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Democracy Now
Oct 17, 2019

Rep. Ro Khanna: We Need a Responsible Withdrawal From Syria, Not One Oblivious to Human Life
As hundreds of thousands of civilians face displacement and violence amid Turkey's assault on Kurdish-controlled areas in northern Syria, the House of Representatives voted to condemn Trump's decision to withdraw U.S. support for the Kurds on Wednesday. The measure passed 354 to 60. We speak with Representative Ro Khanna, who says, "We can't just get involved in a place and then walk away and not have some moral responsibility. We have a moral responsibility not just to the Kurds who fought with us against ISIS. We have a moral responsibility to accept Syrian refugees. We have a moral responsibility to help rebuild a society that was ravaged by civil war, where we were involved." We also speak with Ozlem Goner, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at the City University of New York. She is a member of the Emergency Committee of Rojava.

Democracy Now
Oct 17, 2019

"Meltdown": Trump Defends Syria Withdrawal as House Votes 354 to 60 to Condemn His Actions
As the displacement of 300,000 civilians over Turkey's assault on Kurdish-controlled areas continues in northern Syria, the House of Representatives voted Wednesday to condemn President Trump's actions. Turkey invaded the region on October 9, shortly after Trump virtually greenlit the Turkey assault by abruptly withdrawing a small number of U.S. troops who were protecting Kurdish areas in northern Syria. Since then, the Kurds have aligned themselves with the Syrian government, and a number of former ISIS fighters who were being held by the Kurds have escaped. We speak with Ozlem Goner, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at the City University of New York. She is a member of the Emergency Committee of Rojava.

Democracy Now
Oct 17, 2019

30,000 Chicago Teachers & Support Staff Go on Strike Calling on City to Invest More in Schools
More than 30,000 workers are walking out of Chicago Public Schools today to demand better pay and benefits, smaller class sizes and more nurses, counselors, social workers and librarians. The historic strike has brought the country's third-largest school system to a standstill, with classes canceled for more than 350,000 students. The strike was confirmed Wednesday when the Chicago Teachers Union rejected a final offer by the city's new mayor, Lori Lightfoot, following months of labor negotiations. The city offered pay raises of 16% over a five-year period, while union representatives have been calling for a 15% increase over three years. Seven thousand five hundred public school workers with the Service Employees International Union are also striking today after rejecting their own offer from the city. From Chicago, we speak with Stacy Davis Gates, executive vice president of the Chicago Teachers Union, and Science Meles, executive vice president of SEIU Local 73, about the strike and public school workers' demands.

Democracy Now
Oct 17, 2019

Headlines for October 17, 2019
Trump Has "Meltdown" After Lawmakers Rebuke His Actions on Syria, Gordon Sondland to Testify in Impeachment Inquiry Today, Britain and European Union Reach Brexit Deal, Protests Continue in Catalonia After Sentencing of Separatist Leaders, Trump Admin Proposes Opening Up Tongass National Forest to Logging, 500,000 Kids Could Lose Free School Lunches Under Changes to Food Stamp Program, Chicago Public School Teachers on Strike Today, General Motors and UAW Reach Tentative Deal Aimed at Ending Strike, NYC Council Slated to Vote on $8 Billion Plan to Close Rikers & Build New Jails, Maryland Congressmember Elijah Cummings Dies

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

It Was the Longest Debate So Far, But CNN & NYT Asked No Questions on Climate Crisis & Immigration
Despite ongoing climate chaos and a sustained humanitarian disaster at the southern border, The New York Times and CNN failed to ask candidates directly about immigration or the climate crisis at Tuesday night's Democratic presidential debate. We speak with Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center, who says the lack of attention to immigraton "was a major gap in the three-hour debate." We also speak with journalist Kate Aronoff about the debate's failure to address the climate crisis.

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Democrats Decry Trump's Syria Policy But Fail to Address Palestine, Yemen, China & Other Issues
At Tuesday's debate, Democratic candidates took aim at President Trump's recent move to withdraw support from the Kurds in northern Syria, paving the way for Turkey to invade the region. We speak with Intercept contributor Mehdi Hasan, host of the "Deconstructed" podcast, about the candidates' foreign policy proposals.

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Dem Debate: "Disingenuous" Attacks on Medicare for All Distract From Cost of Today's Broken System
Democratic candidates sparred at Tuesday's debate over their healthcare platforms and Medicare for All. We speak with Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, a professor at CUNY-Hunter College and the co-founder of Physicians for a National Health Program. Moderators in the CNN and New York Times debate repeatedly pressed Elizabeth Warren on whether taxes would increase under Medicare for All. "The framing of that question is crazy," says Dr. Woolhandler. "What really matters is how much a household is paying."

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Warren and Sanders: A Wealth Tax Is Needed to Address Staggering Inequality
2020 progressive front-runners Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren pushed for a wealth tax at the fourth Democratic debate Tuesday night. We speak with senior contributor at The Intercept, Mehdi Hasan, who hosts their "Deconstructed" podcast, and David Cay Johnston, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter. He is the founder and editor of DCReport.org.

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Mehdi Hasan: "There Should Only Be Two Front-Runners Right Now: Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren"
Twelve candidates took to the stage for the fourth round of the Democratic presidential debate in Westerville, Ohio, Tuesday to spar over healthcare, foreign policy, impeachment, gun violence, economic inequality and more. Senator Elizabeth Warren — who is now leading some national polls — repeatedly came under attack from her rivals. In the first debate since Senator Bernie Sanders suffered a heart attack two weeks ago, the Vermont senator advocated for a Green New Deal, Medicare for All and a wealth tax. Former Vice President Joe Biden attacked the proposals of both Sanders and Warren and faced scrutiny for his son Hunter's dealings in Ukraine. We host a roundtable with Intercept senior contributor Mehdi Hasan, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston and journalist Kate Aronoff.

Democracy Now
Oct 16, 2019

Headlines for October 16, 2019
12 Democratic Candidates Take to the Stage in Ohio, Pence Heads to Turkey as Erdogan Vows No Ceasefire in Northern Syria, State Dept. Official: White House Put "Three Amigos" in Charge of Ukraine Policy, Activists Arrested in D.C. over Trump Plan to Gut Refugee Resettlement, British Family Detained for a Week After Mistakenly Driving Across U.S.-Canada Border, Egypt Tortured Journalist & Activist Esraa Abdel Fattah in Custody, Worst Fires in Decades Rage Across Lebanon, Mexican Senate Slated to Vote on Bill to Legalize Marijuana, Mohawk Man Launches Hunger Strike Amid Land Dispute with Real Estate Developers, California: Fuel Storage Tanks Explode at NuStar Facility Outside San Francisco, MSNBC's Chris Hayes Criticizes Own Network & Praises Ronan Farrow Book, Tarana Burke Launches #MeTooVoter Campaign Ahead of 2020

Democracy Now
Oct 15, 2019

Homewreckers: How Wall Street, Banks & Trump's Inner Circle Used the 2008 Housing Crash to Get Rich
We speak with investigative reporter Aaron Glantz about his new book "Homewreckers," which looks at the devastating legacy of the foreclosure crisis and how much of the so-called recovery is a result of large private equity firms buying up hundreds of thousands of foreclosed homes. "Homewreckers: How a Gang of Wall Street Kingpins, Hedge Fund Magnates, Crooked Banks, and Vulture Capitalists Suckered Millions Out of Their Homes and Demolished the American Dream" reveals how the 2008 housing crash decimated millions of Americans' family wealth but enriched President Donald Trump's inner circle, including Trump Cabinet members Steven Mnuchin and Wilbur Ross, Trump's longtime friend and confidant Tom Barrack, and billionaire Republican donor Stephen Schwarzman. Glantz writes, "Now, ensconced in power following Trump's election, these capitalists are creating new financial products that threaten to make the wealth transfers of the [housing] bust permanent." Aaron Glantzis a senior reporter at Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting. He was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize this year for his reporting on modern-day redlining.

Democracy Now
Oct 15, 2019

Botham Jean, Then Atatiana Jefferson: Outrage in Texas As Police Kill Another Black Resident at Home
A white police officer in Fort Worth, Texas, has been arrested and charged with murder, after he shot and killed an African-American woman who was inside her own home. Officer Aaron Dean was responding to a non-emergency call for a wellness check after a neighbor had called the Fort Worth police to report that 28-year-old Atatiana Jefferson's front door was open at around 2:30 in the morning on Saturday. Soon after the officers arrived, Dean, who never identified himself to be a police officer, shouted through Jefferson's bedroom window to put her hands up, and then immediately opened fire, killing her. Minutes before the shooting, Jefferson had been playing video games with her 8-year-old nephew, who witnessed the shooting but was not physically injured. Atatiana Jefferson is the seventh person since June who has been killed by one of the police department's officers. From Dallas, we speak with Lee Merritt, a civil rights attorney representing the family of Atatiana Jefferson.

Democracy Now
Oct 15, 2019

Headlines for October 15, 2019
Syrian Troops Advance Across Northern Syria After Deal with Kurds, Ex-Top Russia Adviser Testified Bolton Called Giuliani a "Hand Grenade", 12 Democrats Will Take the Stage for Presidential Debate in Ohio Tonight, Fort Worth Cop Charged for Murder After Killing Atatiana Jefferson, Judge: Trump Broke Law by Declaring Emergency to Secure Border Funding, Arizona: Bulldozers Destroyed Protected Cacti to Clear Way for Trump Wall, 8-Year-Old Girl Easily Scales Replica of Trump's "Impenetrable" Border Wall, Protests Erupt at Barcelona Airport over Sentencing of Catalan Leaders, Mexico: 14 Police Officers Killed in Ambush in Michoacán, Hong Kong: Pro-Democracy Protesters Demand Support from U.S. Lawmakers, London Bans All Extinction Rebellion Protests, But Direct Actions Continue, Ecuador: President Signs Decree to Revert Fuel Prices Back to Subsidized Levels, General Motors Workers Enter Fifth Week of Strike, Native Americans Mark Indigenous Peoples' Day

Democracy Now
Oct 14, 2019

Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed, Awarded Nobel Prize, Celebrated for "Remarkable Change" in Horn of Africa
Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was awarded the 100th Nobel Peace Prize in an announcement Friday morning. The prime minister last year helped broker a historic peace deal between Ethiopia and Eritrea, where leaders of the neighboring countries signed a "Joint Declaration of Peace and Friendship" and declared an end to nearly two decades of a "state of war" that lasted from 1998 to 2000 and killed 70,000 people. Soon after the peace declaration was signed, the first direct flights between Ethiopia and Eritrea in 20 years took off from Addis Ababa, headed to Eritrea's capital Asmara. Ahmed has also lifted the state of emergency, released thousands of political dissidents from prison and appointed women to a record 50% of cabinet positions. We speak with Awol Allo, an associate professor at the Keele University School of Law in the U.K. His recent article for Al Jazeera is titled "Why I nominated Abiy Ahmed for the Nobel Peace Prize."

Democracy Now
Oct 14, 2019

"We're Still Here": Indigenous Peoples' Day Celebration Reflects Ongoing Resistance to Colonization
Christopher Columbus arrived in the Bahamas 527 years ago this week, unleashing a brutal genocide that killed tens of millions of Native people across the hemisphere. Cities and states across the country are acknowledging this devastating history by rejecting the federal holiday of Columbus Day and celebrating Indigenous Peoples' Day instead to honor centuries of indigenous resistance. Alaska, Maine, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont and Wisconsin have all officially recognized Indigenous Peoples' Day. So have more than 130 cities and counties, from Los Angeles, San Francisco and Dallas to smaller places like Livingston, Kentucky, and Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. Last week, Washington, D.C., became one of the latest to recognize the holiday. Washington, D.C., the District of Columbia, takes its name from Columbus. We speak with Iakowi:he'ne' Oakes of the Snipe Clan. She is a Mohawk of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. She is the executive director of the American Indian Community House in New York.

Democracy Now
Oct 14, 2019

Kurds Turn to Bashar al-Assad for Protection as U.S. Abandons Former Allies to Turkish Assault
Syrian troops are massing near the Turkish border, one day after Bashar al-Assad's government reached a deal to help protect the Kurds from Turkey's deadly air and ground assault. On Sunday, the Kurds agreed, in a deal brokered by Russia, to hand over two border towns to the Syrian government in exchange for protection. The Kurds had been allied with the United States up until last week, when President Trump abruptly pulled U.S. troops from northern Syria, paving the way for Turkey's assault. More than 130,000 people have already been displaced over the past five days since Turkey invaded northern Syria. The death toll is unknown. Turkey is facing increasing international condemnation for invading northern Syria. The European Union has called on all member states to stop selling arms to Ankara. We speak with Ozlem Goner, an assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at the City University of New York and a member of the Emergency Committee of Rojava.

Democracy Now
Oct 14, 2019

Headlines for October 14, 2019
Syrian Troops Mass at Turkish Border After Striking Deal with Kurds, Pentagon Deploying Additional 1,800 Troops to Saudi Arabia, NYT: Russian Warplanes Bomb 4 Hospitals in Syria over 12 Hours, Appeals Court Rules Trump Must Turn Over Financial Records, Video Shows Fake Trump Shooting Journalists, Political Rivals, Fox News' Shepard Smith Has Quit Network, Hunter Biden to Step Down from Chinese Company Board, White Cop Kills Black Woman by Shooting Through Her Bedroom Window, Japan: 40 Have Died in Typhoon Hagibis, Ecuador: Indigenous Protests Force Government to Cancel IMF Loan, Uganda LGBT Activists Fight Possible Reintroduction of "Kill the Gays" Law, Tunisia: Law Professor Kaïs Saïed Poised to Be Next President, Spanish Supreme Court Sentences 9 Catalan Separatist Leaders to Prison, Julian Assange Appears by Videolink for London Court Hearing, Simone Biles Becomes Most Decorated Gymnast in History, Communities Celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day from Coast to Coast

Democracy Now
Oct 11, 2019

The Stanford Sexual Assault Case Made Her "Emily Doe." In New Memoir, Chanel Miller Tells Her Story
We spend the hour with author Chanel Miller speaking about her recently published remarkable memoir, "Know My Name." The book chronicles how Miller reclaimed her name, her story and her life after being sexually assaulted by Brock Turner, a member of the Stanford University swim team, in 2015. At the time, she was known as "Emily Doe." The case gained national prominence when a California judge sentence Turner to just six months in a county jail after he was convicted of three counts of felony sexual assault. He ended up spending only three months locked up. The sentencing sparked outrage. Voters in California later recalled the judge in the case. During the trial, Miller read a victim impact statement addressed to her assailant. The text of the letter later went viral, being read by millions around the world.

Democracy Now
Oct 11, 2019

Headlines for October 11, 2019
Civilians Killed & Forced to Flee Turkish Military Offensive in Northern Syria, Two Associates of Trump's Lawyer Rudy Giuliani Arrested at Dulles Airport, Prince Estate Slams Trump for Using "Purple Rain" at Minneapolis Rally, "Trans Lives Matter": Activists Interrupt CNN Democratic Town Hall, Ethiopian Prime Minister Wins 100th Nobel Peace Prize, Olga Tokarczuk & Peter Handke Win Nobel Prize for Literature, Iranian Oil Tanker Struck in Red Sea, Ecuador: Five Killed Amid Anti-Austerity Protests, News Outlet Splinter Shutting Down, Asylum Seekers Protest "Remain in Mexico" Policy on Brownsville Bridge, Gymnast Simone Biles Wins 5th All-Around World Championship, Multiple Wildfires Raging Across California, Over 60 People Arrested in Extinction Rebellion Protests in New York City

Democracy Now
Oct 10, 2019

Justice for Kaysera: Native Teen's Mysterious Death Highlights Epidemic of Murdered Indigenous Women
The family of Native American teenager Kaysera Stops Pretty Places is demanding justice after she was found dead in Hardin, Montana, in late August, just two weeks after her 18th birthday. Kaysera was a member of the Crow and Northern Cheyenne tribal communities in Montana. She lived with her grandmother. According to her family, Kaysera was reported missing after she never came home on the night of August 24. On August 29, the body of a young woman was found in the town of Hardin. It wasn't until two weeks later that local law enforcement confirmed it was Kaysera. The circumstances surrounding her death and disappearance remain a mystery. Her family believes she was murdered, but says local law enforcement is not treating her sudden disappearance and death as foul play. Kaysera is among at least 27 indigenous girls and women reported missing or murdered in Big Horn County in the past decade. Since 2010, there have also been at least 134 cases of missing or murdered indigenous girls and women in the state of Montana. We speak with Grace Bulltail, Kaysera's aunt and an assistant professor in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. We also speak with the family's lawyer, Mary Kathryn Nagle, a citizen of Cherokee Nation and a partner at Pipestem Law, P.C., a law firm dedicated to the restoration of tribal sovereignty and jurisdiction.

Democracy Now
Oct 10, 2019

Turkey Moves to Crush Rojava, the Kurds' Radical Experiment Based on Democracy, Feminism & Ecology
As Turkey launches an aerial and ground assault on northern Syria targeting Kurdish-controlled areas, we look at how the offensive threatens the Kurdish region of Rojava with Debbie Bookchin, co-founder of the Emergency Committee for Rojava. She is a journalist and author who co-edited a book of essays by her father, Murray Bookchin, "The Next Revolution: Popular Assemblies and the Promise of Direct Democracy." We also speak with Elif Sarican, a Kurdish Women's Movement activist and anthropologist at the London School of Economics, and Ertugrul Kürkçü, honorary chair of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party in Turkey, known as the HDP. He is a former member of Parliament in Turkey.

Democracy Now
Oct 10, 2019

After Trump Abandoned Kurds, Turkish Invasion Raises Fear of Kurdish Genocide & ISIS Resurgence
Turkey has launched an aerial and ground assault on northern Syria targeting Kurdish-controlled areas. The offensive began Wednesday, just days after President Trump ordered U.S. troops to fall back from their positions on the Turkish-Syrian border. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reports at least 16 Kurds have been killed so far. Turkey is claiming the death toll is far higher. The Trump administration has faced widespread criticism from both Republican and Democratic lawmakers for abandoning the stateless Kurds who had helped the U.S. fight ISIS. Turkey is claiming the assault is needed to establish a "safe zone" in northern Syria where Turkey could relocate Syrian refugees who fled over the past eight years of fighting, but the Kurds see the offensive as part of a decades-long attack by Turkey to crush their attempts at greater autonomy. The Kurds have been responsible for holding over 10,000 ISIS fighters and their families in detention. While Trump has claimed Turkey will take control of the makeshift jails, there is growing concern many former ISIS fighters will be able to escape during the Turkish assault. At least one Kurdish prison has already been shelled. To discuss the implications of Turkey's assault, we speak with Elif Sarican, a Kurdish Women's Movement activist and anthropologist at the London School of Economics. We also speak with Ertugrul Kürkçü, honorary chair of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party in Turkey, known as the HDP. He is a former member of Parliament in Turkey.

Democracy Now
Oct 10, 2019

Headlines for October 10, 2019
Turkey Launches Ground Offensive in Northern Syria, WH Budget Office Refuses to Comply with Subpoena for Impeachment Probe, Biden Joins Majority of 2020 Field in Calling for Trump's Impeachment, Trump Faces Dozens of New Allegations of Sexual Misconduct, Matt Lauer Denies Raping NBC Producer Brooke Nevils in 2014, Germany: 2 Killed in Anti-Semitic Attack Outside Temple on Yom Kippur, U.N.: U.S. Military Killed 30 Afghan Civilians in Airstrikes in May, Amnesty: Death Toll in Anti-Government Protests in Iraq Surpasses 150, Protests Erupt in Algeria over Corruption & Army's Role in Politics, Egyptian Dissident Alaa Abd El-Fattah Beaten in Custody, Says Family, National Strike Paralyzes Ecuador as Anti-Austerity Protests Build, Argentina: Dozens of Indigenous Women Protest at Interior Ministry, Honduras: Protesters Accuse President of Drug Trafficking Ties, FBI Carried Out Thousands of Unconstitutional Searches of NSA Archives, U.S. Blacklists Chinese Companies over Imprisonment of Uyghurs, Extinction Rebellion Protests Hit London Airport, Demanding Climate Change Action

Democracy Now
Oct 09, 2019

Divided Supreme Court Hears Landmark LGBTQ Workplace Discrimination Case
The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in three cases that will determine whether LGBTQ people can be fired from their jobs due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Among the court's conservative justices, only Neil Gorsuch appeared open to prohibiting such workplace discrimination. One of the cases centers on a transgender woman from Michigan named Aimee Stephens, who was fired from her job at a funeral home in 2013. The Supreme Court is expected to hand down its decision in the three cases by early next summer. We speak to James Esseks, director of the ACLU LGBT & HIV Project, who attended Tuesday's oral arguments before the Supreme Court.

Democracy Now
Oct 09, 2019

Julián Castro Backs Impeachment Effort & Condemns Trump's "Betrayal" of Kurds in Northern Syria
Turkey's government says its troops are prepared for an imminent assault on Kurdish fighters in northern Syria, after President Trump ordered U.S. troops to fall back from their positions on the Turkish-Syrian border. Kurdish fighters said they're bracing for a "humanitarian catastrophe." This follows warnings that former Kurdish allies of the U.S. who feel betrayed by President Trump will abandon thousands of prisoners captured during the U.S.-backed war against ISIS over the past two years. We speak to former housing secretary and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro, who says Trump's move is a "stunning betrayal of allies."

Democracy Now
Oct 09, 2019

Julián Castro Slams Trump's "Deranged" Immigration Policies After Escorting Asylum Seekers to Border
On Monday, 2020 presidential candidate Julián Castro escorted a dozen asylum seekers to the U.S. port of entry at Brownsville, Texas, in a challenge to President Trump's "Remain in Mexico" policy. The group included a disabled Salvadoran woman and her relatives, as well as nine LGBTQ people from Cuba, Guatemala and Honduras. Many of them report they've been threatened and assaulted while they've been forced to wait in the Mexican border city of Matamoros. The asylum seekers were refused entry into the United States. Castro speaks with us from San Antonio, where he served as mayor from 2009 to 2014.

Democracy Now
Oct 09, 2019

Indigenous-Led Anti-Austerity Protests Shut Down Quito Forcing Ecuadorian Government to Move Capital
Tens of thousands of people, led by indigenous leaders, are expected to again bring Ecuador to a standstill today in massive ongoing anti-government protests. Demonstrators flooded the streets of Quito Tuesday to decry government-imposed austerity measures and a steep hike in fuel prices, despite a severe police crackdown. Civil unrest has been growing since President Lenín Moreno ended a decades-old fuel subsidy program last week as part of a so-called reform plan imposed by the International Monetary Fund after Ecuador took a $4.2 billion loan from the IMF earlier this year. Hundreds of people have been arrested as the government cracks down on protesters and the media. Tuesday's mass demonstrations come one day after Moreno said he was temporarily moving government operations from Quito to the southern city of Guayaquil. We go to Quito to speak with David Cordero Heredia, a law professor at Pontifical Catholic University. He is one of the lawyers representing protesters who have been detained in this latest round of protests.

Democracy Now
Oct 09, 2019

Headlines for October 9, 2019
Trump Won't Cooperate with Impeachment Probe, Prompting Constitutional Crisis, Turkish Attack on Kurds in Syria Imminent After U.S. Steps Aside, Afghanistan Claims al-Qaeda Leader Died in U.S.-Led Attack That Killed 40 Civilians, Trump Admin Planning Withdrawal from Open Skies Treaty, Wife of U.S. Diplomat Claims Immunity After Crash That Killed Motorcyclist, Supreme Court Hears Arguments in LGBTQ Workplace Discrimination Cases, 800,000 Californians Face Blackouts as PG&E Cuts Power Amid Wildfire Fears, Steven Reed Elected First Black Mayor of Montgomery, Alabama, NBC Producer Says Matt Lauer Raped Her in 2014, U.S. Billionaires Paid Lower Taxes Than Working Americans in 2018, Bernie Sanders to Scale Back Campaign Events After Heart Attack, Brazil's Uncontacted Tribes Face "Genocide" Under President Jair Bolsonaro, Pope Francis Warns of "New Forms of Colonialism" in Amazon Rainforest, Oil Slick Fouls Nearly 1,000 Miles of Beaches in Brazil, Canada's Justin Trudeau to Appeal Reparations Payments for Indigenous Youth, Uranium Poisoning Navajo Women and Babies Decades After Mining Ended, Greta Thunberg Lends Support to Indigenous Climate Activists at Standing Rock

Democracy Now
Oct 08, 2019

Will Chicago Teachers Be Next to Strike? Union Head Speaks Out as Walkout Date Approaches
In Chicago, union leaders and the nation's third-largest school district are racing to reach an agreement to avert a teachers' strike authorized to begin later this month. In late September, 25,000 educators voted overwhelmingly to authorize a work stoppage, demanding more staffing and lower class sizes. On Monday, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot accused the union of not coming to the bargaining table with a proposal to counter the offers the district has made in recent weeks. This comes as about 7,000 school support staffers with the Service Employees International Union have also made preparations for a strike, as have over 2,000 Chicago Park District workers with SEIU Local 73. From Chicago, we speak to Jesse Sharkey, president of the Chicago Teachers Union.

Democracy Now
Oct 08, 2019

Will Chicago Teachers Be Next to Go Strike? Union Head Speaks Out As Walkout Date Approaches
In Chicago, union leaders and the nation's third-largest school district are racing to reach an agreement to avert a teachers' strike authorized to begin later this month. In late September, 25,000 educators voted overwhelmingly to authorize a work stoppage, demanding more staffing and lower class sizes. On Monday, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot accused the union of not coming to the bargaining table with a proposal to counter the offers the district has made in recent weeks. This comes as about 7,000 school support staffers with the Service Employees International Union have also made preparations for a strike, as have over 2,000 Chicago Park District workers with SEIU Local 73. From Chicago, we speak to Jesse Sharkey, president of the Chicago Teachers Union.

Democracy Now
Oct 08, 2019

Striking UAW Member: We'll Strike "As Long as It Takes" to Demand Fair Salaries and Benefits
About 48,000 workers at General Motors have entered their fourth week on strike. It is the longest national strike at GM by the United Auto Workers in nearly 50 years. Workers are seeking higher pay, protection of their healthcare benefits, greater job security and a commitment from GM to build more cars and parts in the United States. On Sunday, UAW officials announced they had rejected the company's latest offer, saying negotiations had "taken a turn for the worse." We speak with Steve Frisque, a striking GM worker and former president of UAW Local 722.

Democracy Now
Oct 08, 2019

This is Not A Drill: 700 Arrested as Extinction Rebellion Fights Climate Crisis With Direct Action
More than 700 people have been arrested in civil disobedience actions as the group Extinction Rebellion kicked off two weeks of protests in 60 cities worldwide, demanding urgent government action on the climate crisis. Its members have superglued themselves to government buildings, occupied public landmarks, shut down roads and taken to the streets to sound the alarm about the impending catastrophe of global warming. Extinction Rebellion, a nonpolitical movement, launched last year in the U.K. and rose to prominence in April, when it disrupted traffic in Central London for 11 days. For more about the significance of the coordinated global protests, we speak with Extinction Rebellion co-founder Gail Bradbrook.

Democracy Now
Oct 08, 2019

Headlines for October 8, 2019
Trump Touts "Great and Unmatched Wisdom" as U.S. Abandons Kurdish Allies, State Dept. Orders Ambassador Gordon Sondland Not to Testify to Impeachment Inquiry, Federal Judge Rejects Trump's "Repugnant" Argument Against Turning Over Tax Records, Ecuador's President Moves Government From Capital as Anti-Austerity Protests Grow, Bolivia Rains Quell Fires After 10 Million Amazon Acres Burn, 700 Arrested as Extinction Rebellion Protests Demand Climate Action, Swedish Climate Activist Greta Thunberg to Visit Standing Rock Reservation, Supreme Court Opens New Term with Justice Clarence Thomas Absent, Asylum Seekers Escorted to U.S. Border by Julián Castro, Denied Entry, DHS Secretary Shouted Off the Stage at Georgetown Law Keynote Address, PayPal Drops Out of Libra Cryptocurrency in Blow to Facebook's Plans, California to Make Anti-HIV Drugs Available Without Prescription, NBA Under Fire for Bowing to Chinese Censors, New York's Community Radio Station WBAI in Peril Amid Financial Woes

Democracy Now
Oct 07, 2019

"A Shakespearean Act of Betrayal": Trump Agrees to Let Turkey Invade Kurdish-Controlled Syrian Area
U.S. troops have begun withdrawing from northeast Syria as Turkey prepares to invade Kurdish-controlled areas of the country. For years, the Kurds have been close allies to the United States in the fight against ISIS. On Sunday, however, the White House released a statement that surprised many in the region, announcing that Turkey would be "moving forward with its long-planned operation in Northern Syria," following a phone call between President Trump and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. "The United States Armed Forces will not support or be involved in that operation, and the United States forces, having defeated the ISIS territorial 'Caliphate,' will no longer be in the immediate area," the statement said. The announcement marks a major shift in U.S. policy, since as recently as January President Trump threatened to "devastate Turkey economically" if it attacked Kurdish forces in Syria. Meanwhile, in neighboring Iraq, the death toll continues to rise as police and soldiers fire on people defying a government-imposed curfew in mass anti-government protests. For more on events in the region, we speak with Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent newspaper.

Democracy Now
Oct 07, 2019

"A Backlash Against Our Existence": Laverne Cox Speaks Out on Violence Against Trans Women of Color
At least 18 transgender people have been killed in the United States in 2019 — most of them trans women of color. Last year, there were at least 26 killings of transgender people. The American Medical Association has declared the wave of violence an "epidemic." Laverne Cox, the award-winning transgender actress and longtime trans rights activist, says such violence has long been part of the lives of trans people. "For my entire life as a trans woman, for 21 years, I have been hearing about, witnessing, going to memorials [and] going to Trans Days of Remembrance," she says. Cox says the violence reflects a society-wide backlash against the gains made by trans people and others in the LGBTQ community, including from the Trump administration. "Now we're coming out of the shadows, and as we come out of the shadows, people want to force us back into the dark," she says. Cox joined Democracy Now! ahead of Supreme Court hearings this week on whether federal nondiscrimination laws extend to LGBTQ people. She was joined in studio by Chase Strangio, deputy director for transgender justice with the ACLU's LGBT & HIV Project.

Democracy Now
Oct 07, 2019

"We Have to Mass Mobilize": Laverne Cox & Chase Strangio Sound the Alarm on Major LGBTQ SCOTUS Cases
At the start of its new term, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on Tuesday in three cases to determine whether LGBTQ people can be fired from their jobs due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, employers cannot discriminate against employees on the basis of sex, as well as race, color, national origin and religion, but the Trump administration claims the law does not cover discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The cases mark the first time the Supreme Court will rule on LGBTQ rights since conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh replaced Anthony Kennedy, who wrote many of the court's major LGBTQ rights rulings. We speak with Laverne Cox, a longtime trans rights activist and award-winning transgender actress best known for her role on the show "Orange Is the New Black," and Chase Strangio, deputy director for transgender justice with the ACLU's LGBT & HIV Project. His work includes impact litigation, as well as legislative and administrative advocacy, on behalf of LGBTQ people and people living with HIV across the United States.

Democracy Now
Oct 07, 2019

Headlines for October 7, 2019
Trump Orders U.S. Troops to Step Aside for Turkish Assault on Kurdish Forces, 109 Killed and 6,000 Wounded as Anti-Government Protests Rage in Iraq, Second Whistleblower Has Firsthand Knowledge of Trump-Ukraine Scandal, Secretary of State Pompeo Calls Impeachment Inquiry "Silly Gotcha Game", Trump Calls GOP Senator Mitt Romney "Pompous" over Ukraine Rebuke, North Korea Calls Off Denuclearization Talks with the U.S., U.S. Meets with Taliban for First Time Since Trump Canceled Afghan Peace Talks, Israeli Forces Fire on Gaza Protesters, Killing One and Injuring Dozens, Protesters Call for Kavanaugh's Removal One Year After His Confirmation to SCOTUS, Supreme Court to Decide Fate of Louisiana Anti-Choice Law, Hong Kong Protesters March in Defiance of Ban on Face Masks, Scores Arrested as Extinction Rebellion Protests Kick Off Worldwide, Trump Admin to Open 725,000 Acres of California to Oil & Gas Drilling, Trump to Bar Immigrants Who Can't Afford to Purchase Health Insurance, Senior Border Patrol Agent Faces Trial for Kidnapping, Sexual Assault, Jeffrey Epstein Accuser Blames Victoria's Secret Billionaire for Sexual Assault, Joshua Brown, Key Witness in Dallas Police Murder Trial, Shot Dead, Sen. Bernie Sanders On the Mend After Suffering Heart Attack, Attacker Kills Four Homeless Men Sleeping on New York City Sidewalks

Democracy Now
Oct 04, 2019

From Trump to Nixon: "Watergate" Film Explains "How We Learned to Stop an Out of Control President"
President Donald Trump called openly Thursday for the leaders of Ukraine and China to investigate Trump's campaign rival Joe Biden and Biden's son Hunter for corruption. Trump's explicit remarks during a press conference came as leaders of the Democratic-led House pushed ahead rapidly with their impeachment investigation. President Trump is just the fourth U.S. president to face a formal impeachment inquiry, joining Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton. We spend the hour looking at back at the Watergate scandal, which led to Nixon's resignation in 1974 and is the focus of a documentary titled "Watergate — Or: How We Learned to Stop an Out of Control President." Drawing on 3,400 hours of audiotapes, archival footage and declassified documents, the film chronicles the dramatic events surrounding the break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex in 1972, which precipitated Nixon's eventual resignation two years later under threat of impeachment. We play clips from the film and speak with its director, Charles Ferguson, who won an Academy Award for his documentary "Inside Job."

Democracy Now
Oct 04, 2019

Headlines for October 4, 2019
Trump Publicly Calls on Ukraine and China to Investigate the Bidens, Trump Discussed Campaign Rivals in June Call with China's Xi Jinping, FEC Chair: Illegal for Candidates to Solicit Foreign Help in U.S. Elections, Messages Detail How U.S. Officials Pressured Ukraine on Trump's Behalf, IRS Whistleblower: Treasury Official Tried to Interfere with Trump or Pence Tax Audit, Trump Administration to Collect DNA of All Immigrants Jailed in U.S., Iraq Death Toll at 44 as Violent Repression of Protests Continues, Honduran President Denies Narcotrafficking Ties as His Brother Faces U.S. Trial, Protests Rock Ecuador as IMF-Imposed Austerity Measures Take Effect, Peruvian President Swears In New Cabinet After Leadership Challenge, Photo Shows Brazilian President with Suspect in Marielle Franco's Murder, MGM Reaches $800 Million Settlement with Las Vegas Massacre Survivors, Coast Guard Officer Pleads Guilty in Plot to Murder Liberals, Bernie Sanders Released from Hospital After Surgery, Will Join Next Debate, Iowa Activists Face Up to 110 Years in Prison for Dakota Access Pipeline Sabotage

Democracy Now
Oct 03, 2019

As Man Dies in ICE Custody, California Moves to Ban For-Profit Prisons, Including Immigrant Jails
A Cameroonian immigrant died this week in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in California. The man, identified as 37-year-old Nebane Abienwi, died on Tuesday after suffering a brain hemorrhage. This comes as California lawmakers passed a bill last month that would ban private prisons statewide, a major blow to the for-profit prison industry in the U.S. that is deeply entangled in immigration detention. The legislation also orders the closure of four ICE prisons that can jail up to 4,500 immigrants. The bill is currently awaiting the signature of Governor Gavin Newsom, who said in his January inaugural address that California should "end the outrage of private prisons once and for all." Incarceration at for-profit prisons in California peaked at about 7,000 prisoners in 2016, but state officials have been shifting prisoners to publicly run prisons in recent years. Hamid Yazdan Panah, an immigration attorney with the California Collaborative for Immigrant Justice, joins us for a conversation about the bill and immigrant detention in California.

Democracy Now
Oct 03, 2019

Trump vs. California: In Blow to Climate, U.S. Revokes State's Stricter Auto Emissions Standards
California is in a legal battle with the Trump administration over tailpipe emissions, air quality and climate change. California recently joined nearly two dozen other states to file a lawsuit against the Trump administration after it revoked the state's air pollution standards for cars and light trucks, in its latest regulatory rollback of laws aimed at slowing the climate crisis. Auto emissions are California's single largest source of greenhouse gases. From Los Angeles, we're joined by Mary Nichols, the longtime chair of the California Air Resources Board. She has led the board in crafting California's internationally recognized climate action plan. Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, speaks with us from San Francisco.

Democracy Now
Oct 03, 2019

"Nothing Ends Homelessness Like a Home": Advocates Slam Trump's Attack on SF & Homeless People
President Trump is continuing an all-out attack on San Francisco's homeless population and political leaders. On Wednesday, the Trump administration filed an environmental notice of violation against San Francisco, falsely claiming that the city's homelessness crisis has caused water pollution. City officials have repeatedly rejected Trump's unfounded claims that homelessness is connected to water quality. California is home to 12% of the country's population but half of the country's unsheltered homeless people. President Trump has been pushing for a crackdown on the crisis for weeks and threatened to destroy homeless encampments, increase police enforcement and even jail homeless people. For more on the issues surrounding the affordable housing crisis and homelessness, we speak with Jennifer Friedenbach, executive director of the Coalition on Homelessness, and Paul Boden, executive director of the Western Regional Advocacy Project.

Democracy Now
Oct 03, 2019

Headlines for October 3, 2019
House Democrats Prepare White House Subpoena in Impeachment Probe, Trump Rages Against Impeachment Probe with Profanity and Insults, Bernie Sanders Has Surgery to Clear Blocked Artery, Deaths and Injuries Mount as Iraqi Police and Soldiers Fire on Protesters, EU Officials Wary as British PM Boris Johnson Unveils Brexit Plan , Hong Kong Teen Shot During Protests Charged with Assaulting Officer, Record-Breaking Hurricane Lorenzo Lashes Azores, Heads for Ireland, London Climate Protesters Spray British Treasury with Fake Blood, Cameroonian Asylum Seeker Dies in For-Profit Immigration Jail, Plácido Domingo Quits L.A. Opera Amid Sexual Misconduct Claims, R. Kelly Denied Bail in Federal Sex Crimes Case, Dallas Ex-Cop Sentenced to 10 Years for Murdering Neighbor, 10 Arrested in Anti-Drone Protest at Nevada's Creech Air Force Base

Democracy Now
Oct 02, 2019

"Impunity & Corruption": Haiti Protesters Demand President Moïse's Resignation Amid Failing Economy
In Haiti, massive anti-government protests calling for the resignation of U.S.-backed President Jovenel Moïse continue to escalate. The worsening economic crisis, a shortage of fuel and food, and corruption allegations against Moïse have sent protesters to the streets on and off for over a year. Hundreds demonstrated in the capital Port-au-Prince Monday, and another protest is scheduled for today. Much of Port-au-Prince has been on lockdown for the past two weeks, and at least four people have been killed in recent days after Haitian police opened fire on protesters, using live ammunition and tear gas. From Miami, we speak to Jacqueline Charles, Haiti and Caribbean correspondent at the Miami Herald and a Pulitzer Prize finalist for her coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

Democracy Now
Oct 02, 2019

Hong Kong Youth Face Military Crackdown While Fighting "One of the Most Unequal Societies Anywhere"
China held its largest military parades ever in Beijing this week to mark 70 years of Communist rule. Meanwhile, in Hong Kong, police escalated violence Tuesday by firing live ammunition at demonstrators for the first time in the months-long protests. In a widely viewed video posted online, a riot police officer is seen firing his gun into the chest of 18-year-old protester Tony Tsang. The teenager is reportedly in stable condition. Police also fired tear gas and water cannons, while protesters were seen throwing Molotov cocktails. Ninety-six protesters were arrested on Tuesday on rioting charges.? For more on the Hong Kong protests, we speak with Kevin Lin, China Program officer at the International Labor Rights Forum. He was born and raised in Beijing, and has spent years researching the labor movement and civil society in China. His recent piece for Jacobin is headlined "Four Points on the Hong Kong Protests." He is also the author of "How Should the U.S. Left Think About China?" in the journal New Politics.

Democracy Now
Oct 02, 2019

Botham Jean Family's Lawyer Hails White Cop's Murder Conviction as "Precedent-Setting Case"
A white off-duty police officer who shot and killed a 26-year-old black man in his own home in Dallas in 2018 was convicted of murder on Tuesday. The officer, Amber Guyger, entered Botham Jean's apartment, mistaking it for her own, and shot and killed him. Jean's apartment was located one floor below Guyger's in the building. She claimed during trial to have believed Jean was an intruder. Guyger is the first Dallas police officer to be convicted of murder since the 1970s, according to The Dallas Morning News. For more on the case, we speak with Benjamin Crump, an attorney for the family of Botham Jean. He says the verdict is a potentially "precedent-setting case" that signals white police officers cannot kill unarmed black and brown people without consequence.

Democracy Now
Oct 02, 2019

Headlines for October 2, 2019
Report: Trump Pushed for Shooting Migrants and Placing Alligators & Snakes Along Border, Trump Claims Impeachment Inquiry Is "Coup" as Pompeo Blocks Officials from Testifying, Sen. Grassley Breaks from Trump to Support Protection of Whistleblower, In "Victory for Black People in America," Dallas Officer Convicted of Murdering Black Man Inside His Own Home, Federal Judge Temporarily Blocks Georgia Abortion Law, U.S.-N. Korea Talks to Resume as Pyongyang Carries Out New Missile Test, Hong Kong Protesters Stage Sit-in Outside School of Student Shot by Police, Pretrial Hearings Begin in Netanyahu Corruption Case, Peru Faces Political Crisis After President Dissolves Congress, 1,000 Migrants Have Died Crossing Mediterranean for Sixth Year in a Row, Mississippi City Claims Undocumented Man Shot Dead by Police Has No Constitutional Rights, Federal Court Largely Upholds FCC Repeal of Net Neutrality Rules, In Leaked Audio, Zuckerberg Slams Warren Proposal to Break Up Facebook, Trump & RNC Raise Record $125 Million in Third Quarter, 40,000 Child Care Providers in California Gain Right to Unionize, Federal Judge Rules in Harvard's Favor in Affirmative Action Case, Washington Post Columnist Jamal Khashoggi Rembered One Year After Assassination in Saudi Consulate

Democracy Now
Oct 01, 2019

Newark Water Crisis: Mayor Ras Baraka Responds to Critics & Promises City Is Working on Solution
Newark, New Jersey, city officials recently announced thousands of water filters handed out to residents have significantly reduced lead in drinking water to safe levels. Lead contamination has plagued the city for years, spiking even higher in 2019. Over the summer, the Natural Resources Defense Council filed a lawsuit against Newark, accusing it of violating federal safe drinking water laws. The crisis came to a head last month following revelations that water filters distributed to residents may not have been effective. Meanwhile, New Jersey officials have signed off on a $120 million bond with Essex County to fast-track the replacement of thousands of contaminated pipes in the city in less than three years. Tomorrow, Newark Mayor Ras Baraka will hold a State of the Water Town Hall meeting. Mayor Baraka joins us at the Democracy Now! studio.

Democracy Now
Oct 01, 2019

To Impeach or Not to Impeach? Chris Hedges & John Bonifaz Debate What Congress Should Do Next
House Democrats subpoenaed President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani Monday, seeking documents related to his work in Ukraine. Last week, Guliani admitted on television that he had urged the Ukrainian government to investigate Trump's political rival and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden. This comes as House Democrats continue to build their case for impeaching the president, following a whistleblower complaint focused on a phone call in which Trump asked the Ukranian president to do him a "favor" investigating the actions of Democrats, including Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Meanwhile, Trump is continuing to threaten lawmakers who are pushing impeachment, and publicly admitted he is trying to find out the identity of the anonymous whistleblower, in possible violation of whistleblower protection laws. We host a debate on impeachment with John Bonifaz, co-founder and president of Free Speech for People, one of the organizations demanding Trump's impeachment, and Chris Hedges, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, award-winning author and activist.

Democracy Now
Oct 01, 2019

Headlines for October 1, 2019
House Democrats Subpoena Giuliani over Ukraine Work, Report: Trump Pressured Australia, Italy & U.K. to Help with Political Probes, Trump Renews Threats Against Schiff and Intelligence Whistleblower, Hong Kong Protests Escalate as Beijing Marks 70th Anniversary of People's Republic of China, Four Die in Ongoing Anti-Government Protests in Haiti, Somali Militants Attack U.S. Drone Base & Italian Military Convoy, Nigerian Journalist Omoyele Sowore Pleads Not Guilty, Remains Locked Up, U.S. Blocks Cuban Health Minister from Attending Regional WHO Meeting in D.C., GOP Congressmember Chris Collins Resigns over Insider Trader Scandal, Bernie Sanders Raises $25 Million in Third Quarter, Most So Far by Any 2020 Democrat, Lawyers Call for Missouri Governor to Halt Execution, Warning It May Be "Especially Gruesome", Seattle Climate Activists Shut Down Chase Banks over Fossil Fuel Funding, 37 Animal Rights Activists Arrested at Whole Foods Occupation in SF, California Governor Signs Bill to Allow College Athletes to Sign Endorsement Deals, Elaine Massacre: New Memorial Unveiled on Centennial of Racial Mass Killing

Democracy Now
Sep 30, 2019

Whistleblower Edward Snowden on Trump, Obama & How He Ended Up in Russia to Avoid U.S. Extradition
We conclude our interview with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, who has just published his memoir titled "Permanent Record." In 2013, after quitting his job at the NSA, Snowden attempted to fly from Hong Kong to Latin America in order to avoid being extradited to the United States. But the U.S. revoked his passport when he stopped through Russia, effectively stranding him there. Snowden has lived as an exile in Moscow ever since. He tells us his story.

Democracy Now
Sep 30, 2019

Snowden Reveals How He Secretly Exposed NSA Criminal Wrongdoing Without Getting Arrested
Edward Snowden talks about his decision to leak documents to journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras rather than WikiLeaks, and the issues with the U.S. government's response to whistleblower disclosures. His recently published memoir, "Permanent Record," tells the story of his decision to expose the system of mass surveillance. "I think it's so obvious that no harm to national security has resulted from this process of disclosure. And yet, the same criticisms, the same allegations are made to me as have been every other whistleblower," Snowden says. "What we need to understand here is not my model of publication is right and WikiLeaks' model is wrong, but rather to see you have two very different levels of caution, of risk mitigation in these publication models."

Democracy Now
Sep 30, 2019

Edward Snowden: Private Contractors Play Key Role in U.S. Intelligence's "Creeping Authoritarianism"
As a whistleblower complaint against President Trump rocks Washington, Democrats begin an impeachment inquiry and Trump threatens "big consequences" for the person who came forward, we continue our conversation with one of the world's most famous whistleblowers: Edward Snowden, now in exile in Russia. Six years ago, he shocked the world when he leaked a trove of secret documents about how the United States had built a massive surveillance apparatus to collect every single phone call, text message and email, and pry into the private lives of every person on Earth. He has just published a memoir titled "Permanent Record." In Part 2 of our interview, he talks about how the government initially attempted to say that he was just an outside contractor and not a key figure, but he describes the central role contractors play in the intelligence community.

Democracy Now
Sep 30, 2019

Headlines for September 30, 2019
Facing Threats from Trump, Anonymous Whistleblower to Testify on Capitol Hill, Trump Warns Impeachment Could Lead to Civil War, Calls Critics "Savages", Pomeo Subpoenaed over Ukraine; Trump Envoy for Ukraine Resigns, More Than 2 Million Take Part in Global Climate Strike, Nearly 70 Arrested at New Hampshire Coal Plant Protest, Federal Judge Blocks Trump Administration Effort to Indefinitely Detain Migrant Children, Low Turnout Reported on Election Day in Afghanistan, Egyptian Dissident Alaa Abd El-Fattah Arrested Amid Growing Crackdown, Houthis Claim to Have Killed 500 Saudi Soldiers in August Attack, El País: Spanish Firm Spied for CIA on Assange Inside Ecuadorian Embassy, UAW Strike at General Motors Enters Third Week, Joseph Wilson, Ambassador Who Disputed Bush's Iraq WMD Claim, Dies at 69

Democracy Now
Sep 27, 2019

Over 2,000 Arrested in Egypt in Growing Protests Against Sisi, Trump's "Favorite Dictator"
Demonstrations continued in Egypt Friday, with thousands taking to the streets to demand the resignation of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi over accusations of corruption. Nearly 2,000 people have been arrested over the past week amid protests in Cairo and other cities. The demonstrations were triggered by social media posts by a former army contractor accusing Sisi and other officials of misusing public money. Anti-government protests are rare in Egypt as they've been effectively banned since Sisi came to power following the 2013 overthrow of former President Mohamed Morsi and launched a widespread crackdown on dissent. Earlier this week, President Trump praised Sisi as the two leaders met during the U.N. General Assembly here in New York. Trump also recently referred to Sisi as "my favorite dictator." For more, we're joined by Sharif Abdel Kouddous, Democracy Now! correspondent and a reporter with the independent, Cairo-based media outlet Mada Masr.

Democracy Now
Sep 27, 2019

James Risen: I Wrote About the Bidens and Ukraine in 2015. The Right-Wing Media Twisted My Reporting
Democrats are coalescing behind an effort to impeach President Trump over his call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, in which he pressed the Ukrainian leader to investigate Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Meanwhile, Republicans have latched onto the Biden-Ukraine story as a means of smearing the former vice president as corrupt, in an attempt to damage one of Trump's political rivals. For more on the story, we speak with James Risen, senior national security correspondent for The Intercept, who first wrote about the Bidens and Ukraine in 2015, when he was a reporter for The New York Times. He says the "right-wing spin machine" has since twisted his reporting, misrepresenting his findings. In a new article for The Intercept, Risen writes, "It's strange to see my journalism twisted, perverted, and turned into lies and poisonous propaganda by Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani, and their enablers."

Democracy Now
Sep 27, 2019

James Risen: Whistleblower Complaint Shows "Trump Is a Habitual Criminal" Abusing His Office
Democrats are ramping up efforts to impeach President Trump for pressing the president of Ukraine to investigate Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Nearly 90% of House Democrats now support impeachment. On Thursday, a declassified version of a complaint by an anonymous whistleblower was released, detailing his concerns about Trump's July phone call with Volodymyr Zelensky. In the complaint, the unnamed whistleblower — who has been identified as a CIA official — accused the president of "using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election." The complaint also revealed details about how the White House attempted to "lock down" all records of Trump's phone conversation with Zelensky by moving a transcript of the call to a standalone computer system reserved for codeword-level intelligence information. The whistleblower wrote in his complaint, "According to White House officials I spoke with, this was 'not the first time' under this Administration that a Presidential transcript was placed into this codeword-level system solely for the purpose of protecting politically sensitive — rather than national security sensitive — information." For more on the unfolding scandal, we speak with James Risen, senior national security correspondent for The Intercept.

Democracy Now
Sep 27, 2019

Headlines for September 27, 2019
Whistleblower Warned White House Tried to "Lock Down" Ukraine Call Details, Acting DNI Maguire Says Whistleblower "Acted in Good Faith", Trump Suggests Whistleblower Should Get Death Sentence for Treason, Global Youth-Led Strikes Demand Action on Climate Crisis, Study Finds Climate Crisis May Threaten 60% of World's Wheat Crop by 2100, States Challenge Trump's Rollback of Endangered Species Act, Senate Advances Confirmation of Ex-Monsanto Executive to Lead Wildlife Agency, EPA Chief Blames California's Homeless Population for Poor Water Quality, Protesters Defy Security Crackdown in Egypt, Demanding Ouster of President Sisi, Palestinian President Condemns Israeli PM Plans to Annex West Bank Lands, Trump Administration to Slash U.S. Refugee Admissions Again, to 18,000, 500,000 Children to Lose Free School Meals Under Trump's Food Stamp Rollback, Chicago Teachers Overwhelmingly Authorize Strike on October 7, Senate Confirms Corporate Attorney Eugene Scalia as Labor Secretary, Indonesian Police Open Fire on West Papuan Protesters, Killing 32, Relatives of the Disappeared Demand Justice 5 Years After Ayotzinapa Mass Kidnapping

Democracy Now
Sep 26, 2019

Permanent Record: Why NSA Whistleblower Edward Snowden Risked His Life to Expose Surveillance State
Six years ago, Edward Snowden leaked a trove of secret documents about how the United States had built a massive surveillance apparatus to spy on Americans and people across the globe. Snowden was then charged in the U.S. for violating the Espionage Act and other laws. As he attempted to flee to Latin America, Snowden became stranded in Russia after the U.S. revoked his passport. He has lived in Moscow ever since. Snowden just published his memoir, "Permanent Record," in which he writes about what led him to risk his life to expose the U.S. government's system of mass surveillance. From Moscow, he speaks to Democracy Now!'s Amy Goodman and Juan González about his life before and after becoming an NSA whistleblower.

Democracy Now
Sep 26, 2019

Edward Snowden Condemns Trump's Mistreatment of Whistleblower Who Exposed Ukraine Scandal
Responding to news of a whistleblower's complaint at the center of an impeachment inquiry filed against President Trump this week, famed whistleblower Edward Snowden speaks about his own decision to leak classified documents in 2013. The House Intelligence Committee has released the declassified whistleblower complaint, which details a July phone call between President Trump and the Ukrainian president. The White House is trying "to make the conversation not about the allegations," Snowden told Democracy Now! "They want to talk about the whistleblower rather than the government's own wrongdoing."

Democracy Now
Sep 26, 2019

"Financial Censorship Is Still Censorship": Edward Snowden Slams Justice Dept. Lawsuit Against Him
As a whistleblower complaint filed against President Trump rocks Washington and threatens Trump's presidency, one of the world's most famous whistleblowers, Edward Snowden, joins us from Moscow, Russia. Earlier this month, the Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against Snowden alleging that his newly released memoir, "Permanent Record," violates the nondisclosure agreements he signed with the federal government when he was a National Security Agency employee. The Justice Department also argued that they are entitled to all of Snowden's book profits. Democracy Now!'s Amy Goodman and Juan González speak with Snowden about the lawsuit.

Democracy Now
Sep 26, 2019

Headlines for September 26, 2019
Transcript Shows Trump Pressured Ukrainian Leader to Probe Joe Biden and Son, President Trump on Ukraine Phone Call: "Impeachment for That?", Majority of House Lawmakers Back Impeachment Inquiry Against Trump, Iranian President Rules Out Talks with U.S. While Sanctions Remain, Saudi-Led Coalition Airstrikes Kill 16 Civilians in Yemen, Israel's President Asks Benjamin Netanyahu to Form New Government, 2 Million Wild Animals Perish as Fires Rage in Bolivia, Climate Crisis Drives Mont Blanc Glacier Toward Collapse, 7 Arrested as San Francisco Climate Protesters Block Wells Fargo Entrance, Doctors Glue Themselves to London Building Amid New Extinction Rebellion Protests, Mexican State of Oaxaca Decriminalizes Abortion, Australia's New South Wales Ends Century-Old Abortion Ban, U.S. Agreement with Honduras Severely Restricts Asylum Seekers' Rights, Chicago Park District Workers, Teachers and School Staff Make Strike Plans, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Unveils Legislative Plan for "A Just Society"

Democracy Now
Sep 25, 2019

Billy Bragg: What the U.K. Supreme Court's Historic Ruling Against Boris Johnson Means for Brexit
The U.K. Parliament has reconvened after the country's Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson had unlawfully suspended Parliament in order to push through Brexit with or without a deal. Johnson made the unprecedented move late last month, asking the queen to prorogue Parliament in order to limit debate on leaving the European Union, which the U.K. is scheduled to do by October 31. Calls for Johnson's resignation are mounting since the news broke, with opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn calling for a general election and demanding Johnson apologize to the queen and to the country. For more on the political crisis in Britain, we speak with legendary British singer and songwriter Billy Bragg. "Really, what's behind Brexit is ordinary working people feeling they no longer have agency over their lives. … The European Union have become a focus for anger that really should be directed at the Westminster government that Boris Johnson leads," Bragg says. His new book is "The Three Dimensions of Freedom."

Democracy Now
Sep 25, 2019

Trump Lashes Out at Iran, China & Venezuela in Nationalist Address to U.N. General Assembly
On Tuesday, President Trump made his third address to the United Nations General Assembly amid simmering tensions in the Middle East over recent attacks on Saudi Arabian oil facilities, which the United States blames on Iran. Tehran denies the allegations. Trump also lashed out at China and Venezuela. We speak with Vijay Prashad, director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research and chief editor of LeftWord Books. His latest article for Salon is headlined "World leaders gather at the UN in the face of war, climate catastrophe & global worker exploitation."

Democracy Now
Sep 25, 2019

"We've Reached Critical Mass": Rep. Al Green on Pelosi Vow to Impeach Trump for "Dastardly Deeds"
Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has launched a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump following allegations from an intelligence community whistleblower that Trump sought help from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in a July 25 phone call to investigate Democratic presidential front-runner Joe Biden and his son Hunter. On Tuesday, the Republican-controlled Senate unanimously passed a nonbinding resolution calling for the Trump administration to release the whistleblower complaint to the House and Senate Intelligence Committees. We get response and look at next steps with Congressmember Al Green, Democrat from Texas, who in 2017 was the first congressmember to call for President Trump's impeachment from the floor of the House of Representatives. We also speak with John Nichols, political writer for The Nation and author of the book, "The Genius of Impeachment: The Founders' Cure for Royalism."

Democracy Now
Sep 25, 2019

Headlines for September 25, 2019
Pelosi Launches Impeachment Inquiry Against President Trump, IPCC: World Must Cut Greenhouse Emissions or Face Catastrophic Sea Level Rise, Bolsonaro Faces Condemnation For Defending Deforestation of Amazon in U.N. Speech, Trump Denounces Iran, Venezuela & Calls for Countries to Embrace Nationalism at U.N., Pakistani PM Demands World to Address Crisis in Kashmir, U.K. Parliament Reconvenes After Court Declares Boris Johnson's Parliament Suspension Illegal, Egyptian Authorities Arrest At Least 900 Following Anti-Government Protests, Spain to Exhume Body of Former Dictator Francisco Franco from State Mausoleum, Nigerian Journalist Omoyele Sowore Makes Bail Amid Treason Charges for Rallying Peaceful Protests, German Prosecutors Indict Volkswagen Execs over Diesel Emissions Scandal, Bernie Sanders Proposes Billionaire Wealth Tax That Could Raise Trillions in Revenue, General Motors Strike Enters 10th Day In Longest National GM Strike in 50 Years, Judge Rules American Citizen Can't Challenge His Placement on U.S. "Kill List", Massachusetts Governor Declares Public Health Emergency, Orders 4-Month Ban on Vaping Products, Greta Thunberg & Aminatou Haidar Win Right Livelihood Awards, Known as "Alternative Nobel Prize"

Democracy Now
Sep 24, 2019

Ta-Nehisi Coates on His Debut Novel "The Water Dancer," Slavery & Reparations
Celebrated writer Ta-Nehisi Coates's first novel, "The Water Dancer," was released today. Centering on a man named Hiram Walker, who was born into slavery in 19th century Virginia, the novel is a "crowd-pleasing exercise in breakneck and often occult storytelling," a review in The New York Times stated. Over the past decade Ta-Nehisi Coates has become one of the nation's celebrated writers. In 2014, he wrote a piece titled "The Case for Reparations," which rejuvenated the push for the government to pay reparations to the descendants of slaves. His 2015 book, "Between the World and Me," a National Book Award winner, was written as a letter to his adolescent son. In our New York studio, we speak with Coates about "The Water Dancer" and his attempt in his first novel to "get at American myth" that exists around race and reparations.

Democracy Now
Sep 24, 2019

Meet Brazil's Indigenous Leader Attacked by Bolsonaro at U.N. over Efforts to Preserve the Amazon
A number of indigenous leaders from Brazil traveled to New York to protest Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's push to open the Amazon rainforest for agribusiness, logging and mining. Democracy Now!'s Nermeen Shaikh spoke to Chief Raoni Metuktire of the Kayapó tribe on Monday outside the U.N. Climate Action Summit about the situation in the Amazon, including the recent outbreak of devastating fires. After the interview, Chief Raoni attempted to enter the U.N. summit, but despite support from dozens of activists, he was barred from entering. He is a nominee for the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize.

Democracy Now
Sep 24, 2019

Meet the Brazilian Indigenous Chief Nominated for 2020 Nobel Prize for His Work Preserving Amazon
A number of indigenous leaders from Brazil traveled to New York to protest Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's push to open the Amazon rainforest for agribusiness, logging and mining. Democracy Now!'s Nermeen Shaikh spoke to Chief Raoni Metuktire of the Kayapó tribe on Monday outside the U.N. Climate Action Summit about the situation in the Amazon, including the recent outbreak of devastating fires. After the interview, Chief Raoni attempted to enter the U.N. summit, but despite support from dozens of activists, he was barred from entering. He is a nominee for the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize.

Democracy Now
Sep 24, 2019

In Landmark UN Complaint, 16 Children Accuse Nations of Failing to Protect Them from Climate Change
Youth climate activists from around the world also attended the U.N. Climate Action Summit Monday, where they spoke at UNICEF about a landmark new climate complaint they filed with the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child. Hailing from countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, the Marshall Islands and Tunisia, the young representatives spoke about why they feel compelled to act on the climate crisis. Among the youth climate activists were Alexandria Villaseñor of New York and Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg.

Democracy Now
Sep 24, 2019

How Dare You! Greta Thunberg Slams World's Focus on Economic "Fairy Tales" While Ecosystems Collapse
Scores of world leaders gathered in New York on Monday for the U.N. Climate Action Summit, but the world's largest greenhouse gas emitters announced few new measures to address the climate crisis. President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence briefly attended the summit but left after just 14 minutes. At the beginning of the summit, 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg delivered an impassioned address to world leaders, explicitly naming their inaction on the climate crisis. "People are suffering. People are dying. Entire ecosystems are collapsing," Greta said. "We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!"

Democracy Now
Sep 24, 2019

Headlines for September 24, 2019
Greta Thunberg and Youth Activists Take On World Leaders at U.N. Climate Action Summit, Trump Admin Tells U.N. to Drop Term "Reproductive Health and Rights", Trump Ordered Hold on Ukrainian Aid Before Call with President Zelensky About Bidens, U.K. Supreme Court: Boris Johnson's Suspension of Parliament Is Unlawful, U.K., France & Germany Say Iran Responsible for Saudi Oil Attacks as Trump Addresses UNGA, Afghanistan: At Least 40 Civilians Killed by U.S.-Afghan Attack, Haiti: Senator Shoots AP Photographer in Face During Anti-Gov't Protests, Video of Blindfolded Prisoners in Xinjiang Adds to Fears of Mass Human Rights Abuses Against Uyghurs, Netanyahu and Gantz in Talks over Possible Power-Sharing Deal, DOJ: U.S. Soldier Shared Bomb-Making Instructions, Discussed Bombing News Network, Investigators: FAA Misled Lawmakers on Boeing 737 MAX Safety Inspections

Democracy Now
Sep 23, 2019

Bill McKibben: Youth Who Led Global Climate Strike Are Bringing a New "Spirit" to Climate Fight
Following Friday's youth-led climate strike — the largest-ever global protest focused on climate — we speak with Bill McKibben, longtime journalist and co-founder of 350.org. McKibben's latest piece for The New Yorker is titled "Money Is the Oxygen on Which the Fire of Global Warming Burns," and his cover piece for Time magazine is headlined "Hello from the Year 2050. We Avoided the Worst of Climate Change — But Everything Is Different." McKibben's 1989 book, "The End of Nature," was the first book for a general audience about climate change.

Democracy Now
Sep 23, 2019

"Our House Is on Fire": Greta Thunberg Addresses Hundreds of Thousands at NYC Climate Strike
Sixteen-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg spoke at Friday's climate strike in New York, where an estimated 300,000 people took to the streets. Thunberg inspired the global spread of weekly climate strikes when she started skipping school to protest outside of the Swedish parliament last year. "We will not just stand aside and watch," Thunberg told a crowd of thousands in her speech at Manhattan's Battery Park. "We are united behind the science, and we will do everything in our power to stop this crisis from getting worse."

Democracy Now
Sep 23, 2019

19-Year-Old Indigenous Climate Activist Artemisa Xakriabá: "We Fight for Mother Earth"
Friday's climate strike in New York City concluded with remarks from indigenous leaders, activists and organizers. Artemisa Xakriabá, a 19-year-old indigenous climate activist of the Xakriabá people, spoke about the increasing intensity of environmental destruction across Brazil and the interconnectedness of the fight for climate justice. "We fight for our Mother Earth because the fight for Mother Earth is the mother of all other fights," Xakriabá said. "We are fighting for your lives. We are fighting for our lives. We are fighting for our sacred territory. But we are being persecuted, threatened, murdered, only for protecting our own territories. We cannot accept one more drop of indigenous blood spilled."

Democracy Now
Sep 23, 2019

Millions Took Part in the Youth-Led Global Climate Strike Friday. Here's Why People Marched
As many as a quarter-million people marched on the streets of New York City Friday for a youth-led climate strike inspired by Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg. Globally, as many as 4 million people took to the streets in hundreds of countries. Democracy Now! was in the streets of New York on Friday speaking with climate strikers from the United States and around the world.

Democracy Now
Sep 23, 2019

"This Is Our Time. This Is Our Future." Voices from the Historic Youth Climate Strike in NYC
As many as 4 million people around the world took to the streets Friday in the largest day of action focused on the climate crisis. Students across the globe led climate strikes in hundreds of countries, inspired by 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg. The demonstration kicked off in Foley Square, where tens of thousands of people gathered before the march. Varshini Prakash, co-founder and executive director of the Sunrise Movement, and climate activist Vic Barrett were among the handful of activists who addressed the climate strikers in Foley Square.

Democracy Now
Sep 23, 2019

Headlines for September 23, 2019
4 Million Take to the Streets for Global Climate Strike, Trump Admin Ignored CBP Report Linking Climate Change and Increased Migration, Honduran Woman and 21-Month-Old Son Die While Attempting to Reach U.S., New Deal Would Force Asylum Seekers to Return to El Salvador Despite Obvious Dangers, Calls for Impeachment Grow as Trump Acknowledges Ukraine Phone Call About Bidens, U.S. to Send Troops to Saudi Arabia, Impose Iran Sanctions, as Rouhani Heads to UNGA with Peace Plan, Arab Parties in Israel Back Benny Gantz in Bid to End Netanyahu's Rule, Egyptians Take to Street in Rare Protest Against President Sisi, Gov't Corruption, Trump Praises Indian PM Modi at Massive Texas Rally as Human Rights Abuses Continue in Kashmir, Florida School Officer with History of Child Abuse Arrests 6-Year-Old, Emmy Awarded to 1st Openly Gay Black Actor in Lead Role, as Trans Activists Shine Light on SCOTUS Case

Democracy Now
Sep 20, 2019

This Afghan Teen Was Set to Join First-Ever U.N. Youth Climate Summit, But U.S. Denied His Visa
Climate youth activist Nasratullah Elham of Afghanistan was invited to participate in the first-ever U.N. Youth Climate Summit, but the United States rejected his visa. He breaks the sound barrier to join us from Phuket, Thailand, where he is a 12th grade student, and says his activism is based on the crisis's impact on his home country. "The poor people there are very badly affected in a situation [where] they do not really have much carbon emissions," he says.

Democracy Now
Sep 20, 2019

Kelsey Juliana v. U.S.: Meet the Young Woman Suing the Federal Government over the Climate Crisis
Among those joining today's Global Climate Strike will be Kelsey Juliana, lead plaintiff in Juliana v. United States, the landmark youth climate lawsuit against the U.S. government. She joins us for a roundtable discussion, along with Jerome Foster II, White House Climate Strike organizer, founder and executive director of OneMillionOfUs.

Democracy Now
Sep 20, 2019

"Kelsey Juliana v. U.S.": Meet the Young Woman Suing the Federal Government over the Climate Crisis
Among those joining today's Global Climate Strike will be Kelsey Juliana, lead plaintiff in Juliana v. United States, the landmark youth climate lawsuit against the U.S. government. She joins us for a roundtable discussion, along with Jerome Foster II, White House Climate Strike organizer, founder and executive director of OneMillionOfUs.

Democracy Now
Sep 20, 2019

"Young People Have Had Enough": Global Climate Strike Youth Activists on Why They Are Marching Today
Today is the Global Climate Strike, inspired by 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg. As people took to the streets in Africa, Asia, Europe and Australia, we host a roundtable discussion with youth activists organizing marches in the United States — in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Minneapolis — ahead of next week's U.N. Climate Action Summit. We are joined by Xiye Bastida, a 17-year-old climate justice activist originally from Mexico who is an organizer with Fridays for Future New York and a student at Beacon High School in New York; Katie Eder, a 19-year-old climate justice activist who founded the Future Coalition, where she is currently the executive director; Juwaria Jama, a 15-year-old and first-generation Somali from Minneapolis, Minnesota, who is with U.S. Youth Climate Strikes and is the co-state lead for the Minnesota Youth Climate Strike; and Isra Hirsi, a high school junior and executive director of the U.S. Youth Climate Strike, daughter of Democratic Representative Ilhan Omar.

Democracy Now
Sep 20, 2019

Headlines for September 20, 2019
Students Across the World Walk Out of Classes in Global Climate Strike, Two Die in Texas as Storm Dumps 40 Inches of Rain on Houston Area, Red Cross: 2 Million Need Humanitarian Aid Every Week Due to Climate Crisis, Bird Population in U.S. & Canada Dropped by Nearly 3 Billion Since 1970, Benny Gantz Declares Victory, Rejects Overture from Netanyahu, Trudeau Apologizes Again as New Blackface Photos Emerge, Funeral Held in Afghanistan After U.S. Drone Strike Killed 30 Civilians, Mostly Farmers, Kashmiris Sue Modi in U.S. Court as Trump Prepares to Appear with Indian PM at Texas Rally, Report: Whistleblower Complaint Against Trump Focused on Phone Call with Ukrainian President, Colt to Stop Manufacturing Sporting Rifles, Including AR-15, Self-Described "Antifa Hunter" Arrested for Threatening Black Lives Matter Activist in Charlottesville, Amnesty & HRW Urge Rejection of Torture Backer to Top State Dept. Human Rights Post, Betsy DeVos Threatens to Cut Funding to UNC & Duke for Middle East Studies Program, U.S. Expels Two Cuban Diplomats; Cuban Fuel Shortage Continues, Former Tunisian Dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali Dies, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio Drops Out of 2020 Race

Democracy Now
Sep 19, 2019

Meet the Beauty Queen Who Inspired Gambia's Me Too Movement After Accusing Ex-Dictator of Rape
In Gambia, an ongoing public truth and reconciliation commission is investigating the atrocities of former President Yahya Jammeh, who ruled the West African country of 2 million people for 22 years before his regime ended in 2016. In widely shared public testimony that has been live-streamed to tens of thousands of people, survivors and members of Jammeh's death squad who killed migrants, journalists and civilians during the president's reign are telling their stories for the world to hear. One such survivor is Fatou "Toufah" Jallow, who says the former president raped her in 2015. We speak with Jallow, a Gambian feminist and anti-rapist activist, and Reed Brody, counsel and spokesperson for Human Rights Watch who is currently leading the prosecution of Jammeh.

Democracy Now
Sep 19, 2019

Amnesty Head: Climate Crisis Is a "Death Penalty" for Humanity. Leaders Need Political Will to Act
More than a million students are expected to walk out of class on Friday in a Global Climate Strike, with more than 800 climate strikes scheduled in the United States alone. Strikes are also being organized in another 150 countries around the world. In our New York studio, we speak to Amnesty International's Secretary General Kumi Naidoo, who has urged school districts across the globe to allow students to walk out of school on Friday without facing punishment. In a letter, Naidoo, who is also the former executive director of Greenpeace, writes, "[C]hildren should not be punished for speaking out about the great injustices of our age. In fact, when it has fallen on young people to show the leadership that many adults who hold great positions of power have failed to, it is not young people's behaviour we should be questioning. It is ours."

Democracy Now
Sep 19, 2019

Headlines for September 19, 2019
U.S. Secretary of State Blames Iran for "Act of War" Against Saudi Oil Facility, WaPo: Whistleblower Reported "Troubling" Promise from Trump to Foreign Leader, Trump Names Robert O'Brien as Fourth National Security Adviser, U.S.-Backed Forces Kill 30 Afghan Civilians; Taliban Truck Bomb Kills 20, Thousands Fall Ill as Indonesian Fires Spread Toxic Haze, Thousands Lose Power as Hurricane Humberto Lashes Bermuda, Youth Activist Greta Thunberg to U.S. Lawmakers: Listen to Climate Scientists, University of California to Divest from Fossil Fuel Companies, Israeli Election Challenger Gantz Rejects Call to Join Netanyahu Unity Government, Former Executives Acquitted over Roles in Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, Democratic Donor Ed Buck Arrested, Charged with Running a Drug House, Canadian PM Trudeau Apologizes Appearing in Brownface in 2001 Photo

Democracy Now
Sep 18, 2019

"Beaten Down, Worked Up": Steven Greenhouse on the Past, Present and Future of American Labor
As UAW workers stand on picket lines across the country, teachers prepare to strike in Chicago, and thousands of healthcare workers with Kaiser Permanente plan to strike in October, we speak with longtime labor reporter Steven Greenhouse, author of the new book "Beaten Down, Worked Up: The Past, Present, and Future of American Labor." Among other issues, Greenhouse discusses how labor and climate activists are teaming up to push for a Green New Deal.

Democracy Now
Sep 18, 2019

UAW Strike Enters Day 3 as 50,000 Workers Demand GM to Share Its Billions in Profits
As members of the United Auto Workers head into their third day of a nationwide strike, General Motors has cut off health insurance for the nearly 50,000 people on picket lines across the country demanding better working conditions and fair pay. The workers say GM continues to deny employees' demands for better conditions and compensation despite leading the company to record profits following bankruptcy and a federal bailout. It's the first company-wide strike against GM in 12 years. UAW had sought to have GM cover striking workers' health insurance through the end of the month. In New York City, we speak with Steven Greenhouse, veteran labor reporter formerly with The New York Times. His latest book is titled "Beaten Down, Worked Up: The Past, Present, and Future of American Labor." His recent op-ed in The New York Times is headlined "The Autoworkers Strike Is Bigger Than G.M."

Democracy Now
Sep 18, 2019

Israel's Election Outcome Remains Unclear, But the "Ultimate Loser" Will Be Palestinians
Israel is facing political turmoil as Tuesday's election remains too close to call. With 92% of the vote counted, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Likud party and ex-military chief Benny Gantz's Blue and White party appear to be nearly tied. Both leading candidates aiming to be prime minister had run on platforms vowing to take harsh measures targeting Palestinians. Netanyahu promised to annex nearly a third of the occupied West Bank, in violation of international law, if he won re-election. Earlier this year, Gantz had threatened to bomb Gaza back to the "Stone Ages." On Tuesday night, Gantz said he had fulfilled his mission by preventing Netanyahu's outright re-election, while Netanyahu did not claim victory or concede defeat in a speech to supporters. From Jerusalem, we speak with Palestinian attorney Diana Buttu about the significance of the snap election. "It's not clear who will be the ultimate victor," Buttu says. "I can tell you who will be the ultimate loser, and that's the Palestinian people."

Democracy Now
Sep 18, 2019

Headlines for September 18, 2019
Israeli PM Netanyahu Fails to Win Majority in Deadlocked Election, Climate Researchers Warn of Potential 7 Degree Temperature Rise by 2100, Greta Thunberg Tells U.S. Senators to Work Harder on Climate Crisis, Tropical Depression to Dump 18 Inches of Rain on Parts of Texas Gulf Coast, Trump Admin Seeks to Revoke California's Auto Emissions Standards, "I Have No Obligation to Be Honest to the Media," Testifies Trump's Ex-Campaign Manager, Trump Tells Campaign Rally in New Mexico, "We Love Our Hispanics", U.S. Senate Votes to Sanction China over Violations of Uyghurs' Human Rights , 75 Countries Using Artificial Intelligence for Mass Surveillance, Trump Admin Sues Edward Snowden over Release of Memoir, Pompeo Travels to Saudi Arabia to Discuss Drone Attacks with Crown Prince, Trans Woman Murdered in Kansas City, 19th Such Killing This Year, General Motors Cuts Health Insurance for 50,000 Striking Workers, Whole Foods Cuts Healthcare Benefits to Nearly 2,000 Workers, Uber and Lyft Drivers Protest Low Pay and Poor Working Conditions in NYC, Veteran PBS and ABC Journalist Cokie Roberts Dies at 75

Democracy Now
Sep 17, 2019

Ecofascism: Naomi Klein Warns the Far Right's Embrace of White Supremacy Is Tied to Climate Crisis
Renowned climate activist and author Naomi Klein addresses the rise of ecofascism, the marrying of environmentalism and white power, which she says manifested in the Christchurch, New Zealand, white sumpremacist terrorist attack, where the shooter idenftied himself as an ecofascist. In her latest book, "On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal," Klein writes, "My fear is that, unless something significant changes in how our societies rise to the ecological crisis, we are going to see this kind of white power eco-fascism emerge with much greater frequency, as a ferocious rationalization for refusing to live up to our collective climate responsibilities."

Democracy Now
Sep 17, 2019

Naomi Klein: Greta Thunberg Is a "Prophetic Voice" in Fight for Climate Justice
Renowned activist, author and professor Naomi Klein discusses the importance of youth voices, including 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, in communicating the urgency of the climate justice movement. Klein's new book, "On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal," addresses the necessity of structural change to combat rising global temperatures and climate injustices. Klein praises Greta for her "moral clarity" as one of many youth voices that "burst through the bureaucratic language with which we shield ourselves from the reality of the stakes, the extraordinary stakes, of our moment in history."

Democracy Now
Sep 17, 2019

"On Fire": In New Book, Naomi Klein Makes the Case for a Green New Deal to Save the Planet
Amid mounting climate disasters across the planet, from the fires ravaging the Amazon to Hurricane Dorian's destructive path through the Bahamas, we speak with renowned journalist, author and activist Naomi Klein. In her new book, "On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal," Klein looks unsparingly at the rise of ecofascism, as Western countries fortify their borders and white supremacy surges around the world in response to the climate crisis. But she also lays out another path forward in which mankind meets the challenge of global warming with radical and systemic transformation. "We do know that if we are going to lower our emissions in time, it is going to take transformations of how we live in cities, how we move ourselves around, how we grow our food, where we get our energy from," Klein says. "Essentially, what the Green New Deal is saying: If we're going to do all that, why wouldn't we tackle all of these systemic economic and social crises at the same time? Because we live in a time of multiple, overlapping crises."

Democracy Now
Sep 17, 2019

Naomi Klein: The Climate Crisis Demands Radical Change. Paper Straws Are a Distraction, Not Solution
Renowned climate activist and author Naomi Klein says responses to the climate crisis have for too long focused on individual consumer choices rather than the collective action needed to save the planet. In a new video for The Intercept, Klein argues, "So many environmental responses have just been minor tweaks to an economy based on endless consumption — take your electric car to the drive-through for an Impossible Burger and a Coke with a paper straw. Of course it's better than the alternative. But it's nowhere close to the depth of change required if we hope to actually pull our planet back from the brink." Klein joins us for the hour to discuss her new book, "On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal."

Democracy Now
Sep 17, 2019

Headlines for September 17, 2019
Iran Rejects Talks with U.S. Following Disputed Drone Attacks in Saudi Arabia, Israelis Head to Polls to Decide Netanyahu's Fate, Afghanistan: Blast Near Presidential Rally Kills Dozens Amid Mounting Violence, Massive Blackout Hits Four Central American Nations, 2 Italian Officials Indicted over Migrant Deaths from 2013 Shipwreck, 2019 Was Northern Hemisphere's Hottest Summer on Record, Auto Workers Continue Strike with Support from Dems, Environmental Activists, Manhattan DA Subpoenas Trump Tax Returns, Acting Intelligence Dir. Refused to Turn Over Whistleblower Complaint That Could Involve Trump, House Dems Investigating Elaine Chao for Ethics Violations, Florida Judge Refuses to Toss Epstein "Sweetheart" Plea Deal, Study: 1 of Every 16 Women and Girls' First Sexual Experience Was Rape, Sen. Warren Launches Anti-Corruption Plan, Receives 2020 Endorsement from Working Families Party, Saturday Night Live Fires Racist, Homophobic New Cast Member

Democracy Now
Sep 16, 2019

"Biological Annihilation": The Danger of Opening Alaska's ANWR to Oil & Gas Drilling
The Trump administration is finalizing plans to open one of the world's last pristine wilderness regions, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, to oil and fracked gas drilling. Trump is pushing the drilling at a time when climate change is permanently altering the Arctic and devastating local communities. The plan calls for the creation of landing strips, drill pads, pipeline supports, a seawater treatment plant, 175 miles of roads, and other infrastructure in Alaska's north coast. On Thursday, the House of Representatives voted to block the Trump administration from opening up Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge; however, a companion bill is unlikely to pass the Republican-controlled Senate. From Charlotte, North Carolina, we speak with Subhankar Banerjee, a professor of art and ecology at the University of New Mexico and the author of "Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Seasons of Life and Land."

Democracy Now
Sep 16, 2019

"We in the Media Have Not Been Doing Our Job": 250 News Outlets Pledge to Focus on Climate Crisis
A major new project from The Nation and the Columbia Journalism Review hopes to improve global coverage of the climate crisis, with more than 250 media outlets around the world signing on to the effort to publish or broadcast stories on climate. Organizers say this is one of the most ambitious efforts ever to organize the world's media around a single topic. The week of coverage, which leads up to next week's U.N. Climate Action Summit, kicked off on Sunday. As part of the effort, CBS News released a new poll of over 2,000 U.S. residents that measured attitudes around climate change, which found that two-thirds of Americans believe climate change is either a crisis or a serious problem, and a majority want immediate action to address the Earth's temperature rise. In San Francisco, we speak with Mark Hertsgaard, one of the co-founders of the project, called Covering Climate Now, and The Nation's environment correspondent and investigative editor.

Democracy Now
Sep 16, 2019

Saudi Oil Refinery Attack Raises Fears of "Wider Regional War" Involving U.S. & Iran
President Trump is threatening to take military action after several large Saudi Arabian oil facilities were attacked Saturday by drones and cruise missiles. Houthi rebels in Yemen claimed responsibility for the attack, but numerous reports indicate the attack may have come from Iraq or Iran rather than Yemen. Crude oil prices soared more than 15% after the Aramco-run plants suffered heavy damage. One of the plants struck is the world's biggest petroleum-processing facility. According to one estimate, the attacks decreased Saudi's daily oil output by nearly 6 million barrels. While the United States has been quick to blame Iran, other world powers have not yet assigned blame. In our New York studio, we speak to Peter Salisbury, the International Crisis Group's senior analyst for Yemen. And from Washington, D.C., we speak with Medea Benjamin, co-founder of CodePink and author of "Inside Iran: The Real History and Politics of the Islamic Republic of Iran."

Democracy Now
Sep 16, 2019

Headlines for September 16, 2019
U.S. Threatens Military Action Against Iran After Oil Attacks in Saudi Arabia, United Auto Workers Strike to Demand Fair Wages, Healthcare & Job Security from GM, Purdue Pharma Files for Bankruptcy, Calls Mount to Impeach Justice Kavanaugh After NYT Report on Sexual Misconduct, Hong Kong Protesters Appeal to U.S., U.K. as Uprising Shows No Sign of Slowing Down, Outsiders Lead Tunisia's Presidential Exit Polls, Algeria Announces Elections Amid Ongoing Protests Against Ruling Elite, U.K. Judge Says Julian Assange a Flight Risk, Must Remain in Prison, Appeals Court Revives Emoluments Case Against Trump, Felicity Huffman Gets 2 Weeks in Prison for Paying Someone to Cheat on Daughter's SATs, NYC Activists Protest Microsoft for Collaborating with ICE, Bernie Sanders Previews Plan to Cut Homelessness, Set National Rent Control Standards, Greenpeace Activists Who Rappelled Off Houston Bridge Facing Charges, Greta Thunberg Leads School Strike for Climate in Front of White House

Democracy Now
Sep 13, 2019

Medicare for All: Sanders & Warren Defend Plan to Expand Healthcare Coverage to Everyone
At Thursday's debate, Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren defended their Medicare for All plan. They faced criticism from several rivals, including Senator Amy Klobuchar, who described it as a "bad idea," and South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, who claimed the bill shows Sanders and Warren do not "trust the American people."

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