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Democracy Now
Jul 05, 2022

As Uvalde Reels from School Massacre, a Look Back at Historic 1970 Chicano Walkout at Robb Elementary
Uvalde, Texas, school district police chief Pete Arredondo has resigned from his new position on Uvalde's City Council after facing widespread criticism over his handling of the May 24 school massacre when an 18-year-old gunman shot dead 19 fourth graders and two teachers. State authorities say Arredondo was the incident commander who ordered officers to wait in the school's hallway for over an hour instead of confronting the gunman. We speak with Sewell Chan, editor-in-chief of The Texas Tribune, which has led an investigation into the failed police response to the school shooting. "The heavy militarization of the region raises profound questions about why the police and law enforcement response was so lacking," said Chan. We also feature the Tribune's video report on a 1970 Mexican American student-led walkout that took place in Uvalde.

Democracy Now
Jul 05, 2022

Profiled & Gunned Down: Protests in Akron After Police Shot Unarmed Jayland Walker 60 Times
Mass racial justice protests broke out this weekend in Akron, Ohio, after police released multiple body-camera videos showing eight officers chasing and killing 25-year-old Jayland Walker after a minor traffic violation on June 27. Walker was an unarmed Black man. The video ends with the police firing about 90 rounds and shooting Walker about 60 times, according to an autopsy report, and lawyers for the family of Walker say police handcuffed him after the attack before trying to provide aid. "The video shows that a Black man was spotted driving at night in an area he probably shouldn't have been spotted, was profiled, was then chased and gunned down like he wasn't human at all. Any other narrative is a disgrace to what we've seen in the video," says Ray Greene Jr., executive director of the Freedom BLOC, a Black-led collective based in Akron that pressured the state to release the video. We are also joined by former Ohio state Senator Nina Turner.

Democracy Now
Jul 05, 2022

"Nation Under Siege": Nina Turner on Highland Park Shooting & Stopping U.S. Gun Violence
Six people were killed and at least two dozen injured when a rooftop gunman armed with a high-powered rifle attacked a Fourth of July parade in the Chicago suburb of Highland Park on Monday morning. The police eventually arrested Robert Crimo III, a 21 or 22-year-old white resident of Highland Park and aspiring musician, whose music videos depicted mass murder and school shootings. We speak with Nina Turner, former Ohio state senator and national co-chair of the Bernie Sanders 2020 presidential campaign, who says mass shootings in the U.S. are partly fueled by racism, sexism and "toxic masculinity" that equates gun ownership with manhood. "We have neglected to deal with a violent past and a violent present in the United States of America," says Turner.

Democracy Now
Jul 05, 2022

Headlines for July 5, 2022
Six Killed in Highland Park, IL as Gunman Opens Fire on 4th of July Parade , Protests Erupt as Video Shows Akron, OH Police Shot Jayland Walker Over 60 Times, FDA Wants Reformulated Vaccines to Combat New Coronavirus Lineages, Texas Supreme Court Allows Century-Old Abortion Law to Take Effect, 10-Year-Old Rape Survivor Barred from Receiving Abortion by Ohio "Trigger Law", Russia Declares Victory in Luhansk as Ukraine Withdraws from Lysychansk, Brittney Griner Writes Biden from Russian Jail: "I'm Terrified I Might Be Here Forever", Biden Proposes New Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling, Betraying Campaign Pledge, Torrential Rains Force 50,000 to Evacuate Homes Around Sydney, Australia, At Least Seven Killed as Glacier Collapses Amid Record Heat in Italian Alps, U.S. Accused of "Whitewash" After Clearing Israel of Intentionally Killing Shireen Abu Akleh, Draft Constitution Delivered to Chilean President, Will Face Sept. 4 Nationwide Referendum

Democracy Now
Jul 04, 2022

"I Was Raped by My Father. Abortion Saved My Life": Prof. Michele Goodwin on SCOTUS & the New Jane Crow
As the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. Wade, we speak with law professor Michele Goodwin, who has written extensively about how the criminalization of abortion polices motherhood. She discusses how on the eve of the court's oral arguments in the Dobbs case in November, she wrote about how an abortion saved her life. She describes how the U.S. has historically endangered and denied essential health services to Black and Brown women, and calls new abortion restrictions "the new Jane Crow," warning that they will further criminalize reproductive health and encourage medical professionals to breach their patients' confidentiality and report self-administered abortions to law enforcement.

Democracy Now
Jul 04, 2022

"The Hill We Climb, If Only We Dare It": Watch Amanda Gorman, Youngest Inaugural Poet in U.S. History
Amanda Gorman became the youngest inaugural poet in U.S. history last year when she spoke at the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. She was 22 years old when she read "The Hill We Climb," a poem she finished right after the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6. We continue our July Fourth special broadcast with Gorman's remarkable address.

Democracy Now
Jul 04, 2022

"What to the Slave Is the 4th of July?": James Earl Jones Reads Frederick Douglass's Historic Speech
We begin our July Fourth special broadcast with the words of Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery around 1818, Douglass became a key leader of the abolitionist movement. On July 5, 1852, in Rochester, New York, Douglass gave one of his most famous speeches, "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" He was addressing the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society. James Earl Jones reads the historic address during a performance of "Voices of a People's History of the United States," which was co-edited by Howard Zinn. The late great historian introduces the address.

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2022

Meet the Dutch Doctor Helping Expand Abortion Access by Mailing Safe & Legal Pills Worldwide
As activists across the U.S. are mobilizing to defend reproductive rights, we speak to the Dutch physician Dr. Rebecca Gomperts, who has dedicated her life to circumventing anti-abortion laws, including providing abortions on ships in international waters and sending abortions pills around the world. She also discusses navigating censorship on social media platforms, telemedicine, the future of contraception and more. "This is not the moment anymore to stay within the law," says Dr. Gomperts, referring to the end of Roe v. Wade. "This is the moment to make sure that women have access to safe abortions despite the law, because this is such an unjust law that is creating so much social inequality and that will affect, really, the most poor women in the country."

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2022

San Antonio Organizer: U.S. Immigration Policy Is to Blame for Deaths of 53 in Smuggling Tragedy
We go to San Antonio, where 53 migrants seeking refuge in the U.S. died earlier this week after being confined to a sweltering tractor-trailer. Human rights advocates blamed the tragedy on restrictive immigration policies like the Migrant Protection Protocols, also known as MPP or the "Remain in Mexico" program. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that President Biden has the power to end the Trump-era policy, which forced tens of thousands of asylum seekers to stay on the Mexican side of the border in unsafe conditions while their cases were resolved in the U.S. "Every single migration-related death is preventable by policy that actually focuses on welcome and care," says Claudia Muñoz, co-executive director of Grassroots Leadership.

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2022

In Radical Ruling, Supreme Court Limits EPA's Power to Cut Carbon Emissions & Combat Climate Crisis
In a blow to climate activism, the Supreme Court on Thursday severely limited the Environmental Protection Agency's ability to place emission caps on power plants. In the case, West Virginia v. EPA, several states led by West Virginia and fossil fuel companies fought against the regulations imposed by the Obama administration under the Clean Air Act. The 6-3 ruling by the court's conservative justices ultimately weakens the federal agency's authority to limit carbon emissions and combat the worst effects of the climate crisis. We look at the decision's impact on vulnerable communities, particularly lower-income, Black and Brown residents who live close to coal-fired power plants, as well as the climate emergency more broadly. "They've put people's lives in danger, and they have also put in place steps that will accelerate the climate crisis," says Mustafa Ali, formerly head of the environmental justice program at the Environmental Protection Agency.

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2022

Headlines for July 1, 2022
Supreme Court Ruling Sharply Limits EPA's Power to Combat Climate Crisis, Lawsuits Seek to Block Biden Administration from Restarting Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Protesters Demand Action on Climate and Pollution at U.N. Ocean Conference, SCOTUS to Hear Case on Power of State Courts to Halt Gerrymandering & Voter Suppression, Supreme Court Rules 5-4 to Allow Biden to End "Remain in Mexico" Border Policy, Alleged Driver of Truck in Texas Human Smuggling Tragedy Appears in Court, French Police Arrest 10 Suspected Smugglers over Drownings of 27 Asylum Seekers, Ketanji Brown Jackson Sworn In as First Black Women Supreme Court Justice, Over 180 Arrested Protesting for Abortion Rights Outside Supreme Court , Judges Temporarily Halt Kentucky and Florida Abortion Bans, Sens. Manchin, Sinema Reject Biden's Plea for Filibuster "Carve-Out" on Abortion, Russian Missiles Kill 19 in Odessa, Ukraine, WNBA Star Brittney Griner Appears in Moscow Court, Faces 10 Years in Prison, Sudanese Forces Kill 8 Protesters Demanding End to Military Rule, Ecuadorian Indigenous Leaders Win Gov't Concessions, Reach Deal to End Protests

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2022

Flint Residents Outraged as Charges Dropped in Deadly Water Scandal That Poisoned Majority-Black City
Eight years after the deadly Flint water crisis began, the state's Supreme Court has thrown out charges against former Governor Rick Snyder and eight other former officials for their complicity in the public health emergency. Snyder's administration made the decision to switch the city's water source from the Detroit system to the Flint River as a cost-saving measure and then failed to protect residents from the resulting lead and bacterial poisoning in the majority-Black city. "It really feels like justice is becoming an illusion for Flint residents," says Nayyirah Shariff, director of Flint Rising. "No one is being held accountable, no one is seeing justice, no one is seeing reparations in Flint," adds her fellow activist and Flint resident, Melissa Mays. Democracy Now! first spoke to the two organizers in 2016 in our documentary, "Thirsty for Democracy: The Poisoning of an American City."

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2022

ACLU's David Cole: Supreme Court Conservatives Imposing "Truly Radical Ideology" on U.S. Population
As the Supreme Court ends its term, Justice Stephen Breyer is officially retiring, and Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson takes his place as the country's first Black woman justice, joining a court dominated by conservatives. We speak to ACLU national legal director David Cole about what can be done in the face of lifetime judicial appointments to the nation's highest court who often rule counter to majority opinion in the country. "This is a radical court that is intruding upon our liberties," says Cole. "It's doing it all in the name of a commitment to a historic vision of the Constitution as it was drafted, when it was drafted, and imposing that on the American people, notwithstanding the fact that two centuries have intervened and circumstances are dramatically different today."

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2022

Anatol Lieven on NATO Expansion & What a Ukraine Peace Settlement Could Look Like
The United States announced at a NATO summit in Madrid plans to build a permanent military base in Poland, as it formally invited Sweden and Finland to join the military alliance after they applied for membership in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. We look at the impact of prolonged U.S. military presence in Europe and the overemphasis on Russia or China as enemies to the West at a time when threats to Western liberal democracy seem to be primarily internal. The Quincy Institute's Anatol Lieven also discusses possibilities for a peace settlement to end the war in Ukraine. "It's quite impossible now for Russia to win a total victory in Ukraine, but it does also look very unlikely that Ukraine will be able to win a total military victory over Russia," says Lieven. "We're going to end up with some sort of compromise."

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2022

Headlines for June 30, 2022
Finland and Sweden Invited to Join NATO, Prompting Warnings from Putin, Russia Withdraws from Snake Island, Swaps 144 Prisoners of War with Ukraine, Legal Challenges Seek to Halt Abortion Bans in Ohio and Wisconsin, Biden Reportedly Poised to Nominate Anti-Abortion GOP Lawyer to Federal Bench, SCOTUS Rolls Back Landmark Ruling on Tribal Sovereignty, Pat Cipollone Subpoenaed in Jan. 6 Investigation, Texas Human Trafficking Death Toll Rises to 53, Worst in U.S. History, Xi Jinping Travels to Hong Kong for 25th Anniversary of Return to Chinese Rule, Reporter Killed, Bringing Mexico's 2022 Journalist Death Count to 12, Far-Right Israeli PM Will Not Run for Reelection, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., Son of Late Dictator, Sworn In as President of Philippines, Lone Surviving Perpetrator in Paris Attacks Sentenced to Life in Prison, R. Kelly Sentenced to 30 Years for Sexually Abusing Black Women and Girls, Unserved Warrant Found for White Woman in Emmett Till Lynching Case

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2022

After Jan. 6, Meadows & Giuliani Sought Pardons; Cheney Says Trump Allies Tampering with Witnesses
Former aide to White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, Cassidy Hutchinson, revealed Tuesday to the House January 6 committee that Meadows and Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani both sought pardons after the insurrection. Meanwhile, in a video deposition with Trump's former national security adviser Mike Flynn, who supported Trump's efforts to overturn the election, Flynn repeatedly refused to answer questions from committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney. Cheney concluded the hearing by presenting evidence of possible witness tampering by allies of Trump.

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2022

"Hang Mike Pence!" As Armed Mob Threatens VP on Jan. 6, Witness Says Trump "Thinks Mike Deserves It"
Minutes after rioters stormed the Capitol on January 6, 2021, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows seemed unperturbed and reluctant to act, according to live testimony from his former aide, Cassidy Hutchinson, at the public hearing on Tuesday. Then-President Donald Trump, rather than calling off his supporters, defended their chants to hang Vice President Mike Pence for validating the election results. "I remember thinking in that moment, Mark needs to snap out of this," recalled Hutchinson. "I don't know how to snap him out of this, but he needs to care." Hutchinson also notes Meadows and Rudy Giuliani both sought pardons after the insurrection. Committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney presented evidence of possible witness tampering by allies of Trump. Meanwhile, in a video deposition with Trump's former national security adviser Mike Flynn, who supported Trump's efforts to overturn the election, Flynn repeatedly refused to answer questions from Cheney.

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2022

Jan. 6 Bombshell: Trump Physically Attacked Secret Service Agent, Demanded to Join Mob at Capitol
In one of the most dramatic revelations at Tuesday's hearing of the House committee investigating the January 6 attack, star witness Cassidy Hutchinson described how then-President Trump intended to join his supporters in the march to the Capitol and lunged at his Secret Service agent, who tried to prevent him from doing so, and grabbed the steering wheel of the presidential limousine, before he was driven back to the White House. Hutchinson was aide to White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows at the time. She also describes another temper tantrum by the president weeks earlier, after Attorney General Bill Barr said publicly there was no election fraud, saying Trump threw a plate of food, leaving "ketchup dripping down the wall."

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2022

Jan. 6 Witness Says Trump Was Warned of Potential Violence, Didn't Care: "They're Not Here to Hurt Me"
In explosive testimony Tuesday, Cassidy Hutchinson, former aide to White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, revealed new details to the January 6 select committee about the events leading up to the "Stop the Steal" rally. She indicated then-President Donald Trump and his inner circle, that included personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, expected the event to grow violent and did little to stop it. Hutchinson described how Trump demanded that the Secret Service allow his supporters wielding weapons to enter the Ellipse in order to make his rally seem better attended. "They're not here to hurt me," Trump said in dismissing safety concerns, Hutchinson testified. We feature her extended remarks.

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2022

Headlines for June 29, 2022
Ex-Aide: Trump Attacked His Own Security Detail on Jan. 6 Demanding to Be Taken to Capitol, Report: Trump Urged Security Officials to Halt Weapons Screening at Jan. 6 Rally, Death Toll in Texas Rises to 51 After Migrants Found Trapped in Tractor-Trailer, Texas Court Temporarily Blocks Implementation of State's Century-Old Abortion Ban, At NATO Summit, Biden Pledges to Expand U.S. Military Presence in Europe, Trump-Backed Mary Miller Wins GOP Primary After Saying Overturning of Roe Is "Victory for White Life", Boebert Wins GOP Primary in Colorado, Blasts Separation of Church & State, Supreme Court Moves to Further Erode Separation of Church & State, Supreme Court Reinstates Racially Gerrymandered Louisiana Congressional Map, Michigan Supreme Court Tosses Charges Against Officials over Flint Water Crisis, Truth Commission in Colombia Documents 450,000 Deaths, Criticizes U.S. Role in Backing Violence, 51 Dead in Large Prison Fire in Colombia, Philippines Orders Independent News Outlet Rappler to Be Shut Down, Ghislaine Maxwell Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2022

Encrypt, Obscure, Compartmentalize: Protecting Your Digital Privacy in a Post-Roe World
Reproductive health advocates are urging Congress to pass the My Body, My Data Act, which will prevent consumer data that is related to reproductive health from being used as criminal evidence. Protecting how sensitive personal information is collected and stored online is critical to combating anti-abortion laws, says Daly Barnett, staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Barnett also shares practical advice for securing your online privacy now, such as utilizing encryption and creating a culture of consent. "Privacy should just be a default for people," says Barnett. "It shouldn't be something that the end users have to fight for, especially when the data is potentially dangerous, that could be used as criminal evidence."

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2022

Facebook Helps Anti-Abortion Clinics Collect Investigation: Facebook Is Helping Anti-Abortion Clinics Collect Highly Sensitive Info on People
We look at the fight for privacy rights in a post-Roe America amid concerns that anti-abortion activists could use identifying data from online platforms like Facebook to target abortion seekers. Investigative reporter Grace Oldham describes how this data is already being used by medically unlicensed "crisis pregnancy centers" that actively lure patients to discourage them from seeking abortions. These anti-abortion clinics put people who are considering an abortion at risk to misinformation on reproductive health, or worse, open them to criminal prosecution, says Oldham, whose recent report for Reveal is headlined "Facebook and Anti-Abortion Clinics Are Collecting Highly Sensitive Info on Would-Be Patients."

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2022

Investigation: Facebook Is Helping Anti-Abortion Clinics Collect Highly Sensitive Info on People
We look at the fight for privacy rights in a post-Roe America amid concerns that anti-abortion activists could use identifying data from online platforms like Facebook to target abortion seekers. Investigative reporter Grace Oldham describes how this data is already being used by medically unlicensed "crisis pregnancy centers" that actively lure patients to discourage them from seeking abortions. These anti-abortion clinics put people who are considering an abortion at risk to misinformation on reproductive health, or worse, open them to criminal prosecution, says Oldham, whose recent report for Reveal is headlined "Facebook and Anti-Abortion Clinics Are Collecting Highly Sensitive Info on Would-Be Patients."

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2022

Texas Abortion Funds Push to Keep Supporting Patients as State AG Vows to Prosecute Advocates
Is raising money to send pregnant people to another state to get an abortion aiding and abetting? We speak to Kamyon Conner, executive director of the Texas Equal Access Fund, the first Black woman to head the organization, about how Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has threatened to prosecute anyone violating a statewide abortion ban that was passed in the 1920s and never repealed. Lawmakers are also introducing bills to restrict FDA-approved abortion pills delivered through the mail. This heavily policed environment has placed pro-abortion organizations on high alert even as their work becomes more in demand. "Our abortion fund specifically is on the radar of anti-abortion extremists and our conservative elected officials," says Conner.

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2022

Tragedy in Texas: 46 Found Dead in Suspected Smuggling Attempt Amid Biden's Harsh Border Enforcement
At least 46 migrants were found dead Monday inside a sweltering tractor-trailer in Texas in one of the deadliest tragedies in recent decades. It comes as the Biden administration continues to enforce harsh border policies blocking most people from safely entering through ports of entry along the U.S.-Mexico border. Unless Biden revokes punitive immigration policies, "this is going to create more migrants dying in more unprecedented numbers," says Fernando García, executive director of the El Paso-based Border Network for Human Rights.

Democracy Now
Jun 28, 2022

Headlines for June 28, 2022
46 Migrants Found Dead in Abandoned Tractor-Trailer in Texas, Judges Temporarily Halt Anti-Abortion "Trigger Laws" in Louisiana and Utah, South Dakota Gov. Noem Calls for Ban on Abortion Pills Prescribed Online, Californians Will Vote in November on Constitutional Amendment Protecting Abortion Rights, House Speaker Pelosi Prepares Bills on Abortion Rights, Calls for End to Senate Filibuster, Aide to Trump's Former Chief of Staff to Testify Publicly Before Jan. 6 Committee, At Least 18 Killed in Russian Missile Strike on Ukraine Shopping Mall, NATO to Massively Increase Number of Troops on High Alert to Over 300,000, Chlorine Gas Explosion Kills 13 and Injures Hundreds at Jordan Port, France Says Western Powers Should Open Oil Markets to Iran and Venezuela, Amid Nationwide Protests, Ecuador's President Agrees to Curb Fuel Prices , Three Killed as Amtrak Train Hits Dump Truck and Derails in Missouri, Judge Strikes Down Law Granting Noncitizens the Right to Vote in New York City Elections, California Set to Grant Medicaid to All Undocumented Immigrants , U.N. Issues Dire Warning That World Faces "Ocean Emergency"

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2022

Caught on Tape: "He Punched Me in the Face," says RI Dem Hit by GOP Rival, a Cop, at Abortion Rally
During an abortion rights rally in Providence, Rhode Island, on Friday, Jennifer Rourke, Democratic candidate for state Senate, was punched multiple times by her Republican opponent Jeann Lugo, an off-duty Providence police officer. A video recording shows Lugo confronting Rourke before striking her in the face. Lugo dropped out of the race after being placed on paid administrative leave and charged with simple assault and disorderly conduct. We speak with Rourke about the attack, and her longtime activism for reproductive rights and her current campaign in Rhode Island. "As a senator, I will work hard to pass the Quality Abortion Care Act, and that's to provide coverage to people on Medicaid and state employees to have the abortion care that they need," says Rourke. She also warns that interracial and same-sex marriage rights are at risk from the Supreme Court.

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2022

Missouri Enacts Abortion Ban Trigger Law. Planned Parenthood Opens Clinic 15 Mins. Away in Illinois.
We look at how reproductive health clinics are reacting to the overturning of Roe v. Wade last week. In at least 13 states, including Missouri, trigger laws that criminalize abortions are either already in effect or expected to soon kick in. Clinics have mobilized to center patient care by moving or referring them to safer states. We speak to Yamelsie Rodríguez, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri. Following abortion bans in neighboring states, Planned Parenthood opened a clinic about 15 minutes away in Fairview Heights, Illinois, which has the capacity to serve up to 15,000 abortion-seeking patients a year. She says the clinic has seen a rapid increase in "patients that were traveling from out of state having to flee draconian restrictions and laws in their home state to access basic, fundamental, essential care," says Rodríguez.

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2022

"A Devastating Ruling": Law Prof. Michele Goodwin & SCOTUS Attorney Kitty Kolbert on Overturning Roe
As protests continue across the country in response to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, speak with two leading legal scholars. Kathryn "Kitty" Kolbert is co-founder of the Center for Reproductive Rights and argued the landmark case of Planned Parenthood v. Casey before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1992, which upheld Roe v. Wade. She is the co-author of "Controlling Women: What We Must Do Now to Save Reproductive Freedom." Michele Goodwin is chancellor's professor at University of California, Irvine School of Law and author of "Policing The Womb: Invisible Women and the Criminalization of Motherhood." Her new piece for The New York Times is headlined "No, Justice Alito, Reproductive Justice Is in the Constitution."

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2022

Overturning Roe: Slavery, Abortion, Maternal Mortality and the Disparate Effect on Women of Color
The conservative-led Supreme Court ruled 6 to 3 on Friday to uphold a Republican-backed Mississippi law that bans abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, while voting 5 to 4 to overturn Roe v. Wade. Chief Justice John Roberts supported upholding the Mississippi law but not overturning Roe. Nine states have already banned abortion since Friday, and 17 more states are expected to do so soon. We speak with Michele Goodwin, chancellor's professor at University of California, Irvine School of Law, whose new piece for The New York Times is headlined "No, Justice Alito, Reproductive Justice Is in the Constitution."

Democracy Now
Jun 27, 2022

Headlines for June 27, 2022
Supreme Court Strikes Down Roe v. Wade, Ending Constitutional Right to Abortion, Battle over Abortion Rights Will Shape 2022 Midterm Elections, Biden Signs Bipartisan Gun Safety Bill into Law, Russian Forces Complete Takeover of Ukraine's Severodonetsk, G7 Discusses Ways to Counter Russia and China; Russia Defaults on Foreign Debt, At Least 23 Asylum Seekers Killed Attempting to Cross from Morocco to Spanish Enclave, Thousands Protest in Madrid Ahead of NATO Summit, U.S. Releases Asadullah Haroon Gul, Tortured and Jailed at Guantánamo for 15 Years Without Trial, Indian Human Rights Defender Teesta Setalvad Arrested, Funerals Held for Dom Phillips and Bruno Pereira After Their Murder in Brazil, Pride Celebrations Overshadowed by SCOTUS Ruling Ending Abortion Rights, Oslo, Norway, Pride Events Canceled After Gunman Opens Fire on Gay Bar, Killing 2, Trump-Appointed Judge Blocks Biden Administration Deportation Guidance

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2022

Guess Which Republican Congressmembers Sought Pardons After Trying to Help Trump Subvert Vote
The House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol revealed Thursday that six Republican members of Congress who supported Donald Trump's lies sought broad presidential pardons for their involvement in the campaign to discredit the election results: Mo Brooks of Alabama, Matt Gaetz of Florida, Louie Gohmert of Texas, Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, Scott Perry of Pennsylvania and Andy Biggs of Arizona. "The only reason I know to ask for a pardon is because you think you've committed a crime," noted Republican committee member, Congressmember Adam Kinzinger.

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2022

Top DOJ Staff Threatened Mass Resignation as Trump Weighed Naming Jeff Clark AG to Overturn Election
Former top officials in President Trump's Justice Department told the House January 6 committee Thursday they threatened to resign en masse when Trump mused about appointing Jeffrey Clark, a loyalist who backed the baseless voter fraud claims, as acting attorney general. "I said, 'Mr. President, within 24, 48, 72 hours, you could have hundreds and hundreds of resignations of the leadership of your entire Justice Department because of your actions,'" said former acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue. "'What's that going to say about you?'"

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2022

"Pure Insanity": Trump Pushed DOJ to Chase Absurd Conspiracy Theories to Overturn 2020 Election


Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2022

Radical Supreme Court Guts State Gun Laws & Right to Remain Silent Under Arrest
The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a century-old New York state law that limited who can carry concealed weapons in public, with Justice Clarence Thomas writing for the 6-3 majority that the statute violated the Second Amendment's right to bear arms. The ruling vastly expands gun rights in the U.S. just weeks after mass shootings in Buffalo, New York, and Uvalde, Texas, and represents "a revolution in Second Amendment law," says Slate senior writer Mark Joseph Stern. "It declares that any restriction on the right to self-defense is presumptively unconstitutional." In light of the Supreme Court decision, a bipartisan gun violence bill passed by the Senate is "one step forward, two steps back." Stern also discusses a separate ruling in which the court's conservative majority said a person who is arrested and not told of their right to remain silent cannot subsequently sue police for violating their Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination — even if statements they give are ultimately used against them at trial. The decision could be setting the stage for the court to overturn the 1966 Miranda v. Arizona precedent altogether, Stern warns.

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2022

Headlines for June 24, 2022
Senate Approves Bipartisan Gun Safety Bill by 65-33 Vote, Supreme Court Strikes Down New York Gun Control Law in Major Expansion of Second Amendment, Trump Pushed DOJ to Seize Voting Machines & Declare Election Results "Corrupt", Six Republican Congressmembers Who Backed Trump's Election Lies Sought Pardons, Ukraine Orders Troops to Withdraw from Severodonetsk, Russia Meets with Other BRICS Nations at Virtual Meeting, Afghan Earthquake Death Toll Rises to 1,150; U.S. Urged to Unfreeze Afghan Assets, United Nations Blames Israel for Fatally Shooting Journalist Shireen Abu Akleh, Indigenous Protesters Attempt to Storm National Assembly in Ecuador, Deposed Burmese Leader Aung San Suu Kyi Moved to Solitary Confinement, Supreme Court Protects Police from Lawsuits over Violating Miranda Rights, California Lawmakers Move to Make State a "Legal Sanctuary for Reproductive Choice", Biden Proposes Expanding Title IX to Protect Trans Students, Report: New England Patriots Plane Used for ICE Deportation Flights

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2022

Global Access to COVID-19 Vaccines & Tests Limited by WTO Deal Pushed by Rich Countries & Big Pharma
Hundreds of public health and civil society organizations have denounced the World Trade Organization for approving a text last week that they say leaves in place intellectual property barriers that will continue to limit global access to COVID-19 vaccines, tests and treatments. We host an in-depth discussion about the WTO's move, and what should come next, with two global health justice advocates, Mihir Mankad and Fatima Hassan. Mankad, who attended the WTO meeting and is a senior adviser for global health advocacy and policy for Doctors Without Borders, says the agreement "may ultimately cause more damage than good." Hassan, founder and director of Health Justice Initiative in South Africa, believes Global South countries were "bullied into silence" by richer countries during the WTO negotiations.

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2022

Food Shortage or Economic Crisis? Experts Say Poverty & Capitalism Are Real Drivers of Global Hunger
We speak with food systems experts Sofía Monsalve Suárez and Rachel Bezner Kerr about how to prevent a looming global food shortage. The global food crisis "is not a food shortage crisis" yet, says Suárez, secretary general of FIAN International, a human rights organization working for the right to food and nutrition. "The problem is access to food, that people don't have money to pay for food, that people are jobless." Both guests call for a fundamental "transformation" of the global food system, away from food trade systems and instead toward domestic production and food sovereignty.

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2022

"The Famine Is Coming": War in Ukraine & Climate Crisis Contribute to Food Insecurity in Somalia
Experts are warning of a pending global food shortage due to the climate crisis, blocked grain shipments amid the Ukraine war, and a lack of humanitarian aid. Joining us from Mogadishu, Somalia, Jan Egeland, secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council, says poorer countries in Africa aren't able to financially compete with richer countries to afford basic staples like wheat. Egeland calls on G7 countries to take immediate action to prevent a global famine — which he believes is still stoppable.

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2022

Earthquake in Afghanistan Kills 1,000 . As Death Toll Rises, U.S. Sanctions Limit International Aid
A massive 5.9-magnitude earthquake that struck southeastern Afghanistan early Wednesday has killed more than 1,000 people, according to local officials, though the death toll is expected to rise. The earthquake comes as the United Nations reports nearly half of Afghanistan's population already faces acute hunger. Thousands more have been injured and lost their homes along with everything they own. "Many more will be dead, and we are now rushing with aid," says Jan Egeland, secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council. He says he agrees with the Taliban government that U.S. sanctions on Afghanistan are making it more difficult for aid organizations like his to supply critical resources to Afghans.

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2022

Headlines for June 23, 2022
Earthquake Death Toll in Afghanistan Tops 1,000; Heavy Rain & Sanctions Hamper Relief Efforts, House Jan. 6 Panel Moves Hearings to July Following Flood of New Evidence, Justice Department Subpoenas Chair of Georgia GOP over Fake Elector Plot, Uvalde School Police Head Placed on Leave as Local & State Officials Blame Each Other for Mistakes, Ukraine Warns Battles in Luhansk Cities Entering "Fearsome Climax", Critics Says Biden Push to Suspend Gas Tax Will Aid Oil Companies, Not Consumers, Saudi Arabia and Turkey Move to Mend Ties Four Years After Khashoggi Assassination, Elizabeth Warren Blasts Fed Chair Jerome Powell on Hiking Interest Rates, Minnesota City to Pay $3.25 Million Settlement with Daunte Wright's Family, Three Men Held at Rikers Island Jail Die in Less Than a Week, Federal Court Upholds Arkansas Anti-BDS Law, Head of Australian Journalism Prize Denounces U.K. Approval of Julian Assange's Extradition

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2022

Georgia Poll Workers Falsely Targeted by Trump as "Scammers" Faced Racist Harassment, Lived in Fear
In some of the most dramatic testimony from the fourth hearing of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Shaye Moss, a Black election worker in Georgia, and her mother Ruby Freeman described how their lives were forever changed in December of 2020 when Trump's top campaign lawyer Rudy Giuliani claimed they manipulated ballots to rig the election outcome in the state, which was among those he had lost. They faced severe harassment, racism and death threats from Trump supporters and had to be relocated by the FBI for safety. "I don't want anyone knowing my name. … I don't want to go anywhere. I second-guess everything that I do," said Moss, who, like her former colleagues, is no longer an election worker in Fulton County. "Do you know how it feels to have the president of the United States to target you?" said Freeman in taped testimony. "The president of the United States is supposed to represent every American — not to target one."

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2022

"Whatever You Can Do": Jan. 6 Hearing Lays Out "Fake Electors" Scheme to Rig 2020 Election for Trump
Tuesday's hearing of the House committee investigating the January 6 attack included evidence of how then-President Trump and his campaign "were directly involved" in a plot to replace Biden electors with fake electors for Trump in states where he had lost. Investigators displayed fake certifications manufactured by the Trump campaign and said that one group of fake electors even asked for a promise that the campaign would pay their legal fees if they got sued or charged with a crime. The committee also revealed that just minutes before the joint session on January 6, a staffer for Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson told Mike Pence he wished to hand deliver to the vice president the fake electors' votes from Michigan and Wisconsin — which Pence's aide unambiguously refused. We feature a video presented to the January 6 committee as evidence that features Casey Lucier, an investigative counsel, describing the plan to organize fake electors for Trump in states where he had lost, with testimony of former Trump staffers, lawyers and other Republican officials.

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2022

Top Arizona Republican Testifies He Rejected Trump Plot to Overturn Vote, Then Faced Violent Threats
The House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection held its fourth public hearing Tuesday with testimony that included a series of Republican state officials detailing pressure they faced from President Donald Trump and his staff to overturn the results of the 2020 election. Republican Speaker of the Arizona House "Rusty" Bowers described how he was pushed by Trump, John Eastman and Rudy Giuliani to call the Arizona Legislature back into session to investigate what Trump's team claimed were hundreds of thousands of illegal votes cast by dead people and undocumented immigrants in a greater effort to undo Joe Biden's win in the state. Bowers refused after Trump's team wasn't able to provide evidence of a rigged election — and consequently Bowers and his family became the target of death threats by white supremacist groups and other Trump supporters. "I didn't want to be used as a pawn," said Bowers during his live testimony.

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2022

Headlines for June 22, 2022
Earthquake in Afghanistan Kills at Least 1,000; Over 1,500 Injured, Jan. 6 Committee Accuses Trump of Pressuring State and Local Officials to Overturn Election, Russia Seizes More Areas in Eastern Ukraine, On Visit to Ukraine, Merrick Garland Vows to Probe War Crimes Allegations, I Have "Zero Trust" in U.S. Government: Wife of Brittney Griner, Basketball Star Detained in Russia, Senate Votes to Advance New Bipartisan Gun Legislation, Texas Official: Police Response to Uvalde School Shooting Was "Abject Failure", Alabama: Katie Britt Defeats Mo Brooks in Republican Senate Primary, Recount Shows Henry Cuellar Beat Jessica Cisneros by Less Than 300 Votes, Supreme Court Says Religious Schools in Maine Can't Be Excluded from Voucher Program, Coffin Holding Patrice Lumumba's Tooth Returns to DRC Six Decades After Assassination, Indigenous-Led Protest in Ecuador Condemns Lasso's Economic Policies, El Salvador Votes to Extend State of Emergency; 40,000 Arrested So Far, Third Suspect Arrested in Brazil in Murder of Dom Phillips and Bruno Pereira, Jury Orders Bill Cosby to Pay $500K for Sexually Assualting 16-Year-Old in 1975

Democracy Now
Jun 21, 2022

Gustavo Petro Promised a "New Progressivism." Now He's Set to Be Colombia's First Leftist President
Colombian President-elect Gustavo Petro spoke to Democracy Now! in 2018 about his vision for the country after he placed second in the presidential election, losing to right-wing politician Iván Duque. Petro is a former M-19 guerrilla and the former mayor of Bogotá. "A new progressivism is emerging," explained Petro. On Sunday, he succeeded in his new attempt at the presidency, becoming the first leftist president in Colombia, long a conservative stronghold in Latin America. He has vowed to fight worsening climate change, poverty and inequality in Colombia by raising taxes on the rich and expanding social programs, as well as access to education and healthcare.

Democracy Now
Jun 21, 2022

Colombia's Incoming VP Francia Márquez in Her Own Words: "A New Form of Government Is Possible"
Following the historic victory in Colombia's presidential election of former guerrilla member, former senator and former mayor of Bogotá Gustavo Petro and his running mate, the Afro-Colombian environmentalist Francia Márquez Mina, we feature interviews with each of the candidates on Democracy Now! Francia Márquez Mina is set to become Colombia's first Black vice president. We spoke to her in March, when she was running for president. She later lost in the primary to Petro, who went on to choose her as his running mate. "We are giving impetus to the idea that in Colombia a new form of government is possible, governance that is built up from the Black, Indigenous and peasant peoples from the very different sectors of the community, LGBTIQ , from the youth, from the women, from the small farmers of Colombia, those who have been no one — that is to say, who have never had a voice in the government," says Márquez Mina.

Democracy Now
Jun 21, 2022

Colombia Elects 1st Leftist President Gustavo Petro & 1st Black VP Francia Márquez. Can They Deliver?
Colombia made history Sunday as voters elected former guerrilla member Gustavo Petro as the country's first leftist president and environmental activist Francia Márquez Mina as the country's first Black vice president. The pair, gaining over 50% of the vote, defeated right-wing real estate millionaire Rodolfo Hernández but will now face a major challenge to pass legislation in the conservative Congress, where they lack a majority. "The hurdle has been overcome by winning the election, but the main hurdle, the establishment, cannot be changed by the government; it has to be changed from the people, by the people," says Manuel Rozental, Colombian physician, activist and grassroots organizer. We also speak with Colombia-based journalist Simone Bruno, who says Petro's election could transform the politics and economy of Latin America.

Democracy Now
Jun 21, 2022

Headlines for June 21, 2022
Gustavo Petro & Francia Márquez Mina Win Colombian Election in Historic Vote, Macron's Party Loses Majority in Parliament as Left & Far-Right Parties Gain Seats, Russia Moves Closer to Seizing Severodonetsk in Eastern Ukraine, Ukraine Attacks Oil & Gas Platforms Off Coast of Crimea, Russia Says Captured U.S. Veterans Are Not Protected by Geneva Conventions, Russian Journalist Dmitry Muratov Auctions Off Nobel Prize for Ukrainian Child Refugees, Israeli PM Bennett to Resign & Dissolve Parliament, NYT Probe: Al Jazeera's Shireen Abu Akleh "Most Likely" Shot Dead by Elite Israeli Soldier, Millions Displaced, Over 116 Dead in Flooding in India and Bangladesh, Heat Records Broken Across Globe, from Iran to Spain to the Midwest, Witnesses Say at Least 200 Killed in Ethiopian Massacre, Honduras: Former U.S.-Trained Military Officer Sentenced for Murder of Berta Cáceres, New Surveillance Video Raises Questions About Police Response to Uvalde School Massacre, FDA & CDC Approve COVID-19 Vaccines for Children Under 5, Jan. 6 Committee to Look at How Trump Pressured State Officials to Overturn Election, Adam Kinzinger, Republican on Jan. 6 Committee, Receives Death Threat, In Campaign Ad, Missouri's Ex-Governor Calls for Moderate Republicans to Be Hunted and Shot, Texas GOP Approves Platform Rejecting 2020 Election Results, Apple Workers in Maryland Vote to Unionize, Thousands Gather in D.C. for Mass Poor People's and Low-Wage Workers' Rally

Democracy Now
Jun 20, 2022

Harvard's Deep Ties to Slavery: Report Shows It Profited, Then Tried to Erase History of Complicity
In the final part of our Juneteenth special broadcast, we look at Harvard University's recent report detailing the school's extensive ties to slavery and pledged $100 million for a fund for scholars to continue to research the topic. The report documents dozens of prominent people associated with Harvard who enslaved people, including four Harvard presidents. Harvard commissioned the study in 2019 as part of a wave of schools reckoning with their pasts and the ongoing legacy of racial discrimination. "Harvard's ties to slavery begin with the founding of the institution," says MIT historian Craig Steven Wilder, author of "Ebony & Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities." Wilder says that while this history is not new, Harvard worked for decades to erase its complicity in slavery. "We're really only beginning to reconcile and to really struggle with the deep ties that this institution has to slavery," he adds.

Democracy Now
Jun 20, 2022

"No Atonement, No Repair": Watch Nikole Hannah-Jones Call for Slavery Reparations in Speech to U.N. General Assembly
In March, the United Nations marked the International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of The New York Times's groundbreaking 1619 Project, addressed the U.N. General Assembly. As part of our Juneteenth special, we air her full address. "It is time for the nations that engaged in and profited from the transatlantic slave trade to do what is right and what is just. It is time for them to make reparations to the descendants of chattel slavery in the Americas," Hannah-Jones said. "This is our global truth, a truth we as human beings understand with stark clarity: There can be no atonement if there is no repair."

Democracy Now
Jun 20, 2022

Juneteenth Special: Historian Clint Smith on Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America
In a Juneteenth special, we mark the federal holiday that commemorates the day in 1865 when enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, learned of their freedom more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. We speak to the writer and poet Clint Smith about Juneteenth and his new book, "How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America." "When I think of Juneteenth, part of what I think about is the both-handedness of it," Smith says, "that it is this moment in which we mourn the fact that freedom was kept from hundreds of thousands of enslaved people for years and for months after it had been attained by them, and then, at the same time, celebrating the end of one of the most egregious things that this country has ever done." Smith says he recognizes the federal holiday marking Juneteenth as a symbol, "but it is clearly not enough."

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2022

Poor People's March on Washington Saturday Demands "Moral Reset" on Poverty, Voting Rights, Climate
We speak with Bishop William Barber and Reverend Liz Theoharis, co-chairs of the Poor People's Campaign, about plans for Saturday's Moral March on Washington and to the Polls to demand the government address key issues facing poor and low-income communities. The march will bring together thousands of people from diverse backgrounds to speak out against the country's rising poverty rates, voter suppression in low-income communities and more. "To have this level of poverty that's untalked about too often … is actually morally indefensible, constitutionally inconsistent, politically insensitive and economically insane," says Barber. Theoharis says the lack of universal healthcare in the U.S. is a major source of economic insecurity and has contributed to the COVID-19 death toll. She asks how a rich country "that spends more money on healthcare than any other nation with a comparable economy still has [these] kind of poor health outcomes."

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2022

Trump's Lawyer John Eastman Asked for Pardon After Giving Illegal Advice to Overturn Election
During Thursday's third public hearing of the House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol, Trump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann described in recorded testimony his call with John Eastman, the lawyer advising former President Trump on the plan to overturn the 2020 election. The call took place on January 7, one day after the deadly insurrection. "He started to ask me about something dealing with Georgia and preserving something potentially for appeal. And I said to him, 'Are you out of your F—ing mind?' Right? I said, 'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth from now on: orderly transition. … I don't want to hear any other F—ing words coming out of your mouth no matter what, other than orderly transition. Repeat those words to me,'" said Herschmann. Eastman later emailed Rudy Giuliani and requested that he be included on a list of potential recipients of a presidential pardon. Eastman's email stated, "I've decided that I should be on the pardon list if that is still in the works."

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2022

"Hang Mike Pence!": Jan. 6 Hearing Shows Trump Targeted VP, Knew Plan to Overturn Vote Was Illegal
We air highlights from the third public hearing of the House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol, which revealed that President Trump pressured Vice President Pence to overturn the 2020 election results even though he knew it was illegal. The hearing included testimony from Pence's attorney, Greg Jacob, who said the plan's main architect, attorney John Eastman, actively admitted his strategy violated the law, and yet continued anyway. Right-wing legal expert Michael Luttig advised Pence against following Trump's orders, calling Trump and his supporters a "clear and present danger to American democracy."

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2022

Punished for Exposing War Crimes? U.K. Approves Assange Extradition to U.S., Faces 175 Years in Prison
In a blow to press freedom, the United Kingdom has approved the extradition of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to the United States to face espionage charges related to the publication of classified documents exposing U.S. war crimes. Home Secretary Priti Patel signed off on the transfer after the U.K. Supreme Court denied Assange's appeals earlier this year, part of a years-long legal battle that rights groups have decried as an attack on journalism and free speech. Assange faces up to 175 years in prison if convicted for violations of the Espionage Act, and his case represents a "once-in-a-lifetime fight for press freedom," says Gabriel Shipton, Assange's half-brother.

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2022

Headlines for June 17, 2022
U.K. Home Secretary Approves Extradition of Julian Assange to U.S., House Jan. 6 Committee: Trump Knew His Plan to Overturn Election Was Illegal, People Over the Pentagon: Reps. Lee & Pocan Push for $100B Military Budget Cut, Ukraine Moves Closer to Joining European Union, Human Rights & Public Health Groups Blast WTO Deal on COVID Patents, Over 2,000 Cows Die in Kansas in Record-Breaking Heat Wave, Biden Declares Montana a Disaster Area After Yellowstone River Flooding, Study: Parts of Arctic Warming Seven Times Faster Than Rest of the Earth, Groups Sue Biden over Drilling Permits in New Mexico and Wyoming, Flooding Forcers Abbott to Close Michigan Baby Formula Plant Again, Israel Shoots Three Palestinians Dead in Jenin Raid, Israeli Politician Says He Wishes He Could Get Rid of All Palestinians, Sister of Imprisoned Egyptian Activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah Launches Her Own Hunger Strike

Democracy Now
Jun 16, 2022

No Pride in Detention: Trans Immigrant Activist Skips WH Event, Urges Support for LGBTQ Asylum Seekers
We speak with Jennicet Gutiérrez, an organizer and co-executive director of Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement, who declined an invitation to attend the annual White House Pride Month celebration to protest the detention and deportation of LGBTQ immigrants and asylum seekers. At the U.S.-Mexico border, trans people in detention centers are reportedly being misgendered, denied access to essential healthcare, held in inhumane conditions or blocked altogether from entering the country due to the Trump-era Title 42. Roxsana Hernández Rodriguez, a trans asylum seeker from Honduras, died while in ICE custody. Regarding Biden's recent executive orders to establish some protections against anti-LGBTQ discrimination, Gutiérrez says, "We cannot just applaud and say, 'Yes, you've done enough,' when, no, that's the least you can do."

Democracy Now
Jun 16, 2022

Idaho to Bay Area: White Supremacists Violently Target Pride Events, Egged on by Right-Wing Media
President Biden celebrated Pride Month at the White House Wednesday as events encouraging celebration of LGBTQ identity and visibility are increasingly being targeted by white supremacist violence and as Republican-controlled states pass a slew of anti-LGBTQ measures. We speak with Ari Drennen, LGBTQ program director for Media Matters, who says far-right social media influencers and conservative media outlets are spreading lies that members of the LGBTQ community "aim to confuse, corrupt or sexualize kids." We also talk to Southern Poverty Law Center investigative reporter Michael Edison Hayden, who has studied the key players in recent attacks and describes a "concerted effort to ramp up this rhetoric tying LGBTQ people baselessly to pedophilia."

Democracy Now
Jun 16, 2022

$1B More in U.S. Military Aid to Ukraine: Weapons Expert Urges Negotiation vs. "Military-First Approach"
The U.S. has announced another $1 billion in military equipment to Ukraine, adding to billions in military aid to Ukraine since the start of the Russian invasion. Support for a "military-first approach" to Ukraine is fueled by the mainstream media and not only undermines ceasefire talks but also funnels profits directly into the pockets of weapons manufacturers, says William Hartung of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft. "The United States is a major player here, and its only policy shouldn't be sending weapons without some sort of diplomatic strategy to go with it."

Democracy Now
Jun 16, 2022

Headlines for June 16, 2022
Ukraine War, Food Crisis & Climate Emergency Push World Refugee Total Over 100 Million, Leaders of Germany, France and Italy Visit Ukraine, Xi Jinping Expresses Support for Russia's "Sovereignty and Security", U.S. Announces New $1 Billion Arms Package for Ukraine, Ukraine Accused of Shelling a Maternity Ward in Donetsk, Suspect in Brazil Admits to Killing Dom Phillips and Bruno Araújo Pereira, Jan. 6 Rioter Who Threatened Democrats Got Tour of Capitol a Day Earlier from GOP Lawmaker, Jan. 6 Hearing to Examine How Trump Pressured Pence to Overturn Election, Proud Boys Had Plan Named "1776 Returns" to Occupy Capitol Buildings, New Mexico's Supreme Court Orders GOP-Led County Commission to Certify Primary Results, FDA Advisory Panel Recommends COVID-19 Vaccines for Young Children, Dr. Anthony Fauci Tests Positive for COVID-19, Activists Stage Die-In at WTO Summit Calling for TRIPS Waiver, Fed Issues Highest Interest Rate Hike Since 1994, Federal Hate Crime Charges Filed Against Buffalo Gunman, Street Outside Saudi Embassy in D.C. Is Renamed Jamal Khashoggi Way

Democracy Now
Jun 15, 2022

Biden to Visit Saudi Arabia After Vowing to Treat Kingdom as a "Pariah" for Human Rights Violations
President Biden's formally announced plan to visit Saudi Arabia next month is a dramatic reversal of earlier promises to treat the Arab nation as a "pariah" in light of its repeated human rights violations. Calls are growing for Biden to hold the Saudi government accountable for the brutal murder and dismemberment of American resident and Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. But as he faces domestic anger over rising fuel prices, Biden seems to have declining leverage with one of the most oil-rich countries in the world and the top weapons client for the U.S. "The Biden administration has succumbed to the pressures of defense industries and the foreign government lobbyists to continue what are very profitable arms sales," says Sarah Leah Whitson, executive director of Democracy for the Arab World Now, founded by Khashoggi.

Democracy Now
Jun 15, 2022

AFL-CIO Elects 1st Woman Pres. & African American Sec.-Treasurer. Will It Organize Amazon, Starbucks?
President Biden addressed the economy and labor rights in an address Tuesday to the AFL-CIO convention as delegates elected Liz Shuler to become the AFL-CIO's first female president and Fred Redmond to be its first African American secretary-treasurer. Longtime labor journalist Steven Greenhouse was there, and says the exclusion of organizers from Amazon and Starbucks from the convention disappointed those calling for the AFL-CIO and Democratic lawmakers to support the youth-led labor movement.

Democracy Now
Jun 15, 2022

"Conspiratorial Mindset": From Nixon to Trump, Lessons for Jan. 6 Hearing 50 Years After Watergate
The 50th anniversary of the Watergate burglary in 1972 this Friday comes as public hearings are underway by the House committee investigating the January 6 Capitol insurrection. We speak with Garrett Graff, author of "Watergate: A New History," about critical lessons and historical parallels between the defining controversies of the Nixon and Trump presidencies. Rather than isolated crimes, Watergate and January 6 should be seen as culminating events of U.S. presidencies that share a "dark, criminal, conspiratorial mindset that drives and links together so many of their scandals," says Graff.

Democracy Now
Jun 15, 2022

Headlines for June 15, 2022
Republican Who Voted to Impeach Trump Defeated in GOP Primary in South Carolina, Backers of Trump's Election Lies Win GOP Primaries in Nevada, Republican Mayra Flores Wins Special House Election in Texas, Jan. 6 Committee Appears Divided on Its Role in Making Criminal Referrals to DOJ, "Are You Out of Your F—ing Mind": White House Lawyer's Message to John Eastman on Jan. 7, 2021, Pope Francis Says Russia's Invasion May Have Been "Provoked", U.S. Admits It Is Not Pushing Ukraine to Hold Talks to End War, Report: Biden Officials Are Privately Concerned Russian Sanctions Are Backfiring, Biden to Visit Saudi Arabia in July Despite Campaign Vow to Make Kingdom a "Pariah", Biden Urges Oil Companies to Produce More Gas as Price Reach New High, Federal Reserve Prepared to Hike Interest Rates as S&P Slump Continues, At AFL-CIO Meeting, Biden Blames GOP for Blocking His Plan to Fight Inflation, European Court of Human Rights Blocks U.K. from Sending Asylum Seekers to Rwanda, Indigenous Leader Arrested in Ecuador Amid Nationwide Strike, Brazil: Second Suspect Arrested in Case of Missing Journalist & Indigenous Expert, Anti-Sweatshop Activist & Researcher Charlie Kernaghan, 74, Dies

Democracy Now
Jun 14, 2022

Trump's "Big Lie Was Also a Big Ripoff" as He Raised $250 Million from Supporters After 2020 Loss
Monday's January 6 committee hearing ended with closing statements from January 6 committee vice chair, Republican Liz Cheney and Democrat Zoe Lofgren describing how the Trump administration raised over $250 million from his supporters, off of the lie that the 2020 election results were fraudulent, for an election defense fund that didn't exist.

Democracy Now
Jun 14, 2022

Pennsylvania GOP Election Official Tells Jan. 6 Comm. His Family Faced Death Threats Because of Trump
The House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack heard live testimony Monday from Al Schmidt, the sole Republican on the Philadelphia County Board of Elections in Pennsylvania, a key battleground state in the 2020 election. He described how he found no evidence of voter fraud in 2020, and said he and his family received death threats after Trump lashed out at him on Twitter for not halting the vote count due to false claims of fraud.

Democracy Now
Jun 14, 2022

"Detached from Reality": Barr Says Trump Embraced Lies & Conspiracy Theories After His Election Loss
One of the key witnesses who testified live at Monday's hearing of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol was former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt, who led the the Fox News decision to become the first network to call Arizona for Joe Biden on election night in November 2020. Fox fired Stirewalt months later. Answering questions from Congressmember Zoe Lofgren, Stirewalt said Trump's chance of winning was virtually zero. His comments were supported by Trump's former Attorney General William Barr. The committee also heard testimony from Trump's former campaign manager Bill Stepien, who said he had contradicted false election victory claims by Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani, and was part of what he called "Team Normal." Former Attorney General Barr told the committee about how he became "demoralized" after the 2020 election when he tried to counter allegations of voting fraud with then-President Trump.

Democracy Now
Jun 14, 2022

A Drunk Rudy Giuliani Urged Trump to Declare Victory on Election Night, Trump Aides Testify
We spend the hour featuring highlights from the second public hearing of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. Main witnesses were ex-President Donald Trump's former inner circle, including campaign manager Bill Stepien, Attorney General William Barr, campaign adviser Jason Miller and his own daughter Ivanka Trump, who all said Trump ignored them on election night in November 2020 when they argued against declaring victory. They described how Trump instead turned to his lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who they said was drunk when he urged Trump to claim he'd won and say the election was being stolen.

Democracy Now
Jun 14, 2022

Headlines for June 14, 2022
Barr Says Trump Was "Detached from Reality" in Pushing Election Fraud Claims, "The Big Lie Was the Big Ripoff": Jan. 6 Panel Accuses Trump of Ripping Off Donors, Supporters of Trump Coup Are on Ballot in Nevada and Other States Today, Study: 338,000 Lives Would Have Been Saved During Pandemic If U.S. Had Universal Healthcare System, Study Finds Ivermectin Not Effective at Treating COVID-19, U.K. Faces Outcry over Plan to Deport Asylum Seekers to Rwanda, Ukraine Seeks More Heavy Arms as Russia Moves to Solidify Rule in Eastern Ukraine, India Demolishes Homes of Muslim Activists, Arrests Hundreds Following Protests, Israel Is Suspected in Poisoning Deaths of Two Iranian Scientists, Over 100 Million Put Under Heat Advisories Amid Record-Breaking Heat Wave in U.S., Record Flooding Forces Closure of Yellowstone National Park, Nobel Peace Laureate Malala Yousafzai Warns Girls Impacted Most from Climate Crisis, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine Signs Bill to Make It Easier for Teachers to Carry Guns, Supreme Court Makes It Harder for Jailed Immigrants to Challenge Their Detention, Police in Idaho Face Death Threats After Arresting White Supremacists Near Pride Event, Doctors Call on U.K. to Block Extradition of Julian Assange to U.S., Conflicting Reports Emerge from Brazil on Search for Missing Men

Democracy Now
Jun 13, 2022

Harvest of Empire: Juan González on His Landmark Book, Immigration & Consequences of U.S. Imperialism
As the Summit of the Americas wrapped up in Los Angeles with President Biden announcing a plan to address migration in the Western Hemisphere that includes a series of so-called bold actions, we spend the hour with Democracy Now! co-host, professor, longtime journalist and author Juan González, who has just released the newly revised edition of his landmark 2000 book, "Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America." González's best-seller has been expanded to include more contemporary Lantix history, such as U.S. immigration policy under Presidents Trump and Biden, the overpolicing of non-U.S. citizens and how it connects to a history of Western colonialism in the region. While European colonization caused Latin America to be "the incubator of the American empire," the millennial immigration apparatus has become fixated on "kicking out Latin Americans, and no one is doing anything about it," says González. He also examines the culture and history of Latinos and discusses the history of U.S. involvement and imperialism in countries like the Dominican Republic, where many of the immigrants here in New York City hail from, and the conditions of Guatemala's Indigenous peoples under the brutal U.S.-backed government that drove many of them to leave their country and head north in search of safety.

Democracy Now
Jun 13, 2022

Headlines for June 13, 2022
Senators Reach Bipartisan Deal on Guns Without Ban on Assault Weapons, March for Our Lives: Protests Held in Hundreds of Cities Against Gun Violence, Amnesty Accuses Russia of Killing Hundreds of Civilians in Kharkiv, Russia Has Earned Nearly $100B in Fossil Fuel Exports Since War Began, SIPRI Warns Risk of Nuclear War Is Highest Since the Cold War, New Details Emerge of Ginni Thomas's Support of Trump Coup, Bolivia: Jeanine Áñez Sentenced to 10 Years in Prison for 2019 Coup, Biden Unveils New Plan to Address Migration at Summit, Macron Fights to Keep Parliamentary Majority, Israel Bombs Damascus International Airport in Syria, Brazil: Two Bodies Found During Search for Dom Phillips & Bruno Pereira, China Begins Testing 5 Million in Beijing Following COVID Outbreak at Bar, FDA Announces Pfizer-BioNTech's Vaccine Safe and Effective for Children Under 5, 31 Members of Neo-Nazi "Patriot Front" Arrested on Riot Charges in Idaho Near Pride Event, FDA Admits That Contaminated Formula May Have Killed Up to Nine Children, Larry Nassar Abuse Survivors Sue FBI for Delayed Action in Sexual Assault Allegations, Google to Pay $118 Million to Employees in Gender Discrimination Suit, Gen. John Allen, Subject of FBI Probe, Resigns as Brookings Institute President

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2022

Carnage & Chaos: "I Was Slipping in People's Blood" on Jan. 6, Says Brain-Injured Capitol Officer
The second witness who testified live in the first primetime hearing of the House select January 6 committee was Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who suffered a traumatic brain injury as she tried to hold the line outside the Capitol with fellow officers. She was with officer Brian Sicknick, who she said appeared to have been sprayed in the face and was extremely pale. Sicknick died the next day. Sicknick's fiancee sat behind Edwards as she testified. Edwards said the pro-Trump mob included Proud Boys leader Joseph Biggs, who is now facing federal seditious conspiracy charges. "What I saw was just a war scene. It was something like I'd seen out of the movies. I couldn't believe my eyes. There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding," recalled Edwards. "I was slipping in people's blood. … It was carnage. It was chaos."

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2022

"From Protesters … to Insurrectionists": Jan. 6 Witness Describes Proud Boys' Violence at the Capitol
The white supremacist Proud Boys group and the far-right, anti-government Oath Keepers militia played an instrumental role in planning for a violent insurrection on the Capitol, according to the January 6 House committee, which aired new testimony from witnesses and the groups' leaders in its first public hearing Thursday night. British filmmaker Nick Quested was embedded with the Proud Boys and shared his footage with the committee. As the first of two live witnesses, he said he was "confused" when "a couple of hundred of Proud Boys were marching toward the Capitol."

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2022

"Hang Mike Pence": Watch Dramatic New Footage of Trump Mob Attacking Capitol on Jan. 6
The January 6 committee released new footage Thursday night showing a detailed timeline of the day of the insurrection. We feature the video they played that shows how Proud Boys and Oath Keepers marched from the National Mall — where Donald Trump delivered a speech pressuring Mike Pence to recertify the election results to deliver him a victory — to the Capitol Building to chants of "Hang Mike Pence," before they violently pushed through police barriers and broke into the government building chanting "Nancy."

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2022

"Bullshit": Bill Barr & Ivanka Trump Told House Jan. 6 Probe They Didn't Believe Stolen Election Lies
Donald Trump "engaged in a massive effort to spread false and fraudulent information to convince huge portions of the U.S. population that fraud had stolen the election from him," Congressmember Liz Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6 attack, said during Thursday's primetime hearing. "This was not true." We air excerpts from her presentation, which included a new video of Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner dismissing concerns about the campaign to overturn the 2020 election as mere "whining."

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2022

"Attempted Coup": First Public Jan. 6 Hearing Puts Trump at Center of Plan to Overturn 2020 Election
The House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection held its first public hearing Thursday night, televised in primetime by all major networks except Fox News. We spend the hour featuring excerpts from the hearing, starting with Committee Chair Bennie Thompson's opening statement, in which he argued January 6 was the "culmination of an attempted coup" by Donald Trump, comparing the insurrection to the ransacking of Washington, D.C., by British forces more than two centuries ago.

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2022

Headlines for June 10, 2022
House Jan. 6 Committee Says Trump Was at Center of Attempted Coup, Michigan GOP Gubernatorial Candidate Ryan Kelley Arrested over Jan. 6 Riot, Maryland Gunman Who Killed 3 Arrested After Shootout with Police, Ukraine Asks Allies for Rapid Delivery of Heavy Weapons as Fight Rages in East, Blood Found in Boat Tied to Disappearance of Dom Phillips and Bruno Pereira in Brazil, U.S. Secretary of State Dismisses Evidence Israel Killed Shireen Abu Akleh, U.S. Pentagon Chief Lloyd Austin Meets Chinese Counterpart , Iran Has Begun Removing Nuclear Site Surveillance Cameras, Warns U.N., Michigan Police Officer Charged with Murdering Patrick Lyoya, Justice Dept. to Probe Civil Rights Abuses by Louisiana State Police, Abbott Was Alerted to Formula Plant Problems in February 2021, Massachusettes to Allow Undocumented People to Apply for Driver's Licenses , Uvalde Police Chief Defends Officers' Actions Amid Delayed Response to School Massacre

Democracy Now
Jun 09, 2022

Jan. 6 Hearings to Open as Proud Boys Members Are Indicted for Seditious Conspiracy
The House committee investigating Donald Trump's attempt to overturn the 2020 election and the deadly January 6 insurrection at the Capitol holds its first public hearing Thursday night in primetime, as five members of the far-right Proud Boys are indicted for seditious conspiracy. These hearings will provide voters with a choice between those who will want to continue to defend free and fair elections and those who want to take away the will of the people," says Kristen Doerer, managing editor of Right Wing Watch, who previews what to expect.

Democracy Now
Jun 09, 2022

"Act Now": House Hears from Uvalde & Buffalo Gun Violence Victims, Passes Reforms Doomed in Senate
The House of Representatives on Wednesday approved new gun control measures, including raising the minimum age for the purchase of most semiautomatic rifles to 21 and banning high-capacity magazines. The new rules passed the House in a 223-204 vote, but are doomed in the Senate, where a bipartisan group is working on passing a much more limited set of reforms. The vote took place after a House committee heard harrowing testimony from people affected by recent gun violence, including an 11-year-old survivor of the Uvalde school massacre who watched her classmates get killed. "I grabbed a little blood, and I put it all over me'," Miah Cerrillo told lawmakers in her testimony. "And then I grabbed my teacher's phone and called 911." We feature excerpts of Cerrillo's testimony, along with the parents of 10-year-old victim Lexi Rubio and Dr. Roy Guerrero, Uvalde's only pediatrician.

Democracy Now
Jun 09, 2022

Sexual Violence by Russian Troops in Ukraine "Chronically Underreported," U.N. & Amnesty Int'l Find
The United Nations is demanding an independent investigation into charges of rape and sexual assault committed by Russian soldiers in Ukraine since the start of the invasion. We speak with Pramila Patten, the U.N.'s special representative on sexual violence in conflict, who is just back from Ukraine and told the Security Council Monday about multiple shocking reports of rape and assault — all of which Russia has since denied. "We are dealing with a crime which is chronically underreported," says Patten, who emphasized the need to establish safe spaces for victims to come forward and ensure no perpetrators be granted amnesty through a potential ceasefire or peace agreement. We also speak with Oksana Pokalchuk, executive director of Amnesty International Ukraine, whose organization is investigating the alleged war crimes.

Democracy Now
Jun 09, 2022

Headlines for June 9, 2022
House Approves Limited Gun Law Reforms, Mass Shooting Survivors Testify to Congress, Police Arrest Man for Allegedly Plotting to Kidnap or Kill Justice Brett Kavanaugh, House Jan. 6 Committee to Hold Primetime Public Hearing, Ukrainian Troops Hold Out in Severodonetsk Industrial Zone, Ukraine Brings Chernobyl Radiation Monitors Back Online, As Global Food Crisis Worsens, Russia and Turkey Discuss Grain Export Corridor, Sanctions Could Shrink Russian Economy by 15% This Year, Biden Admin Secures 10 Million Doses of Pediatric COVID-19 Vaccine, FDA Panel Recommends Emergency Use of Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine, Donald Trump, Ivanka and Don Jr. to Be Questioned Under Oath in New York Fraud Probe, Man Being Given Lethal Injection Has to Direct Execution Team on How to Find a Vein, Workers Attempt to Organize First-Ever Union at Trader Joe's, Belgian King Voices "Deepest Regrets" for Atrocities in DRC, Does Not Apologize

Democracy Now
Jun 08, 2022

"Intensify the Search": Journalist Dom Phillips and Indigenous Expert Bruno Pereira Missing in Brazil
British journalist Dom Phillips and Indigenous expert Bruno Pereira have still not been found, after being reported missing Sunday in one of Brazil's most remote areas of the Amazon. The pair were traveling across the region to interview Indigenous leaders patrolling the area for illegal miners and fishers for Phillips's upcoming book. "We know that they had been receiving threats. We know that there are other people who are being threatened in this territory," says Ana Alfinito, Brazil legal adviser for Amazon Watch. Alfinito also explains how Brazilian President Jair Bolsanero has systematically destroyed protections for Indigenous groups across the Amazon.

Democracy Now
Jun 08, 2022

Indigenous Amazon Leader, Excluded from Summit of Americas, Urges Leaders to Protect Rainforest
The Biden administration has denied members of an Indigenous delegation from the Amazon rainforest entry at this week's U.S.-hosted Summit of the Americas. Meanwhile, President Biden agreed to meet with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who told Biden he would only attend the conference if he was guaranteed immunity from criticism on his systematic destruction of the Amazon rainforest, among other policies. We speak with one of the delegation's members, Domingo Peas, an Achuar leader from Ecuador and territories coordinator for the Amazon Sacred Headwaters Initiative for the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of the Ecuadorian Amazon. "We cannot continue to destroy the forest and expect to survive. So we call on President Bolsonaro, we call on President Lasso, to act on behalf of future generations with courage, with their heart, and to stop expansion of disruptive economies, and to really embrace fully a new path forward that's for the benefit of all life," says Peas.

Democracy Now
Jun 08, 2022

"Global Embarrassment": Mexico & More Skip Biden's Summit of Americas for Excluding Cuba, Venezuela
Top leaders from Mexico, Bolivia, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are all absent from the ninth Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles. Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced he would boycott the conference after the U.S. said it would not invite Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua. We speak with historian Alejandro Velasco and Roberto Lovato, award-winning Salvadoran American journalist and author, who calls the conference ??"a failure of hemispheric proportions and a global embarrassment for the United States and for the Biden administration." Lovato calls the Biden administration's condemnation of some countries as anti-democratic hypocritical and says the absence of so many Latin American countries represents a decline in U.S. hegemony.

Democracy Now
Jun 08, 2022

Billionaire Democracy? San Francisco DA Chesa Boudin Ousted in Recall & L.A. Mayor Race Heads to Runoff
Progressive San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin was ousted by voters Tuesday in a special recall election, after facing well-funded tough-on-crime attacks by the real estate industry. "He made enemies with very, very deep pockets," says Lara Bazelon, professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law and chair of Boudin's Innocence Commission, who describes the primary challenge as a "perfect storm" to take down Boudin. Bazelon also discusses the mayoral race in Los Angeles, where billionaire real estate developer Rick Caruso and Congressmember Karen Bass will head to a runoff in November after placing first and second in Tuesday's primary. She says the two candidates will be competing for the Latinx voting bloc, which could ultimately determine the outcome of the election.

Democracy Now
Jun 08, 2022

Headlines for June 8, 2022
SF Voters Recall DA Chesa Boudin; L.A. Mayor's Race Headed for Runoff, "My Mother's Life Mattered": Son of Buffalo Victim Pleads with Congress to Take Action, Matthew McConaughey: The Second Amendment Has Been Hijacked by "Deranged Individuals", Gabby Giffords Speaks at Memorial for Gun Violence Victims at the National Mall, Arizona Police Officers Placed on Leave After Refusing to Help Drowning Man, North Carolina County to Pay Andrew Brown Jr.'s Family $3 Million over Police Killing, Millions at Risk of Starvation If Ukrainian Ports Don't Reopen, Latin American Leaders Boycott Summit of the Americas, State Dept. and Pentagon Failed to Count Civilians Killed by U.S. Weapons in Yemen, FBI Seizes Data from Retired Gen. John Allen in Qatar Lobbying Probe, Lebanon Arrests 64 Attempting to Sail to Europe, Federal Judge Rejects Louisiana's Racially Gerrymandered Congressional Map, Louisiana Becomes 18th State to Enact Trans Student Athlete Ban, Yellen Warns Inflation Remains High; Fed Chair Aims to "Get Wages Down", "Memphis 7" Starbucks Store Votes to Unionize

Democracy Now
Jun 07, 2022

"Corrections in Ink": Keri Blakinger on Her Journey from Addiction to Cornell to Prison to Newsroom
Criminal justice reporter Keri Blakinger speaks with us about her new memoir, out today, called "Corrections in Ink," which details her path from aspiring professional figure skater to her two years spent in prison after she was arrested in her final semester of her senior year at Cornell University with six ounces of heroin. Blakinger says her relatively short jail sentence was a lucky case, which she attributes to progressive drug reform as well as her racial privilege. Blakinger went on to become an investigative journalist and now works at The Marshall Project, where she is the organization's first formerly incarcerated reporter.

Democracy Now
Jun 07, 2022

Texas Editor: Police in Uvalde Are Actively Obstructing Us from Doing Our Jobs
Police and bikers in Uvalde, Texas, are restricting a growing number of journalists from reporting on the aftermath of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School that left 19 fourth graders and two teachers dead. "None of us can ever recall being treated in such a manner and our job impeded in such a manner," says Nora Lopez, executive editor of San Antonio Express-News and president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. "Newsgathering is a constitutional right, so at some point this will cross into basically official oppression," she says. Lopez also says residents are now afraid to speak with the press after one parent of two Robb Elementary students reported police had threatened to arrest her if she spoke with reporters about how she rushed the school to try to save her children.

Democracy Now
Jun 07, 2022

We Can't Get Answers: Texas Lawmaker Decries Police Refusal to Address Response to School Massacre
We speak with Texas Democratic state Senator Roland Gutierrez about how the police botched the response to the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, a small town that is part of Gutierrez's congressional district. The shooting left 19 fourth graders and two teachers dead after the police waited over an hour before anyone confronted the gunman. Gutierrez says he can "get no answers" from the state's Department of Public Safety about why the police waited or which officials were present in the school in response to the shooting. He is calling on Texas Governor Greg Abbott to hold a special legislative session to pass comprehensive gun safety measures in response to the massacre.

Democracy Now
Jun 07, 2022

U.K. PM Boris Johnson Survives No-Confidence Vote But Faces Uphill Battle to Stay in Power
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson survived a vote of no confidence held by members of his own Conservative Party on Monday. The 211-148 vote came just days after Johnson was booed by conservative royalists when he arrived at a service to honor the queen's 70-year reign. We speak with Priya Gopal, English professor at the University of Cambridge, who says the vote signals a division within the country's Conservatives and an opening for progressives. "This reflects a mood shift among voters who handed Johnson a huge majority at the last elections," says Gopal. She also explains how Johnson may be forced to resign if he isn't able to gain enough parliamentary support to pass legislation.

Democracy Now
Jun 07, 2022

Headlines for June 7, 2022
Ukraine Says Russia Has Killed or Wounded 40,000 Since Invasion, U.N. Official Warns of Rape and Sexual Violence Committed by Russian Forces in Ukraine, Mexico's AMLO Skips Summit of the Americas After Biden Bans Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua, Caravan of Asylum Seekers Departs Southern Mexico for U.S. Border, U.K.'s Boris Johnson Narrowly Survives No-Confidence Vote by Conservative MPs, GOP's John Cornyn Says Senators Need More Time for Bipartisan Talks on Gun Violence, New York Governor Signs Package of Gun Control Bills, Proud Boys Leader Charged with Seditious Conspiracy over January 6 Capitol Riot, Jessica Cisneros Requests Recount in Texas Primary Runoff Against Rep. Henry Cuellar, Journalist Dom Phillips and Indigenous Expert Bruno Pereira Go Missing in Brazil's Amazon

Democracy Now
Jun 06, 2022

California's First-in-Nation Reparations Report Urges Action on Wealth, Education, Criminal Justice
We speak with the chair of the California Reparations Task Force, which is the first in the United States and has just released a landmark report calling for "comprehensive reparations" for Black people harmed by a historical system of state-sanctioned oppression. While the state report is unprecedented, reparations are "first and foremost a federal responsibility," says attorney Kamilah Moore.

Democracy Now
Jun 06, 2022

Jan. 6 Hearings to Begin as More Revelations Show How Trump Attempted to Orchestrate a Coup
The House committee investigating the deadly January 6 attack on the Capitol will hold its first public hearing on Thursday after 10 months of meeting in private. The hearing will be the first of eight and is expected to draw on roughly 1,000 depositions and interviews. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Will Bunch says the success of the hearings will hinge on whether the committee can convince the public that the January 6 attack "wasn't just a one-off event" but rather "part of an ongoing threat to democracy." Bunch also speaks about the Pennsylvania Senate race, which he says "is life or death for democracy," as well as the mass shooting in Philadelphia on Saturday, which left three dead and 11 injured.

Democracy Now
Jun 06, 2022

Katrina vanden Heuvel on How U.S. Media's "One-Sided Debate" on Ukraine Fans the Flames of War
Russian missiles struck Ukraine's capital of Kyiv for the first time in over a month on Sunday. This comes as Russian and Ukrainian forces continue to battle over control of the eastern city of Severodonetsk and Russian President Vladimir Putin is warning Western nations against supplying longer-range missile systems to Ukraine. "The longer this war goes on, the much more difficult it is to end it," says Katrina vanden Heuvel, editorial director and publisher of The Nation magazine and columnist for The Washington Post. Vanden Heuvel says U.S. corporate media is responsible for what she calls a "one-sided debate" on Ukraine, which is greenlighting unprecedented spending on weapons over the importance of negotiations.

Democracy Now
Jun 06, 2022

Headlines for June 6, 2022
Putin Warns U.S. and NATO Against Sending Long-Range Missiles to Ukraine, Finland and Sweden Join NATO War Games in Baltic Sea, Mike Pence's Chief of Staff Warned Secret Service of Threat Posed by Donald Trump, U.S. Mass Shootings Over the Weekend Leave 15 Dead and 60 Wounded, Buffalo-Area GOP Rep. Chris Jacobs Faces Backlash over Guns, Won't Run for Reelection, Sen. Chris Murphy Optimistic About Bipartisan Talks on Gun Violence, "They Could Have Saved Many More Lives": Uvalde Mother Blasts Police Response, 49 Killed, Hundreds Injured in Bangladesh Chemical Fire, At Least 50 Killed in Southeastern Nigeria as Gunmen Attack Catholic Church, North Korea Tests Missile After U.S. and South Korea Hold Naval War Games, Washington Post: U.S. Support Critical to Saudi Airstrikes in Yemen That Killed Civilians, Biden Excludes Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela from Summit of the Americas, Spanish Court Summons Mike Pompeo over CIA Plot to Kidnap or Kill Julian Assange, Gina Haspel Personally Observed Torture at Secret CIA Black Site, Psychologist Testifies, U.K. Conservatives to Hold Vote of No Confidence in Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Atmospheric CO2 Hits 420 Parts Per Million, 50% Higher Than Pre-Industrial Levels, Wisconsin Judge Found Bound and Murdered in Own Home, Ohio Legislature Bans Transgender Girls from Female-Only School Sports

Democracy Now
Jun 03, 2022

Biden OKs $5.8B in Debt Relief for Corinthian Students; Pressure Grows to Abolish All Student Debt
The Biden administration this week canceled almost $6 billion in student loan debt for borrowers who attended the now-defunct network of for-profit schools known as Corinthian Colleges, which defrauded thousands of students before being shut down in 2015. We speak to two activists from the Debt Collective, a group working to end the student loan crisis, about the ongoing fight for full federal student debt cancellation. Pamela Hunt was a former Corinthian College student who accumulated hundreds of thousands of dollars in student debt and was one of the original 15 students who refused to pay their loans. "It's a very monumental win," she says, adding that her crushing debt prevented her from becoming a homeowner and contributed to the stress of her cancer diagnosis. "If student debt is illegitimate, why not cancel all of it?" says Braxton Brewington, press secretary of the Debt Collective.

Democracy Now
Jun 03, 2022

"We Can't Jail Our Way Out of Poverty": San Fran. DA Chesa Boudin Defends Record Ahead of Recall Vote
We speak to San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin, who was elected in 2019 after promising to end cash bail, curb mass incarceration and address police misconduct. He now faces a recall campaign, with opponents blaming rising crime rates on his policies, even though sources like the San Francisco Chronicle report that crime rates have returned to pre-pandemic levels. Boudin says the recall campaign is spearheaded by wealthy donors, the real estate industry and Republicans who desire a conservative DA who will not hold police and other powerful actors accountable. Opponents who attack Boudin's social justice reform without any of their own proposals "are a scourge to democracy," says Boudin. "We don't need to jail our way out of poverty or other social programs."

Democracy Now
Jun 03, 2022

"This Is Racist Terrorism": Ex-Buffalo Cop Says Gun Violence & White Supremacy Must Both Be Addressed
As President Biden calls on Congress to enact new gun control measures, we go to Buffalo to speak with Cariol Horne, a racial justice advocate and former Buffalo police officer. She says the nation must address white supremacy, as well as gun control, following last month's massacre in Buffalo, when a white supremacist attacked a grocery story, fatally shooting 10 people, all of whom were Black. "He victimized everyone in that community, even the people who arrived on the scene after it happened and watched the carnage that he left behind," says Horne. "This is racist terrorism. We have to call it what it is." Horne also talks about how she was fired from the Buffalo police force for stopping a white officer from choking a Black man who was handcuffed.

Democracy Now
Jun 03, 2022

Headlines for June 3, 2022
In Primetime Address, Biden Asks Congress to Pass Gun Control Laws, Three Killed and Two Wounded in Mass Shootings in Iowa and Wisconsin, House Committee Advances Package of Gun Controls, Ohio GOP Approves Bill to Arm Educators After One Day of Gun Training, Zelensky Says Russia Controls One-Fifth of Ukrainian Territory, Biden to Visit Saudi Arabia, Will Ask Mohammed bin Salman to Pump More Oil, Yemen's Houthis Extend Ceasefire with Saudi-Led Coalition, Israel Kills Four Palestinians in 48 Hours, Including 17-Year-Old Odeh Sadaka, Funerals Held for Haitians Who Died in Mexico While Waiting for U.S. to Hear Asylum Claims, House Select Committee to Hold Primetime Public Hearing on Jan. 6 Insurrection, Journalist Ricardo Ávila, Who Covered Social Movements, Murdered in Honduras, "Massive Human Rights Violations": Amnesty Says 18 Killed in Crackdown on El Salvador Gangs, Activist Sultana Khaya Arrives in Spain After 500 Days of House Arrest in Western Sahara

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