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Democracy Now
May 30, 2024

PFAS Cover-Up: How 3M Hid Risks of Forever Chemicals & "Gaslit" Scientist Who Tried to Sound Alarm
As public concern grows about the health and environmental impacts of so-called forever chemicals, a new investigation by ProPublica and The New Yorker reveals that 3M, the American manufacturing giant, discovered and concealed the risks of these toxic substances for decades. PFAS are used in everyday products, from nonstick cookware to food packaging, but take decades or longer to break down in the body and environment. They have been found in the blood of almost every person in the United States and are linked to serious health effects. Investigative reporter Sharon Lerner says 3M knew as early as the 1970s that forever chemicals were dangerous even in small amounts, but kept those findings secret and "gaslit" one of its own scientists, Kris Hansen, who later raised concerns about forever chemicals in human blood samples. "Her direct bosses had been aware of the presence of this chemical in blood, even though they … appeared to act surprised when she brought her findings," says Lerner. "They knew all along that what she was finding was true."

Democracy Now
May 30, 2024

Univ. of Toronto Protesters Vow to Continue Gaza Encampment as Admin Demands Police Clear It
A judge in Canada this week ruled that a student protest encampment could remain standing at the University of Toronto until at least mid-June, when a top court will decide on an injunction filed by the school requesting the police to clear the pro-Palestinian protesters off campus. Students and faculty launched the encampment on May 2 to protest Israel's war on Gaza. It quickly became one of the largest encampments in North America with 175 tents, hundreds of campers, and a sacred fire led by Indigenous elders. Administrators at the University of Toronto, Canada's largest university, had wanted to clear the encampment before graduation ceremonies begin in early June. "We know what we're doing is just. And all of us are willing to stand our ground no matter what happens," says Mohammad Yassin, a graduating senior, spokesperson for Occupy University of Toronto and a member of the student negotiating team. Yassin is Palestinian with family members currently in Gaza. We also speak with geography professor Deb Cowen, part of the Jewish Faculty Network, who says the encampment is a "precious learning space" bringing students together. "We have maybe never seen our campus be so alive with the spirit of debate, of creative thought, of rigorous conversation and dialogue," Cowen says.

Democracy Now
May 30, 2024

"This Is a Crime": Ken Roth on Israel's Secret War Targeting the ICC to Derail War Crimes Charges
We speak with Kenneth Roth, international affairs scholar and former head of Human Rights Watch, about revelations that Israel waged a nearly decadelong campaign to intimidate the International Criminal Court in order to stop possible war crimes prosecutions of Israeli officials. A joint investigation by The Guardian and the Israeli 972 Magazine revealed that Israel surveilled, hacked, smeared and threatened top ICC officials, including chief prosecutor Karim Khan and his predecessor, Fatou Bensouda. The former head of the Mossad, Yossi Cohen, is said to have personally threatened Bensouda. The revelations come just a week after Khan announced he is seeking arrest warrants for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Defense Minister Yoav Gallant and three top leaders of Hamas. "This is a crime," Roth says of the Israeli campaign against the ICC. He says the revelations also undermine U.S. claims that Israel can hold itself accountable. "There is no good-faith Israeli investigation. There is a concerted, high-level effort to undermine justice to protect Netanyahu, Gallant and others from war crime charges."

Democracy Now
May 30, 2024

Headlines for May 30, 2024
Israel Seizes Entire Gaza-Egypt Border, Continues Deadly Invasion of Rafah, Palestinian Journalist Motasem Dalloul Loses Two Young Sons in Israeli Strikes, "Send the Whole World to Gaza": Families Beg the World to Help End Israeli Border Blockade, Spain Hosts Palestinian PM as European Countries Extend Diplomatic Relationship with Palestine, Brazil Withdraws Tel Aviv Ambassador; China Calls for Int'l Peace Conference, "Stop Fueling Genocide": Activists Block Entrance to Chevron Headquarters, Celebrated NYC Nurse Fired After Highlighting Gaza Genocide in Speech, Meta Removes Hundreds of Fake Accounts Set Up by Israeli Firm, NATO Members Meet Amid Debate over Allowing Ukraine to Use Western Weapons in Russia, Another Candidate for Mayor Killed in Mexico Days Ahead of Nationwide Election, Hong Kong Convicts 14 Pro-Democracy Activists in National Security Trial as Authorities Expand Arrests, Thousands of Rohingya Displaced Along Burma's Border as Fighting Intensifies, Jurors Deliberate for Second Day in Trump's NYC Criminal Trial, Samuel Alito Rejects Calls to Recuse Himself from Supreme Court Cases Related to Jan. 6 and Trump

Democracy Now
May 29, 2024

"America's Monster": How a U.S. Ally Kidnapped, Killed & Tortured Hundreds in Afghanistan
A major New York Times investigation explores the history of one of America's most important allies in the war against the Taliban: Abdul Raziq. While fighting in Afghanistan, Raziq was frequently praised by American generals and oversaw soldiers "trained, armed and paid by the United States and its allies." But to civilians in the area, Raziq became known as "America's monster" after coming to power through years of torture, extrajudicial killing and abduction. Raziq, who was assassinated in 2018, was responsible for the largest known campaign of forced disappearances during America's 20-year war in Afghanistan. "Raziq was basically the poster child for brutality by the U.S.-backed government," says New York Times journalist Matthieu Aikins. Despite knowing about the abuses, the U.S. "continued to work with Raziq side by side because he was just so effective in the war." Aikins argues U.S. "wishful thinking and self-delusion" about the atrocities committed by U.S. troops and allies "is part of the reason why the U.S. failed in Afghanistan despite spending 20 years there and so many hundreds of billions of dollars."

Democracy Now
May 29, 2024

"The North Needs to Learn from the South": Mexico Poised to Elect First Woman President
In Mexico, millions of voters are poised to elect the first woman president in the country's history when they cast their ballots on Sunday. Voters will be choosing between front-runners Claudia Sheinbaum, the former mayor of Mexico City, and Xóchitl Gálvez, a former senator; and a third candidate, Jorge Álvarez Máynez, who is trailing further behind in the polls. The landmark moment has filled many with hope as Mexico has one of the highest rates of gender violence and femicides in Latin America. "This is the primary contradiction for Mexico. You're going to elect a woman, but you still haven't resolved the fact that women are being murdered at the rate of about 10 to 11 every single day," says Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa, who interviewed both Sheinbaum and Gálvez. Hinojosa says the two front-runners are the result of "decadeslong work by feminists in Mexico, along with feminists all over Latin America, pushing for equality."

Democracy Now
May 29, 2024

"A Narrative of Trump Criminality": Jury Begins Deliberations in Hush Money Case
Jury deliberations begin today in Donald Trump's hush money and election interference trial. Trump has been charged with 34 felony counts of falsifying business records in relation to a $130,000 hush money payment that his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, made to adult film actress Stormy Daniels. In a marathon day of closing arguments, prosecutor Joshua Steinglass argued that the payment scheme amounted to an effort by Trump "to manipulate and defraud the voters" before the 2016 presidential election by preventing Daniels from going public with her claim that she had a sexual encounter with Trump. "It was an amazing summation in which every piece of evidence was explained as a part of the entire narrative of Trump criminality," says Ron Kuby, a criminal defense lawyer. On the other hand, Trump's defense lawyer Todd Blanche branded Cohen, the prosecution's star witness, as "the greatest liar of all time" and dismissed the trial as a politicized attack. If Trump is found guilty, it will likely be weeks or months until he is eventually sentenced. The charges carry a maximum of four years in prison, and Trump is expected to appeal any conviction.

Democracy Now
May 29, 2024

Headlines for May 29, 2024
White House: Israeli Attack on Rafah Tent Camp Does Not Violent Biden's "Red Line", Algeria Proposes New U.N. Resolution on Gaza as Mexico Seeks to Join ICJ Genocide Case, New U.S.-Made Pier Breaks Apart Off Coast of Gaza, Halting Aid Shipments, From Hacking to Surveillance, Israel Waged "War" on ICC Prosecutors, State Dept. Official Resigns After U.S. Claims Israel Is Not Obstructing Aid to Gaza, Pro-Palestinian Protests Continue Across Globe, Jury Deliberations to Begin in Donald Trump Criminal Trial, India Issues Red Alert Amid Record Heat as Int'l Court Holds Climate Hearing in Flood-Ravaged Brazil, Papua New Guinea Links Deadly Landslide to Climate Crisis, Transitional Council in Haiti Picks New Prime Minister, Replacing Official Picked Weeks Ago, Georgia Lawmakers Override Veto to Pass New Foreign Agents Law, South Africa Holds Election as ANC Risks Losing Majority, Texas House Speaker Wins GOP Primary Runoff Against Trump-Backed Challenger, 2024 Race: Jill Stein Secures Enough Support for Green Nomination; Libertarians Pick Chase Oliver

Democracy Now
May 28, 2024

"Corky Lee's Asian America": Chinese American Legend Spent 50 Years Seeking "Photographic Justice"
As we mark Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in the United States, we're joined by Mae Ngai to discuss the life and work of legendary Chinese American photographer Corky Lee, who documented the Asian American community in a career that spanned five decades before his death from the COVID-19 pandemic in 2021. Ngai is the co-editor of the new book Corky Lee's Asian America: Fifty Years of Photographic Justice. We also play excerpts of the new documentary Dear Corky by filmmaker Curtis Chin, which features Lee himself discussing his activism and career. Lee "often said his aim in life was to break stereotypes of Asian Americans one photograph at a time. He wanted to make Asian Americans visible when we had been invisible, erased from American history," says Ngai.

Democracy Now
May 28, 2024

Latest Israeli Rafah Attack Kills 45, Injures 110 ; How Can World Enforce ICJ's Ruling to End Assault?
Two days after the International Court of Justice ordered Israel to immediately stop its assault on Rafah, Israeli warplanes began to drop bombs on refugee tent camps in what had previously been declared a "safe zone." At least 45 people, including children and infants, were killed in the bombing. We discuss the ruling and the massacre in Rafah with Ahmed Abofoul, a legal researcher and advocacy officer at the Palestinian human rights organization Al-Haq who was born and raised in Gaza. Abofoul is now based in The Hague, where the International Court of Justice recently ordered Israel to halt its assault on Rafah in a genocide case brought by South Africa. Abofoul notes the significance of the World Court ruling but decries Israel's complete disregard for international orders, including previous ICJ rulings this year. "Israel is lying," while its allies are "parroting whatever Israel is saying." Without a direct enforcement mechanism, attempts to rein in Israeli attacks are likely to continue to fail. Will "complicit" Western states "continue business as usual, or will we see sanctions on Israel?" Abofoul asks. "Everything I know in Gaza has been destroyed," he adds. "This is a genocide. This is about the erasure of the Palestinian people in the Gaza Strip and as a whole, and this is the essence of Zionism as a settler-colonial ideology."

Democracy Now
May 28, 2024

People Burned Alive, Child Decapitated: Report from Rafah on Israeli Strike That Killed 45 in Camp
We go to Rafah for an update after an Israeli attack on refugee tent camps in what had previously been declared a "safe zone" killed at least 45 people, including women and children. "Basically, the situation is totally catastrophic," reports Palestinian journalist Shrouq Aila, from Rafah. She explains the bombs set tents made largely of nylon on fire, igniting a deadly blaze, and that Israel's relentless assault has made three hospitals in the city inoperable. "People are in a total mess and desperate because of this," she says. Aila has been displaced since the start of the war from Jabaliya, where she had been studying English at the now-destroyed Islamic University of Gaza.

Democracy Now
May 28, 2024

Headlines for May 28, 2024
Israeli Bombing of Rafah Camp Kills 45 People, Burns Children Alive, ICJ Orders Israel to "Immediately Halt Its Military Offensive in Rafah", Spain, Norway and Ireland Formalize Recognition of Palestinian State, Gaza Solidarity Protests Continue Following Attack on Rafah Camp, UCLA Police Make First Arrest Weeks After Violent Mob Attacked Gaza Solidarity Encampment, University of Toronto Asks Court to Allow Campus Arrests After Protesters Defy Deadline to Disband, Reporters Without Borders Asks ICC to Investigate Israeli War Crimes Against Gaza Journalists, At Least 18 Killed in Russian Strike Amid Intensifying Kharkiv Offensive, Death Toll Estimate from Papua New Guinea Landslide Rises to 2,000, Temperatures Top 125 Degrees in South Asia; Brazilian Flood Survivors Face Threat of Disease, Mexico Faces Water Shortages as Another Heat Wave Sends Temperatures Soaring, 22 People Killed in Memorial Day Weekend Storms, South Korea, Japan and China Hold First Joint Summit in Years; Comfort Women Protest Japan in Seoul, WHO Members Fail to Reach Consensus on a Pandemic Treaty, Trump's NYC Criminal Trial to Head to Deliberations After Closing Arguments, Liberian Man Detained at Stewart Immigrant Prison Has Died, Uvalde Families Sue Meta, Microsoft and Gunmaker Daniel Defense, UAW Challenges Alabama Mercedes-Benz Loss at NLRB

Democracy Now
May 27, 2024

"A Day in the Life of Abed Salama": How the Death of Abed's 5-Year-Old Son Sheds Light on Life Under Israeli Apartheid
We spend the rest of our Memorial Day special with Nathan Thrall and Abed Salama, the author and subject of a Pulitzer Prize-winning book detailing the many bureaucratic barriers and indignities that make the lives of Palestinians living under Israeli occupation even more difficult. A Day in the Life of Abed Salama: Anatomy of a Jerusalem Tragedy focuses on the 2012 death of Salama's son, 5-year-old Milad, who was killed in a fiery bus crash during a school field trip to a theme park. What followed was a desperate daylong search by Salama and his family to locate Milad's body across different cities and hospitals, encountering numerous barriers due to the Israeli occupation system, like different ID cards giving varying levels of access through military checkpoints, and lack of help from any Israeli authorities. "I think and I hope the book will make some changes and help us as Palestinians to live our lives as other people around the world," says Salama. This interview first broadcast on October 5, 2023.

Democracy Now
May 27, 2024

Pulitzer Winner Nathan Thrall on Gaza, Israel's "System of Domination" and U.S. Complicity
In Part 1 of our Memorial Day special broadcast, we speak with Jerusalem-based journalist and author Nathan Thrall, who was recently awarded the 2024 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction for his book, A Day in the Life of Abed Salama: Anatomy of a Jerusalem Tragedy. Thrall discusses Israel's ceasefire talks with Hamas and Israel's intensified crackdown in the West Bank. "The restrictions on movement in the West Bank are the worst that they have ever been since the occupation began," Thrall says. He also responds to the cancellation of some of his book talks in Germany.

Democracy Now
May 24, 2024

"Why Do Israel's Bidding?": Human Rights Advocate Hossam Bahgat Blasts Egypt Policy at Rafah Crossing
Israel's seizure of the Rafah border crossing with Egypt has sparked anger from the Egyptian government, which has warned that Israel is endangering the landmark 1978 Camp David Accords that normalized relations between the two countries. Despite the increasingly critical tone about Israel's war on Gaza, however, Egyptian authorities have closely coordinated with Israel in decisions around allowing humanitarian aid in through the Rafah crossing and allowing Palestinians out of Gaza. Egyptian security forces have also locked up over 120 people in Egypt, placing them in pretrial detention on terrorism charges for expressing solidarity with Palestine. "There is a fear within the system that allowing people to voice support and solidarity with Palestinians' opposition to Israel will extend not just to criticism of the Egyptians' official position vis-à-vis the war … but also extend to the domestic situation, the human rights situation, the unprecedented economic crisis the country is going through," says Egyptian journalist and human rights advocate Hossam Bahgat. He is executive director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights and was banned from traveling outside of Egypt for the past eight years, with his assets frozen, as part of an Egyptian government crackdown on human rights NGOs. In March, Egyptian authorities finally closed the case against EIPR and other human rights groups and lifted the travel ban, allowing Bahgat to join us now in our New York studio.

Democracy Now
May 24, 2024

1,000 Harvard Students Walk Out of Commencement to Support 13 Seniors Barred from Graduation over Gaza
More than a thousand Harvard students walked out of their commencement ceremony yesterday to support 13 undergraduates who were barred from graduating after they participated in the Gaza solidarity encampment in Harvard Yard. Asmer Safi, one of the 13 pro-Palestinian student protesters barred from graduating, says that while his future has been thrown into uncertainty while he is on probation, he has no regrets about standing up for Palestinian rights. "This is an ethical stance that we're taking," Safi says. We also hear from history professor Alison Frank Johnson, one of over 100 faculty members who voted to confer degrees on the 13 seniors, who describes Harvard's punishment of them as an "egregious departure from past precedent," as was the board's subsequent overruling of faculty. "We hoped then that the Corporation, as it has always done in the past, would accept our recommendations for degree recipients and allow the 13 to graduate, which they chose not to do."

Democracy Now
May 24, 2024

Northwestern Professor Steven Thrasher: You Are Being Lied to About Pro-Palestine Protests on Campus
The presidents of UCLA, Northwestern and Rutgers universities were questioned Thursday on Capitol Hill about pro-Palestine protests on campus Thursday, the fourth time in six months that the Republican-led House Education Committee has summoned school leaders to Washington over accusations of antisemitism. Lawmakers reserved their heaviest questioning for the presidents of Northwestern and Rutgers, where Gaza solidarity encampments were voluntarily dismantled after students negotiated deals with university administrators. Northwestern journalism professor Steven Thrasher, who has been an outspoken supporter of the Gaza solidarity encampments at his school and elsewhere, was singled out during the hearing and described as a "goon," but he tells Democracy Now! he is undeterred in both his pro-Palestine advocacy and defense of his students. "It's supposed to scare everybody who supports Gaza. It's supposed to scare everybody who's against the genocide. It's supposed to scare students who are righteously standing up against the killing that's happening," says Thrasher.

Democracy Now
May 24, 2024

Headlines for May 24, 2024
Al-Aqsa Hospital Loses Power as Health Facilities Inundated Amid Nonstop Israeli Attacks, U.N.: 900,000 Gazans Have Been Displaced Since Start of Rafah Invasion, House Panel Grills More University Heads Amid Ongoing Student Protests, Police Raid UCLA; Harvard Graduates Walk Out, Defend Protesters Who Were Denied Graduation, German Police Raid Palestinian Solidarity Protest at Humboldt University, Biden Welcomes President William Ruto to White House as Kenya Prepares to Deploy to Haiti, Over 100 Feared Dead After Papua New Guinea Landslide, U.N. Approves Srebrenica Genocide Resolution, Macron Visits New Caledonia, Insists Reform Will Take Place Against Will of Indigenous Population, SCOTUS Approves Racially Gerrymandered South Carolina Voting Map, Louisiana Moves to Classify Abortion Pills as Controlled Substances, NCAA Agrees to $2.8B Deal Which Would Allow Colleges to Start Paying Their Athletes, DOJ Announces Antitrust Lawsuit Against Live Nation, Norfolk Southern Will Pay $15 Million Clean Water Act Fine for East Palestine Disaster, George Floyd Justice in Policing Act Reintroduced Ahead of 4th Anniversary of His May 25 Murder

Democracy Now
May 23, 2024

"Power": Yance Ford on His New Documentary & Why "Violence Is Part and Parcel" of U.S. Policing
The new Netflix documentary Power examines the role of police in the United States. We speak to its Oscar-nominated director, Yance Ford, about how policing is used to suppress dissent and protect property in the U.S., its relationship to imperialism and occupation, and the significance of the film's release ahead of the fourth anniversary of the death of George Floyd, the Minneapolis man who was killed when police officers placed him in a deadly chokehold and who became a rallying point for protests against anti-Black racism and police brutality. "The thing that police want to do more than anything else is contain and control threats to order," says Ford. What we still see in the U.S. and around the world today, from the Black Lives Matter movement to the campus Gaza solidarity movement, is "the use of police as small militaries whose job is to suppress dissent."

Democracy Now
May 23, 2024

Dr. Adam Hamawy Describes Desperate Conditions at Gaza Hospitals Amid Attacks & Lack of Supplies
When a group of volunteer doctors with the Palestinian American Medical Association traveled to Gaza last month, they were prepared to treat some of the most horrific injuries caused by Israel's relentless assault on civilians in Gaza. But they were not prepared to be stranded under the bombardment for over a week after the Israeli military seized and closed the border crossing into the southern end of the besieged region, preventing people and supplies from getting in or out. Dr. Adam Hamawy, a plastic surgeon and Army veteran from New Jersey, has now evacuated Gaza after he was trapped at European Hospital in Khan Younis with dwindling supplies. Hamawy, who previously treated Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth for a life-threatening injury while both were in the Army, was offered evacuation along with another group of American doctors days earlier, but refused to leave without first securing the release of his entire volunteer medical team. He now emphasizes that he and his colleagues must be immediately replaced with additional humanitarian relief workers. "It was never a condition for our exit to have other people come in — it was an expectation," he says. "A hospital cannot run on just a few doctors alone. It also needs nurses, it needs staff."

Democracy Now
May 23, 2024

Irish Lawmaker: Recognizing Palestine as a State Is Rooted in Our History of Colonization & Famine
Three European nations have announced plans to recognize the State of Palestine, joining 143 other countries around the world in formal recognition. Leaders in Ireland, Norway and Spain cited a desire to support a political solution to the ongoing conflict in Gaza as the driving force behind the announcements, while Israel responded by recalling its ambassadors from all three countries. Israel's Ambassador to Ireland Dana Erlich called the move a "prize for terrorism." Catherine Connolly, an independent member of the Irish parliament, rejects Erlich's characterization, instead calling recognition "a step for peace" and a "direct result of people's outrage and upset" over Israeli brutality in Palestine. She connects the Palestinian national struggle with Ireland's own fight for recognition at the League of Nations just over a century ago and its history with famine and colonialism. "Our solidarity is with people who suffer in any way, but particularly from famine," Connolly says. "Next Tuesday will be historical, when we raise the Palestinian flag on the grounds of our parliament."

Democracy Now
May 23, 2024

Headlines for May 23, 2024
Israel Continues to Decimate Gaza's Hospitals, Storming Al-Awda and Bombing Kamal Adwan, Mike Johnson Pressures Schumer to Endorse Netanyahu Invitation to Congress Amid Democratic Objections, U.S., Israel Condemn Recognition of Palestinian State, as Colombia Announces Embassy in Ramallah, Two Progressive Dems Lose Oregon Primaries After AIPAC-Tied Group Funds Opponents, China Starts Major Military Drills Around Taiwan After Inauguration of New President, U.K. Prime Minister Calls Surprise July Election, Maritime Tribunal Issues Ruling Holding Governments Responsible for Ocean Pollution, Judge Blocks Part of Florida Anti-Immigrant Law; Arizona GOP Advances Anti-Immigrant Ballot Measure, Justice Alito Flew Another Right-Wing Flag Used by Trump Supporters Outside Holiday Home, Senate Confirms Biden's 201st Federal Judge, Uvalde Families Settle with City, Announce New Lawsuit Ahead of 2nd Anniversary of Massacre, Biden Cancels Another $7.7B in Student Debt; Debt Collective Protesters Arrested in D.C.

Democracy Now
May 22, 2024

Will Biden Undermine His Own Climate Goals with New Tariffs on Chinese Electric Vehicles?
We speak with The New Republic's Kate Aronoff about how President Biden has unveiled steep tariff increases on various Chinese imports, including electric vehicles, which will quadruple from the current tariff rate of 25% to 100%. "What you see … is Biden really looking to lean into a really quite hawkish position on China," says Aronoff. She explains why Biden is caught between insulating the American auto industry from competition and allowing affordable EVs to enter U.S. markets for climate goals. Aronoff says experts say Biden should work with China on this industry and "to not see this as zero-sum competition. We need to build a lot of clean technology. This is a very large pie, and there's no reason why the United States cannot also have a piece of it."

Democracy Now
May 22, 2024

"The New McCarthyism": Pro-Palestine Educators Face Censorship, Harassment & Firings Across U.S.
The Intercept columnist Natasha Lennard details how the combination of anti-Palestinian, Islamophobic repression and very few worker protections across the U.S. has created a "very dangerous constellation" for academic laborers that is "overwhelmingly only facing pro-Palestinian speakers, not speakers who are supporting Israel's genocide." She calls it "the New McCarthyism" on college campuses. "A lot of media attention has focused on the spectacle of encampments and the very, very brutal police response," says Lennard, "What you also have going on behind the scenes is the targeting of individuals who work at universities."

Democracy Now
May 22, 2024

"We Hope to Be a Model": Students & Faculty at The New School Secure Divestment Vote


Democracy Now
May 22, 2024

"Brutal Force": Police Raid UMich Gaza Solidarity Camp Before President Ono Testifies in Congress
We speak with Palestinian American University of Michigan student Salma Hamamy, who was pepper-sprayed and beaten at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor when the Gaza solidarity encampment there became the latest to be violently dismantled Tuesday morning in the nationwide crackdown on student-led protests in solidarity with Palestine. Student protesters set up the encampment about a month ago to demand the University of Michigan's endowment divest from companies with ties to Israel, but school President Santa Ono claimed the peaceful action had become a threat to public safety. Dozens of officers raided the encampment before dawn, arresting and hospitalizing students after pepper-spraying and pushing them to the ground. "I repeatedly said that my family has been killed, and that is why I am here. And as I was saying that through the megaphone, police officers snatched the megaphone out from my hand," says Hamamy. She explains the university has refused to discuss divestment with protesters. "Instead of meeting with us at the table and meeting with us at the encampment, they decided to meet us with violent force and chemical attacks." University of Michigan President Santa Ono is slated to appear before Congress Thursday alongside the presidents of UCLA and Yale.

Democracy Now
May 22, 2024

"Collective Punishment": Israel Raids Jenin Camp in West Bank, Killing 8, "Shooting Everything"
In the occupied West Bank, Israeli forces raided the northern city of Jenin early Tuesday morning, killing at least eight Palestinians, including a doctor shot dead on his way to work and a teenager riding his bicycle. About a dozen others were injured, including a journalist. Motasem Abu Hasan, an actor at The Freedom Theatre in the Jenin refugee camp who escaped the invasion, describes the ongoing attack on the camp. "They are shooting everything," says Abu Hasan. The Freedom Theatre was about to premiere their first play since October 7 as part of their wider effort to share the Palestinian narrative and "reveal the truth about the Israeli occupation." The raid began just as Spain, Ireland and Norway became the latest European states to recognize the Palestinian state. "It's a result of the cultural intifada," says Abu Hasan. "That's why we really believe in the power of narrative, especially in The Freedom Theatre, in Palestine, in Jenin camp."

Democracy Now
May 22, 2024

Headlines for May 22, 2024
Ireland, Norway & Spain Announce Recognition of Palestinian State, U.N. Suspends Food Aid in Rafah; U.S. Admits No Aid from New Pier Has Reached Gazans, Protesters Disrupt Blinken Testimony, Calling Him "The Butcher of Gaza", Police Raid Univ. of Michigan Encampment; UC Santa Cruz Academic Workers Go on Strike, Israel Seizes AP Broadcasting Equipment & Then, Under Pressure, Reverses Course, Trump Trial: Defense Rests Case as Former President Declines to Take Stand, Trump Removes Campaign Video Referencing "The Creation of a Unified Reich", Trump Suggests He May Back Birth Control Restrictions, Fani Willis and Judge Scott McAfee Win Races in Georgia, Iran's Supreme Leader Khamenei Speaks at Funeral for Ebrahim Raisi, U.N. Warns Genocide May Be Occurring in Sudan, Greek Judge Dismisses Charges in Migrant Smuggling Shipwreck Case, Mexico: 14 Killed in Political Violence in Chiapas Ahead of June 2 Election, H. Bruce Franklin, Historian & Fierce Critic of Vietnam War, Dies at 90

Democracy Now
May 21, 2024

Israeli Historian Ilan Pappé on Interrogation at U.S. Airport and "Collapse of the Zionist Project"
We speak with renowned Israeli historian Ilan Pappé about his recent trip to the United States, when he was interrogated for two hours by federal agents upon arrival at Detroit airport about his political views on Gaza, Hamas and Israel, as well as demanding to know whom he knew in U.S. Muslim, Arab and Palestinian communities. Pappé was only allowed to enter the country after agents copied the contents of his phone. "They refused to tell me why they stopped me," he says. Pappé, author of The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine, also discusses the Nakba, growing support for Palestinian rights, and why he believes "the collapse of the Zionist project" is imminent.

Democracy Now
May 21, 2024

"A Watershed Event": ICC Charges Against Netanyahu First Time Court Has Gone After Western Leader
Israel and the United States have both strongly condemned the International Criminal Court's decision to pursue arrest warrants against Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Yoav Gallant on war crimes charges, calling it "outrageous" and seeking support from other allies in opposing the court's moves. On Monday, ICC chief prosecutor Karim Khan outlined specific charges against Netanyahu and Gallant, including "starvation of civilians as a method of warfare" and "extermination." The ICC also sought arrest warrants for three leaders of Hamas — Yahya Sinwar, Ismail Haniyeh and Mohammed Deif — for war crimes including extermination and murder, the taking of captives, torture, rape and other acts of sexual violence. The warrants for Israel's top leaders, which must still be approved by a panel of ICC judges, is "a watershed event in the history of international justice," says war crimes prosecutor Reed Brody. "This is the first time that a Western or pro-Western leader is [the] subject of an indictment request."

We also speak with Israeli historian Ilan Pappé, author of The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine, who says Israel's strident response to the ICC prosecutor is no surprise. "This is the kind of Israel we have in 2024. It doesn't care about international law. It doesn't care about international opinion," says Pappé.

Democracy Now
May 21, 2024

Meet Lily Greenberg Call, First Jewish Biden Appointee to Publicly Resign over Gaza
We speak with Lily Greenberg Call, the first known Jewish appointee to resign from the Biden administration over the war in Gaza. Greenberg Call was a special assistant to the chief of staff at the Interior Department after being named to the post by President Joe Biden in early 2023, but she quit on May 15 in a four-page letter that slammed Biden's "disastrous, continued support for Israel's genocide in Gaza." Greenberg Call is at least the fifth high-profile resignation from the Biden administration since October 7. She says her resignation was motivated by her Jewish values. "I feel that I am really living in my Jewishness, in the essence of what I was raised with, by standing up for Palestinians and by demanding their freedom," Greenberg Call tells Democracy Now!, criticizing Biden and others for pitting Jewish safety against Palestinian rights. "I am so angry at the president that he is using my community as justification for this slaughter, making us the face of the American war machine."

Democracy Now
May 21, 2024

Headlines for May 21, 2024
Israeli Airstrikes Kill Dozens Across Gaza as Genocide Continues in Wake of ICC Arrest Warrant News, Israel Kills 7 Palestinians in Jenin Raid, Incl. a Student, Teacher and Doctor, AOC Lends Her Clout to New York Bill Which Would Sanction Charities Funding Israel, Yale Students Walk Out of Graduation; The New School and Bard Make Progress in Their Demands, Funeral Proceedings Begin in Iran for Pres. Ebrahim Raisi, Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian, Pres. Macron Heads to New Caledonia as Death Toll from Unrest Increases to 6, Pylos Shipwreck Trial Opens in Athens, Raising Concerns over Criminalization of Migrants, Prosecution Rests in Trump's NYC Trial; Defense Starts Off with Admonishment of Witness, Judge and DA in Georgia's Trump Election Subversion Case Up for Reelection, Larry Bensky, Veteran KPFA Broadcaster Who Reported on Iran-Contra, Dies at 87

Democracy Now
May 20, 2024

Meet Two Morehouse Professors Who Protested Biden over Gaza and Congo During Commencement Speech
At Morehouse College, students and faculty were divided over inviting President Joe Biden to receive an honorary degree and give a speech at the school's commencement ceremony. Morehouse valedictorian DeAngelo Fletcher, who had a Palestinian flag affixed to his graduation cap, called for a permanent ceasefire in Gaza during his speech, and assistant professor of sociology Taura Taylor stood with her fist raised, facing away from Biden as he addressed the crowd. "I wanted to take it upon myself to, one, stand up for my principles, and then also kind of stand in solidarity for my students as well as my other fellow faculty members who felt that we were caught in this moment where it seemed like we, as a community, selected Biden, when we all did not," says Taylor. We also speak with Samuel Livingston, an associate professor of Africana studies, who held a flag of the Democratic Republic of the Congo behind Biden as he spoke. "We held up the flag because the people of the Congo do not get enough media attention in terms of the active genocide that the United States is supporting through its support of Rwanda," says Livingston. "Congo deserves justice, reparations from the United States for the assassination of Patrice Lumumba, conspiring in that assassination, and the people today deserve a country that is built on peace and justice."

Democracy Now
May 20, 2024

British High Court Grants WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange the Right to Appeal U.S. Extradition
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Monday won the right to appeal his extradition to the United States. Assange's lawyers argued before the British High Court that the U.S. government provided "blatantly inadequate" assurances that Assange would have the same free speech protections as an American citizen if extradited from Britain. Assange has spent more than a decade facing the threat of extradition to the U.S., where he faces up to 175 years in prison for publishing classified documents exposing U.S. war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan. "This is a victory for Julian Assange in that he lives on to fight another day, his case lives on to fight another day. But he's not out of Belmarsh [Prison] yet, and he's not in the clear yet," says Chip Gibbons, policy director of Defending Rights & Dissent. "This could still end in him being sent to the U.S. And the person who can stop this is Joe Biden and Merrick Garland."

Democracy Now
May 20, 2024

Int'l Criminal Court Seeks Arrest Warrants for Netanyahu, Gallant & Hamas Leaders for War Crimes
The chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court has announced he is seeking arrest warrants for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Israeli Defense Minister Yoav Gallant and three leaders of Hamas: Yahya Sinwar, Ismail Haniyeh and Mohammed Deif. The charges against Netanyahu and Gallant include starvation of civilians, extermination, intentionally directing attacks against a civilian population, among other crimes. The charges against the Hamas leaders include extermination, murder, taking hostages, rape, among other crimes. "It places Israel's leaders of this genocidal onslaught on the Gaza Strip in the dock," says Middle East analyst Mouin Rabbani, who explains why this will be "very significant" for Israel's allies and signatories to the ICC. "They now have to make a choice between Israeli impunity and obligations under the Rome Statute."

Democracy Now
May 20, 2024

Trita Parsi on Future of Iran After President & Foreign Minister Die in Helicopter Crash
Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi and Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian were killed on Sunday in a helicopter crash along with six other officials and crew. Wreckage of the helicopter was found early Monday in a mountainous region of the country's northwest following an overnight search in blizzard conditions. Raisi was returning from inaugurating a new dam built jointly with Azerbaijan along the two countries' border. Raisi, 63, was elected in 2021 in a vote that saw the lowest-percentage turnout in the Islamic Republic's history after major opposition candidates were disqualified from taking part. Analyst Trita Parsi says the president's death will have little impact on the Islamic Republic's policies, including barring dissident candidates from running for office. "Now the regime is going to have to try to whip up and mobilize voters and excitement for an election within 50 days," he says. "And it has to make a decision: Is it actually going to allow other candidates to stand, or is it going to continue on the path that it has set out for itself in which these elections increasingly become rather meaningless in terms of actual democratic value?"

Democracy Now
May 20, 2024

Headlines for May 20, 2024
Iran in Mourning After Helicopter Crash Kills President and Foreign Minister, ICC Chief Seeks Arrest Warrants for Netanyahu, Gallant and Hamas Leaders, Israel Expands Deadly Attacks in Gaza, Occupies Al-Awda Hospital Amid Dire Fuel and Water Shortages, Netanyahu Facing Internal Opposition in His Coalition and on the Streets, Biden Is Met with Protest as He Delivers Morehouse Graduation Speech, U.K. High Court Rules Julian Assange Can Appeal U.S. Extradition, Congolese Military Says It Thwarted Coup Attempt Led by Opposition Leader Malanga, Pres. William Lai Inaugurated in Taiwan, Tells China to Stop Its Intimidation, Pres. Luis Abinader Wins Reelection in Dominican Republic, Russian Attacks in Kharkiv Kill 11 as Ukraine Asks NATO, U.S. for Help Training Its Army, Mercedes-Benz Workers Vote Against Unionizing with UAW, Man Who Broke Into Nancy Pelosi's House and Attacked Her Husband Sentenced to 30 Years, Houston Storm Death Toll Climbs to 7

Democracy Now
May 17, 2024

"Resist the Normalization of Evil": Israeli Reporter Amira Hass on Palestine & the Role of Journalism
Our guest is the Haaretz correspondent Amira Hass, the only Israeli Jewish journalist to have spent 30 years living in and reporting from Gaza and the West Bank. She is the recipient of the 2024 Columbia Journalism Award, and on Wednesday she addressed the graduating class of the Columbia Journalism School in New York City. Hass discusses the ongoing Israeli war on Gaza, why journalists should "resist the normalization of evil and injustice," Israel's recent censorship of Al Jazeera, its maintenance of a strict apartheid system, its complete rejection of the prospect of Palestinian statehood and more. "Israel took Palestinian life, liberty and freedom as hostage for the past 75 years," says Hass. "You go to Tel Aviv, you think you are in New York or you are in London — and 40, 50 kilometers away, Palestinians live in cages."

We also play an excerpt from the student and faculty-led "People's Graduation" held Thursday at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City in response to Columbia University's crackdown on student protest, which culminated in the administration's cancellation of university-wide commencement. Centering Palestinian solidarity, the People's Graduation featured speakers including the Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist and illustrator Mona Chalabi, who praised the work of student journalists. While "our institutions have failed us these past seven months, … we listened to your radio stations if we wanted the truth," she said.

Democracy Now
May 17, 2024

Headlines for May 17, 2024
"We Don't Want Ships. We Want Safety": Displaced Gazans Reject U.S. Pier; U.N. Calls for Land Access, Spain Bars Ships with Weapons For Israel; 13 Foreign Ministers Warn Against Israel's Rafah Assault, "Israel's Genocide Has Reached New and Horrific Stage": South Africa Requests Urgent ICJ Intervention, Police Raid and Arrest Students at Gaza Solidarity Encampments at UC Berkeley, DePaul University, WaPo: Billionaires and Execs Urged Eric Adams to Send Police to Columbia's Gaza Encampment, SCOTUS Overrules Challenge to Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, NYT: Upside-Down Flag Seen Outside Alito's Home in Jan. 2021, a Symbol Used by Election Deniers, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott Pardons Known Racist Who Murdered BLM Protester in 2020, Texas Storms Kill 4, Cut Power to a Million Customers, Biden Admin to End New Leases in U.S.'s Largest Coal-Producing Region, Ron DeSantis Eliminates Climate Change as Priority in Florida's Energy Policy, Congolese Mourners Call Out Rwanda and Western Supporters for "Genocide" on Its People, HRW Says Rwanda Denied Entry to Its Researcher, Another Deportation Flight Leaves the U.S. for Haiti Despite "Grave Dangers", DOJ Moves to Reclassify Marijuana

Democracy Now
May 16, 2024

"Rampage of Killings, Looting, Torture, Rape": Ethnic Cleansing in Sudan's Darfur Region
Human Rights Watch has documented ethnic cleansing in the West Darfur region of Sudan by the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces and allied militias against the Masalit people and other non-Arab communities. "These allied militia and the RSF then, from April until June, conducted a rampage of killings, of lootings, of torture, of rape," says Belkis Wille, associate director with the Crisis, Conflict, and Arms Division at Human Rights Watch. She says international actors must cut off the flow of arms to all warring parties, but adds there is little "political will" to enforce an arms embargo in Sudan.

Democracy Now
May 16, 2024

"In Cold Blood": Russian Forces Executing Surrendering Ukrainian Soldiers
Ukrainian forces are withdrawing from some areas in the northeastern region of Kharkiv as Russian forces continue a new offensive that has displaced thousands. This latest setback for Ukraine comes more than two years after Russia invaded the country. Human Rights Watch has documented several incidents of Russian soldiers summarily executing surrendering Ukrainian soldiers, with drone footage showing the killings "in clear detail," says Belkis Wille, associate director with the Crisis, Conflict, and Arms Division at Human Rights Watch. "They take off their vests, they put down their helmets, they lie on the ground and put their hands up. And then we see them being executed by Russian soldiers in cold blood."

Democracy Now
May 16, 2024

Human Rights Watch: Israeli Forces Attack Known Aid Worker Locations in Gaza
A new Human Rights Watch Report finds Israeli forces have attacked humanitarian aid convoys and facilities at least eight times since October 7 despite being given their coordinates. Israeli authorities did not issue advance warnings to any of the aid organizations before the attacks, which killed at least 15 people, including two children, and injured at least 16 others. More than 250 aid workers have been killed in Gaza over the past seven months, according to the United Nations. "Aid workers, unfortunately, die in conflict zones," says HRW researcher Belkis Wille. "What's really unique in the context of Gaza is the high number in such a short period of time."

Wille also discusses a recent U.S. government report that found Israel has likely violated international law in its assault on Gaza but that it could not make that conclusion definitively — a "shocking" finding, she says. "The United States absolutely has to start doing more to limit military assistance to Israel. … And it needs to do far more to protect civilians more broadly."

Democracy Now
May 16, 2024

Israeli Human Rights Lawyer Attacked While Documenting Settler Raid on Gaza Aid Convoy
Aid agencies are running out of food in southern Gaza amid Israel's ongoing offensive in Rafah and the shutdown of the two main border crossings in the south. Some 1.1 million Palestinians are on the brink of starvation, according to the United Nations, while a "full-blown famine" is taking place in the north. Meanwhile, some Israelis have been blocking aid from reaching the Gaza border, including a violent attack on trucks carrying humanitarian relief through the occupied West Bank earlier this week, when settlers threw food packages on the ground and set fire to the vehicles at the Tarqumiyah checkpoint near Hebron. "They did whatever they want," says Israeli lawyer and peace activist Sapir Sluzker Amran, who documented the attack on the aid convoy. She says Israeli soldiers appeared to be working with the settlers, refusing to intervene. "They were just standing aside like there is nothing that they can do, like it's normal, what's happening."

Democracy Now
May 16, 2024

Headlines for May 16, 2024
Gazans Flee Israeli Attacks Across the Territory as Chaos Reigns in Besieged Territory, University Human Rights Network Concludes Israel Is Committing Genocide in Gaza, Israel's Far-Right Leaders Dispute Future of Gaza, "Biden Is Making Jews the Face of the War Machine": First Jewish Biden Appointee Resigns over Gaza, Israeli Historian Ilan Pappé Interrogated by U.S. Agents at Detroit Airport, Germany Lifts European Ban on British Palestinian Surgeon Ghassan Abu-Sittah, "Refuse to Accept Hell as Normal": Amira Hass Delivers Graduation Speech as Students Keep Up Protests, Sonoma State President Placed on Leave After School Agrees to Academic Boycott of Israel, Unions Representing UC and Harvard Student Workers Challenge Violent Crackdown on Gaza Protests, Prime Minister of Slovakia in Stable Condition After Assassination Attempt, Far-Right Populist Geert Wilders Forms Dutch Coalition But Agrees Not to Become Prime Minister, Putin Backs Beijing Peace Plan for Ukraine as He Meets with Xi Jinping in China, France Declares State of Emergency in New Caledonia After 4 Killed in Clashes with Police, Activists Say Javier Milei's Rhetoric and Policies Led to Deadly Attack on Lesbians, Ex-Gambian Interior Minister Ousmane Sonko Convicted for Crimes Against Humanity, SCOTUS Restores Louisiana Voting Map with Additional Black-Majority District, Biden and Trump Agree to 2 Network Debates, Eschewing Debate Commission

Democracy Now
May 15, 2024

Drop the Charges: Demands for CUNY to Divest from Israel Met by Violent Police Repression & Felony Charges
Students and workers at the City University of New York held a peaceful occupation Tuesday of the school's Graduate Center in solidarity with Palestine and renamed its library "The Al Aqsa University Library," after Gaza's oldest public university, which was destroyed by Israel's bombardment. This comes as over 500 faculty and staff at CUNY have signed a letter demanding the charges be dropped against at least 173 people arrested in April when NYPD violently raided a peaceful Gaza solidarity encampment on the City College campus. "This is really the most egregious example we've seen of violent repression of pro-Palestinian organizing," says pro-Palestine activist and CUNY alumni Musabika Nabiha, who says the crackdown wasn't in response to the tents, rallies or free food, but because the "encampment's demands themselves proved a threat to the constant accumulation of profit and profiting off of genocide that CUNY is engaged in." Alex Vitale, coordinator of the Policing and Social Justice Project at CUNY's Brooklyn College, criticizes the school administration for being relatively harsh on student activists. "CUNY is spending millions of dollars for a security apparatus that fails to address the real security needs of students and is really there in moments like this to be a tool, a kind of private army, for the administration to suppress student dissent."

Democracy Now
May 15, 2024

"A Racist, Criminal Project": Palestinian Historian on 1948 Nakba, Israel's War on Gaza & U.S. Complicity
Palestinians across the globe are marking the 76th anniversary of the Nakba — which means "catastrophe" in Arabic — when those establishing the state of Israel violently expelled over 700,000 Palestinians. Palestinian historian Abdel Razzaq Takriti says closer to 900,000 Palestinians were forced out or massacred during Israel's founding, which is being celebrated inside Israel with calls to ethnically cleanse and settle the Gaza Strip and the occupied West Bank. "The Nakba is continuing. This is a colonial continuum," says Takriti. "It's not enough to commemorate. It's not enough to talk about it. We have to stop it right now. … The first step to doing that is to stop the genocide in Gaza." Takriti lays out four principles for Nakba education: refuting Nakba denialism, recognizing the Nakba is part of an ongoing process of settler colonialism, stopping that process, and then reversing it by restoring Palestinian national rights.

Democracy Now
May 15, 2024

"Stop This War Right Now": U.S. Doctor Who Saved Sen. Duckworth's Life in Iraq, Now Trapped in Gaza
Democracy Now! speaks with Dr. Adam Hamawy, one of around 20 American medical workers trapped in Gaza after Israel closed the Rafah border crossing into Egypt. A plastic surgeon and Army veteran, Hamawy is on a volunteer mission with the Palestinian American Medical Association at the European Hospital in Khan Younis. Like many Gazans, the U.S. medical workers are now facing dehydration and other deadly health conditions. "We're continuing to do our job. … It's tiring, but this is exactly what we need to be doing," says Hamawy, who calls on President Biden to stop supporting Israel's assault on Gaza. "If my best friend is a serial killer, I'm going to stop being his friend." Hamaway describes treating "massive" injuries to civilians in Khan Younis, where much of the city has been destroyed and vandalized in Hebrew. "It's going to haunt all of us. … I'm here. I see it with my own eyes. At some point in time, everyone is going to see it."

Democracy Now
May 15, 2024

Defense Attorney Ron Kuby on Trump Criminal Trial & Representing Climate & Pro-Palestinian Protesters
In the historic criminal hush money election fraud trial of former President Donald Trump, New York prosecutors are wrapping up their case charging Trump with falsifying business records in an illegal effort to influence the 2016 presidential election. On Tuesday, Trump's former fixer Michael Cohen admitted he misled the Federal Election Commission about hush money payments made to adult film star Stormy Daniels. In cross-examination, defense attorneys tried to suggest Cohen was motivated by vengeance against Trump. "He's the one who has firsthand knowledge of the actual deal that he and Donald Trump struck in order to pay the hush money, create a phony retainer, and ultimately falsify the business records," says criminal defense lawyer Ron Kuby. "The boss betrayed him. And now he, indeed, is out for revenge." Kuby says Trump and his right-wing allies are using the trial as a backdrop for politics, and discusses the possibility of Trump serving prison time. Kuby is also representing climate crisis activists arrested at Citibank headquarters in New York City during Earth Week last month and pro-Palestinian activists arrested at recent protests at Fordham University and SUNY Purchase. "I tend to view these struggles … as perennial struggles with each generation kind of rising up to do their part," Kuby says. "I just have mad respect for the young people who are literally risking their education, their careers and their futures to stand up for the planet, to stand up against the slaughter in Gaza."

Democracy Now
May 15, 2024

Headlines for May 15, 2024
Biden to Send Another $1 Billion in Arms to Israel as Palestinians Mark 76th Nakba Anniversary, Palestinian Truck Drivers Face New Risks After Settlers Attacked Aid Convoy in West Bank, Israel's National Security Minister Itamar Ben-Gvir Joins March Calling for Resettlement of Gaza, Pro-Palestinian Protesters Disrupt Google Conference Over Israel Contract, Harvard Students End Encampment as Officials Agree to Discuss Divestment Demand, House Speaker Mike Johnson Visits Trump Trial & Bashes Prosecution, Maryland, Nebraska and West Virginia Hold Primaries, Ukrainian Forces Withdraw from Areas of Kharviv Amid New Russian Offensive, Protests in Georgia After Passage of "Foreign Influence" Bill, Biden Places 100% Tariff on Chinese Electric Cars, DOJ Says Boeing Violated Settlement, Could Face Criminal Prosecution, Eight Migrant Farmworkers Die in Bus Accident Heading to Watermelon Farm

Democracy Now
May 14, 2024

"Unbuild Walls": Detention Watch's Silky Shah on Debunking Immigration Myths & Embracing Abolition
Amid an intensifying crackdown on asylum seekers at the U.S.-Mexico border, we speak to the author of the new book Unbuild Walls: Why Immigrant Justice Needs Abolition about U.S. immigration policy under the Biden administration. Author Silky Shah is the executive director of Detention Watch Network and a longtime immigration rights advocate whose new book aims to "debunk the idea that immigration is a public safety issue," in the face of narratives, from both the Republican and Democrat political establishments, of criminality and deterrence. Despite Biden's campaign promises to reform the immigration system, his administration has "ceded more and more ground to the Republicans and moved the whole conversation to the right," Shah says. "Legalization isn't even on the table." Shah discusses how the immigrant rights' movement uses the language of abolition to build connections with other social movements fighting oppression, from mass incarceration to police brutality. "These systems aren't separate. … We have to call for abolition of the whole system and understand those things together."

Democracy Now
May 14, 2024

Columbia-Affiliated Union Theological Seminary Votes to Divest from Israel's War on Gaza
As student protests around the world call for their educational institutions to divest from companies with ties to Israel, we speak to the Reverend Dr. Serene Jones, the president of Union Theological Seminary, an ecumenical seminary affiliated with Columbia University that is one of the first schools to begin divesting from companies that "profit from war in Palestine/Israel." Jones says divestment is an extension of Union's "long policy of trying our best to bring our values, our core mission and our conscience to bear on how we invest our money," and credits student activists with pushing the administration to action. Jones criticizes Columbia's decision to arrest student protesters with a "police takeover" and "violent decampment," in contrast to Union's approach to student political expression. "We support students learning what it means to find their voice and speak out for justice and freedom," she says.

Democracy Now
May 14, 2024

"Displacement Has Been Weaponized": Gaza Reporter Akram al-Satarri on Israeli Attack & Fleeing Rafah
Over 450,000 Palestinians, many already internally displaced, have fled Rafah in the past week alone since Israel launched an offensive on the city. Another 100,000 have been forced to flee homes in the north of Gaza amid escalated bombing and ground attacks. Among the recently redisplaced is our guest, the Gaza-based journalist Akram al-Satarri, who joins us from a crowded shelter outside the Al-Aqsa Hospital in Deir al-Balah in central Gaza. "Displacement has been weaponized," al-Satarri says, citing the experiences of families who have been displaced as many as eight times since the start of Israel's assault. "People are suffering. They are deprived of everything," al-Satarri adds, due to Israel's seizure and closure of the Rafah border crossing, preventing food, water, supplies or aid from reaching the famine-stricken population. "They are trying to prepare the Palestinians for full subjugation," he continues. Life in Gaza is "unimaginable; however, Gazans are living it."

Democracy Now
May 14, 2024

Headlines for May 14, 2024
Israel Strikes UNRWA School, Intensifies Air and Ground Attacks Across Gaza, 20 U.S. Medical Workers Trapped in Gaza, Face Severe Health Issues, After Israel Shuts Rafah Border, Hashem Ghazal, Leading Figure in Palestine's Deaf Community, Killed with Wife in Israeli Airstrike, U.S. Army Officer Resigns over "Enabling and Empowering the Killing and Starvation of Palestinians", At Least 10 Israeli Military Members Have Died by Suicide Since Oct. 7, "This Was All About the Campaign": Michael Cohen Testifies in Trump Hush Money Trial, Democrats May Investigate Trump Comments Suggesting Quid Pro Quo with Oil Execs If Reelected, Blinken in Ukraine to Show U.S. Support Amid Russian Advances in East, Australia Sentences Whistleblower to 5 Years; U.K. Court Ruling Expected on Assange Extradition, Death Toll from Brazilian Floods Mounts as Residents Question Livability of Region, Climate Protesters Disrupt Italian Open, 5,000 Mercedes-Benz Workers in Alabama Voting on Whether to Join UAW, University of California Union Could Strike to Protest Violent Crackdown on Campus Encampments

Democracy Now
May 13, 2024

NYPD Kills Bangladeshi Teen Win Rozario After He Calls 911 for Help, as His Mom Pleads for His Life
The police fatal shooting of Win Rozario, a 19-year-old Bangladeshi teen who lived in Queens, New York, has set off protests and demands for justice from the family. Rozario had called 911 in late March asking for help as he experienced a mental health crisis, but two New York police officers who arrived at the family's home shot him at least four times within minutes after entering the Rozario residence. The NYPD claimed Rozario "came at" the officers with a pair of scissors when they fired at him, but police body-camera footage shows he was standing on the other side of the kitchen, several feet away from the officers, as his mother desperately tried to shield her son. "He needed help, and what they did instead was kill him," says New York City Councilmember Shahana Hanif, who represents the city's 39th Council District. She also discusses progressives' ongoing efforts to pass a ceasefire resolution at City Council to demand an end to the war in Gaza, as well as Mayor Eric Adams's crackdown on asylum seekers.

Democracy Now
May 13, 2024

The Killing of Roger Fortson: Police Shoot Dead Black Airman After Entering Wrong Home
We speak with civil rights attorney Ben Crump about the police killing of Roger Fortson, a Black 23-year-old Air Force member who was fatally shot by a Florida police officer mere moments after opening the door of his apartment. Fortson's family says the police had arrived at the wrong home and that Fortson had grabbed his legal firearm as a precaution. Police body-camera footage shows Fortson answered the door with his gun at his side, not posing an imminent threat to the officer, who immediately shot Fortson six times. "The Second Amendment applies to Black people, too," says Crump, who has represented victims of police violence in many high-profile cases. The police claim that officers were responding to a domestic dispute is contradicted by the fact that Fortson was home alone, Crump says. "They need to go ahead and admit that it was the wrong apartment and quit trying to justify this unjustifiable killing."

Democracy Now
May 13, 2024

"The Plan Is Genocide": Palestine's U.K. Ambassador Decries Israel's Attack on Gaza & U.S. Complicity
Israel is intensifying its war across the Gaza Strip, with the official death toll now over 35,000, including more than 14,500 children. More than 360,000 Palestinians have now been displaced from Rafah as Israeli forces ramp up their attacks there despite warnings from the United States and others against an escalation in the southern city, where more than a million Palestinians had sought shelter. This comes as the United Nations General Assembly voted 143-9 on Friday in support of full membership for Palestine, with 25 countries abstaining. The measure grants new rights to privileges to Palestine, though it can't become a full U.N. member without support from the Security Council, where the U.S. vetoed a Palestine statehood resolution last month. "The last seven months have unmasked, beyond doubt, many things, including the hypocrisy, selectivity, double standards of certain international actors, and I believe the U.S. administration is right at the top of that list?," says senior Palestinian diplomat Husam Zomlot, currently serving as ambassador to the United Kingdom. Zomlot also casts doubt on the claim Israel lacks clear goals in its assault on Gaza. "Israel does have a plan, and Israel is executing the plan with almost perfection. And the plan is genocide."

Democracy Now
May 13, 2024

Headlines for May 13, 2024
Death Toll in Gaza Tops 35,000 as Israel Intensifies Attack from Rafah to Northern Gaza, Walkouts, Disruptions & Encampments Mark Graduation Ceremonies as Campus Protests for Gaza Continue, State Dept. Report Finds Israel Likely Violated International and U.S. Law Using U.S. Weapons, U.N. General Assembly Votes 143-9 for Palestinian Statehood, Israeli Whistleblowers Describe Torture of Gazan Detainees in Military Camp, Families of Hamas Captives Protest Netanyahu's Handling of Hostage Crisis on Israeli Memorial Day, Putin Replaces Long-Standing Defense Chief Shoigu as Russia Claims 9 More Villages in Kharkiv, Children Killed at Darfur Hospital as Fighting Intensifies in Sudan's El Fasher, Calls for a National Strike in Tunisia After Arrest of Prominent Lawyer Amid Crackdown on Dissent, Catastrophic Flooding Kills Hundreds in Afghanistan, Dozens in Indonesia, Socialists Win Catalan Elections in Major Blow to Independence Movement, Michael Cohen to Testify in Trump Trial; Jury Selection Starts in Bob Menendez Corruption Trial

Democracy Now
May 10, 2024

"Grenfell: In the Words of Survivors": Play Tells Story of 2017 London Apartment Fire That Killed 72
The play Grenfell: In the Words of Survivors, which is being staged this week in Brooklyn, tells the story of the 2017 apartment fire at Grenfell Tower in London that killed 72 people. It was the worst fire in Britain since World War II, and survivors blamed the government for mismanaging the public housing block and neglecting maintenance. The play tells the story of how the residents of Grenfell Tower, from the Caribbean, Portugal, Syria, Morocco, Ethiopia and Britain, created a thriving community even as their homes fell into disrepair in the years before the fire. Playwright Gillian Slovo says she was moved to create the play after watching "in absolute horror as that building burned," wondering how such a tragedy could happen in one of the richest neighborhoods of London. We also hear from Grenfell survivor Ed Daffarn, who barely escaped the inferno with his life. "I'm here. It's like a million-to-one chance," Daffarn says.

Democracy Now
May 10, 2024

Playwright Gillian Slovo: I Grew Up in Apartheid South Africa. I Saw the Same Thing in Palestine
Gaza solidarity encampments, which started on U.S. college campuses, have now spread worldwide as students call on their educational institutions to divest from companies profiting from Israeli apartheid and occupation. The uprising echoes the anti-apartheid movement of the 1980s, when many in civil society called for divestment from companies that profited from South Africa's system of racial domination. Democracy Now! explored the parallels this week with South African-born novelist and playwright Gillian Slovo, whose parents were legendary anti-apartheid activists Joe Slovo and Ruth First. "I have been to the West Bank, and I had a childhood in South Africa. I knew what apartheid looked like," Slovo says. "When I went to the West Bank, what I saw was apartheid in action."

Democracy Now
May 10, 2024

NJ Senate Candidate Larry Hamm on '70s Anti-Apartheid Protests at Princeton and Voting "Uncommitted"
Larry Hamm is chair of the People's Organization for Progress and a Princeton alumnus who took part in protests at the school in the 1970s to call for divestment from apartheid South Africa. He visited the Princeton student encampment earlier this week and says he is "really proud of the students" for their protest against the war in Gaza. Hamm, who is running in the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate from New Jersey, is promoting a vote for "uncommitted" in the state's presidential primary vote. "I'm totally opposed to the Biden administration's approach to this genocidal war in Gaza. There must be an immediate and permanent ceasefire, and the United States should cease any military aid to Israel."

Democracy Now
May 10, 2024

Senate Candidate Larry Hamm on '70s Anti-Apartheid Protests at Princeton and Voting "Uncommitted" in NJ
Larry Hamm is chair of the People's Organization for Progress and a Princeton alumnus who took part in protests at the school in the 1970s to call for divestment from apartheid South Africa. He visited the Princeton student encampment earlier this week and says he is "really proud of the students" for their protest against the war in Gaza. Hamm, who is running in the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate from New Jersey, is promoting a vote for "uncommitted" in the state's presidential primary vote. "I'm totally opposed to the Biden administration's approach to this genocidal war in Gaza. There must be an immediate and permanent ceasefire, and the United States should cease any military aid to Israel."

Democracy Now
May 10, 2024

"We Feel Unheard": Hunger-Striking Princeton Students Vow to Fast Until Divestment Demands Are Met
Over a dozen students at Princeton University have been on hunger strike for the past week as part of a Gaza solidarity encampment on campus protesting Israel's war on Gaza and calling on the university to disclose and divest from companies with ties to Israel, among other demands. The hunger strikers are also calling for all charges to be dropped against a number of students arrested on campus in late April as part of the encampment. Areeq Hasan, a graduating senior at Princeton who has not eaten for a week, tells Democracy Now! the hunger strike was a response to the university's stonewalling. "We feel unheard at every step of the way, so therefore we resorted to a hunger strike," says Hasan, noting the long history of hunger strikes as a means of protest. "It is in solidarity with the history of Palestinian political prisoners since 1968. … We're tapping into this long-standing tradition with both Palestinian political prisoners and also in the Irish and Indian liberation movements."

Democracy Now
May 10, 2024

12 Arrested Outside NYC's New School as First Faculty-Led Gaza Solidarity Encampment Continues
??The first faculty-led Gaza solidarity encampment in the United States was launched Wednesday at The New School in New York City, where nearly two dozen professors and lecturers pitched tents inside the lobby of the university's main building on Fifth Avenue. The encampment is named after the Palestinian writer, poet and professor Refaat Alareer, who was killed in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza in December. The faculty protest began after the police raided a student encampment at The New School and arrested more than 40 students following a request by the university administration to clear the encampment. On Thursday, 12 more people were arrested outside The New School as the faculty encampment continued inside. Democracy Now! was on the scene and spoke with protesting faculty who denounced the school's ties to Israel and the militarized police response against student protesters. "For the state violence that our students were subjected to and traumatized because of, we could not stand on the sidelines any longer," part-time lecturer Suneil Sanzgiri said. "What we're doing here is calling for all faculty across the country to step up, to risk more and to escalate, because we have to get all war profiteers out of our universities."

Democracy Now
May 10, 2024

Headlines for May 10, 2024
100,000 Palestinians Flee Rafah as Israel Pummels Region from the Sky, Keeps Border Shut, UNRWA Closes East Jerusalem HQ After Israeli Arson Attack, Campus Uprising: Hunger Strike at Princeton, Arrests at UPenn, Victory at Sacramento State, Protests in Sweden Call Out Israel's Participation in Eurovision, HRW: RSF Likely Committed Genocide Against Masalit and Other Communites in Sudan, Interim Chadian Leader Mahamat Déby Wins Contested Presidential Election, General Strike Brings Argentina to Standstill, Three Boeing Accidents over Past Two Days Draw More Scrutiny on Embattled Company, Police Kill 23-Year-Old Black Air Force Member Roger Fortson in His Own Home, Biden Admin to Unveil New Rules Making the Asylum Process Even Harder, Virginia School Board Votes to Restore Confederate Names to 2 Schools, USC Valedictorian Asna Tabassum Gets Standing Ovation at Pared-Down Graduation

Democracy Now
May 09, 2024

Indian PM Narendra Modi Runs on "Hatred and Demonization" of Muslims in World's Largest Election
Millions of voters in India are casting their ballots in the third of seven phases in the country's mammoth general election. The election pits Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Hindu nationalist BJP party against an alliance of more than two dozen opposition parties led by the Indian National Congress. Modi has recently come under fire from opponents for referring to Muslims in India as "infiltrators," but our guest, the award-winning Indian author and journalist Siddhartha Deb, points out that "the Hindu right, they've always been extreme," using "genocidal language" to describe those who do not fit the ethnonationalist image of their "masculine, violent, patriarchal project" and modeling the vision for a Hindu supremacist state after Israel, with its "idea that a strong, muscular, militant majority that are the only people who have the right to [the] nation." Deb, a professor at The New School, also discusses India's growing inequality gap, U.S. politicians' embrace of Modi, and faculty support for pro-Palestine student protests in the U.S.

Democracy Now
May 09, 2024

Pulitzer Winner Nathan Thrall on Israel's "System of Domination" and Biden Pausing Bomb Shipment
Jerusalem-based journalist and author Nathan Thrall has been awarded the 2024 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction for his book, A Day in the Life of Abed Salama: Anatomy of a Jerusalem Tragedy. It tells the story of Israel's occupation of the West Bank through one Palestinian father's quest to seek answers and accountability after his 5-year-old son is involved in a deadly accident. We speak to Thrall about President Biden saying for the first time that he would not supply certain weapons to Israel to be used in an all-out invasion of Rafah. "It is too little, too late," Thrall says. "It is a step in the right direction, but the administration has said that it has not made a final determination even about these paused weapons." Thrall also discusses Israel's ceasefire talks with Hamas, anti-Netanyahu protests led by families of Israeli hostages, Israel's intensified crackdown in the West Bank, how criticism of Israel is conflated with antisemitism, and why debates over the future of a Palestinian state are an "enormous distraction from the reality on the ground" — Israel's "system of domination that is extremely bureaucratic and elaborate, [that] has lasted for over half a century and [is] not going anywhere."

Democracy Now
May 09, 2024

Aid Worker in Gaza: "To Say There's Not an Incursion in Rafah Right Now Is Patently False"
Tens of thousands of displaced Palestinians are fleeing Rafah as Israeli airstrikes and shelling hammer the eastern part of the city. Fuel, food, medicine and other supplies have been cut off following Israel's seizure and closure of the border crossing with Egypt. The main hospital in the area has also been shut down. Over 1.4 million people are seeking shelter in Rafah, the southernmost city of the Gaza Strip. Tent camps in some parts of Rafah have now vanished, springing up again as displaced families head back north. Over 60 Palestinians were killed across Gaza, many of them in Rafah, over the past 24 hours. We get a live update from Rafah from Dorotea Gucciardo of the Glia Project, who is currently on a medical mission in Gaza. "The situation on the ground is dire. Everyone here is quite afraid. To say that there's not an incursion in Rafah right now is patently false," Gucciardo says. "Throughout this entire day I have heard bombs, explosions, I have heard machine gun fire, and it seems to be creeping closer and closer to where we are."

Democracy Now
May 09, 2024

Headlines for May 9, 2024
Israel "Chokes Off Aid" to Gaza, Rains Down More Bombs on Rafah as Families Have Nowhere to Go, Biden Says U.S. Will Cut Off Some Weapons to Israel If It Goes Further into Rafah, Protesters Greet Biden During Chicago Campaign Stop; Hostage Families Clash with Police in Tel Aviv, Health Workers Uncover 49 More Bodies at Gaza's Al-Shifa Hospital, Israel Demolishes 47 Bedouin Homes in Negev Desert, Rashida Tlaib, Cori Bush Hold Press Conference with Students Amid Police Crackdown on Gaza Protests, Professors at The New School Launch First Faculty Encampment for Gaza, Universities in Barcelona, Dublin Commit to Divestment Measures After Student Protests, April Was 11th Straight Month to Break Global Heat Record as SE and South Asia Swelter in Heat Wave, Intense Flooding Has Killed Hundreds, Displaced 100,000s Across East Africa, Vermont Lawmakers Pass Bill to Make Big Oil Pay for Climate Destruction, Body of Final Lethal Victim of Baltimore Bridge Collapse Is Recovered, Win Rozario's Family Demands Justice After Release of NYPD Bodycam of His Fatal Shooting, House Votes Down Marjorie Taylor Greene's Bid to Oust Mike Johnson as Speaker, Mike Johnson Joined by Stephen Miller and Trump Allies to Push "Election Integrity" Bill, RFK Once Suffered from a Parasitic Infection, Claimed a Worm Ate Part of His Brain

Democracy Now
May 08, 2024

Mistrial: Abu Ghraib Survivors Detail Torture in Case Against U.S. Military Contractor
A historic case against U.S. military contractor CACI brought by three Iraqi survivors of torture at the notorious Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq ended in mistrial in Virginia last week after the jury failed to reach a unanimous verdict. The lawsuit against CACI — which was hired to provide interrogation services at Abu Ghraib — was first filed by the Center for Constitutional Rights in 2008. Since then, CACI repeatedly attempted to have the case dismissed. Plaintiffs Suhail Al Shimari, Asa'ad Zuba'e and Salah Al-Ejaili had accused CACI of conspiring to commit war crimes at Abu Ghraib. The three were subjected to sexual abuse and other forms of torture by interrogators. Democracy Now! speaks with Baher Azmy, attorney in the case and legal director of the Center for Constitutional Rights, who said it was "a historic human rights case" despite the outcome. "What they could not stop is three courageous human beings who stood up against every obstacle and told their story in a U.S. court in a breathtaking, compelling manner. And while we didn't get a judgment from a jury, we got historical testimony that makes clear, I think, CACI's responsibility for these clients' harms," says Azmy, who adds that they intend to retry the case.

Democracy Now
May 08, 2024

60 Journalism Profs Demand Investigation into Controversial NYT Article Alleging Mass Rape on Oct. 7
A group of more than 60 journalism professors has written to The New York Times calling on the paper to commission an independent review of its report that members of Hamas committed widespread sexual violence on October 7. Numerous media outlets, as well as some of the paper's own staff, have raised questions about the December 28 article headlined "Screams Without Words," reported in part by a freelance Israeli journalist who had liked multiple posts on social media advocating for violence against Palestinians. The Times has even published subsequent reporting undercutting some of the key elements of the article, which was used by Israeli leaders and Western allies as justification for the brutal military campaign in Gaza that had already killed tens of thousands of Palestinians up to that point. "It was very troubling to professors of journalism to see such a shoddy article be published without a retraction or an investigation," says Rutgers media studies professor Deepa Kumar, one of the signatories, author of Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire. She also says that as an academic, she is troubled by the mainstream media's depiction of student encampments as places of hate and violence. "For those of us who have been to these encampments, we know that the atmosphere there is peaceful until the police show up and start to create chaos. … These are fantastic spaces of learning."

Democracy Now
May 08, 2024

Meet Students at 4 Colleges Where Gaza Protests Win Concessions, Incl. Considering Israel Divestment
As students around the country set up Gaza solidarity encampments on their campuses, many universities have called in police who have arrested students and dismantled the sites. But students at a number of colleges have managed to negotiate agreements where administrators have acceded to some of their demands, including considering divestment from Israel. We speak with four students who have been involved in pro-Palestine protests on campuses at Middlebury College in Vermont, Evergreen College in Washington state, Brown University in Rhode Island and Rutgers in New Jersey.

"Being an American complicit in this and being a student at an institution complicit in this genocide directly, I couldn't imagine standing by and not acting," says Duncan Kreps, who is graduating from Middlebury.

Aseel, a Palestinian student at Rutgers who is only using her first name out of safety concerns, tells Democracy Now! that nearly 100 of her relatives have been killed in Israel's assault on Gaza. "The Gaza that I once knew is essentially gone, but I am more than confident, along with my family, that we will return and that we will rebuild it," she says.

Democracy Now
May 08, 2024

Headlines for May 8, 2024
U.N. Warns Gaza Could Run Out of Fuel & Drinking Water After Israel Seized Rafah Crossing, Biden Withholds 3,500 Bombs from Israel, But U.S. Approves Another $827M for Israel, Families of Israeli Hostages Urge Netanyahu to End War on Gaza, Police Raid Encampments at U. of Illinois & Fashion Institute of Technology, RISD Students Occupy Campus Building, Cousin of Rabbi Meir Kahane Arrested After Driving Into Pro-Palestinian Protest in NYC, Jewish Voice for Peace Criticizes Biden's Antisemitism Speech at U.S. Holocaust Museum, Judge Rejects Mistrial Motion After Stormy Daniels Testifies in Trump Trial, Death Toll in Brazil Tops 90 After Catastrophic Flooding, Xi Jinping Visits Belgrade on 25th Anniversary of NATO Bombing of Chinese Embassy, Florida Sues Biden Administration over Transgender Protections, Tennessee Company Fined $649,000 for Employing Children to Clean Slaughterhouses

Democracy Now
May 07, 2024

"Stop Weaponizing Antisemitism": Police "Body-Slam" Jewish Dartmouth Prof. at Campus Gaza Protest
Gaza solidarity protests continue at college campuses across the nation — as does the police crackdown. This comes as more than 50 chapters of the American Association of University Professors have issued a statement condemning the violent arrests by police at campus protests. At Dartmouth College last week, police body-slammed professor and former chair of Jewish studies Annelise Orleck to the ground as she tried to protect her students. She was charged with criminal trespass and temporarily banned from portions of Dartmouth's campus. She joins us to describe her ordeal and respond to claims conflating the protests' anti-Zionist message with antisemitism. "People have to be able to talk about Palestine without being attacked by police," says Orleck, who commends the students leading protests around the country. "Their bravery is tremendous and is inspiring. And they really feel like this is the moral issue of their time, that there's a genocide going on and that they can't ignore it."

Democracy Now
May 07, 2024

Report from Rafah: Israel Seizes Border Crossing, Blocking Humanitarian Aid, as Ceasefire Talks Continue
In Rafah, we speak with Gaza-based journalist Akram al-Satarri about Israel tightening restrictions on humanitarian aid, refusing a ceasefire deal and planning to invade the city where over a million Palestinians are sheltering. Israel's military seized control of the Palestinian side of the Rafah crossing with Egypt, blocking humanitarian aid from entering the besieged territory, and trapping Palestinians under heavy Israeli bombardment. This comes after Israel also closed the Karem Abu Salem crossing in southern Gaza this weekend after a Hamas attack killed four Israeli soldiers. "Israel is not allowing the entry of the humanitarian aid to Gaza, which is perceived as a lifeline," says al-Satarri, who reports Palestinians are "in despair" as Israel orders a third of Rafah's population to move ahead of their invasion. "They understand that more destruction, more devastation, more death and deprivation is coming for them." Al-Satarri also speaks about Israel banning Al Jazeera, one of the only international outlets with reporters in Gaza. "I think they want to silence Al Jazeera and they want to silence all the free media for the sake of preventing any further exposure of the things that are happening on the ground."

Democracy Now
May 07, 2024

Fmr. Israeli Peace Negotiator Daniel Levy: U.S. Pressure on Israel Is Key to Lasting Gaza Ceasefire
Even after Hamas accepted a Gaza ceasefire proposal Monday, Israeli forces moved in with tanks to seize the Rafah crossing with Egypt. Israel says the ceasefire deal falls short of its demands, and Hamas has called for "international intervention." Former Israeli peace negotiator Daniel Levy says the limited information and political maneuvering of all parties raises more questions than answers right now, but the core issue is whether all parties can maintain a sustained end to hostilities. "In addition to testing each other, the Hamas and Israeli parties are testing the United States of America and the Biden administration in an unprecedented way," says Levy. "Hamas detects that the U.S. may finally be serious about offering a sustained calm." While Levy says growing external pressure from global protests are "having an impact," he doubts U.S. and Israeli leaders feel they must change course yet. "The pressure does not feel sufficient that Netanuahu's politics needs him to accept a ceasefire. He still thinks he can wiggle out of this," says Levy. "If this deal doesn't go through, I fear we're in for the much longer haul."

Democracy Now
May 07, 2024

Headlines for May 7, 2024
Israel Begins Ground Invasion of Rafah After Hamas Agrees to Ceasefire, Israel Used U.S. Weapons in Lebanon Attack That Killed 7 Health Workers, Students Continue Gaza Solidarity Protests, Defying Arrests, Suspensions, Harvard and MIT Students Defy Deadlines for Ending Protests, Receive Faculty Support, SUNY Purchase Agrees to Student Demands; Columbia Cancels Commencement Ceremony, Gaza Solidarity Encampments Form in Copenhagen, Barcelona; French High Schoolers Join Movement, Belgian Police Arrest 132 Climate Activists During Act of Peaceful Civil Disobedience, Bomb Attacks on IDP Camps In Democratic Republic of Congo Kill 12 People, Incl. Children, Voters in Chad Cast Presidential Ballots 3 Years After Military Takeover, Russia to Launch Drills for Possible Deployment of Tactical Nuclear Weapons
, Tunisian Police Raid Refugee Encampments; Hundreds Reportedly Bused Then Abandoned in the Desert, Heavy Rains Kill at Least 17 People in Haiti, Flood Thousands of Homes, Judge Merchan Fines Trump for Violating Gag Order for the 10th Time, Threatens Jail

Democracy Now
May 06, 2024

Revolt on Campus: Protests over Gaza Disrupt Graduation Ceremonies as Police Crack Down on Encampments
Police have now arrested more than 2,500 students at pro-Palestine protests across the U.S., yet students continue to call for an end to the war on Gaza and universities' investment in companies that support Israel's occupation of Palestine. We speak to three student organizers from around the country: Salma Hamamy of the University of Michigan, president of the school's chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine, about the commencement ceremony protest she helped organize, and Cady de la Cruz of the University of Virginia and Rae Ferrara of the State University of New York at New Paltz about police crackdowns on their schools' encampments. De la Cruz was arrested in the UVA raid and banned from campus without an opportunity to collect any of her belongings. She says repression has strengthened the resolve of many protesters, who are willing to risk their academic futures to push for divestment. "All of us there felt like we have more time on our hands … than the people of Gaza," she explains, "We would hold it down for anything."

Democracy Now
May 06, 2024

"They Are Starving," Says Doctor Back from Gaza; World Food Programme Warns North in "Full-Blown Famine"
The World Food Programme is warning northern Gaza has reached a "full-blown" famine that is spreading south. This comes after the Israeli military has spent months blocking the entry of vital aid into Gaza, attacking humanitarian aid convoys and opening fire on Palestinian civilians waiting to receive lifesaving aid. We get an update on conditions among the besieged and starving population of Gaza — including of children now suffering from the psychological effects of intense and prolonged trauma — from Dr. Walid Masoud, a vascular surgeon and a board member of the Palestine Children's Relief Fund who is just back from heading a medical mission to Gaza.

Democracy Now
May 06, 2024

"Criminal Act": Israel Bans Al Jazeera, Largest Int'l News Org. in Gaza, Ahead of Rafah Invasion
As the death toll in Gaza soars to more than 34,700, Israeli authorities have taken Al Jazeera off the air in Israel and ordered Palestinians in eastern Rafah to evacuate ahead of an Israeli offensive. "The Israeli government is trying to conceal what's happening in Gaza and trying to intimidate Al Jazeera … and delegitimize the whole coverage," says Al Jazeera's managing editor Mohamed Moawad, explaining this is "a strategy" to "try to make sure that the story doesn't reach the world." Over the past eight months, Al Jazeera has been one of the only international outlets with reporters on the ground inside Gaza, where at least three of its employees have been killed by Israel's monthslong assault. Israel has been threatening to ban Al Jazeera for "incitement" via "a series of intimidations" for months, culminating in "a criminal act," says Moawad. He calls on the international community, including the U.S. government, to condemn Israel's suppression of a free press.

Democracy Now
May 06, 2024

Headlines for May 6, 2024
Israel Denounced for Ordering Displaced Palestinians in Rafah to Evacuate Again, Campus Gaza Protests Keep Spreading Despite Police Crackdown; 2,500 Arrested So Far, Evergreen State College Agrees to Work Toward Divesting from Israel, Education Dept. Investigating Columbia for Anti-Palestinian Discrimination, "A Dark Day for Democracy": Israel Takes Al Jazeera Off Air, Raids Local Office, Mass Protests in Israel to Demand Netanyahu Make Hostage Deal, José Raúl Mulino, Stand-in for Ex-President Ricardo Martinelli, Wins Panama Presidency, Major Flooding in Southern Brazil Kills at Least 78 People, with More Than 100 Missing, 5-Year-Old Child Killed as Houston Is Battered by Rains and Flooding, Conservative Texas Democrat Henry Cuellar Indicted for Bribery and Conspiracy, Trump's Criminal Hush Money Trial Continues in New York, Canadian Police Charge 3 Indian Suspects in 2023 Assassination of Sikh Leader, Prominent British Palestinian Surgeon Ghassan Abu-Sittah Barred from France

Democracy Now
May 03, 2024

"Dead on Arrival": Doctors Back from Gaza Describe Horrific Hospital Scenes, Decimated Health System
Nearly seven months of constant bombardment, siege and obstruction of aid deliveries have annihilated the healthcare system in Gaza. Last week, the Palestinian Health Ministry said that around 600,000 Palestinians in the northern Gaza Strip no longer have access to any kind of healthcare. The World Health Organization has said that Israel is "systematically dismantling" the health system in Gaza. Only 11 hospitals out of 36 hospitals in Gaza are partially functioning. At both of Gaza's largest hospitals, Al-Shifa and Nasser, Palestinians found hundreds of bodies buried in mass graves after Israel raided and destroyed the facilities. Democracy Now! speaks with Dr. Ismail Mehr and Dr. Azeem Elahi just after they volunteered at the largest hospital still operating in Gaza, the European Hospital in Khan Younis. "The healthcare system has been always in a noose, and that noose tightens at times when there's conflict," says Mehr. "Right now that noose has completely just hung the healthcare system."

Democracy Now
May 03, 2024

"This Militaristic Approach Has Been a Failure": Meet Hala Rharrit, First U.S. Diplomat to Quit over Gaza
Democracy Now! speaks with Hala Rharrit, the first State Department diplomat to publicly resign over the Biden administration's policies backing Israel's assault and siege of the Gaza Strip. Rharrit is an 18-year career diplomat who served as the Arabic-language spokesperson for the State Department in the region. "I could no longer be a part of the State Department and promote this policy. It's an inhumane policy. It's a failed policy that is helping neither Palestinians, neither Israelis," Rharrit says. "We are not authorized to send military equipment, weapons to countries that commit human rights abuses. ICJ has determined plausible genocide, yet we are still sending billions upon billions of not just defensive weaponry, but offensive weaponry. It is tantamount to a violation of domestic law. Many diplomats know it. Many diplomats are scared to say it." She adds, "I read the talking points that we were supposed to promote on Arab media. A lot of them were dehumanizing to Palestinians." Rharrit also discusses how "corruption" in government allows for arms sales to continue. "I could not help but be concerned about the influence of special interest groups, of lobbying groups on our foreign policy and, as well, on Congress — on the people that decide whether or not some of those shipments of arms get sent. The bottom line is that our politicians should not be profiting from war. And unfortunately, we have some institutionalized corruption that enables that," she says.

Democracy Now
May 03, 2024

Headlines for May 3, 2024
Israel Continues Air Assault on Rafah, Killing Young Children, Ahead of Its Planned Ground Invasion, Palestinian Dr. Adnan Al-Bursh Dies in Israeli Prison; Released Detainee Describes Horror of Arrest, ICC Warns Netanyahu's Comments Threaten "Independence and Impartiality" of Court, Student Protest Movement for Gaza Gains Steam Despite Police Crackdown, Biden's Dismissal as "Chaos", French Students Escalate Their Gaza Solidarity Protest, Pentagon Concedes U.S. Drone Strike in Syria Killed Civilian Farmer, U.S. Accuses Russia of Using Chemical Weapons in Ukraine, Imposes New Sanctions, Abu Ghraib Survivors Case Against U.S. Military Contractor Ends in Mistrial, Biden Admin Expands Affordable Care Act to Cover DACA Recipients, Senate Panel Blasts Deception, Greenwashing by Fossil Fuel Industry, Federal Court Dismisses Historic Youth Climate Case Against U.S. Government, U.K. Starts Rounding Up Asylum Seekers to Be Deported to Rwanda, Federal Court Rejects Louisiana Voting Map That Created New Majority-Black District, Democrat Timothy Kennedy Wins NY Special Election for U.S. House Seat, Manhattan DA Will Retry Harvey Weinstein After Court Overturned Rape Conviction, UNESCO Awards World Press Freedom Prize to Gaza Journalists

Democracy Now
May 02, 2024

"Workers Have Power": Thousands Rally in NYC for May Day, Call for Solidarity with Palestine
Workers around the world rallied Wednesday to mark May Day, with many calling on the labor movement to stand in solidarity with the Palestinian cause. In New York, Democracy Now! spoke to demonstrators who demanded that U.S. unions apply political pressure for a ceasefire in Gaza and to stop their government's arms trade with Israel. "Workers do have the power to shape the world," said Palestinian researcher Riya Al'sanah, who was among thousands gathered at a May Day rally in Manhattan.

Democracy Now
May 02, 2024

Amnesty Int'l: Biden Must Halt Weapon Sales to Israel After U.S. Arms Used to Kill Civilians in Gaza
A new report from Amnesty International finds the sale of U.S.weapons to Israel for use in its indiscriminate assault in Gaza is in violation of U.S. and international law. We speak to Budour Hassan, a Palestinian writer and contributing researcher to the report, who says the U.S. is "complicit in the commission of war crimes" and must "halt all arms transfer to Israel as long as Israel continues to fail to comply with international humanitarian law and international human rights law." We also discuss Israel's detention of thousands of Palestinians without charge, the inadequacy of U.S. human rights investigations into the Israeli military, and Israel's threatened ground invasion of Rafah.

Democracy Now
May 02, 2024

Former Brandeis President on Gaza Protests: Schools Must Protect Free Expression on Campus
We look at how university administrators have responded to Palestine solidarity protests by students with Frederick Lawrence, former president of Brandeis University and now the CEO of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and a lecturer at Georgetown Law School. Brandeis was founded in 1948 by the American Jewish community in the wake of the Holocaust and named after the first Jewish Supreme Court justice, the celebrated free speech advocate Louis Brandeis. Lawrence says the nationwide university crackdown on student protesters is a worrying violation of the principles of academic freedom. "Provoking people, challenging people, asking difficult questions, making people uncomfortable, that's part of the price of living in a democracy," he says. He also notes that what constitutes a threat to campus safety should be narrowly defined. "You are not entitled to be intellectually safe. You are entitled to be physically safe."

Democracy Now
May 02, 2024

"People Could Have Died": Police Raid UCLA Gaza Protest, Waited as Pro-Israel Mob Attacked Encampment
We get an update from the University of California, Los Angeles, where police in riot gear began dismantling a pro-Palestinian encampment early Thursday, using flashbang grenades, rubber bullets and tear gas, and arresting dozens of students. The raid came just over a day after pro-Israel counterprotesters armed with sticks, metal rods and fireworks attacked students at the encampment. The Real News Network reporter Mel Buer was on the scene during the attack. She describes seeing counterprotesters provoke students, yelling slurs and bludgeoning them with parts of the encampment's barricade, and says the attack lasted several hours without police or security intervention. "UCLA is complicit in violence inflicted upon protesters," wrote the editorial board of UCLA's campus newspaper, the Daily Bruin, the next day. Four of the paper's student journalists were targeted and assaulted by counterprotesters while covering the protests. We speak with Shaanth Kodialam Nanguneri, one of the student journalists, who says one of their colleagues was hospitalized over the assault, while campus security officers "were nowhere to be found." Meanwhile, UCLA's chapter of Faculty for Justice in Palestine has called on faculty to refuse university labor Thursday in protest of the administration's failure to protect students from what it termed "Zionist mobs." Professor Gaye Theresa Johnson, a member of UCLA Faculty for Justice in Palestine, denounces the administration's response to nonviolent protest and says she sees the events as part of a major sea change in the politicization of American youth. "This is a movement. It cannot be unseen. It cannot be put back in the box."

Democracy Now
May 02, 2024

Headlines for May 2, 2024
Police Violently Crack Down on Gaza Campus Protests at UCLA, Dartmouth, UW and Others, "This Is the Conscience of a Nation": Columbia Faculty Back Students as Campus Movement Continues, House Passes Antisemitism Bill, Which Critics Blast as "Chilling", "Catastrophe on Top of Catastrophe": Fears Mount over Rafah Invasion as Israel Refuses to Retreat, U.S. Cities, Hawaii Vote for Ceasefire Resolutions as Washington Continues to Support Israel, U.S. and Saudi Arabia Reportedly Close to Finalizing Security Pact, Colombia Cuts Diplomatic Ties with Israel as Global May Day Protests Foreground Gaza Genocide, Police Crack Down on Intensifying Protests Against Georgia's Foreign Influence Bill, Kenya Floods Claim Nearly 200 Lives as Mass Evacuations Ordered, Another Boeing Whistleblower Has Died, Arizona Senate Votes to Repeal 1864 Abortion Ban, United Methodist Church Overturns 4-Decade Ban on LGBTQ Clergy, Biden Cancels Another $6 Billion in Student Loans for Borrowers Enrolled at Shuttered Art Institutes

Democracy Now
May 01, 2024

Reed Brody: U.S. Hypocrisy Laid Bare as Biden Admin Claims ICC Can't Prosecute Israel for War Crimes
The Biden administration is claiming the International Criminal Court has no jurisdiction to charge Israeli officials for war crimes. This comes after rumors that the ICC may be close to issuing arrest warrants for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and other Israeli officials over possible crimes in Gaza. The International Court of Justice has rejected a request by Nicaragua to order Germany to halt exporting arms to Israel, but the court declined to throw out the case. For more, we speak with human rights attorney and war crimes prosecutor Reed Brody, who says ICC charges would be a "huge" development. "Since Nuremberg, no international tribunal has issued an arrest warrant for a Western official. For decades, we've had this double standard where international justice has only been effective for crimes committed by leaders of developing countries or by enemies of the U.S. like Vladimir Putin," says Brody.

Democracy Now
May 01, 2024

USC Grad Student Union Files Unfair Labor Practice Charge Against Univ. over Arrests
As protests continue on campuses across North America, we go to the University of Southern California, where the union representing about 3,000 graduate student workers at USC has filed an unfair labor practice charge against the school to end campus militarization and drop charges against students and faculty. The "rampant violence that they inflicted on our workers" violates the National Labor Relations Act, says Margaret Davis, president of UAW Local 872. "It was a clear act of retaliation because people were engaging in pro-Palestinian free speech, which they have a right to."

Democracy Now
May 01, 2024

USC Grad Student Union Files Unfair Labor Practice Charge Against University over Arrests
As protests continue on campuses across North America, we go to the University of Southern California, where the union representing about 3,000 graduate student workers at USC has filed an unfair labor practice charge against the school to end campus militarization and drop charges against students and faculty. The "rampant violence that they inflicted on our workers" violates the National Labor Relations Act, says Margaret Davis, president of UAW Local 872. "It was a clear act of retaliation because people were engaging in pro-Palestinian free speech, which they have a right to."

Democracy Now
May 01, 2024

Juan González, Veteran of '68 Columbia Strike, Condemns University Leaders' Silence on Gaza Slaughter
Tuesday's raid on Columbia University came 56 years to the day that police raided Hamilton Hall, arresting 700 students protesting racism and the Vietnam War. Democracy Now! co-host Juan González, who was a student leader at the historic 1968 protest, says the violent crackdown on Columbia University and other campuses across the United States has refocused national attention on "an unjust war," carried out by Israel with U.S. backing. "No commencement in America will occur in the next month where the war in Gaza is not a burning issue," he says. He adds that the more diverse makeup of the protests today — led primarily by Palestinian, Muslim and Arab students — may have made school officials and police "much more willing to crack down" than when it was a mostly white protest movement.

Democracy Now
May 01, 2024

Campus Crackdown: 300 Arrested in Police Raids on Columbia & CCNY to Clear Gaza Encampments
New York police in full riot gear stormed Columbia University and the City College of New York Tuesday night, arresting over 300 students to break up Gaza solidarity encampments on the two campuses. The police raid began at the request of Columbia President Minouche Shafik, who has also asked the police to remain a presence on campus until at least May 17 to ensure solidarity encampments are not reestablished before the end of the term. Police also raided CUNY after the administration made a similar call for the police to enter campus. Democracy Now! was on the streets outside Columbia on Tuesday night and spoke with people who were out in support of the student protests as police were making arrests. We also speak with two Columbia University students who witnessed the police crackdown. "When the police arrived, they were extremely efficient in removing all eyewitnesses, including legal observers," says journalism student Gillian Goodman, who has been covering the protests for weeks and who says she and others slept on campus in order to be able to continue coverage and avoid being locked out. We also hear from Cameron Jones, a Columbia College student with Jewish Voice for Peace, who responds to claims of antisemitism, saying, "There is a large anti-Zionist Jewish voice on campus, and it's also important to recognize the difference between anti-Zionism and antisemitism."

Democracy Now
May 01, 2024

Headlines for May 1, 2024
NYPD Raid Columbia & City College, Arresting 200 Pro-Palestinian Protesters, Pro-Israel Counterprotesters Violently Attack Student Encampment at UCLA, U.N. Decries Widening Police Crackdown on Student Protests in U.S., Netanyahu Vows to Invade Rafah With or Without a Ceasefire Deal, ICJ Refuses to Order Germany to Halt Exporting Arms to Israel, Career Diplomat Resigns from State Department over Biden's Gaza Policy, Haiti's Transitional Council Picks Little-Known Ex-Sports Minister to Be New PM, Judge Holds Trump in Contempt of Court, Fines Him $9,000 for Violating Gag Order, "It Depends": Trump Refuses to Rule Out Political Violence If He Loses Election, Florida's Six-Week Abortion Goes into Effect, Justice Department Moves to Reclassify Marijuana, U.S. Rowing Rescinds Honors for Olympic Legend Ted Nash over Sex Abuse, May Day: U.K. Workers Block Gov't Building to Demand Gaza Ceasefire

Democracy Now
Apr 30, 2024

Months After Israel Killed Gaza Poet Refaat Alareer, His Daughter & Infant Grandson Die in Airstrike
An Israeli airstrike in Gaza City on Friday killed the eldest daughter and the infant grandson of the prominent Palestinian poet and past Democracy Now! guest Refaat Alareer, who himself was killed in an Israeli airstrike in December. Shaima Refaat Alareer was killed along with her husband and 2-month-old son while sheltering in the building of international relief charity Global Communities. Shaima had recently lamented on Facebook that her father never got to meet his grandson, writing, "I never imagined that I would lose you early even before you see him." "Why is the state of Israel and its military targeting the families and relatives of those it has already assassinated and murdered?" asks Jehad Abusalim, a scholar, policy analyst and friend of Refaat Alareer and his family. "Israel seeks to eradicate, to destroy the social environment that fosters resistance and defiance. This environment produced figures like Refaat."

Democracy Now
Apr 30, 2024

Israeli Holocaust Scholar Omer Bartov on Campus Protests, Weaponizing Antisemitism & Silencing Dissent
As Biden administration and U.S. college and university administrators increasingly accuse peaceful pro-Palestinian protesters on school campuses of antisemitism, we speak with Brown University professor of Holocaust and genocide studies Omer Bartov, who visited the student Gaza solidarity encampment at UPenn alongside fellow Israeli historian Raz Segal. "There was absolutely no sign of any violence, of any antisemitism at all," says Bartov, who warns antisemitism is being used to silence speech about Israel. "There's politics, and there's prejudice. And if we don't make a distinction between the two, then what we are actually doing is enforcing a kind of silence over the policies that have been conducted by the Israeli government for a long time that ultimately culminated now in the utter destruction of Gaza."

Democracy Now
Apr 30, 2024

In Gaza Protest, Columbia Students Occupy Hamilton Hall, Site of Historic 1968 Takeover
Columbia University students began occupying Hamilton Hall shortly after midnight Tuesday as the university moved to suspend students who joined Gaza solidarity protests, and renamed it Hind's Hall, after Hind Rajab, a 6-year-old Palestinian girl killed by Israeli soldiers in Gaza in January. We look at how it was 56 years ago today, on April 30, 1968, that the hall was also the site of the historic student occupation by students who renamed the building "Nat Turner Hall at Malcolm X University." We feature an archival newsreel about the 1968 occupation and our interviews with campus activists on the 40th anniversary of the action about how they were protesting Columbia's connections to the military-industrial complex and racist development policies in Harlem.

Democracy Now
Apr 30, 2024

"We Don't Want to Trade in the Blood of Palestinians": Voices of Students & Profs at Columbia Protest
Nearly 300 peaceful protesters were arrested over the weekend as student-led Gaza solidarity encampments across U.S. university and college campuses face an intensifying crackdown. Democracy Now! spoke with Columbia University professors and students Monday as they were threatened with suspension but voted to continue the Gaza Solidarity Encampment, which began almost two weeks ago. "Hundreds of our students have been disciplined in the past six months on unfair premises," said Sueda Polat, a Columbia student organizer who is studying human rights. "We are willing to put a lot on the line for this cause. My right to education shouldn't come before the right to education of Gazans."

Democracy Now
Apr 30, 2024

Headlines for April 30, 2024
Columbia Students Occupy Hamilton Hall After School Suspends Students over Gaza Encampment, 100 Arrested at UT Austin Encampment as Campus Protests over Gaza Continue to Spread, Hamas Criticizes Blinken After He Claimed Israel Made "Extraordinarily Generous" Ceasefire Proposal, Palestinians Worry Negotiations Are in Vain as Israel Continues to Attack Gaza, Coalition of Lawyers Call on Biden to Halt Military Aid to Israel, Biden Administration Claims ICC Can't Prosecute Israel for War Crimes, Journalism Professors Urge New York Times to Conduct Review of Reporting on Oct. 7 Attack, Russia Strikes "Harry Potter Castle" in Ukraine, Killing 5, U.S. Warns "Large-Scale Massacre" Could Occur in Sudanese City of El Fasher, Washington Post Reveals Indian Spy Agency Plotted to Assassinate Sikh Activist in NYC, Temperatures Reach 118 in Burma as Unprecedented Heat Wave Continues in Southeast Asia, Four Officers Killed in Charlotte as U.S. Marshals Attempt to Serve Warrant , UAW Reach Deal with Daimler Truck, Averting Strike

Democracy Now
Apr 29, 2024

"Lyd": Palestinian & Jewish Directors of New Sci-Fi Doc on How 1948 Nakba Devastated Palestinian City
A new film about the once-thriving Palestinian city of Lyd, now known as the Israeli city Lod and home to Ben Gurion Airport, has begun screening in the United States. The film is a "science fiction documentary" that depicts the Palestinian city both with and without the 1948 Nakba, when over 750,000 Palestinians were driven from their homes and villages. In Lyd, Israeli soldiers massacred hundreds of Palestinians in Dahmash Mosque during their takeover of the city. "We use the story of Lyd to symbolize the story of the Nakba, the Palestinian Nakba, the demolition and expulsion of over 600 villages all across Palestine," explains Rami Younis, a descendant of Nakba survivors from Lyd. Younis and Sarah Ema Friedland, the co-directors of Lyd, join Democracy Now! to share excerpts from their film and discuss the vision behind their project.

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