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NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

As At-Home Coronavirus Tests Hit Pharmacies, What Role Can They Play In The Pandemic?
Rapid COVID-19 tests are now available at pharmacies in the U.S. Dr. Michael Mina of Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health says these can help people wondering if they are infectious right now.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

Critics Say The U.S. Isn't Doing Enough To Help Haiti With Its Deteriorating Security
Kidnappings and a deadly crime wave is crippling Haiti. Critics say the U.S. isn't doing enough to help the hemisphere's poorest country find a solution for the current crisis.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

Hundreds Gathered At The Funeral Of Daunte Wright, Who Was Fatally Shot By Police
Hundreds of people gathered in the Shiloh Temple in Minneapolis Thursday for the funeral of 20-year-old Daunte Wright, killed April 11 when he was shot by a suburban Minneapolis police officer.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

Scientists Are Working On Booster Shots In Case COVID-19 Vaccines Lose Their Effect
Scientists are working on boosters to deal with the possibility that current COVID-19 vaccines may eventually wear off — or the virus will mutate in ways that will evade the vaccine's protections.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

How India Is Confronting Disinformation On Social Media Ahead Of Elections
As Prime Minister Modi's party tries to win control in upcoming elections in India, his party is using a highly effective social media strategy. But that's where politics can veer into disinformation.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

House Passes D.C. Statehood Bill — But The Senate Might Be Harder To Convince
The House of Representatives passed a bill to make the District of Columbia the U.S.'s 51st state. The cause has unprecedented levels of political support but meets an uphill battle facing the Senate.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

In The Wake Of Chauvin's Conviction, A Look Back At The Origins of American Policing
In the wake of Derek Chauvin's conviction for the murder of George Floyd, we examine the tension that has existed between African American communities and the police for centuries.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

HHS Secretary Talks Unaccompanied Minors At The Border, Addresses Criticisms
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Xavier Becerra how the Biden administration is housing and handling the unaccompanied migrant children crossing the border.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

Change To Census Military Counts Could Shift House Seats, Electoral College
Deployed U.S. troops were counted in a new way for the 2020 census. It could shift congressional seats and Electoral College votes to states with military bases after the first census results are out.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

President Biden's Decision To Withdraw From Afghanistan May Have Derailed Peace Talks
President Biden's announcement for U.S. and foreign forces to withdraw from Afghanistan by Sept. 11 appears to have derailed the peace process that was meant to wind down the conflict in that country.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

After Supreme Court Decision, A Former Juvenile Lifer On What A Second Chance Meant
The Supreme Court just made it easier to sentence juveniles to life in prison without parole. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with John Pace, a "juvenile lifer," released thanks to an earlier decision.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

President Biden Begins Climate Summit By Setting Ambitious Emissions Goals
President Biden hosted dozens of world leaders for a virtual climate summit as the administration tries to reassert U.S. leadership on the issue around the globe.

NPR Headline News
Apr 22, 2021

Supreme Court Rejects Restrictions On Life Without Parole For Juveniles
The court's conservatives said that a judge need not make a finding of "permanent incorrigibility" before sentencing a juvenile offender to life without parole.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Minneapolis Mayor Says He Welcomes Justice Department Policing Investigation
Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey says his city is taking more steps to change policing following the murder conviction of Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Competition With The Greatest: Podcast Winner Fact-Checked Family Lore
Every family has that story it tells a million times. For NPR's student Podcast Challenge winner Miriam Colvin, that story is of a family friend boxing against an unknown up-and-comer: Cassius Clay.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Biden Hoping For Brazil's Bolsonaro To Agree To Stop Destroying The Amazon Rainforest
The Biden administration is hoping Brazil's Jair Bolsonaro will commit to climate standards for the Amazon. Activists warn of the folly of a deal with Bolsonaro, who's long dismissed climate concerns.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Bodycam Video Released After Columbus Police Fatally Shot 16-Year-Old Ma'Khia Bryant
On Tuesday, a Columbus police officer shot and killed 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant, whose aunt says called the police for help. The body camera video has been released as the community grieves.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Bodycam Video Released After Columbus Police Fatally Shot Black Teen Ma'Khia Bryant
On Tuesday, a Columbus police officer shot and killed 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant, whose aunt says called the police for help. The body camera video has been released as the community grieves.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Location Of Harriet Tubman's Home Discovered
Archaeologists have finally uncovered the location of Harriet Tubman's house, where she spent her formative teenage years before she escaped enslavement. Their clue was a Lady Liberty coin dated 1808.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

U.S. Department Of Justice To Investigate The Minneapolis Police Department
The U.S. Department of Justice announced that it will investigate the Minneapolis Police Department for possible patterns of excessive use of force and discriminatory practices.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

The Push To Provide Free Attorneys For People Facing Eviction
Advocates say the number of places that offer free attorneys for people in court for evictions need to be expanded. Bills are pending in eight states, but there are real costs that someone has to pay.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Congressional Democrat Says The Time Is Now For Federal Police Reform
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Democratic Congresswoman Karen Bass of California about the George Floyd police reform bill she's sponsoring and her talks with Republicans to help it pass in the Senate.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

American Indicators Check-in: The Faces And Stories Behind The Economic Statistics
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with the American indicators, four people whose stories illustrate what the American economy faces a month after President Biden signed a coronavirus relief bill into law.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Federal Judge Orders Los Angeles To Offer Shelter To Skid Row Residents
A federal judge has ordered Los Angeles to offer shelter to people experiencing homelessness on Skid Row by October. The ruling says authorities wrongly focus on permanent housing over shelters.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Philonise Floyd And Attorney Ben Crump Reflect On Chauvin Verdict
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Philonise Floyd and his attorney Ben Crump about the guilty verdicts finding former officer Derek Chauvin responsible for the death of George Floyd.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Shuttered Venues Still Waiting for Government Aid Announced in December
The Small Business Administration experienced a rough launch for its grant program intended to help long-beleaguered venues. After so long without a lifeline, though, time is running thin.

NPR Headline News
Apr 21, 2021

Masks Remain Extremely Effective Indoors, But Are They Necessary Outside?
Unless people are packed together, "there really just is not much spread happening outdoors," Dr. Ashish Jha of Brown University's School of Public Health says.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

How The Chauvin Trial Could Impact Policing
The implications from the trial of Derek Chauvin could impact the policing system.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Minneapolis' Reaction To Chauvin's Verdict
In Minneapolis, crowds gathered Tuesday to celebrate the guilty verdict in Derek Chauvin's murder trial.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

The Mood On The Ground In Minneapolis
Ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been found guilty of three counts of murder and manslaughter. In Minneapolis, crowds gathered today at George Floyd Square to celebrate that verdict.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

President Biden Spoke From The White House After Chauvin's Murder Conviction
After former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty in the murder of George Floyd, President Biden marked the important moment for the country, speaking from the White House.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Reactions From George Floyd Square
At George Floyd Square in Minneapolis, a crowd gathered when they heard that the jury had reached a verdict.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Reactions From George Floyd Square In Minneapolis
At George Floyd Square in Minneapolis, a crowd gathered when they heard that the jury had reached a verdict.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

What's Next For Derek Chauvin: The Legal Implications Now That He's Been Convicted
Much awaits Derek Chauvin. His sentencing will come in eight weeks, and on his most serious charge — unintentional second degree murder — he faces about over 12 years under sentencing guidelines.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

George Floyd's Friend Speaks About Chauvin's Verdict
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Ronnie Lillard, friend of George Floyd, about his reaction to Tuesday's verdict.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

What's Next For Derek Chauvin: Legal Implications Now That He's Been Convicted
Much awaits Derek Chauvin. His sentencing will come in eight weeks, and on his most serious charge — unintentional second degree murder — he faces about over 12 years under sentencing guidelines.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Chile's COVID-19 Vaccination Program Was Largely Successful — But The Virus Persists
Chile has been praised worldwide for its COVID-19 vaccination program, inoculating a higher proportion of its population than all but two countries. Yet Chile's battle against the pandemic isn't over.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Mexico's President Has Been Muddying The Country's COVID-19 Vaccine Messaging
Mexico's president has been zigzagging on whether or not to get a vaccine, muddying a message about the vaccine's effectiveness in the country with the third-highest COVID-19 death rate in the world.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Chauvin Found Guilty On All Charges
A verdict has been reached in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin. The former Minneapolis police officer was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Mexico's President Is Muddying The Country's COVID-19 Vaccine Messaging
Mexico's president has been zigzagging on whether or not to get a vaccine, muddying a message about the vaccine's effectiveness in the country with the third-highest COVID-19 death rate in the world.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Manchester City And Chelsea To Pull Out Of Newly-Formed Football League
NPR's Mary Louise Kelley talk with Roger Bennett of Men in Blazers about how just two days after the announcement of a new European Super League, Manchester United and Chelsea say they won't join.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

In 'Crying In H Mart' Michelle Zauner Grapples With Food, Grief And Identity
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Michelle Zauner, a musician who performs under the name Japanese Breakfast, about her memoir, Crying in H Mart. It's an exploration of grief, food and identity.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Union Groups Mobilize To Keep Moderate Democrats In Line For Biden's Proposals
Union groups are trying to keep moderate Democrats in line on Biden's jobs and infrastructure proposals. Senator Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) raised concerns about proposed tax increases on corporations.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Some CEOs Are Hearing A New Message: Act On Climate, Or We'll Cut Your Pay
Some companies, under pressure from shareholders, are tying executive compensation to climate targets. It's not widespread yet, but the approach is catching on.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Outdoor Mask Mandates Could Lift Soon, According To Ashish Jha Of Brown University
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Ashish Jha, Dean of Brown University School of Public Health, who says outdoor transmission of COVID-19 is low and states may soon lift outdoor mask mandates.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

EMA Says Benefits Outweigh The Clots Potentially Linked To Johnson & Johnson Vaccine
The European Medicines Agency concluded there is a possible link between the Johnson & Johnson vaccine and rare, unusual blood clots, saying the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the very rare risks.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Archaeologists Discover Earliest Example Of Dog Domestication In Arabia
Archaeologists have discovered remains of the earliest example of dog domestication on the Arabian Peninsula, providing a look into pet ownership 6,000 years ago.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Abnormally Dry California Forests Are A Grim Warning For 2021's Wildfire Season
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with reporter Amy Graff from SFGate about a grim sign for 2021's wildfire season: low moisture in California forests.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

As Cape Cod's Tourist Season Nears, A Push To Get The Community Vaccinated
COVID-19 variants are escalating new cases on Cape Cod. Health officials are racing to get communities vaccinated before the tourists arrive.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Nigella Lawson On How To Find Peace While Cooking
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with cookbook writer Nigella Lawson about her latest book Cook, Eat, Repeat and how to stop viewing cooking as tedious and, instead, find peace in the kitchen.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

How Pandemic Responses Are Shaping The Economic Recovery Of 3 Continents
China, Europe, and the United States have had mixed success in controlling the pandemic, and it's shaping the economic recovery on three continents.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Chad's Military Says President Killed On Battlefield
Chad's President Idriss Déby, who ruled the country for more than 30 years, is dead. An army spokesman says Déby died after sustaining injuries on the front line of a battle against rebel forces.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Cuba's Communists Change Leadership, But Likely Not Much Else
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Patrick Oppmann, a CNN reporter based in Havana, about what it means for Cuba that a Castro is not at the helm for the first time in more than sixty years.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Verdict Reached For Derek Chauvin's Trial For The Murder Of George Floyd
A verdict has been reached in Derek Chauvin's Trial for the murder of George Floyd.

NPR Headline News
Apr 20, 2021

Anatomy Of A Spillover: We Failed To Stop SARS-CoV-2. How Do We Find Next 'Big One'?
For decades, the U.S. has spent many millions hunting down viruses in hope of stopping a pandemic. Yet the efforts failed. A group of researchers thinks there's a better strategy for the future.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

How The Pandemic Changed The College Admissions Selection Process This Year
Colleges around the country faced an admissions season marked by pandemic-era challenges: dropped testing requirements, remote learning, disrupted extracurriculars and record applicant pools.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Joy, Relief In Airports As Australia And New Zealand Open 'Travel Bubble'
Families and friends met in airports for the first time in over a year after Australia and New Zealand opened a "bubble" of quarantine-free travel between their countries.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

What Security Looks Like Amid Protests In The Minneapolis Area
We look at the security for Minneapolis and nearby areas, including a quiet protest outside the Brooklyn Center police station.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

The Fight To Change Attitudes Toward COVID-19 Vaccines In The U.K.
Millions of people in the U.K. who were hesitant or against taking the COVID-19 vaccine have changed their minds. NPR visited a mosque-turned-vaccination center at the cutting edge of that battle.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Philadelphia's Imbalanced Vaccination Rates Fueled By Lack Of Access
Vaccination rates for Black and Latino people in Philadelphia are half those of their white and Asian counterparts. It appears lack of access is more to blame than hesitancy to get vaccinated.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

COVID-19 Is Now Spreading Fastest In India — Pushing Its Health System Near Collapse
India is now where the coronavirus is spreading fastest. With shortages of hospital beds, oxygen and vaccines, the country's health system is near collapse.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

'Open Water' Explores Blackness and the Vulnerability of Falling In Love
Caleb Azumah Nelson's Open Water is built on a familiar premise: two young people meet and fall in love. Nelson's debut novel is brimming with references to Black art, music, poetry and photography.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Apple Is Rolling Out Big Privacy Changes
Apple is rolling out a big change to the way iPhones and iPads track millions of people: Apps will now be required to ask before collecting data to share with data brokers for targeted advertisements.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Afghanistan Veterans Weigh In On Biden's Announcement To Bring Troops Home
President Biden announced that troops will be out of Afghanistan by September. Many Afghanistan veterans were among the strongest voices calling for the U.S. to leave, but veteran opinions are varied.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Defense Delivered Their Closing Arguments In Derek Chauvin's Murder Trial
Lawyers delivered their closing arguments in Derek Chauvin's murder trial before the start of jury deliberations.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Bubble Tea Without Boba: Shortage Leaves Many Wondering When Tapioca Will Return
Without enough workers to unload shipping containers, the pandemic has caused another shortage of products: boba pearls used to make bubble tea.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Closing Arguments Delivered In Derek Chauvin's Murder Trial
Lawyers delivered their closing arguments in Derek Chauvin's murder trial before the start of jury deliberations.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Proposed Breakaway European Super League Outrages Soccer World
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Roger Bennett, co-anchor of the Men In Blazers podcast, about the proposed breakaway European Super League and the impact such a move would have on soccer.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

The World's First 'Travel Bubble' Opens Between Australia And New Zealand
Australia and New Zealand have launched one of the world's first "travel bubbles" between countries. People traveling between the two now no longer have to quarantine upon landing.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

Tissue Box-Sized Helicopter Takes Flight On Mars
NASA announced that a small helicopter sent to Mars aboard the Perseverance rover took flight — the first controlled, powered flight on another planet. The helicopter took aerial photos of Mars.

NPR Headline News
Apr 19, 2021

How TikTok And Skater Girls Are Sending Skateboard Sales Off The Wall
The streets are full of skateboarders these days, and skate shops can hardly keep up with the demand. Why now? The answer might put a smile on your face.

NPR Headline News
Apr 18, 2021

In Brooklyn Center 'War Zone,' Minnesota Volunteers Step In To Help
The police killing of 20-year-old Daunte Wright has spurred seven nights of street protests in Brooklyn Center, Minn. Amid tear gas and grief, local organizers are stepping up.

NPR Headline News
Apr 18, 2021

Despite Strained Relations, U.S. And China Agree To Combat Climate Change Together
The U.S. and China say they will work together to tackle climate change. It's a rare display of cooperation amid an overall tense relationship.

NPR Headline News
Apr 18, 2021

#NPRPoetry: Samuel Getachew
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with poet Samuel Getachew, former National Youth Poet Laureate finalist, about his favorite listener-submitted poems.

NPR Headline News
Apr 18, 2021

'Renegade' Rug Makers Create Community, Tufting On TikTok
With industrial metal tufting guns, fiber artists can make colorful, textured designs — Pokémon characters, candy wrappers, portraiture — worthy of walls, floors or social media feeds.

NPR Headline News
Apr 18, 2021

Writer Gets LinkedIn To Make Room For Parents Trying To Re-Enter Workforce
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Heather Bolen about an article she wrote that got LinkedIn to add several new title options for stay-at-home parents.

NPR Headline News
Apr 18, 2021

What To Expect In Chauvin Trial This Week
In Minneapolis, residents brace for a possible verdict this week in the murder trial against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin.

NPR Headline News
Apr 18, 2021

What Would A 'Feminist Internet' Look Like?
Charlotte Jee of the MIT Technology Review speaks with NPR's Michel Martin about some of the ideas to make the internet more welcoming to women.

NPR Headline News
Apr 18, 2021

Researcher Studies How Messaging On COVID-19 Disparities Affects Policy Preferences
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with professor Evan Lieberman about the study he co-authored looking at how sharing information about the pandemic's racial disparities affect peoples' policy opinions.

NPR Headline News
Apr 17, 2021

Police Violence And Reform: The Inequality In Restorative Justice Opportunities
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with attorney sujatha baliga about whether restorative justice principles are useful after a shooting incident or killing involving a police officer.

NPR Headline News
Apr 17, 2021

Sen. Mazie Hirono Talks New Memoir
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono, Democrat from Hawaii, about her book, Heart of Fire: An Immigrant Daughter's Story.

NPR Headline News
Apr 17, 2021

1st Grader Who Wrote To Old Navy On Why Girls Need 'Real' Jean Pockets
Kamryn Gardner, a first-grader from Bentonville, Ark., tells NPR about the letter she wrote to Old Navy to convince them to put real pockets in all their jeans for girls.

NPR Headline News
Apr 17, 2021

Idaho Resistance Groups Work To Combat Extremism Seeping Into Mainstream
There's a fledgling effort to organize against far-right ideology that's moving into Idaho's political mainstream.

NPR Headline News
Apr 17, 2021

Examining Public Health Responses To Gun Violence
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Dr. Paul Nestadt, a psychiatrist who studies gun violence, about public health responses to gun violence — which President Biden has called an epidemic.

NPR Headline News
Apr 17, 2021

Family Fostering Migrant Children Share Experience
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Bridget and Christopher, a couple fostering migrant children and teenagers waiting to be reunited with family in the United States.

NPR Headline News
Apr 17, 2021

Haitian Activist Brings Awareness To Spate Of Violence Rattling Country
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Jimmy Jean-Louis, a Haitian activist and actor who has been calling attention to the recent surge of violence and kidnappings in his country.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Here's What 'All Things Considered' Sounds Like — In Blackbird Song
A Finnish computer scientist had a dream that a blackbird was speaking to her in human language. So she devised a computer program to transform the sounds of the human voice into birdsong.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

A Look At Little Village, The Chicago Community Where Police Shot Adam Toledo
Following the release of the police shooting of 13-year-old Adam Toledo, we look at the Little Village community where the shooting took place in Chicago.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

As Michigan Virus Cases Surge, State Would Rather Add Vaccinations Than Restrictions
Coronavirus cases are surging in Michigan. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, Michigan's chief medical executive, about the state's decision not to implement new restrictions.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Biden Administration Expected To Reverse Trump's Ban On Funding Fetal Tissue Research
The Trump administration banned federal funding for scientific research on fetal tissue from abortions. The Biden administration is expected to reverse that.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Cities Looking To Reform Police Traffic Stops To Combat 'Fishing Expeditions'
A handful of states and cities are rethinking police traffic stops. They want to reduce or eliminate what critics have long called "fishing expeditions" that disproportionately affect people of color.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Julie Fisher, First U.S. Ambassador To Belarus Since 2008, Awaits Travel To Minsk
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Julie Fisher, the first U.S. Ambassador to Belarus since 2008, about last year's disputed presidential election and where diplomatic relations currently stand.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

President Biden's Press Conference With Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga
President Biden took questions from reporters after holding his first in-person meeting with a foreign leader since taking office, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

The Ramifications Of The Johnson & Johnson Vaccination Halt Are Global
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's decision to temporarily halt the use of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine is having ramifications globally.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

What The Johnson & Johnson Pause May Mean For Vaccine Equity
Which communities could suffer most from the Johnson & Johnson vaccination pause? NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to Dr. Paul Adamson, an infectious diseases fellow at David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Member Of The Oath Keepers First To Plea Guilty In U.S. Capitol Attack Investigation
The Justice Department has secured its first guilty plea in the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol attack investigation. A founding member of an anti-government militia group has pleaded guilty on two counts.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Convincing Amish Communities To Get Vaccinated As Their COVID-19 Cases Surge
Those with ties to the Amish are figuring out the best ways to educate and encourage them to get the shot, as COVID-19 cases surge in their communities.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Behind Those 'Extended Auto Warranties' Robocalls
Calls about "extended auto warranties" blow up our phones over and over. But where did these calls begin? And what are they actually offering?

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Indianapolis Pastor 'Angry' and 'Bewildered' By City's Gun Violence
After the mass shooting Thursday in Indianapolis, NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Rev. Charles Harrison, president of the Indianapolis TenPoint Coalition, about the impact of gun violence in his city.

NPR Headline News
Apr 16, 2021

Shooter Killed 8 People And Himself At An Indianapolis FedEx Facility Thursday Night
Nine are dead after a shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis. Family members waited hours Friday morning for news of their loved ones at a nearby airport hotel. Police are seeking a motive.

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