate is one of the issues Biden and McCarthy will discuss
President Biden and House Speaker McCarthy hold a meeting at the White House Wednesday. They're hoping to reach an agreement about the federal debt limit.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

Inflation is coming down but the Fed isn't about to declare victory just yet
The Federal Reserve is expected to continue its crackdown on inflation by raising interest rates, but only by a quarter percentage point. That would be the smallest rate hike since last March.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

HBO's 'The Last of Us' revives Linda Ronstadt's hit 'Long Long Time'
It may have been a while since you heard the 1970s hit. "Long Long Time" was used three times in The Last of Us episode. An hour after the show aired, Spotify reported streams increased by 4,900%.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

Teenage chimpanzees may be fairly similar to human teens, study says
Chimpanzees take risks, have emotional outbursts and sometimes even show aggression. Researchers say that growing adolescent bodies help explain the behaviors.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

The story behind the man responsible for Black History Month
The white and Black descendents of Carter G. Woodson, the father of Black History and founder of Black History Month, come together to heal their past.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

Examining the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster 2 decades later
Seven astronauts died 20 years ago when the Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated on reentry. NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to NASA deputy administrator Pam Melroy about the loss and how NASA changed.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

Fla. Gov. DeSantis is now looking to overhaul the state's colleges and universities
Board members appointed by Gov. Ron DeSantis unveiled plans to reshape the New College of Florida. DeSantis wants to ban diversity, equity and inclusion programs and limit tenure for professors.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

More than 2,500 people are expected to attend the funeral of Tyre Nichols
NPR's A Martinez talks with Lucas Finton, a reporter for The Commercial Appeal in Memphis, Tenn., about Wednesday's funeral for Tyre Nichols, who was violently beaten by police.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

Nichol's death triggers another push for legislation to reign in police misconduct
NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Rep. Marilyn Strickland — the Congressional Black Caucus's whip — about police reform in the wake of Tyre Nichols's death.

NPR U.S. News
Feb 01, 2023

FDA announces a restructuring of the agency's food safety and nutrition division
The FDA is appointing a deputy commissioner of "human food," to oversee food safety and nutrition. The move follows the baby formula shortage crisis and other outbreaks of food-borne illness.

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