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Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2020

"Most Important Indian Law Case in Half a Century": Supreme Court Upholds Tribal Sovereignty in OK
In a landmark decision, the Supreme Court has ruled that much of eastern Oklahoma, constituting nearly half the state, is Native American land, recognizing a 19th century U.S. treaty with the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Justice Neil Gorsuch, a Trump nominee, joined the court's liberal wing in a narrow 5-4 ruling that found state authorities cannot criminally prosecute Indigenous peoples under state or local laws. The court's bombshell decision — which also impacts the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Seminole Nations — is a major victory for Indigenous sovereignty and treaty rights. "It's a landmark case, and probably the most important Indian law case in the last half a century to come down from the court," says lawyer Sarah Deer, a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma and a professor at the University of Kansas. "The language of the decision itself goes far beyond Oklahoma."

Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2020

"House of Absolute Horrors": Mary Trump's Book Reveals How Trump Family Gave Rise to a "Sociopath"
In a new book, Mary Trump — the president's niece — describes Donald Trump as a "sociopath" who grew up in a dysfunctional family that fostered his greed and cruelty. Donald Trump's younger brother, Robert, is seeking to block the sale of the book on the grounds that it violates a confidentiality agreement, but publisher Simon & Schuster says 600,000 copies of the book have already been distributed ahead of its July 14 publishing date. Investigative journalist David Cay Johnston, who has reported on Trump for three decades, says the book is "very, very important" and helps to answer how Trump got to the White House.

Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2020

Supreme Court Rules Trump Is Not Above the Law, But Public Unlikely to See Tax Returns by Election
In a pair of 7-2 rulings, the Supreme Court rejected President Trump's claim of absolute immunity under the law. The court ruled a Manhattan grand jury could have access to the president's tax returns, but it remains unlikely any of Trump's tax records will be seen before the election. "Legally, Trump had a big loss," says investigative reporter David Cay Johnston, founder and editor of DCReport.org. "Politically, he got a big win out of this court."

Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2020

Brazilian Epidemiologist Slams Bolsonaro's COVID Response as Far-Right President Tests Positive
As Brazil faces the world's second-worst COVID-19 outbreak after the United States, Trump ally and far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has tested positive, after months of downplaying the severity of the pandemic. Brazil has gone almost two months with no health minister. "Bad political leadership is a major risk factor for the spread of the pandemic," says leading Brazilian epidemiologist Cesar Victora, who coordinates the International Center for Equity in Health at the Federal University of Pelotas.

Democracy Now
Jul 10, 2020

Headlines for July 10, 2020
Supreme Court Rejects Trump's Claim of Absolute Immunity, Court Says Much of Oklahoma Remains Indian Country in Landmark Indigenous Sovereignty Case, Hospitals Face Surge as U.S. Reports Record 65,000 New Coronavirus Cases, Surge in Cases Directly Tied to Early Reopenings in Florida, Arizona, Texas, Bolivia's Interim President Tests Positive; India, S. Africa & Mexico Report New Record Highs, 1.3 Million More File for Unemployment as GOP Rejects Extending Jobless Aid, Biden Unveils $700 Billion "Buy American" Economic Recovery Plan, St. Louis Police Break Up City Hall Protest Encampment, With Veto-Proof Majority, Seattle City Council Votes to Defund Police by 50%, Protests Erupt in Salt Lake City After Police Cleared in Fatal Shooting, Report: Dataminr Firm Used Twitter Data to Help Police Monitor BLM Protests, NYC Paints "Black Lives Matter" Outside Trump Tower, Hate Groups Receive Federal Loans Under COVID-19 Stimulus Program, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chair Breaks with Trump on Renaming Bases with Confederate Names, Pentagon: Reports of Russia Paying Bounties to Kill U.S. Troops Is Not Corroborated, Mayor of Seoul Dies in Apparent Suicide, Immigration Rights Groups Raise Alarm over ICE Plan to Host "Citizens Academy", Trump Immigration Filing Could Lead to More Children Being Separated from Parents, Robert Fuller's Death Ruled Suicide in California

Democracy Now
Jul 09, 2020

Belgian Princess Condemns Her Family's Brutal Colonial History in Congo & Calls For Reparations
Black Lives Matter protests in the U.S. have sparked a reckoning about racism and colonialism across the world, including in Belgium, where a growing movement is demanding the country address systemic racism and make amends for its violent colonial legacy. King Philippe issued an unprecedented statement "expressing regret" for Belgium's brutal colonial rule in Congo under Leopold II, who ran the country as his personal fiefdom and under whose command millions of Congolese were enslaved and killed. "It's an erased history," says Belgo-Congolese journalist and activist Gia Abrassart. We also speak with Princess Esméralda, a member of the Belgian royal family and great-grandniece of Leopold II, who says the country has taken an important first step, but adds that "we have to go much farther."

Democracy Now
Jul 09, 2020

How to Stop the Next Pandemic: U.N. Report Links Outbreaks to Climate Crisis & Industrial Farming
As the unprecedented global health emergency continues to unfold, a new United Nations report says humans must lower stress on the natural environment to prevent the next pandemic. COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, has a zoonotic origin, meaning it jumped from animals to humans, and the U.N. report finds that such diseases are spreading with greater frequency due to human activity, including industrial farming and the climate crisis. "Rather than focusing on the symptoms, we were looking at the causes," says Delia Grace, lead author of the report, veterinary epidemiologist at the International Livestock Research Institute in Kenya and professor of food safety at the U.K. Natural Resources Institute.

Democracy Now
Jul 09, 2020

Viagra? Yes. Birth Control? No. SCOTUS Sides with Trump & Limits Free Contraception Under Obamacare
The Supreme Court dealt a major blow to reproductive rights when it sided with the Trump administration in letting employers deny people access to free birth control based on religious or moral grounds, hollowing out a mandate under the Affordable Care Act that requires most private health insurance plans to provide cost-free birth control. "It's a really deeply disappointing ruling," says Fatima Goss Graves, president and CEO of the National Women's Law Center. "These individuals are effectively on their own to find and pay for their contraception."

Democracy Now
Jul 09, 2020

Headlines for July 9, 2020
U.S. Posts Another Record Daily High in New Coronavirus Cases, Anthony Fauci Absent from Coronavirus Task Force Briefing After Drawing Criticism from Trump, Trump Attacks CDC Guidance on School Reopenings During Pandemic, Hundreds Test Positive for COVID-19 at Arizona For-Profit Immigration Jail, Tulsa, OK Health Official Links Explosion of Coronavirus Cases to Trump Rally, HHS Secretary Claims Medical Workers "Don't Get Infected" After 95,000 Test Positive for Coronavirus, COVID-19 Cases Spike in Africa, While Melbourne, Australia, Is Placed Back on Lockdown, Bolivians Buried in Mass Graves as Hospitals "Collapse" Amid COVID-19 Surge, Oxfam Warns COVID-19 Pandemic Could Push 122 Million to Brink of Starvation, 126,000 Could Lose Birth Control After SCOTUS Overturns Contraceptive Care Mandate, Man Convicted of Murder at 18 Put to Death in Texas's First Execution Since Pandemic Began, Owner of Dakota Access Pipeline Threatens to Defy Federal Court Order to Stop Oil Flowing, Mexican Labor Leader Released from Jail But Barred from Visiting Maquiladora Workers, U.N. Special Rapporteur Calls U.S. Assassination of Iranian General Illegal Under International Law, Minneapolis Police Bodycam Transcripts Reveal George Floyd's Dying Words, Autopsy Finds L.A. Sheriff's Deputies Shot Andrés Guardado in the Back 5 Times, California Couple Who Defaced Black Lives Matter Mural Charged with Hate Crimes, Jackson, MS to Remove Andrew Jackson Statue, May Replace It with Medgar Evers Memorial, Tucker Carlson Echoes White Nationalists in Attack on Lawmakers of Color, Federal Court Upholds Endangered Species Protections for Yellowstone Grizzly Bears

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2020

COVID Exposes "Significant Racial Health Inequities" as Black, Brown & Indigenous People Suffer Most
The coronavirus continues to hit communities of color the hardest, with federal data showing African American and Latinx people are nearly three times more likely to be infected and twice as likely to die from the virus compared to their white neighbors. There were "pretty significant racial health disparities" even before COVID-19 ravaged the country, says Dr. Uché Blackstock, emergency medicine physician in New York and founder and CEO of Advancing Health Equity, a company working to fight racism and bias in health services. "What we saw in the pandemic these first few months is these really significant racial health inequities being exposed and even amplified." We also continue to speak with award-winning New York Times correspondent Dr. Sheri Fink.

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2020

The New NYC? Houston Hospitals Struggle with "Astonishing" Rise in Coronavirus Cases
As COVID-19 cases rise and hospitalizations are soaring, hospitals in Florida, Texas, Arizona and California are running out of ICU beds. On Tuesday, Texas set a grim new record of 10,000 new cases in a single day. "It's been astonishing," says Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times correspondent Dr. Sheri Fink, who has been reporting from Houston's largest hospital. "They've been adding unit after unit after unit just to care for coronavirus patients."

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2020

ICE Threatens to Deport or Bar International Students If Schools Move Classes Online Due to Pandemic
As President Trump pressures states to reopen schools in the fall despite an alarming surge in new coronavirus cases, ICE says international students studying at U.S. universities could face deportation if their schools switch to online-only courses. The U.S. issues more than a million student visas a year, and international students account for as much as a third of the undergraduate student body at many colleges and universities and often constitute the majority of graduate students. "I have yet to see a justification for this," says immigration attorney Fiona McEntee, who notes that international students contribute about $41 billion to the U.S. economy per year. We also speak with Jian Ren, a Chinese international student pursuing a Ph.D. at Rutgers University.

Democracy Now
Jul 08, 2020

Headlines for July 8, 2020
Trump Begins Formal U.S. Withdrawal from World Health Organization, Brazil's Official Coronavirus Death Toll Tops 65,000 as Jair Bolsonaro Tests Positive, U.S. Confirms Record 60,000 Coronavirus Cases as Trump Demands School Reopenings, Houston Mayor Pleads with Republicans to Cancel Texas Convention Amid Coronavirus Surge, Prominent GOP Senators to Skip Republican National Convention Amid Pandemic, Serbian Anti-Lockdown Protesters Storm Parliament; Spanish Study Questions "Herd Immunity", Mexican President to Meet with Trump; Canadian PM Won't Attend over COVID Concerns, Reps. Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna Pressley Introduce BREATHE Act, Backed by Black Lives Matter, Phoenix, AZ and Columbus, OH Latest U.S. Cities to Ban Police in High Schools, New York Protesters Demand Broad Moratorium on Evictions Amid Pandemic, Black Lives Matter Protesters Struck by Motorists in Indiana, New York, New Jersey Incumbents Fend Off Progressive Primary Challengers, New Data Show 12-Year Period Ending in June Tied Warmest Year on Record, U.N. Investigators Find All Factions Committed War Crimes During Offensive in Idlib, Syria, Bone Fragment from Disappeared Student Casts Doubt on Official Account of Ayotzinapa Massacre, Police in Kenya's Capital Fire Tear Gas to Clear Protests Against Police Brutality , Facebook Ad Boycott Leaders Say CEO Zuckerberg Is Failing to Crack Down on Hate Speech, WNBA 2020 Season Will Honor Black Lives Matter, Say Her Name Movements

Democracy Now
Jul 07, 2020

"They Don't Care About Our Health": Hunger Striker at Otay Mesa ICE Jail Speaks Out as COVID Spreads
As COVID-19 infections continue to rise behind bars, we go inside the Otay Mesa Detention Center in California to speak with Anthony Alexandre, a longtime U.S. resident of Haitian descent, who describes conditions at the for-profit jail, run by private prison company CoreCivic, which has seen a mass outbreak of COVID-19, leading to at least 167 infections and one death. "Basically, CoreCivic is telling us they do not care about our health," says Alexandre. "They do not care about anything else but their bottom line."

Democracy Now
Jul 07, 2020

How Black & Indigenous Groups Won the Fight to Stop the Atlantic Coast Pipeline
Anti-pipeline activists are celebrating after Duke Energy and Dominion Energy announced they are dropping plans to build the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a 600-mile pipeline that would have carried fracked gas from West Virginia to North Carolina and threatened rural Indigenous, Black and Brown communities. "There was an awful lot of opposition to this," says Donna Chavis, senior fossil fuel campaigner for Friends of the Earth and an elder of the Lumbee Nation, whose territory the pipeline would have crossed. She says the communities that would have suffered "irreparable harm" from the pipeline "now have that cloud lifted from them."

Democracy Now
Jul 07, 2020

"A Dream That Comes True": Standing Rock Elder Hails Order to Shut Down DAPL After Years of Protest
Following years of resistance, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and Indigenous organizers across the country scored a massive legal victory Monday when a federal judge ordered the Dakota Access Pipeline to be shut down and emptied of all oil, pending an environmental review. "You ever have a dream, a dream that comes true? That is what it is," responds LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, an elder of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and founder of Sacred Stone Camp, where resistance in 2016 brought tens of thousands of people to oppose the pipeline's construction on sacred lands. We also speak with Ojibwe lawyer Tara Houska, founder of the Giniw Collective.

Democracy Now
Jul 07, 2020

Headlines for July 7, 2020
Judge Rules Dakota Access Pipeline Be Shut Down Pending Review, Trump Admin Moves to Deport and Bar International Students If Colleges Go Online in Fall, Coronavirus Surges Across Country as Dr. Fauci Warns U.S. Still "Knee-Deep" in First Wave, Jair Bolsonaro Gets Tested for COVID-19; WHO Warns AIDS Deaths in Africa Could Rise Amid Pandemic, Congressmembers, Trump Associates Among Beneficiaries of Coronavirus Stimulus Funds, Anti-Asian American Hate Crimes Have Been Soaring Since the Start of the Pandemic, Indiana Civil Rights Activist Says He Was Victim of Attempted Lynching, Video Shows Police Officers Fatally Shooting Phoenix Man in His Parked Car, White Woman Who Claimed Black Man in Central Park Threatened Her, Charged with Filing False Report, GA Governor Declares State of Emergency Days After Fatal Shooting of 8-Year-Old Girl, Pentagon Considering Banning Confederate Flag at Military Bases, Questions Remain After Fire at Iranian Nuclear Facility Caused "Significant Damage", Prominent Iraqi Security and Political Expert Hisham al-Hashimi Shot Dead, Sec. State Pompeo Says U.S. Considering Banning TikTok and Other Chinese Apps, Political Outsider Luis Abinader Wins Dominican Republic Presidential Election, Germany Votes to End Coal Use by 2038; Activists Say It's Not Enough to Stop Climate Catastrophe, SCOTUS Rules States Can Require Electoral College Members to Back Popular Winner, #BlackoutDay2020 Encourages Consumers to Support Black Business Owners

Democracy Now
Jul 06, 2020

Egyptian Activist Laila Soueif on the Jailing of Her Children & the Fight Against Authoritarianism
Egyptian authorities have arrested scores of people, including doctors, medical workers, journalists, lawyers and activists, as the country grapples with the coronavirus outbreak. "Unlike nearly every other country in the Middle East, Egypt has not released thousands of prisoners as a precaution against the coronavirus. Instead, it's arrested more people and cut off communication," says Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous. One of the most high-profile arrests is that of Sanaa Seif, a film editor and the youngest member of one of Egypt's most prominent activist families. Sanaa's brother, Alaa Abd El-Fattah — a leading figure of the 2011 revolution — was released from prison last year after serving a five-year sentence on trumped-up charges, but was rearrested in September and remains behind bars in pretrial detention. In an exclusive interview, we speak with their mother, Laila Soueif, who is a professor of mathematics at Cairo University and one of the most outspoken and active advocates for prisoner rights in Egypt.

Democracy Now
Jul 06, 2020

Indigenous Historian Nick Estes on Toppling Statues, Racist Team Names & COVID-19 in Indian Country
President Trump's visit to Mount Rushmore comes after months of escalating coronavirus infections in Native communities, but Indigenous scholar and activist Nick Estes says South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem, like many of her Republican counterparts across the U.S., has taken a "hallucination-based approach to the COVID-19 pandemic," and notes she refused to enforce social distancing at this weekend's event that attracted thousands of people. He also reacts to growing pressure on the Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians to change their racist names.

Democracy Now
Jul 06, 2020

"He Wasn't Invited": How Trump's Racist Mt. Rushmore Celebration Violated Indigenous Sovereignty
Amid ongoing protests against systemic racism and state violence, Trump attacked protesters, vowed to defend statues of colonizers and white supremacists, and ignored Indigenous sovereignty over the area, when he held an Independence Day rally at Mount Rushmore, sparking even more protests that led to 15 arrests. "The Black Hills, or what we know as He Sápa, is the cultural center of our universe as Lakota people," says Indigenous scholar and activist Nick Estes, a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe and assistant professor of American studies at the University of New Mexico. "More than 50 different Indigenous nations actually have origin stories or ties or spiritual connections to the Black Hills."

Democracy Now
Jul 06, 2020

Headlines for July 6, 2020
As Coronavirus Surges, States Blame Hasty Reopenings, and Trump Falsely Claims 99% of Cases "Harmless", COVID-19 Spikes Around the World Force Countries to Reimpose Lockdowns, Indigenous Land Defenders Arrested as They Blocked Highway to Mt. Rushmore Ahead of Trump Speech, Antiracist Activist Summer Taylor Killed by Driver Who Targeted Crowd of Protesters, Protesters Topple Columbus Statue in Baltimore, BLM Uprising Continues Over July 4 Weekend, 3 Colorado Officers Fired for Photo Reenacting Killing of Elijah McClain, Pressure Mounting to Change Racist Names of Washington and Cleveland Sports Teams, 160 People Killed in Ethiopian Unrest Following Murder of Popular Singer, Pro-Democracy Books Pulled from Hong Kong Libraries as New National Security Law Takes Effect, Phillipine President Duterte Signs Anti-Terror Law in Further Blow to Freedom of Speech, Landslide at Burmese Jade Mine Kills Over 170 People, Family of Vanessa Guillén Confirms Remains Found Last Week Belong to Missing Fort Hood Soldier, Merci Mack and Brayla Stone, a Black Trans Woman and Girl, Were Killed in Late June, FBI Arrests Epstein Co-Conspirator Ghislaine Maxwell; NYT Reports Prince Andrew Contacted D.C. Lobbyist, Atlantic Coast Pipeline Canceled in Major Win for Land Defenders, Environmentalists

Democracy Now
Jul 03, 2020

"America's Moment of Reckoning": Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor & Cornel West on Uprising Against Racism
Scholars Cornel West and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor respond to the global uprising against racism and police violence following the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. "We're seeing the convergence of a class rebellion with racism and racial terrorism at the center of it," said Princeton professor Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. "And in many ways, we are in uncharted territory in the United States."

Democracy Now
Jul 03, 2020

Angela Davis on Abolition, Calls to Defund Police, Toppled Racist Statues & Voting in 2020 Election
Amid a worldwide uprising against police brutality and racism, we discuss the historic moment with legendary scholar and activist Angela Davis. She also responds to the destruction and removal of racist monuments in cities across the United States, and the 2020 election.

Democracy Now
Jul 03, 2020

"What to the Slave Is the 4th of July?": James Earl Jones Reads Frederick Douglass's Historic Speech
In a Fourth of July holiday special, we hear the words of Frederick Douglass. Born into slavery around 1818, Douglass became a key leader of the abolitionist movement. On July 5, 1852, in Rochester, New York, he gave one of his most famous speeches, "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro." He was addressing the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society. This is actor James Earl Jones reading the speech during a performance of historian Howard Zinn's acclaimed book, "Voices of a People's History of the United States." He was introduced by Zinn.

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2020

Did the Army Ignore a Soldier's Murder? Questions Mount over Vanessa Guillén Disappearance
The U.S. Army says it has a suspect in custody in connection with the disappearance of Vanessa Guillén, a missing 20-year-old Fort Hood soldier whose family says her remains were likely found in a shallow grave near the Texas Army base. A second suspect in the case — a soldier who the Guillén family lawyer named as Aaron Robinson — killed himself in Killeen, Texas, as officers approached. The news comes after months of anguish for Vanessa Guillén's family, who say she was sexually harassed by a higher-up prior to her disappearance and that the military was slow to investigate when she went missing. We get an update from the family's attorney, Natalie Khawam.

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2020

Barbara Ransby on the Biden Problem: Social Movements Must Defeat Trump & Also Hold Dems Accountable
Amid a mass uprising against racism and state violence, social movements are not just fighting hostility and backlash from President Trump, but also dealing with a "Biden problem," according to historian, author and activist Barbara Ransby. "I think it's fair to say that Joe Biden is not our dream candidate, by any means," she says. "We should be critical of Joe Biden. We should be ready to hold Joe Biden accountable come January. But we should be clear about the need to defeat Trump in November."

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2020

The Untold History of Mount Rushmore: A Friend of the KKK Built Monument on Sacred Lakota Land
As tribal governments call on President Trump to cancel his Mount Rushmore Independence Day celebration, we look at why Native Americans have long pushed for the removal of the monument carved into the sacred Black Hills and designed by a sculptor with ties to the Ku Klux Klan. "This place is very, very sacred to our people," says Nick Tilsen, president and CEO of the NDN Collective. "Stealing our land and then carving the faces of four white men who were colonizers, who committed genocide against Indigenous people, is an egregious act of violence."

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2020

The Untold History of Mount Rushmore: A KKK Sympathizer Built Monument on Sacred Lakota Land
As tribal governments call on President Trump to cancel his Mount Rushmore Independence Day celebration, we look at why Native Americans have long pushed for the removal of the monument carved into the sacred Black Hills and designed by a sculptor with ties to the Ku Klux Klan. "This place is very, very sacred to our people," says Nick Tilsen, president and CEO of the NDN Collective. "Stealing our land and then carving the faces of four white men who were colonizers, who committed genocide against Indigenous people, is an egregious act of violence."

Democracy Now
Jul 02, 2020

Headlines for July 2, 2020
States Reverse Reopenings as Daily U.S. Coronavirus Cases Top 50,000 for First Time, As U.S. Deaths Top 128,000, Trump Predicts Coronavirus Will "Sort of Just Disappear", Dallas Choir Members Tested Positive for COVID-19 Ahead of Performance for Mike Pence, San Quentin Prisoners Launch Hunger Strike Amid Explosion of COVID-19 Cases, Seattle Riot Police Clear Autonomous Zone, Los Angeles City Council Approves $150M in Cuts to Police Budget, Trump Calls Black Lives Matter Message Outside Trump Tower a "Symbol of Hate", Richmond, Virginia, Mayor Removes Confederate Statue, Trump Backs Confederate Base Names as Monuments to Racism Continue to Fall , Baltimore Court Reinstates $38 Million in Damages to Family of Korryn Gaines, Killed by Police, Family of Andrés Guardado, Shot by L.A. Sheriff's Deputy, Demands Autopsy Report, Families Demand Investigations into Police Killings of Sean Monterrosa, Erik Salgado, Shallow Grave Found Near Fort Hood, TX Likely Holds Missing Soldier Vanessa Guillén, Reporters German Vallecillo and Jorge Posas Murdered in Northern Honduras, U.S. Seizes Chinese Hair Products Said to Be from Uyghurs in Forced Labor Camps , Russians Approve "Rigged" Referendum Allowing Vladimir Putin to Remain in Power, Fires in Brazil's Amazon Surge to Highest Rate in 13 Years

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2020

Ed Yong on the "Disgraceful" U.S. Pandemic Response & How Medicare for All Could Have Saved Lives
As the United States experiences the world's worst outbreak of COVID-19, we speak with Ed Yong, science writer for The Atlantic, who warned of the country's unpreparedness for a viral outbreak in 2018. Now he says "it's truly shocking and disgraceful" how badly the pandemic has been handled in the United States, and blames a lack of federal leadership for most of the damage. "A country with the resources that we have should not be in this state," he argues, and adds that Medicare for All could have saved lives.

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2020

Jamaal Bowman on NY Primary Upset, Rent Strikes, Police Brutality & Opposing West Bank Annexation
As a surge of a progressive candidates of color see victories in Democratic primaries across the country, we speak with former Bronx middle school principal Jamaal Bowman about his upset victory over New York Congressmember Eliot Engel, the 16-term Foreign Affairs Committee chair. Bowman ran on a Green New Deal, Medicare for All platform and recently joined protests demanding an end to racism and police brutality. He says his upset over Engel came down to mobilizing people who are "disenfranchised and ignored" by the political establishment. "We didn't just target those who consistently vote in primaries. We targeted everyone," he says. Looking forward, he describes his support for Palestine, a rent strike and police accountability.

Democracy Now
Jul 01, 2020

Headlines for July 1, 2020
Dr. Anthony Fauci Warns U.S. Could Soon Record 100,000 Coronavirus Cases a Day, Dozens of Healthcare Workers Died of COVID-19 After OSHA Dismissed Pleas for PPE, 627,000 in Western Hemisphere Will Die of Coronavirus by October, Warns WHO, Hickenlooper Wins CO Senate Primary; Oklahoma Voters Approve Medicaid Expansion, Amy McGrath Narrowly Defeats Charles Booker in Kentucky Democratic Senate Primary, Oglala Sioux President Says Trump "Doesn't Have Permission" to Visit Mt. Rushmore, Top Republicans Break from Trump, Recommend Masks to Slow Coronavirus, New York Court Blocks Publication of Tell-All Book by Donald Trump's Niece, Joe Biden Blasts Trump on Coronavirus: "Our Wartime President Has Surrendered", New York City Hall Occupation Continues as Budget Fails to Meet Protesters' Demands, Graham, NC Bans Protests & Enforces 24/7 Police Protection of Confederate Monument, Mississippi Governor OKs Removal of Confederate Emblem from Flag, Still Backs Monuments, Supreme Court Rules Private Religious Schools Are Eligible for State Aid, Federal Judge Blocks Trump Rule Forcing Refugees to First Seek Asylum Elsewhere, Immigrant Prisoners Denounce Inhumane Conditions, ICE Negligence Amid COVID-19 Outbreak in Arizona, Mexican Labor Leader's Arrest Draws Protests as USMCA Trade Deal Goes into Effect, White House Had Intelligence on Russian Bounties to Kill U.S. Soldiers in Afghanistan, Israel's Netanyahu Vows to Annex Occupied West Bank Despite International Condemnation, Hundreds of Protesters Arrested in Hong Kong as New Security Law Goes into Effect, Harvey Weinstein Sexual Assault & Harassment Survivors Awarded $19M Settlement, Rudolfo Anaya, "Godfather of Chicano Literature," Dies at 82

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2020

#OccupyCityHall: Mayor's "Tone Deaf" Pledge to Move $1B from NYPD Budget Fails to Satisfy Protesters
New York police have closed in on peaceful protesters camped outside City Hall who are demanding $1 billion be cut from the police department's $6 billion budget, as the city approaches its July 1 budget deadline. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a budget deal that would move $1 billion in NYPD funding in an apparent nod to protesters' demands, but organizers say they're not satisfied. "All they've really done is shifted money from the NYPD budget over to school safety officers," says Bianca Cunningham with the #OccupyCityHall encampment, who adds that school safety officers still contribute to a school-to-prison pipeline that disproportionately hurts Black and Brown communities. "It shows that they are completely tone deaf about what this moment is about," she says.

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2020

NJ Latinx Parents & Students Fight Robert Wood Johnson Plan to Demolish Public School
In a story Democracy Now! has followed closely, Juan González shares an update on efforts to prevent the demolition of the Lincoln Annex public school in New Brunswick, New Jersey. City officials are trying to proceed with demolishing the public school this summer, in a move that would force 760 students to be bussed to other schools for years, and parents and local activists are holding a rally in front of the Lincoln Annex School. "They want to keep the pressure on in the streets and to call on allies … who support public education, who are against gentrification and the abuse of immigrants, to join the rally," González says.

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2020

NAACP's Derrick Johnson on Mississippi's State Flag, Trump's White Power Tweet & Boycotting Facebook
In a historic vote, the Mississippi state Legislature passed a bill to remove the Confederate battle emblem from its state flag, making it the last state to do so, after an ongoing nationwide uprising against racism and police brutality and a mounting pressure campaign in Mississippi. Derrick Johnson, president and CEO of the NAACP, says it has been a "long journey" to change the Mississippi flag. "We've had to fight both against the symbol of racial oppression, the revisionist history of racial oppression, and now the next step is to fight against the structural racism that's embedded in the public policy, not only in the state of Mississippi but across the country," Johnson says. He also addresses how President Trump shared a video on social media of a Trump supporter chanting "white power," as well as the growing boycott of Facebook for allowing the spread of hateful and false information on its platform.

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2020

"Moment of Elation": In 1st Big Abortion Case of Trump Era, SCOTUS Strikes Down Strict Louisiana Law
In the first big ruling on abortion in the Trump era, the Supreme Court has struck down a restrictive abortion law in Louisiana that would have left the state with just one abortion clinic. The 2014 law required doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of their clinic, an onerous requirement that often made it impossible for abortion providers to continue to operate. "It was a moment of elation," says Lakeesha Harris, director of reproductive health and justice at Women with a Vision, a women's rights organization based in New Orleans. "Many of us have been working years, so this was justice in the making."

Democracy Now
Jun 30, 2020

Headlines for June 30, 2020
SCOTUS Strikes Down Draconian Louisiana Abortion Law, SCOTUS Rules on Federal Executions, Trump's Ability to Fire Head of CFPB, Funding of Int'l AIDS Projects, States Mandate Face Masks, Impose New Restrictions as Cases Surge Across U.S., WHO Says "The Worst Is Yet to Come" as Scientists Study New Flu Strain That Could Become Pandemic, Judge Sets March Trial Date for Police Officers Who Killed George Floyd, Madison Schools Vote to End Police Contract; Protesters Unfurl Breonna Taylor Banner in Louisville, Shooting at Seattle's CHOP Kills One Teenager, Injures Another, Twitch Suspends Trump's Channel; Reddit and YouTube Ban Accounts for User Violations, Viral Video Shows White Missouri Couple Brandishing Guns at Peaceful Protesters, LULAC, Family of Missing Fort Hood Soldier Demand Congressional Investigation, China Signs Security Law, Giving It Sweeping New Powers Over Hong Kong, AP Report Says China Engaging in "Demographic Genocide" of Uyghurs, Iran Issues Arrest Warrant for Trump over Targeted Killing of Qassem Soleimani, Progressive Dems Denounce Planned Israeli Annexation, At Least 23 Civilians Killed as Blasts Rip Through Afghan Market, Golden State Killer Pleads Guilty to 13 Murders, Over 50 Rapes, Baseball Greats and Fans Celebrate 100th Anniversary of Negro National League

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2020

Louisiana Activists Face 15 Years for "Terrorizing" Oil Lobbyist with Box of Plastic Pollution
Two environmental activists with the Louisiana Bucket Brigade face up to 15 years in prison for leaving a box of plastic pellets, found on the Texas coast, at the home of an oil and gas lobbyist in December. Advocates say the "terrorizing" felony charges reflect longtime attempts to criminalize environmental activists in Louisiana and come amid a campaign to block Formosa Plastics from building a new plant in St. James Parish, an area known as Cancer Alley. We speak with Anne Rolfes, director of the group Louisiana Bucket Brigade and one of those facing felony charges, and Gregory Manning, activist and pastor of Broadmoor Community Church, who was charged with inciting a riot as he led a peaceful protest along Cancer Alley in October of 2019.

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2020

"Atrocious": Police Killed Elijah McClain in 2019. Why Did It Take Colorado So Long to Launch Probe?
Colorado Governor Jared Polis has ordered a new investigation into the 2019 police killing of 23-year-old Elijah McClain in Aurora, which is facing renewed scrutiny and outrage amid the nationwide uprising against police brutality. McClain was walking home from a store last August when someone called 911 to report a "suspicious person." Three Aurora police officers who answered the call tackled McClain to the ground and placed him in a chokehold as he pleaded for his life, and medical responders who arrived then injected McClain with the powerful sedative ketamine. He suffered a cardiac arrest on the way to the hospital and died several days later. "It's really atrocious that it's taken almost a year for this case to gain the kind of attention that it should have gained immediately," says Mari Newman, attorney for the McClain family.

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2020

Massive Case of Denial: COVID Surges in US, Tops 10M Globally, as Pence Touts "Remarkable Progress"
As coronavirus cases top 10 million worldwide and spikes are being reported in 36 states, Vice President Mike Pence has touted "truly remarkable progress" on the pandemic. "This has just been a massive case of denial, of idiotic government policy, of the lack of any strategic planning, any really specific strategic goal," Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer Laurie Garrett says of the response to the pandemic. "We're in very, very dire straits right now."

Democracy Now
Jun 29, 2020

Headlines for June 29, 2020
Global Coronavirus Cases Top 10 Million as U.S. Cases Surge and a Dozen States Pause Reopening, Judge Orders ICE to Release Immigrant Children over Coronavirus Fears, Coronavirus Cases Mount in India, Iran and Australia, Gunman Kills One Person After Opening Fire at Antiracist Protesters in Louisville, Kentucky, Police in Aurora, Colorado, Pepper-Spray Protesters Calling for Justice for Elijah McClain, Protests Against Police Violence Gain Steam in NYC, Seattle, Philadelphia, Racist Symbols Come Down Across the Country Amid National Uprising, Trump Retweets Video of Supporter Shouting "White Power!", Facebook to Start Labeling Hate Speech Posts by Trump as It Faces Growing Ad Boycott, Georgia Signs Hate Crimes Bill into Law as It Increases Protections for Police, Federal Court Says Trump Cannot Use Pentagon Funds for Border Wall Without Lawmaker Approval, NYT: Russian Intelligence Unit Offered Taliban Bounties to Kill U.S. Troops, Gunmen Attack Pakistan Stock Exchange in Karachi, Colombian Soldiers Confess to Raping 13-Year-Old Indigenous Girl, Gunmen Attack Mexico City Police Chief, Killing 3, Rikers Employees Disciplined over Death of Layleen Polanco, Afro-Latinx Trans Woman, NYPD Pepper-Sprays Queer Liberation Marchers on 51st Anniversary of Stonewall Riots

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2020

In Racial Justice Victory, Johnson & Johnson to Pay $2B to Women in Asbestos-Laced Baby Powder Suit
Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay $2.1 billion to a group of women who developed ovarian cancer after using talcum powder contaminated with asbestos. Johnson & Johnson heavily marketed the powder to African American women despite warnings that the products could cause cancer. Six of the plaintiffs in the Johnson & Johnson case died before the trial started. Five more of the women have died since 2018. We get response from M. Isabelle Chaudry, senior policy manager at the National Women's Health Network, who says the company must ban the products globally and do more to address the harm it has caused, particularly to communities of color. "They have a history of engaging in racist practices," she says.

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2020

One Bad Algorithm? Advocates Say Facial Recognition Reveals Systemic Racism in AI Technology
The controversy over police use of facial recognition technology has accelerated after a Black man in Michigan revealed he was wrongfully arrested because of the technology. Detroit police handcuffed Robert Williams in front of his wife and daughters after facial recognition software falsely identified him as a suspect in a robbery. Researchers say facial recognition software is up to 100 times more likely to misidentify people of color than white people. This week, Boston voted to end its use in the city, and Democratic lawmakers introduced a similar measure for federal law enforcement. "This is not an example of one bad algorithm. Just like instances of police brutality, it is a glimpse of how systemic racism can be embedded into AI systems like those that power facial recognition technologies," says Joy Buolamwini, founder of the Algorithmic Justice League.

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2020

The End of Asylum? Supreme Court Sides with Trump Administration on Fast-Tracking Deportations
The Supreme Court handed the Trump administration a major victory Thursday when it ruled the government can fast-track deportations of asylum seekers without first allowing them to fight for their cases in front of a judge. The ACLU's Lee Gelernt argued the case in court on behalf of Tamil asylum seeker Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam. "It's a very serious decision and will adversely affect many, many asylum seekers," says Gelernt. "We're likely to see more people fail their hearings, and now they don't have a backstop in the federal courts."

Democracy Now
Jun 26, 2020

Headlines for June 26, 2020
U.S. Sets Another Daily COVID-19 Record as Infections Surge in 31 States, Supreme Court Ruling Will Deny Asylum Seekers Their Day in Court, Trump Admin Asks SCOTUS to Annul Obamacare Even as Millions Lose Health Coverage, India Nears 500,000 Confirmed Coronavirus Cases as Pandemic Worsens Globally, WHO Declares End to Ebola Outbreak in Democratic Republic of the Congo, House Democrats Pass Sweeping Police Reform Bill That Trump Promised to Veto, Activists Demanding $1B Cut to NYPD Budget Occupy City Hall for Third Straight Night, NC Police Dept. Fires Officers Caught on Tape Discussing "Slaughtering" Black Residents, Trump Demands Toppled Statue of Confederate General Be Restored in D.C., Madison, WI Police Launch Hate Crime Probe into Black Teen Set on Fire by White Men, NASCAR Releases Photo of Noose Found in Bubba Wallace's Garage, L.A. Times Settles Racial Bias Complaint with Promise of Sweeping Changes in Hiring, FCC Approves Plan to Make "988" New National Suicide Prevention Hotline Number, Louisiana Environmental Activists Charged with "Terrorizing" Oil & Gas Lobbyist, Bernie Sanders Proposes 10% Cut to Pentagon Budget to Invest in Health & Education

Democracy Now
Jun 25, 2020

Repair & Revive: Rev. William Barber on Fighting Racism, Poverty, Climate Change, War & Nationalism
The Poor People's Campaign offered a counterpoint to President Trump's sparsely attended Tulsa campaign rally with a mass digital gathering that unveiled a policy platform to spur "transformative action" on five key issues of systemic racism, systemic poverty, ecological devastation, the war economy and the threat of religious nationalism. "We have to repair and revive," says Rev. Dr. William Barber, co-chair of the Poor People's Campaign. "That has to be a part of if we're truly going to ever be the democracy we claim to be on paper."

Democracy Now
Jun 25, 2020

How U.S. and Brazil Leadership That "Neglects Science" Led to Hemisphere's Worst Coronavirus Crises
As coronavirus infections worldwide approach 10 million, nearly half can be found in the two largest countries in the Americas: the United States and Brazil, which now has the worst infection rate in the world and could surpass the U.S. death toll next month. "What we see in the country is a reflection of the leadership that we have," says Marcia Castro, professor of demography, chair of the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and co-chair of Harvard's Brazil Studies Program, noting far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has downplayed the pandemic's severity and undermined efforts to enforce protective measures. We also discuss the country's participation in vaccine trials, the impact of the crisis on Brazil's Indigenous population, and the spike in COVID in the three most populous U.S. states of California, Texas and Florida.

Democracy Now
Jun 25, 2020

Headlines for June 25, 2020
U.S. Coronavirus Cases Surge to Highest Daily Level Since Pandemic Began, WHO Warns Coronavirus Has Yet to Peak in the Americas, Kellyanne Conway Defends Trump's Use of "Kung Flu," Weeks After Calling the Term "Highly Offensive", Protesters Camp Outside New York City Hall Demanding $1B in Cuts to NYPD Budget, Democrats Halt Senate Police Bill, Saying Reforms Don't Go Far Enough, Colorado Lawmakers Demand Investigation into Police Killing of Elijah McClain, Family Demands Justice for Queens Man Tasered to Death by Police in His Own Home, NYPD Officer David Afanador to Face Strangulation Charges for Using Banned Chokehold, Tucson Police Chief Offers to Resign over Death of Carlos Ingram Lopez in Police Custody, Chrystul Kizer, Teen Who Killed Her Alleged Sex Trafficker, Freed on Bail, Three White Men Indicted on Murder Charges for Killing Ahmaud Arbery, Georgia Bill Would Bar Election Officials from Mailing Absentee Ballot Applications, The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Will Shorten Its Name, Wisconsin State Senator Assaulted as Statues Toppled from Capitol Grounds, U.N. Secretary-General Calls on Israel to Abandon Plans to Annex Palestinian Land, Jamaal Bowman Declares Victory Over Rep. Eliot Engel in New York Primary, Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee Moved Mostly Online, Appeals Court Will Allow Justice Department to Dismiss Criminal Case Against Michael Flynn, Massive Saharan Dust Plume Heads Toward U.S. After Darkening Skies Over Caribbean, Minnesota Attorney General Sues Fossil Fuel Giants over "Campaign of Deception" on Climate

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2020

Outbreak at San Quentin: COVID Is Skyrocketing in CA Prisons. Why Haven't More People Been Released?
As coronavirus rapidly spreads through California's overcrowded prisons, 400 people have tested positive for the virus at San Quentin State Prison. Advocates and incarcerated people warn conditions behind bars make it nearly impossible to stop the virus once it enters. We speak with Adnan Khan, executive director of Re:Store Justice, an organization that advocates for policy and alternative responses to violence and life sentences. He links inhumane prison conditions to the mass uprising in the streets against systemic racism and state violence. "There are literally millions of people in prison based on the 'credible testimony' and written reports of the very police that we're seeing brutalize protesters, brutalize and shoot at media and nurses during these peaceful protests," he says.

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2020

How Black Lives Matter Protests Are Shifting Racial Justice Dialogues in Professional Sports
The Black Lives Matter protests are dramatically shifting dialogues about racial justice in sports, says former NBA player, author and activist Etan Thomas. He describes how athletes are forcing a reckoning about systemic racism in professional sports, including in NASCAR, which has rallied around the sole Black driver competing in the Cup Series, Bubba Wallace, who led a push to ban Confederate flags from races. "It's amazing what's happening in NASCAR," Thomas says. "They did more in 48 hours than the NFL did for Colin Kaepernick for four or five years."

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2020

Palestinian Scholar Noura Erakat: Israeli Forces Killed My Cousin on His Sister's Wedding Day
Israeli soldiers on Tuesday killed 27-year-old Ahmed Erekat at a checkpoint in the occupied West Bank as he was on his way to pick up his sister, who was set to be married that night. Ahmed Erekat is the nephew of senior Palestinian official Saeb Erekat, secretary general of the Palestine Liberation Organization, and cousin of Palestinian American legal scholar Noura Erakat, who says Israeli claims that Ahmed was attempting a car-ramming attack on soldiers are completely unfounded. "What we understand is that Ahmed lost control of his car or was confused while he was in his car. That was all it took to have a knee-jerk reaction … and immediately to cause the soldiers to open fire on him multiple times," she says.

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2020

The Next AOC? Progressive Insurgent Jamaal Bowman Takes Big Lead Over Rep. Eliot Engel in NY Primary
In what could be one of the biggest progressive upsets of the year, Jamaal Bowman, an African American former middle school principal, appears headed to victory over 16-term Democratic Congressmember Eliot Engel in Tuesday's New York primary election. The race has not been called, but Bowman has a large lead over Engel, the powerful chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee known for his support of Israel. Bowman supports a Green New Deal, Medicare for All and defunding the police. We air his remarks from a campaign party late Tuesday.

Democracy Now
Jun 24, 2020

Headlines for June 24, 2020
Dr. Anthony Fauci Warns of "Disturbing Surge" of U.S. COVID-19 Cases, Trump on Claim He Tried to Slow Coronavirus Testing: "I Don't Kid", Latin America Tops 100,000 Coronavirus Deaths as Brazilian President Ordered to Wear Mask in Public, Kentucky Slashes Polling Places by 95%, Causing Election Day Chaos, Progressive Challenger Jamaal Bowman Poised to Upset 16-Term Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel, 3,000 Pack Indoor Trump Rally in Arizona as COVID-19 Cases Surge to Record High, Student-Led March in Oakland Calls for End to Police in Schools, Louisville Police Department Fires Officer Who Shot Breonna Taylor, Two New York Attorneys Face 45-Year Sentences for Burning Empty Police Car, Ahmed Erekat, Nephew of Top Palestinian Official, Shot by Israeli Forces at Checkpoint and Left to Die, Egyptian Activist Sanaa Seif Abducted Outside Cairo Prosecutor's Office, 7.4 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Southern Mexico, Killing at Least Five People, Johnson & Johnson Ordered to Pay $2.1B for Cancer-Causing Baby Powder, Obama Helps Raise $11M for Joe Biden's Presidential Campaign, Charleston, SC Removes Statue of Former VP & Slave Owner John Calhoun, Mississippi Football Star Refuses to Play Unless Confederate Symbol Is Removed from Flag, Rayshard Brooks Laid to Rest in Atlanta 11 Days After He Was Killed by Police

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2020

Meet Brandon Saenz: Dallas Protester Who Lost Eye After Police Shot Him with "Less Lethal" Projectile
As a new Amnesty International report documents at least 125 instances of police violence against Black Lives Matters protesters in 40 states from May 26 to June 5, we speak with Brandon Saenz, a 26-year-old Black man shot in the face by Dallas police with so-called less-lethal ammunition that shattered his left eye and fractured his face. We also speak with his lawyer, Daryl Washington, about how he has since helped to win a 90-day preliminary injunction against the police use of chemical agents and rubber bullets in Dallas.

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2020

A New Voting Crisis: Kentucky Closes 95% of Polling Places, Leaving Louisville with Just One
As primary voters head to the polls in New York, Kentucky and Virginia, they face long lines, even as President Trump continues to attack mail-in voting, falsely claiming it leads to fraud. Kentucky has reduced the number of polling places from 3,700 to just 170 — a 95% reduction. "There's the potential for record turnout," notes Cliff Albright, co-founder and executive director of Black Voters Matter, despite such suppression tactics.

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2020

Trump Attacks Anti-Fascists But Is Silent on Boogaloo & Far-Right Groups Engaged in Deadly Violence
President Trump claims without evidence that anti-fascists are inciting riots at protests against police brutality, but has downplayed groups like the "boogaloo" movement, which are using the protests as cover to carry out violence, even murder. "We know that in this country the far right holds a monopoly on political violence and that since September 11th, far-right extremists have killed far more people than members of any other ideology," says Cassie Miller, senior research analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center. We also speak with journalist Ali Winston about a new BBC investigation into how the neo-Nazi militant group The Base is grooming and recruiting teenagers online.

Democracy Now
Jun 23, 2020

Headlines for June 23, 2020
COVID-19 on the Rise in 29 States; Immigrant and Communities of Color Carry Brunt of Devastation, Coronavirus Continues to Devastate Latin America; South Korea in Midst of Second Wave, Trump Issues Ban on H-1B Visas and Green Cards Through 2020, KY Slashes Primary Polling Sites as Key Races Pit Progressives and Establishment Dems in KY, NY, VA, Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan Shutting Down CHOP, Says Police Will Return, Bridgeport Council Agrees to Shift Police Funding After Mass Protests, NYPD Says Officers Who Plowed SUVs into Protesters Were Not at Fault, Funeral for Rayshard Brooks Held in Atlanta, NAACP Lawsuit: Arizona Prisons Are Practicing Slavery, U.N. to Probe Torture, Mass Killings in Libya as ICC Investigates Mass Graves, Separatists and Saudi-Backed Gov't in Yemen Reach Ceasefire Deal, Canada Warns Dissident He Is a Potential Target of Saudi Kingdom, Longtime Animal Rights Activist Killed by Truck Transporting Pigs to Slaughterhouse, U.S. Soldier Charged with Plotting Attack on Unit with Satanic Neo-Nazi Group, Selena Reyes-Hernandez Believed to Be 17th Victim of Transgender Murder This Year, Temperatures in Arctic Soar Above 100 Degrees, Shattering Records, NASCAR Drivers Escort Bubba Wallace onto Track in Show of Solidarity After Discovery of Noose, New Yorkers Demand Gov. Cuomo Cancel Rent, Extend Eviction Moratorium Amid Pandemic

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2020

Five Black & Brown Men Have Been Recently Found Hanged in Public. Were Some of Them Lynched?
As mass protests against racism and police brutality continue, at least five men — four Black and one Latinx — have been found hanging in public across the U.S. in recent weeks. We speak with Jacqueline Olive, director of "Always in Season," a documentary that examines the history of lynchings through the story of Lennon Lacy, an African American teenager who was found hanged from a swingset in 2014. "They deserve a full investigation," Olive says of the recent hangings, "and given the context of this history … that we look at them more than three days, and then that they are looked at as a whole."

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2020

"Robert E. Lee Was a Brutal Slave Master": Activist's Call to Rename Louisiana School Goes Viral
We play a video that has now gone viral from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where community activist Gary Chambers Jr. calls out members of the Lee High School school board for their racism during a June 18 meeting to discuss a resolution to rename the school, which is named after Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Chambers urged members to choose a name in honor of people who fought slavery and racism, not someone who defended it, and addressed board member Connie Bernard, who had defended Robert E. Lee and was seen shopping on her computer during the meeting.

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2020

Trump's Reelection Playbook: Racist Tropes & Downplaying COVID Pandemic by Slowing Down Testing
As the U.S. death toll from COVID-19 nears 120,000 and mass protests against police brutality and racism continue, President Trump faces condemnation for his remarks at his poorly attended campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, when he repeated racist terms like "kung flu" and lashed out at protesters. "You just see this tremendous impulse to divide," says Emily Bazelon, staff writer at The New York Times Magazine. "This is what has worked for Trump in the past. He is not going to change now."

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2020

Trump Fires Top U.S. Prosecutor as William Barr Moves to Expand "Imperial Presidency"
After a dramatic weekend showdown, the Trump administration has ousted Geoffrey Berman, the U.S. attorney in Manhattan who led multiple prosecutions and investigations into allies of the president. We look at the extraordinary measures U.S. Attorney General William Barr took to protect Trump, with New York Times Magazine writer Emily Bazelon, who has profiled Barr. "He believes in a very strong executive presidency, a kind of imperial presidency in which a huge amount of power resides in the president," she says of the attorney general.

Democracy Now
Jun 22, 2020

Headlines for June 22, 2020
AG Barr Under Fire as Dems Launch Investigation into Firing of U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman, Coronavirus Cases Surging in U.S. and Around the World, Antiracism Uprising Continues as Demonstrators Celebrate Juneteenth, Dept. of Homeland Security Spied on Protesters in 15 U.S. Cities, More Confederate and Racist Statues Fall Across the Country, Protesters Call for Justice After Fatal Shooting of 18-Year-Old Andres Guardado in Gardena, CA, Louisville Police Chief Moves to Fire Officer Who Shot and Killed Breonna Taylor, 19-Year-Old Killed in Shooting in Seattle's Autonomous "Capitol Hill Occupied Protest" Zone, Noose Found in Stall of African American NASCAR Driver Bubba Wallace, Trump's Tulsa Rally Turnout Just Over 6,000 After Campaign Predicted Massive Crowds Amid Pandemic, White Security Guard Charged with Manslaughter for Shooting Black Guest at Tulsa Motel, NYPD Suspends Officer Who Used Banned Chokehold, Kentucky Slashes 95% of Polling Places Ahead of Primary Election, Louisiana Activist Blasts School Board Member Who Defended Confederate General Robert E. Lee , Tennessee Lawmakers Approve Near-Total Ban on Abortions, Judge Refuses to Block Publication of John Bolton's Book on Trump Presidency, On World Refugee Day, Nearly 80 Million Remain Forcibly Displaced

Democracy Now
Jun 19, 2020

99 Years Later, Wounds of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Have "Never Been Remedied"
President Trump's first campaign rally since the start of the pandemic takes place Saturday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, despite a spike of COVID-19 cases there. Trump rescheduled the rally to Saturday after facing backlash for saying it would happen on Juneteenth — a celebration of African Americans' liberation from slavery — amid a nationwide uprising against racism and police brutality. Tulsa is also the site of one of the deadliest massacres in U.S. history, when a white mob in 1921 killed as many as 300 people in a thriving African American business district known as "Black Wall Street." For more on this history and the pervasive racism that remains, we speak with civil rights lawyer Damario Solomon-Simmons, who represents the last known survivor of the Greenwood massacre living in Tulsa. He's also the attorney for the family of Terence Crutcher, a Black man who was shot and killed by a white police officer in Tulsa in 2016. Terence Crutcher's sister, Dr. Tiffany Crutcher, also joins us from Tulsa.

Democracy Now
Jun 19, 2020

Juneteenth: A Celebration of Black Liberation & Day to Remember "Horrific System That Was Slavery"
June 19 is Juneteenth, celebrating the day in 1865 when the last enslaved Black people in the United States learned they had been freed from bondage. As momentum grows to enshrine it as a national holiday, we speak with author and historian Gerald Horne, who says that while the story of Juneteenth is "much more complicated and much more complex than is traditionally presented," increased recognition of the day "provides an opportunity to have a thorough remembrance of this horrific system that was slavery."

Democracy Now
Jun 19, 2020

How DREAMers Defeated Trump: Supreme Court DACA Win Shows "Sustained Pressure of Activism" Works
In a 5-4 decision led by Chief Justice John Roberts, the Supreme Court on Thursday blocked President Trump's attempt to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The federal program created by President Obama in 2012 protects from deportation about 700,000 immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children. Luis Cortes, one of the lawyers who defended DACA at the Supreme Court, says the key to the victory was being able to share the stories of DACA recipients. "What moved Chief Justice Roberts in our case was the stories," says Cortes, who is a DACA recipient himself. We also speak with Erika Andiola, advocacy chief at RAICES, the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, and host of the podcast "Homeland Insecurity."

Democracy Now
Jun 19, 2020

Headlines for June 19, 2020
Supreme Court Blocks Trump from Ending DACA in Victory for Immigrants, Global COVID Death Toll Tops 450,000 as Cases Keep Growing in 77 Nations, Navajo Nation Reinstates Lockdown Due to New COVID Surge, "Trump Death Clock" Heads to Tulsa for Trump Speech, Juneteenth: Longshore Union Shuts Down West Coast Ports; Trump Claims He Made Holiday "Very Famous", Atlanta Officers Involved in Killing of Rayshard Brooks Turn Themselves In, Probe Launched over Use of Military Surveillance Planes to Monitor Protesters, High-Ranking Black State Dept. Official Resigns to Protest Trump's Actions, Klobuchar Removes Herself from VP Consideration, Urging Biden to Pick Woman of Color, Another 1.5 Million File for Unemployment as Billionaires Make $600B During Pandemic, Faced with Ad Boycott, Facebook Takes Down Trump Ad with Nazi Symbol, Close Adviser to Bolsonaro's Son Arrested in Brazilian Corruption Probe, Vatican Urges Divestment from Fossil Fuel & Arms Industries, Study: Climate Crisis Tied to Increased Pregnancy Risks, AOC vs. Wall Street: CEOs of Goldman Sachs & Blackstone Back Ex-GOPer in Dem Primary, Egyptian LGBT Activist & Former Political Prisoner Sarah Hegazy, 30, Dies, Amazon Indigenous Chief Paulinho Paiakan, 66, Dies from COVID-19

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2020

"Movements Work": As Activists Occupy Seattle's Capitol Hill, City Bans Tear Gas, Expels Police Union
In Seattle, the fight to demilitarize and defund the police continues as the King County Labor Council voted to expel the Seattle police union Wednesday, following weeks of protest. Seattle police sparked outrage for responding to massive protests against police brutality by using pepper spray, tear gas and flashbangs on demonstrators and reporters. Activists then formed an autonomous zone in response to the police department's abandonment of a precinct building. On Wednesday, President Trump threatened to send troops into Seattle to dismantle the community-run Capitol Hill Occupied Protest, which extends over several city blocks. Seattle socialist Councilmember Kshama Sawant calls the threat of military intervention "absolutely horrific" and says it "shows that Donald Trump is a coward and movements work."

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2020

"Tear Gas Is a Weapon": Amnesty Report Reveals Police Use of Tear Gas Fuels Rights Abuses Worldwide
As police officers in nearly 100 U.S. cities and towns have fired tear gas on protesters in recent weeks and left many with severe injuries, a new Amnesty International report finds the use of tear gas continues to grow each year, and fuels police human rights violations against peaceful protesters on a global scale. "Everywhere we look, police are just very quick to use tear gas, which is not a safe product and can cause real injuries," says Brian Castner, senior crisis adviser on arms and military operations for Amnesty International.

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2020

Rashad Robinson on Recent Spike in Hanging Deaths, the Cancelation of "Cops" & Boycotting Facebook
For more than a decade, the racial justice organization Color of Change led a push to cancel the long-running TV show "Cops," which glorifies police aggression. Now the show has been cancelled, along with A&E's "Live PD." "The thing about these shows is that they call themselves reality programming, but they are only from the vision of the police officers," says Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change. "These shows have served as a PR arm for law enforcement." He is now calling on Netflix to cancel "Border Security: America's Front Line."

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2020

Rashad Robinson on Recent Spike in Hanging Deaths, the Cancellation of "Cops" & Boycotting Facebook
For more than a decade, the racial justice organization Color of Change led a push to cancel the long-running TV show "Cops," which glorifies police aggression. Now the show has been cancelled, along with A&E's "Live PD." "The thing about these shows is that they call themselves reality programming, but they are only from the vision of the police officers," says Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change. "These shows have served as a PR arm for law enforcement." He is now calling on Netflix to cancel "Border Security: America's Front Line."

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2020

Murder Charge for Atlanta Cop Who Shot & Killed Rayshard Brooks Shows the "Power of a Movement"
Prosecutors have charged the Atlanta police officer who shot and killed Rayshard Brooks with felony murder, and accuse Garrett Rolfe of twice shooting Brooks in the back and then kicking him as he lay dying. A second officer, Devin Brosnan, faces four charges, including assault. We talk to Rashad Robinson of Color of Change about the charges in Atlanta and growing calls to defund the police. "For the last 20 years in this country, violent crime has basically steadily went down," Robinson says. "At the same time, police budgets have continued to rise, continued to expand. We've militarized police."

Democracy Now
Jun 18, 2020

Headlines for June 18, 2020
Former Atlanta Police Officer Who Shot Rayshard Brooks Charged with Murder, Rayshard Brooks Described Struggles with Criminal Justice System in Video Recorded Before His Killing, Trump Calls Protesters "Anarchists, Terrorists and Looters" as Vigilantes Attack Peaceful Marches, George Floyd's Brother Calls on United Nations to Probe U.S. Racism and Police Brutality, Coronavirus Infection Rate Hits Record in States That Eased Social Distancing, Florida COVID-19 Cases Surge as Gov. DeSantis Promises to Keep Restaurants Open, Tulsa Mayor "Not Positive That Everything Is Safe" as 19,000 Plan to Attend Trump Rally, Brazil on Pace to Surpass U.S. Coronavirus Death Toll in July, Researchers Warn, Lima Medical Workers Beaten by Police at Protest Demanding PPE, John Bolton Says Trump Asked China for Help with 2020 Reelection Campaign, Trump Signs Bill Condemning Uyghur Internment Camps That John Bolton Claims He Once Supported, Lawmakers Press for Answers over Secretive $500 Billion Coronavirus Bailout, Fear Grows of Modern-Day Lynchings as Six People of Color Are Found Hanged, Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben's and Mrs. Butterworth's Brands Scrapped over Racist Imagery, Human Rights Experts Condemn Israel's Plans to Annex Parts of West Bank, Oxford University to Remove Statue of 19th Century Imperialist Cecil Rhodes, Delbert Africa, Whose Beating by Philadelphia Police Sparked Outrage, Dies at 74

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2020

Meet Jamaal Bowman, the Bronx Principal Challenging One of the Most Powerful Dems in Congress
In the Bronx, the second most economically unequal district in New York state, the insurgent primary campaign of former middle school principal Jamaal Bowman threatens to unseat 16-term Democratic congressmember and House Foreign Affairs Committee Chair Eliot Engel. Bowman supports defunding the police, Medicare for All and a Green New Deal. He has also gotten high-profile endorsements from Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and The New York Times editorial board. "I've worked in this district for the last 10 years as a middle school principal," Bowman says. "Over that 10 years, I've developed thousands of amazing relationships with the children and the families of this community, and I've learned intimately the impact of poverty and bad policy on their lives each and every day."

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2020

No Oversight of $1.5 Billion Electric Project Raises Alarm over Privatization of Puerto Rico's Power
As hurricane season begins, we look at moves to privatize Puerto Rico's electric grid and a new investigation that reveals the island's government failed to follow proper oversight or examine the environmental impact when it issued a $1.5 billion contract to a company for the first large power generation project since Hurricane Maria, that will continue its reliance on fossil fuels. Former Puerto Rico Chief of Staff Ingrid Vila Biaggi co-authored the report and calls it "an ill-conceived project full of fiscally irresponsible practices."

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2020

"Disruptor on Road to Reconciliation": Trump Doubles Down on Rally in Tulsa, Site of 1921 Massacre
President Donald Trump says he will push ahead with a massive campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Saturday, even as COVID cases are surging there as the state reopens. Trump delayed the rally by one day after it was originally scheduled for June 19, Juneteenth, a celebration marking the emancipation of enslaved people. Tulsa is also the site of one of the deadliest massacres in U.S. history, when a white mob in 1921 killed as many as 300 people in a thriving African American business district. "The rally is troubling to a lot of people because of both the venue, Tulsa, and because of the timing," says Hannibal B. Johnson, attorney and author of "Black Wall Street: From Riot to Renaissance in Tulsa's Historic Greenwood District."

Democracy Now
Jun 17, 2020

Headlines for June 17, 2020
U.S. Coronavirus Deaths Surpass World War I Toll; Nine States Report New Highs for COVID Cases, Trump to Hold Rally in Tulsa as COVID Cases Reach New High in Oklahoma, Prison COVID Cases Double in U.S.; Nursing Home Deaths Top 50,000, U.S. Exports Record Amount of Pork as Meatpackers Risk Lives to Keep Factories Running, WHO Hails New Study Showing Widely Used Steroid Could Reduce COVID-19 Deaths, Daily Coronavirus Deaths Reach New Highs in India & Pakistan; Beijing Locks Down Again, Honduran President Tests Positive for Coronavirus, U.S. Extends Border Closures with Mexico & Canada, Study: 450,000 Coronavirus Cases Could Have Been Avoided If States Mandated Face Masks, Trump's Executive Order on Policing Decried as "Toothless" and "Anemic", Justice for Jayson: Protest Encampment Outside Bridgeport, Conn., Police HQ Enters 5th Day, Richmond Police Chief Ousted Days After Forces Tear-Gassed Protesters, Buffalo Peace Activist Martin Gugino Suffered Brain Injury & Fractured Skull After Police Assault, Air Force Sergeant Tied to Far-Right Boogaloo Movement Arrested for Killing Two Officers, Police Probe Hanging Death of Black Trans Woman TeTe Gulley in Portland, Oregon, Study: Nearly 2,000 Lynchings Occurred in U.S. Between 1865 and 1877, Chinese & Indian Troops Involved in Deadly Fight in the Himalayas, Tensions Escalate on the Korean Peninsula, Syria Braces for Sweeping New U.S. Sanctions, Utility Firm PG&E Confesses to Killing 84 People for Starting Devastating 2018 California Fire, After Hunger Strikes, Prisoners at Otay Mesa Detention Center Blocked from Communicating with Support Group, Families of the Disappeared in Mexico Camp Outside AMLO's Home Demanding Probes, Justice Department Sues John Bolton over Forthcoming Book

Democracy Now
Jun 16, 2020

Goodbye, Columbus: Bree Newsome Bass on the Movement to Topple Racist Statues Across the Globe
As protesters worldwide continue to topple monuments to racists, colonizers and Confederates as part of the wave of demonstrations against racism and state violence, we speak to Bree Newsome Bass, artist and antiracist activist based in North Carolina, who five years ago was arrested at the state Capitol in South Carolina after scaling a 30-foot flagpole to remove the Confederate flag. She says the current backlash against racist symbols reflects "impatience with the pace of incremental progress" both in the United States and elsewhere. "People are tired of centuries of colonialism and white supremacist ideology."

Democracy Now
Jun 16, 2020

Black Trans Lives Matter: Movement Pushes for Justice & Visibility Amid "Epidemic" of Violence
At least 15,000 people marched through Brooklyn Sunday to protest violence against Black transgender people, particularly women, who face disproportionate levels of violence at the hands of police and on the streets. The protest came as two more Black trans women were killed last week, in Ohio and Pennsylvania. They are believed to be at least the 13th and 14th violent deaths of transgender people in the United States this year. We speak with journalist Imara Jones, creator of TransLash, who says the trans rights movement currently has "tremendous visibility" but also faces a "tremendous backlash."

Democracy Now
Jun 16, 2020

Supreme Court Bars Workplace Discrimination Against LGBTQ People; Ruling May Be Transformative
In a historic 6-3 ruling, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, forbidding workplace discrimination on the basis of sex, applies to gay and transgender people. The decision comes just days after the Trump administration reversed health protections for transgender people under the Affordable Care Act. "This truly is a historic ruling," says Chase Strangio, deputy director for transgender justice with the ACLU's LGBT & HIV Project. "This is going to have a transformative effect on federal civil rights laws in the context of housing, education and healthcare, as well as credit." We also speak with journalist Imara Jones, creator of TransLash.

Democracy Now
Jun 16, 2020

Headlines for June 16, 2020
In Long-Awaited Victory, SCOTUS Rules LGBTQ Workers Protected by the Civil Rights Act, Atlanta Mayor Orders New Police Rules After Killing of Rayshard Brooks, 911 Dispatcher Raised Concerns About Police Treatment of George Floyd During His Arrest and Killing, Protester Shot in Albuquerque While Toppling Racist Statue; Right-Wing Militia Members Arrested, 19-Year-Old BLM Protester Oluwatoyin "Toyin" Salau Found Dead One Week After Disappearance, Mourners Demand Justice for Killing of Black Teenager Na'Kia Crawford in Ohio, FBI, DOJ to Review Probes into Two Black California Men Found Hanging from Trees, U.N. Human Rights Body to Hold Urgent Debate on Racism and Police Brutality in the U.S., Cities and States Adopt New Police Rules Amid Mass Uprising, SCOTUS Hands Down Decisions on CA Sanctuary Law, Second Amendment Cases, Atlantic Coast Pipeline, Trump Defends Hydroxychloroquine for COVID, Blames Testing for Surge in Cases, Latin American Countries Grapple with Surging Coronavirus Cases, Federal Gov't Schedules Four Executions, Breaking Nearly 2-Decade Moratorium, Trump Admin Reinterprets Cold War Arms Treaty to Allow Saudi Arabia, UAE to Buy U.S. War Drones, Russian Court Sentences U.S. Citizen Paul Whelan to 16 Years for Espionage, South Korea Reports North Korea Blew Up Liaison Office as Tensions in Region Mount, Hundreds of Nigerian Refugees in Netherlands Missing, Likely Victims of Trafficking, European Human Rights Court Grants Victory to Palestinian Rights Activists, Says BDS Is Free Speech

Democracy Now
Jun 15, 2020

"He Wanted to Hurt Me": New York Protester Hospitalized After NY Officer Shoved Her to the Ground
In a rare development, a New York police officer has been charged with assault, criminal mischief, harassment and menacing, after a viral video showed him violently shoving a peaceful protester to the ground as he shouted an expletive and a misogynistic slur. We speak with Dounya Zayer about the attack she faced during a protest against police brutality in Brooklyn on May 29 and how she suffered a seizure and was hospitalized with a concussion. We're also joined by one of her attorneys, Tahanie Aboushi.

Democracy Now
Jun 15, 2020

Police Anti-Bias Trainer Shot in Groin by San Jose Cops at Protest: "It's Clear This Isn't Working"
As protests against racism and police violence continue across the United States, we speak with Derrick Sanderlin, a San Jose community organizer who has spent years training police on avoiding implicit bias toward people of color, but an officer from the same police department shot him in the groin with a rubber bullet during a May 29 protest against racism and police violence, rupturing Sanderlin's testicle and possibly affecting his ability to have children.

Democracy Now
Jun 15, 2020

The Killing of Rayshard Brooks: Atlanta Police Shoot Dead Unarmed Man Who Fell Asleep in His Own Car
Protests have erupted in Atlanta, where the police killing of unarmed African American man Rayshard Brooks in a Wendy's parking lot has outraged residents. The autopsy revealed that Brooks was shot in the back as he was running away, and the death has been ruled a homicide by the county medical examiner. Brooks's killing comes as protests against racism and police violence continue across the country. The Atlanta police chief has already resigned, and the officer who shot Brooks has been fired. "What we saw happen to Mr. Brooks is unfortunately something that we continue to see repeated in our communities all across this country," says Mary Hooks, co-director of Southerners on New Ground, which is part of the National Bail Out collective and the Movement for Black Lives. "What we continue to see is police being called in as first responders to things that they should not be showing up for."

Democracy Now
Jun 15, 2020

Headlines for June 15, 2020
Protests Intensify in Atlanta over Police Killing of Rayshard Brooks, Calls Mount to Investigate as 2 Black Men Found Hanging from Trees in California, 10 Days Apart, 2 More Black Transgender Women Are Killed; Trump Slashes Health Protections for Trans People, Black Lives Matter Protests Gain Steam Across the U.S. and Around the World, SFPD Will Stop Responding to Noncriminal Complaints as Wave of New Policies Takes Shape Across U.S., Seattle City Council Considers Bills Banning Chokeholds and Tear Gas, 21 States See Increase in Daily Coronavirus Cases as Researchers Warn of a Second Wave, Brazil Now Has 2nd-Highest COVID-19 Death Toll; WHO Warns Cases Accelerating in Africa, New Video Shows Police Kicking Handcuffed Black Teen in Tulsa After Arrest for Jaywalking, Tulsa Police Major: We're Shooing African Americans 24% Less Than We Ought to Be, Trump Reschedules Tulsa Rally After Juneteenth Criticism, RNC Moved to Jacksonville, Trump to Accept Nomination on Anniversary of KKK Attack , Filipina Journalist Maria Ressa Convicted in Major Blow to Press Freedom

Democracy Now
Jun 12, 2020

Angela Davis: Dems & GOP Tied to Corporate Capitalism, But We Must Vote So Trump Is "Forever Ousted"
"Neither party represents the future — both parties remain connected to corporate capitalism," Angela Davis says of the 2020 election. "We're going to have to translate some of the passion that has characterized these demonstrations into work within the electoral arena, recognizing that the electoral arena is not the best place for the expression of radical politics."

Democracy Now
Jun 12, 2020

Angela Davis Slams Trump Rally in Tulsa, Massacre Site, on Juneteenth Celebration of End of Slavery
President Trump will resume holding indoor campaign events starting with a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on June 19, a day known as Juneteenth, that celebrates African Americans' liberation from slavery. The rally also falls on the 99th anniversary of the Tulsa race riots, one of the worst acts of racial violence in U.S. history, in which white residents killed hundreds of their African American neighbors. Legendary scholar Angela Davis says it's important to recognize that Trump "represents a sector of a population in this country that wants to return to the past … with all of its white supremacy, with all of its misogyny." Given the historic uprising against racism and state violence, "We cannot be held back by such forces as those represented by the current occupant of the White House," she says.

Democracy Now
Jun 12, 2020

Angela Davis: Toppling of Confederate Statues Reflects Reckoning with Slavery & Historical Racism
The destruction and removal of racist monuments in cities across the United States during recent weeks is part of an overdue reckoning with "historical racisms that have brought us to the point where we are today," Angela Davis says. "Racism should have been immediately confronted in the aftermath of the end of slavery."

Democracy Now
Jun 12, 2020

Uprising & Abolition: Angela Davis on Movement Building, "Defund the Police" & Where We Go from Here
The uprising against police brutality and anti-Black racism continues to sweep across the United States and countries around the world, forcing a reckoning in the halls of power and on the streets. The mass protests following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25 have dramatically shifted public opinion on policing and systemic racism, as "defund the police" becomes a rallying cry of the movement. We discuss the historic moment with legendary scholar and activist Angela Davis. "One never knows when conditions may give rise to a conjuncture such as the current one that rapidly shifts popular consciousness and suddenly allows us to move in the direction of radical change," she says. "The intensity of these current demonstrations cannot be sustained over time, but we will have to be ready to shift gears and address these issues in different arenas."

Democracy Now
Jun 12, 2020

Headlines for June 12, 2020
India Coronavirus Cases Surge Amid Global Rise in COVID-19, Graves on Copacabana Beach Mark 40,000 COVID-19 Deaths in Brazil, Guatemala City Hospitals Near Collapse Amid Surge in Coronavirus Patients, Oregon Pauses Lifting of Coronavirus Lockdown as Cases Hit New High, Another 1.5 Million U.S. Workers Filed Unemployment Claims Last Week, One Minneapolis Officer Charged in George Floyd's Killing Released on Bond, Minneapolis Police Chief Suspends Union Talks Following George Floyd's Killing, Austin City Council Votes to Reinvest Police Funds, Restrict Police Use of Force, Texas Grand Jury to Hear Case of Austin Officers Who Shot and Killed Michael Ramos, National Guard Bullet Killed David McAtee, Beloved Louisville Restaurateur, Louisville Adopts Ban on No-Knock Warrants, Named for Police Victim Breonna Taylor, Bronx Teen Jahmel Leach, Shot in Face by Police Taser, Describes NYPD Brutality, "I Can't Breathe": Bodycam Video Shows Derrick Scott's Killing by Oklahoma City Police, 13-Year-Old Handcuffed and Arrested for "Jaywalking" in Empty Tulsa Street, Trump Campaign Rallygoers Must Sign COVID-19 Liability Waiver, Joe Biden Calls for Increased Law Enforcement Funds Amid Calls to Defund the Police, Joint Chiefs Chair Sorry for Trump Photo Op After Brutal Crackdown on Peaceful Protest, Chicago Cops Caught on Camera Breaking Into Rep. Bobby Rush's Office to Make Popcorn & Nap, CBP Used Funds for Asylum Seekers' Food & Medicine to Buy Dirt Bikes & Riot Helmets, Massive Protests Erupt in Lebanon as Country's Currency Collapses, Trump Sanctions ICC Staff as Investigators Probe U.S. War Crimes in Afghanistan, "I Support It": NY Gov. Cuomo Rejects Calls to Tear Down Columbus Monument, Birmingham Comedian Charged with "Inciting a Riot" After Condemning Confederate Symbols

Democracy Now
Jun 11, 2020

Seattle Protesters Declare Autonomous Zone Around Police Precinct After Heated Standoff with Police
In Seattle, protesters have barricaded a six-block autonomous zone, after protests were met with a violent police response. Amid a days-long standoff, police removed barricades and abandoned their East Precinct building, and protesters moved into the area, declaring it "Free Capitol Hill." We go to Seattle to speak with Omari Salisbury, a citizen journalist who has been live-streaming the uprising and police crackdown.

Democracy Now
Jun 11, 2020

Historian Robin D.G. Kelley: Years of Racial Justice Organizing Laid Groundwork for Today's Uprising
As protests against police brutality and racism continue across the country, we speak with historian and UCLA professor of African American studies Robin D.G. Kelley. "We're not here by accident," Kelley says, crediting racial justice organizers for laying the groundwork for this moment over the last decade. "The real question now is whether or not this can be sustained."

Democracy Now
Jun 11, 2020

"He Didn't Deserve to Die Over $20": George Floyd's Brother Urges Congress to Stop Police Killings
A day after George Floyd's family laid him to rest in his hometown of Houston, his brother Philonise Floyd addressed lawmakers on Capitol Hill to demand an end to police violence. "I'm tired. I'm tired of pain," he told the House Judiciary Committee. "People of all backgrounds, genders and races have come together to demand change. Honor them. Honor George."

Democracy Now
Jun 11, 2020

U.S. Passes 2 Million Coronavirus Cases as States Lift Restrictions, Raising Fears of a Second Wave
The number of confirmed U.S. coronavirus cases has officially topped 2 million as states continue to ease stay-at-home orders and reopen their economies and more than a dozen see a surge in new infections. "I worry that what we've seen so far is an undercount and what we're seeing now is really just the beginning of another wave of infections spreading across the country," says Dr. Craig Spencer, director of global health in emergency medicine at Columbia University Medical Center.

Democracy Now
Jun 11, 2020

Headlines for June 11, 2020
As U.S. Confirms 2 Million Coronavirus Cases, Hospitalizations Surge in Many States, White House Coronavirus Task Force Goes Quiet as Mike Pence Flouts Social Distancing, British Research Backs Universal Adoption of Face Masks to Slow COVID-19, Coronavirus Pandemic Worsens as Global Infections Reach New Records, George Floyd's Brother Asks Congress to Ensure "His Death Is Not in Vain", Louisville, KY Police Filed Nearly Blank Report After Killing Breonna Taylor, Black Lives Matter Protests Held for 16th Consecutive Day, Statues of Columbus and Confederates Toppled in Cities Across U.S., Trump Will "Not Even Consider" Renaming U.S. Bases That Honor Confederates, Trump to Resume Campaign Rallies on Juneteenth in Tulsa, Site of 1921 Mass Lynching, White Nationalist White House Adviser Stephen Miller Drafting Trump Speech on Race, ACLU Sues Trump Administration over U.S.-Mexico Border Shutdown, "Gone with the Wind" Pulled by HBO Max Pending New Introduction About Racist Content, Oakland Protesters Demand Justice for Erik Salgado, Shot Dead by Highway Patrol, Amazon Halts Police Use of Facial Recognition Software for One Year, NASCAR to Ban Confederate Flags Following Protest by African American Driver

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2020

Buffalo Police Assaulted a 75-Year-Old Longtime Peace Activist, Now Trump Is Attacking Him Too
We look at the story of peace activist Martin Gugino, who was hospitalized in critical condition after being pushed to the ground by a police officer in Buffalo last week — an attack captured on video that has been viewed millions of times. On Tuesday, President Trump attacked the 75-year-old activist on Twitter, suggesting he staged his fall and was "an ANTIFA provocateur," echoing baseless claims from a segment on the far-right channel One America News Network. We speak with Lu Aya, a member of the New York-based group The Peace Poets, who organized with Martin in the group Witness Against Torture. "Martin, first and foremost, is just one of the kindest, most good-hearted people I've been lucky to walk with," Aya says. "Martin is someone who deserves, like all our elders, much more respect and care."

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2020

"Out of Options in Terms of Reform": Khalil Gibran Muhammad on the Racist History of Police in U.S.
Protests in defense of Black lives and calls to defund the police continue across the U.S., from Los Angeles to Minneapolis and New York. We speak with Khalil Gibran Muhammad, a professor of history, race and public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, about the significance of this moment and the history of policing in the U.S. "We haven't seen a moment like this in at least half a century," Muhammad says. "It's hard to know for sure where we're going to go from this moment, but it's clear that when we look at the history of policing, we have run out of options in terms of reform, in terms of thinking about what the police can do for themselves."

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2020

"Justice Will Be Served": Family Pays Tribute to George Floyd and Demands Change at Houston Funeral
A private funeral was held in Houston Tuesday for George Floyd, two weeks after a Minneapolis police officer killed him by kneeling on his neck for nearly nine minutes. Floyd's death has sparked protests against police brutality and racism across the United States and around the world. We play excerpts from the funeral service and hear from Floyd's family and dignitaries.

Democracy Now
Jun 10, 2020

Headlines for June 10, 2020
George Floyd Laid to Rest, Two Weeks After Killing by Police Sparked Global Uprising, Coronavirus Cases Surge in States That Eased Lockdowns Two Weeks Ago, Georgia Election "Catastrophe" Disproportionately Affects Voters of Color, Protesters Topple Monuments to Slave Traders, Racists and Mass Murderers, Seattle Protesters Take Over City Hall as Calls Grow to Defund Police, New York State Will No Longer Hide Disciplinary Records of Police Officers, Phoenix Protests Demand Justice for Dion Johnson, Black Man Fatally Shot by State Trooper, Minneapolis Police Admit to Slashing Tires of Parked Vehicles During Recent George Floyd Protests, Activists Demand Arrest of Austin, TX Officers Who Left 2 Young Protesters with Head Trauma, San Jose Police Anti-Bias Trainer Shot in Groin by San Jose Police, Los Angeles Officer Faces Felony Assault Charges for Beating Unhoused Man, NYPD Officer Charged over Assault That Left Peaceful Protester Hospitalized, Trump Falsely Claims Peace Activist Assaulted by Buffalo Police Is "ANTIFA Provocateur", Moscow Eases Coronavirus Restrictions as Cases Continue to Surge, Brazilian Supreme Court Orders Government to Release Updated Coronavirus Data, WHO Retracts Claim That Asymptomatic People with Coronavirus Are Rarely Contagious, Burundi President Dies of Heart Attack Amid Speculation He Had COVID-19, Trump to Open Atlantic Maritime Monument to Commercial Fishing, Record Heat Wave Grips Russia's Arctic Circle, Paramount Network Cancels "Cops" After 33 Seasons

Democracy Now
Jun 09, 2020

Amid Protests & Pandemic, 200 Unhoused People Sheltering in Minneapolis Hotel Now Face Eviction
We go to Minneapolis, where the community has taken over a Sheraton hotel to provide shelter to more than 200 unhoused people amid protests and the pandemic. Now they face eviction. "Using hotels for emergency housing is an obvious answer," says Rosemary Fister, community organizer. "They are largely vacant as we enter an economic depression in the midst of a global pandemic."

Democracy Now
Jun 09, 2020

"Essential Labor, Expendable Lives": Mass Transit Workers Worry About Safety as NYC Begins to Reopen
As New York City begins to partially reopen, we look at what it means for the nation's largest public transportation system. "It's a very stressful and dangerous situation," says Seth Rosenberg, a subway operator, shop steward with the Transport Workers Union Local 100 and a member of a small coalition of transit workers called Local 100 Fightback. "The safety measures are not in place to protect transit workers or riders."

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