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Democracy Now
Dec 06, 2022

Warnock vs. Walker, Round 2: Georgia Breaks Voting Records in Senate Runoff Election
Voters in Georgia cast their ballots Tuesday in the closely watched runoff election between Senator Raphael Warnock and Republican challenger Herschel Walker. A victory for Warnock would give Democrats a 51st seat in the Senate. The election has seen a record number of early votes, especially in communities of color, but Black Voters Matter co-founder and executive director Cliff Albright says that is "partially a function of the voter suppression" in the state. A new voting law passed by Georgia last year, known as SB 202, reduced the early voting period from three weeks to one and introduced a range of other restrictions.

Democracy Now
Dec 06, 2022

Publishing Is Not a Crime: NYT, The Guardian & More Urge Biden Admin to Drop Charges Against Assange
The New York Times and four major European newspapers — The Guardian in Britain, Le Monde in France, Der Spiegel in Germany and El País in Spain — recently urged the Biden administration to drop all charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. In a joint letter, the newspapers said, "This indictment sets a dangerous precedent, and threatens to undermine America's First Amendment and the freedom of the press." The letter ends with the words "Publishing is not a crime." Assange, who is jailed in Britain, faces up to 175 years in a U.S. prison on espionage and hacking charges for exposing U.S. war crimes in Afghanistan and Iraq. The five publications had partnered with WikiLeaks in 2010 to report on documents leaked by Chelsea Manning. "The prosecution of Assange … would set a clear and devastating precedent in the United States that could be applied to any of these organizations, journalists, going forward," says Carrie DeCell, senior staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University.

Democracy Now
Dec 06, 2022

Pegasus Spyware Maker NSO Group Sued in U.S. Court by Central American Journalists
A group of journalists working for the award-winning Central American independent news outlet El Faro have filed a lawsuit in U.S. court against NSO Group, the Israeli company that operates the Pegasus spyware used to monitor and track journalists, human rights activists and dissidents across the globe. The journalists of El Faro, which is based in El Salvador, allege that Pegasus software was used to infiltrate their iPhones and track their communications and movements. "We're of course of the belief that it was the government of El Salvador who engaged in these attacks. This is weapons-grade software that is sold exclusively to governments," says Roman Gressier, a French American staff reporter with El Faro English and one of 15 plaintiffs in the lawsuit. We also speak with Carrie DeCell, senior staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University and the lead lawyer in the lawsuit, who says part of the goal is to force the courts to confirm who NSO Group's client was. "That would send a signal to other government clients around the world that they can no longer rely on NSO Group's assurances of secrecy when they … intimidate and persecute journalists, civil rights activists, human rights activists around the world," says DeCell.

Democracy Now
Dec 06, 2022

Pegasus Spyware Maker NSO Group Sued in U.S. Court by El Faro Journalists
A group of journalists working for the award-winning Central American independent news outlet El Faro have filed a lawsuit in U.S. court against NSO Group, the Israeli company that operates the Pegasus spyware used to monitor and track journalists, human rights activists and dissidents across the globe. The journalists of El Faro, which is based in El Salvador, allege that Pegasus software was used to infiltrate their iPhones and track their communications and movements. "We're of course of the belief that it was the government of El Salvador who engaged in these attacks. This is weapons-grade software that is sold exclusively to governments," says Roman Gressier, a French American staff reporter with El Faro English and one of 15 plaintiffs in the lawsuit. We also speak with Carrie DeCell, senior staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University and the lead lawyer in the lawsuit, who says part of the goal is to force the courts to confirm who NSO Group's client was. "That would send a signal to other government clients around the world that they can no longer rely on NSO Group's assurances of secrecy when they … intimidate and persecute journalists, civil rights activists, human rights activists around the world," says DeCell.

Democracy Now
Dec 06, 2022

Jeffrey Sachs: A Negotiated End to Fighting in Ukraine Is the Only Real Way to End the Bloodshed
With the war in Ukraine now in its 10th month, Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Joe Biden have both expressed openness to peace talks to end the fighting, as have leaders in France, Germany and elsewhere. This comes as millions of Ukrainians brace for a winter without heat or electricity due to Russian strikes on Ukrainian civilian infrastructure. "This war needs to end because it's a disaster for everybody, a threat to the whole world," says economist and foreign policy scholar Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Center for Sustainable Development at Columbia University. He says four major issues need to be addressed to end the war: Ukraine's sovereignty and security, NATO enlargement, the fate of Crimea and the future of the Donbas region.

Democracy Now
Dec 06, 2022

Headlines for December 6, 2022
Russian Missiles Fall Across Ukraine After Drones Strike Air Bases Deep Inside Russia, Vladimir Putin Signs Bill Expanding Russia's Anti-LGBTQ Laws, Supreme Court Hears Case Pitting Religious Freedom Against LGBTQ Protections, Biden Administration Expands Temporary Protected Status for Haitian Refugees, U.S. Senators Reportedly Nearing Deal on Immigration Bill, CDC Encourages People Wear Masks Amid Surge of Flu, RSV and COVID-19, Ethiopian Troops Accused of Massacring Tigrayan Prisoners of War, Congolese Protesters Demand Peace as M23 Rebels Are Accused of Massacring 272 Civilians, Al Jazeera Asks International Criminal Court to Prosecute Shireen Abu Akleh's Killers, Protesters in Mongolia's Capital Decry Coal Industry and Government Corruption, Georgia Holds Runoff Election Pitting Sen. Raphael Warnock Against Herschel Walker, Judge Dismisses Murder Charge Against Domestic Abuse Survivor Tracy McCarter, 17 Arrested as Striking University of California Academic Workers Stage Sit-In Protest

Democracy Now
Dec 05, 2022

The Jailscraper vs. Chinatown: NYC Residents Fight Construction of World's Tallest Jail
Residents of New York's Chinatown are speaking out against the construction of a new megajail in the neighborhood that would be a third as high as the Empire State Building, which would likely make it the tallest jail in the world, if finished. The so-called jailscraper is part of an $8 billion plan to build new jails across the city in order to retire the infamous Rikers Island facility, but opponents say that money would be better spent on social services, harm reduction and other initiatives that would better serve the community. Jan Lee, co-founder of the community group Neighbors United Below Canal, says Chinatown residents are interested in "creating a more humane environment for those who are incarcerated." We also speak with Christopher Marte, who represents the area on New York City Council, and Jon Alpert, co-founder of the community media center DCTV, based in Chinatown for half a century, who has been documenting the struggle.

Democracy Now
Dec 05, 2022

Abandoned? Meet a Student Suing Yale for Pressuring Those with Mental Health Needs to Withdraw
A group of current and former Yale students is suing the Ivy League university over what they say is "systemic discrimination" against students struggling with mental health issues. In a lawsuit filed last week, they say school administrators routinely pressure students to withdraw from Yale rather than accommodating their mental health needs, a practice that disproportionately hurts students of color, those from poor or rural backgrounds and international students. For more, we speak with Alicia Abramson, a current Yale student and one of the named plaintiffs in the lawsuit, who says she was pushed to withdraw while dealing with an eating disorder, depression and insomnia, which led her to lose her health insurance and most of her tuition. "It certainly felt like Yale was abandoning me when I was in need of the most help," says Abramson. We also speak with attorney Monica Porter, with the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, and Miriam Heyman, a researcher at the Lurie Institute for Disability Policy at Brandeis University.

Democracy Now
Dec 05, 2022

Headlines for December 5, 2022
Early Voting Breaks Records Ahead of Georgia's Crucial Senate Runoff, DNC Agrees to New Presidential Primary Calendar, Making South Carolina First State to Vote, G7 Price Cap on Russian Oil Goes into Effect as European Countries Grapple with Energy Crisis, Intense Fighting Continues in Eastern Ukraine; Global Arms Sales Continue to Rise, Targeted Shooting at North Carolina Power Stations Triggers Curfew, Cuts Power to 45,000 Customers, Biden Signs Law Thwarting Rail Strike, Depriving Workers of Paid Sick Leave, South Korean Trade Unions Rally in Solidarity with Striking Truckers, Iran's Morality Police Could Be Suspended Following 3 Months of Anti-Government Protests
, U.N. Envoy Calls for Probe After Video Captures Israeli Soldier Killing Palestinian Man, Syrian Troops Open Fire on Rare Anti-Government Protest, Killing 2, Sudan's Military Rulers Sign Deal to Gradually Transition to Civilian Rule, Tens of Thousands of Congolese March to Demand Peace in DRC, Donald Trump Calls for "Termination" of U.S. Constitution, "Fire Drill Friday": Climate Protesters Target Sen. Manchin's "Dirty Deal" on Permits

Democracy Now
Dec 02, 2022

The New McCarthyism: Angela Davis Speaks in New York After Critics Shut Down Two Events
When high school students in Rockland County, New York, invited renowned activist and professor Angela Davis to speak, the event got shut down in two different venues over protests that she was "too radical." But the students persevered, and Angela Davis addressed a packed church Thursday night. "I talked about the importance of recognizing that through struggle, through organized struggle, through the efforts of people who come together and join hands and join their voices together, we've made changes in this country," says Davis. We also speak with community activist Nikki Hines, who supported students at Rockland County High School when they invited Davis to speak and who says "misinformation" drove the protests.

Democracy Now
Dec 02, 2022

Inside Israel's Cover-up & U.S. Response to Murder of Palestinian American Journalist Shireen Abu Akleh
More than six months since the Palestinian American journalist Shireen Abu Akleh was killed while reporting in the occupied West Bank, "there is still no accountability in what happened," says journalist Sharif Abdel Kouddous. He is the correspondent on a new Al Jazeera documentary for the program "Fault Lines" that investigates Abu Akleh's May killing. It draws on videos and eyewitness accounts of Abu Akleh's killing to establish that Abu Akleh was fatally shot in the head by Israeli forces, a finding supported by numerous other press investigations. The Biden administration also recently opened an FBI probe into her killing, but Israel is refusing to cooperate and has continued to deny responsibility. Abu Akleh, who was one of the most recognizable faces in the Arab world, had worked for Al Jazeera for 25 years and held U.S. citizenship. We play excerpts from the Al Jazeera documentary, "The Killing of Shireen Abu Akleh," and hear from Shireen's niece Lina Abu Akleh. "We want there to be accountability. We want there to be justice," she says.

Democracy Now
Dec 02, 2022

Headlines for December 2, 2022
Senate Votes to Impose Contract on Rail Workers, Rejecting Paid Sick Leave, Supreme Court to Keep Biden Student Debt Relief Plan on Hold as It Considers Challenge, Biden Says He Is Prepared to Meet Putin Under Certain Conditions, Benjamin Netanyahu Coalition Deal Puts Far-Right Party in Charge of Illegal Settlements, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa's Future Uncertain After Damning Report, Guatemalan Newspaper El Periódico Ceases Print Edition After Being Targeted by Government, Amnesty Report Reveals Systematic Sexual Abuse by Colombian Police Against 2021 Protesters, Biden Proposes Change to Presidential Primary Schedule to Give Voters of Color More Power, Appeals Court Halts Special Master Review of Trump Mar-a-Lago Documents, Uvalde Survivors and Grieving Families Sue over Catastrophic Failures of Local Authorities

Democracy Now
Dec 01, 2022

Rights Advocates to NYC Mayor Adams: You Can't Arrest Your Way Out of Housing & Mental Health Crisis
New York Mayor Eric Adams announced this week that police and emergency medical workers will start hospitalizing people with mental illness against their will, even if they pose no threat to others. Rights groups and community organizations have slammed the move as inhumane and are demanding better access to housing and other support for people struggling with mental illness and homelessness. "That does require funding. That does require investment. Unfortunately, we don't get that," says Jumaane Williams, New York City's public advocate, who says officials are too quick to use policing as a solution to social inequality. We also speak with Jawanza Williams of social justice group VOCAL-NY, who says Mayor Adams and his administration are intent on obscuring issues of homelessness and mental illness rather than solving them. "Hiding, disappearing people experiencing homelessness, dismantling encampments, preventing people from taking photographs inside of the shelters will not prevent the truth from coming out," he says.

Democracy Now
Dec 01, 2022

David Dayen on Rail Contract Bill, Respect for Marriage Act, Debt Ceiling & What a GOP Congress Means
With a new Congress being sworn in next month, Democratic lawmakers have a busy lame-duck session during which they will try to pass as many bills as possible before losing their majority in the House of Representatives. The Senate has just passed the historic Respect for Marriage Act in a 61-36 vote that protects marriage equality, and lawmakers are also moving to impose a controversial contract on the freight rail industry to avert a possible strike by thousands of rail workers who are demanding sick days and other improvements. Meanwhile, a fight is looming over a funding bill to avoid a government shutdown. For more, we speak with journalist David Dayen, whose recent piece for The American Prospect is headlined "Reconciliation Is Available to End Debt Limit Hostage-Taking."

Democracy Now
Dec 01, 2022

Oath Keepers Founder Guilty of Seditious Conspiracy for Plotting to Violently Overthrow U.S. Gov't
Jurors in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday found Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes guilty of seditious conspiracy for plotting to keep Donald Trump in power after the 2020 election, resulting in the deadly January 6 insurrection at the Capitol. Kelly Meggs, who led the Florida chapter of the Oath Keepers, was also convicted of seditious conspiracy, and three other insurrectionists were found guilty of other felonies. The case marks the first time in nearly three decades that a federal jury has convicted defendants of seditious conspiracy, the crime of conspiring to overthrow, put down or destroy by force the government of the United States. "It's a win for the Justice Department, and it also sends a message that illegal actions against the government will not go unpunished," says Kristen Doerer, managing editor of Right Wing Watch. Doerer also discusses other upcoming trials for insurrectionists and how extremist groups have infiltrated military and law enforcement circles.

Democracy Now
Dec 01, 2022

Headlines for December 1, 2022
House Passes Bill to Block Rail Strike at Urging of President Biden, House Democrats Elect Hakeem Jeffries to Head Party, China Moves to Lift Some COVID Restrictions as Protests Continue, Russian Lawmakers Approve Expanding Anti-LGBTQ Law, Palestinian Activist Arrested After Filming Israeli Solider Assaulting Israeli Activist, U.S. Citizen Faces Extradition from UAE to Egypt for Criticizing el-Sisi, Appeals Court Denies Biden Admin Request to Reinstate Student Loan Relief Plan, U.S. Gov't to Close Berks Immigrant Prison, Which Once Locked Up Asylum-Seeking Families, ICE Posts Personal Data of Asylum Seekers Online, Putting Thousands at Risk, Students with Mental Health Disabilities Sue Yale for Discrimination, Cryptome Founder Says He Should Be Prosecuted with Julian Assange for Publishing Classified Docs, Biden Announces Plan to Help Tribal Communities Respond to Climate Crisis, Including Relocation, DOJ Sues City of Jackson for Failing to Provide Residents with Safe Drinking Water, Coterra Energy Acknowledges Fracking Polluted Water of PA Residents, Will Pay $16 Million, 2022 Right Livelihood Awards Honors Activists from Somalia, Ukraine, Uganda and Venezuela, U.N. Calls for Renewed Push to Combat AIDS, Address Inequalities

Democracy Now
Nov 30, 2022

Meet Puerto Rican Journalist Bianca Graulau, Featured in Viral Bad Bunny Video on Injustices in PR
Puerto Rico's financial oversight board has voted to extend a contract with LUMA Energy — the private U.S.-Canadian corporation that took over the island's power grid and is widely denounced by residents on the island for its inconsistent service and high prices. The privatization of Puerto Rico's power grid, supported by an unelected board appointed by the U.S. government, represents the "everyday consequences of colonialism," says independent reporter Bianca Graulau, whose latest documentary is called "País de Apagones," or "Country of Blackouts."

Democracy Now
Nov 30, 2022

Striking Univ. of California Grad Students Speak Out on Nation's Largest-Ever Higher Education Strike
The largest higher education strike in U.S. history has entered its third week in an effort to secure livable wages, more child care benefits, expanded family leave and other demands. Some 48,000 academic workers at all 10 University of California campuses are on strike, including teaching assistants, postdoctoral scholars, graduate student researchers, tutors and fellows. We speak with a professor and graduate students at three campuses in the UC system, as a tentative deal with postdoctoral scholars and academic researchers was announced Tuesday by the University of California that does not cover graduate student employees who make up the vast majority of those on strike. "We are the ones who are producing the work. We're teaching the classrooms. And yet, most of these student workers qualify for food stamps," says UCLA doctoral student and local union head Enrique Olivares Pesante. UC Davis student researcher Aarthi Sekar describes how international graduate students have also been impacted. We also speak with Nelson Lichtenstein, director of the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy at UC Santa Barbara.

Democracy Now
Nov 30, 2022

"Enough Is Enough": Rail Workers Decry Biden's Push to Impose Strike-Breaking Labor Deal
President Biden is pushing Congress to block a pending nationwide rail strike and push through a contract deal that includes no sick days and is opposed by four of the 12 rail unions. Biden's latest request is an attempt to "legislate us basically back to work, before we've even had a chance to strike," says locomotive engineer and Railroad Workers United organizer Ron Kaminkow. "Workers should have the right to take off work for a reasonable amount for whatever reason they need it," says labor professor Nelson Lichtenstein, who urges the rail workers to strike anyway.

Democracy Now
Nov 30, 2022

Headlines for November 30, 2022
Senate Passes Marriage Equality Act in Bipartisan Vote, House to Impose Deal Blocking Rail Strike Despite Objections from Workers, Progressive Dems, U.S. Announces Ukraine Infrastructure Aid as Europe Calls for Tribunal for Russian War Crimes, Oath Keepers Founder Stewart Rhodes Found Guilty of Seditious Conspiracy, Qatari World Cup Official Says 400-500 Migrant Workers Died While Working on FIFA Tournament, Former Chinese President Jiang Zemin Dies at 96, Blast at Religious School in Northern Afghanistan Kills at Least 15
, Missouri Executes Kevin Johnson After SCOTUS Denies Stay
, Democratic Congressmember Donald McEachin Dies, Hawaii's Mauna Loa Erupts for First Time in Almost Four Decades
, NYC to Start Involuntarily Hospitalizing People with Mental Illness, 16 Communities in Puerto Rico File Climate Lawsuit Against Big Oil

Democracy Now
Nov 29, 2022

NYC DA Asks Judge to Drop Murder Charges Against Domestic Abuse Survivor Tracy McCarter
In a remarkable courtroom scene, Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg asked a New York judge Monday to dismiss murder charges against Tracy McCarter, who says she acted in self-defense when her estranged husband died from a stab wound in the chest in 2020. Bragg campaigned on a promise to fight to free McCarter of murder charges, though, when elected, advocates say his actions initially fell short. This comes as pressure is growing in New York to end the criminalization of domestic abuse survivors, which happens at a disproportionate rate against Black women. Advocates say 90% of women who are incarcerated in New York have been subjected to domestic violence. McCarter "had done everything we tell domestic abuse survivors to do," says journalist Victoria Law, who has closely followed McCarter's case, but the nurse still finds herself "in legal limbo, waiting to see if she can try to start picking up the pieces of her life or if she will be facing trial for murder."

Democracy Now
Nov 29, 2022

"Sportswashing & Greenwashing": Ex-Soccer Player Jules Boykoff on Qatar Hosting World Cup
We speak with author Jules Boykoff about the climate and political implications of the 2022 World Cup. The soccer tournament is being played in the winter for the first time due to Qatar's extreme summer temperatures. Boykoff says Qatar and FIFA have greenwashed the event by erroneously claiming the World Cup is "fully carbon neutral" despite blocking an independent review of the games. Boykoff also says Qatar is participating in "sportswashing" by using the games to deflect attention from labor abuses. Boykoff's article in Scientific American is "The World Cup in Qatar Is a Climate Catastrophe."

Democracy Now
Nov 29, 2022

Abdullah Al-Arian on First Middle East World Cup & Western Media's "Orientalist Outlook"
As the 2022 World Cup plays out in Qatar, the first Arab country to host the major sporting event, we speak with history professor Abdullah Al-Arian, who says the international media is projecting an "Orientalist outlook" in its coverage of the games. Al-Arian says despite mainstream discourse, football in the Middle East has historically been used by nationalist movements as "a means of organizing collectively on the basis of achieving their own liberation against colonial rule." His recent New York Times opinion piece is "Why the World Cup Belongs in the Middle East."

Democracy Now
Nov 29, 2022

Headlines for November 29, 2022
NATO Pledges More Support for Ukraine as Some in Europe Accuse U.S. of Profiting from the War, China Eases Some COVID Restrictions as It Moves to Block New Protests, In Blow to Taiwanese Gov't, Voters Back Opposition Nationalist Party in Local Elections, Biden Sides with Big Business & Asks Congress to Block Potential Rail Strike, Teenage Gunman Pleads Guilty in Mass Shooting at Buffalo Supermarket in Black Neighborhood, Chesapeake, Virginia, Holds Vigil for Walmart Workers Shot Dead by Store Manager, Five Police Officers in New Haven, CT, Arrested After Man Is Paralyzed in Police Van, Arizona Sues Republican-Led County for Refusing to Certify 2022 Election Results, "Publishing Is Not a Crime": Major Newspapers Urge Biden to Drop Charges Against Julian Assange, Biden Eases Sanctions on Venezuela and Allows Chevron to Resume Oil Pumping, Israeli Military Demolish Palestinian Primary School Near Hebron, Israel Kills Four Palestinians as U.N. Warns Occupied West Bank Is "Reaching a Boiling Point", Former British Soldier Convicted of Shooting Irish Man in Back in 1988 During the Troubles, Missouri Supreme Court Refuses to Halt Execution of Kevin Johnson, Mike Pence & White House Condemn Trump for Hosting White Supremacist at Mar-a-Lago, Houston Lifts Boil Water Notice for 2 Million Residents, Judge Orders Amazon to Stop Retaliating Against Union Organizing Efforts, Two Peet's Coffee Stores Move to Become Chain's First Unionized Stores

Democracy Now
Nov 28, 2022

"A Forgotten Conflict": Sahrawi Activists Slam Moroccan Greenwashing Amid Western Sahara Occupation
As climate Sahrawi activists in occupied Western Sahara accuse Morocco of greenwashing, the Spanish Film Academy, the Spanish equivalent to the Oscars, has just given its social justice award to the Western Sahara International Film Festival and its film school. We feature our interview at the U.N. climate summit with Mahfud Bechri, who explains how Morocco sells the natural resources and wealth of Western Sahara without the consent of the Sahrawi people as part of an effort to greenwash its military occupation of Western Sahara, and his larger campaign to demand companies end complicity with the occupation. The new social justice award from the Spanish Film Academy recognizes how Spanish support for the Moroccan occupation has led to "a complete media blockade" of the conflict, says María Carrión, executive director of FiSahara, the Western Sahara International Film Festival.

Democracy Now
Nov 28, 2022

Will Missouri Stay Execution of Kevin Johnson, Case Tainted by Racism, or Let Daughter Witness Death?
Pressure is growing for Missouri to stop the execution of Kevin Johnson set for Tuesday. At a hearing Monday before Missouri's Supreme Court, a special prosecutor will request a stay in order to fully investigate how the case was tainted by racism. Meanwhile, Johnson's 19-year-old daughter has been barred from witnessing his lethal injection because she is under 21. "We understand that the death penalty does not solve anything," says Michelle Smith, co-director of Missourians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, who says Johnson is being "punished more severely" because of his race. Lawmakers are also urging Missouri's governor to grant Johnson clemency.

Democracy Now
Nov 28, 2022

From Xinjiang to Shanghai, Protests Grow in China over COVID Restrictions After Fatal Apartment Fire
Unprecedented protests have erupted in multiple Chinese cities over President Xi Jinping's strict zero-COVID policies, which have resulted in extended strict lockdowns across the country. The protests were triggered by a deadly fire Thursday at an apartment building in Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang, where local COVID restrictions reportedly prevented firefighters from reaching the trapped residents. This comes as hundreds of workers at the world's largest iPhone factory, Foxconn, clashed last week with police over restrictions that have forced many workers to live at the factory. "China now for three years has seen a level of lockdown that is simply inconceivable," says Cornell labor scholar Eli Friedman, who calls the cross-class, cross-ethnic protests a "movement against surveillance." Friedman says although China enforces the country's COVID restrictions, top U.S. corporations like Apple and Tesla are implicated in upholding the closed-loop management system at Foxconn and other Chinese manufacturers.

Democracy Now
Nov 28, 2022

Headlines for November 28, 2022
COVID Protests Spread Across China as Lockdown Anger Boils Over, Zelensky Warns of Further Russian Attacks on Energy Infrastructure as Ukrainians Face Harsh Winter, Ayatollah's Niece Voices Support for Mass Protests as Iran Cracks Down on Public Figures, Extremist Itamar Ben-Gvir to Head Nat'l Security in Incoming Israeli Gov't, Anwar Ibrahim Confirmed as Malaysia's New Prime Minister, Hong Kong Convicts 6 Pro-Democracy Activists over Protest Fund, São Tomé and Príncipe PM Says Gov't Thwarted Coup, Fragile Ceasefire Takes Effect in DRC as Local Groups Tell Foreign Forces to Leave Country, Rescue Teams Search for Missing People After Ischia Landslide Kills at Least 7, Greta Thunberg and 600 Swedish Youth Activists Sue Gov't over Climate Inaction, New Regulations for Preservation of Sharks and Other Species Announced at Int'l Conservation Summit, Georgians Start Voting in Dec. 6 Senate Runoff; GA Supreme Court Reinstates Abortion Ban, Twitter Says It Will Reinstate Suspended Accounts as Advertisers Have Withdrawn en Masse, E. Jean Carroll Sues Trump for Sexual Assault Using New York's Adult Survivors Act, 70,000 U.K. University Staff Walk Out; British Nurses Prepare for Historic Strike, Amazon Workers Walk Out on Black Friday over Poor Working Conditions and Low Wages

Democracy Now
Nov 25, 2022

"You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train": Remembering the People's Historian Howard Zinn at 100
In a special broadcast, we remember the legendary historian, author, professor, playwright and activist Howard Zinn, who was born 100 years ago this August. Zinn was a regular guest on Democracy Now!, from the start of the program in 1996 up until his death in 2010 at age 87. After witnessing the horrors of World War II as a bombardier, Zinn became a peace and justice activist who picketed with his students at Spelman College during the civil rights movement and joined in actions such as opposing the Vietnam War. He later spoke out against the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. "I believe neutrality is impossible, because the world is already moving in certain directions. Wars are going on. Children are starving," Zinn said in a 2005 interview. "To be neutral … is to collaborate with whatever is going on, to allow it to happen."

Democracy Now
Nov 25, 2022

Black Friday Special: Howard Zinn & Voices of a People's History of the United States
This year marks 100 years since the birth of the historian Howard Zinn. In 1980, Zinn published his classic work, "A People's History of the United States." The book would go on to sell over a million copies and change the way many look at history in America. We begin today's special with highlights from a production of Howard Zinn's "Voices of a People's History of the United States," where Zinn introduced dramatic readings from history. We hear Alfre Woodard read the words of labor activist Mother Jones and Howard' son Jeff Zinn read the words of an IWW poet and organizer Arturo Giovannitti.

Democracy Now
Nov 24, 2022

Dr. Gabor Maté on "The Myth of Normal," Healing in a Toxic Culture & How Capitalism Fuels Addiction
In an extended interview, acclaimed physician and author Dr. Gabor Maté discusses his new book, "The Myth of Normal: Trauma, Illness, and Healing in a Toxic Culture." "The very values of a society are traumatizing for a lot of people," says Maté, who argues in his book that "psychological trauma, woundedness, underlies much of what we call disease." He says healing requires a reconnection between the mind and the body, which can be achieved through cultivating a sense of community, meaning, belonging and purpose. Maté also discusses how the healthcare system has harmfully promoted the "mechanization of birth," how the lack of social services for parents has led to "a massive abandonment of infants," and how capitalism has fueled addiction and the rise of youth suicide rates.

Democracy Now
Nov 24, 2022

Lakota Historian Nick Estes on Thanksgiving, Settler Colonialism & Continuing Indigenous Resistance
Lakota historian Nick Estes talks about Thanksgiving and his book "Our History Is the Future," and the historic fight against the Dakota Access pipeline at Standing Rock. "This history … is a continuing history of genocide, of settler colonialism and, basically, the founding myths of this country," says Estes, who is a co-founder of the Indigenous resistance group The Red Nation and a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe.

Democracy Now
Nov 23, 2022

Filipino Climate Activist Yeb Saño on COP27, Climate Reparations & Philippines' New President Marcos
This week U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris visited the Philippines, where she said the U.S. would defend the Philippines "in the face of intimidation and coercion" from China and vowed to expand the U.S. military presence in the country even after former bases leaked toxic waste into the environment. We recently spoke about the environment and more with Filipino activist Yeb Saño at the U.N. climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. He was previously the chief climate negotiator for the Philippines and is now executive director of Greenpeace Southeast Asia. Saño describes the "loss and damage" fund negotiated between the Global North and Global South as an "expression of human solidarity." He also discusses Philippines President Ferdinand Marcos Jr.'s commitments to climate action, as well as the threats faced by Filipino environmental activists.

Democracy Now
Nov 23, 2022

Noam Chomsky on Legacy of Radical Historian Staughton Lynd, Who Protested Korea, Vietnam & Iraq Wars
Noam Chomsky remembers the life and legacy of longtime peace and civil rights activist, lawyer and author Staughton Lynd, who has died at the age of 92. Lynd faced professional blowback after he was a conscientious objector during the Korean War and an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War, and later supported U.S. soldiers who refused to fight in Iraq. We feature an extended interview excerpt from when he appeared on Democracy Now! in 2006 to discuss the U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq, his conscientious objector status and the 1993 Ohio prison uprising in Lucasville.

Democracy Now
Nov 23, 2022

Defiance in Iran: Despite Crackdown, Anti-Government Protests May Grow into "Nationwide Revolution"
The situation in Iran is "critical" as authorities tighten their crackdown on the continuing anti-government protests after the September death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in the custody of the so-called morality police. United Nations human rights officials report Iranian security forces in Kurdish cities killed dozens of protesters this week alone, with each funeral turning into a mass rally against the central government. "The defiance has been astounding," says Middle East studies professor Nahid Siamdoust, who reported for years from Iran, including during the 2009 Green Movement, and calls the protests a "nationwide revolution."

Democracy Now
Nov 23, 2022

Headlines for November 23, 2022
Six People Shot Dead at Walmart in Chesapeake, Virginia, Supreme Court OKs Release of Trump's Tax Returns to Congress, Zelensky Accuses Russia of Turning Cold Winter into "Weapon of Mass Destruction", Ukrainian Forces Raid 1,000-Year-Old Orthodox Monastery in Kyiv, On Trip to Moscow, Cuban President Denounces U.S. Sanctions on Russia & NATO Expansion, Turkey Threatens Ground Invasion of Northern Syria in Assault on Kurds, Brazil: Bolsonaro Contests Lula's Victory, Alleging Voter Machine Problems, Colombia Resumes Peace Talks with ELN Guerrillas, Fatal Bomb Blasts Hit Jerusalem a Day After Deadly Israeli Raid in West Bank, China: Hundreds of Workers Walk Off Job at World's Largest iPhone Factory, Biden Administration to Extend Pause of Student Loan Payments, Atlanta to Pay $1 Million to Family of Rayshard Brooks, Over 400 Groups Urge Biden to Expand TPS Protection for Haitians, Teachers Union Head Denounces Pompeo for Calling Her "The Most Dangerous Person in the World", Starbucks Closes First Store to Unionize in Seattle, Elon Musk Has Lost $100 Billion in 2022 But Remains World's Richest Person

Democracy Now
Nov 22, 2022

Family of British-Egyptian Political Prisoner Alaa Abd El-Fattah on Their Struggle for His Freedom
In a wide-ranging interview recorded in Cairo, we speak with Laila Soueif and Sanaa Seif, the mother and sister of British-Egyptian political prisoner Alaa Abd El-Fattah, about his health, his case, his family and his hopes for freedom. After visiting him in prison, they describe how El-Fattah started a water strike on the first day of the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh to draw international attention to the country's human rights violations and protest his seemingly indefinite imprisonment. He paused after collapsing and suffering a "near-death experience" when prison officials appeared reluctant to record his full water and hunger strike. Seif says they set a date to restart his hunger strike, once he regains physical and mental strength. Laila Soueif discusses how El-Fattah helped her raise his two younger sisters when her now-deceased husband was in jail for his own activism. They also describe his relationship with his son, Khaled, who is nonverbal and diagnosed with autism, calling El-Fattah a "patient, kind father." Recalling his most recent trial, they lay out how he was sentenced to five years in prison last December, and explain how El-Fattah's lawyers never had access to the case trial or were allowed to argue his case. "There is clearly a vendetta" against El-Fattah, notes Seif, who adds "it's pointless to talk about the legal procedures [since] each step of it is a sham." Seif also speaks about the mass imprisonment of other political prisoners and the major influence and responsibility the U.S. has in freeing El-Fattah and others. "This whole operation [in Egypt] is a U.S. operation," says Soueif, who says she wants El-Fattah freed and deported to the U.K. to keep him safe.

Democracy Now
Nov 22, 2022

Headlines for November 22, 2022
Suspect in Colorado LGBTQ Nightclub Massacre Charged with Murder, Hate Crimes, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott Warns of Immigrant "Invasion," Mirroring Language Used by El Paso Shooter, As Russian Attacks Leave Ukraine Without Power, WHO Warns "This Winter Will Be About Survival", Kamala Harris Pledges "Unwavering Commitment" to Defend Philippines, Death Toll from Java Earthquake Rises to 268, 38 Workers Die as Fire Sweeps Through Factory in Central China, U.S. Rail Workers Reject Tentative Union Contract, Set Stage for Dec. 9 Strike, Alabama Governor Halts Executions After Third Botched Lethal Injection, Missouri Teen Asks to Attend Her Father's Execution, Oregon Governor Pardons 45,000 People for Cannabis Convictions, Rights Groups Denounce FIFA for Banning Displays of LGBTQ Pride at World Cup

Democracy Now
Nov 21, 2022

World Cup in Qatar Is "Deadliest Major Sporting Event" in History, Built on a Decade of Forced Labor
As the World Cup begins, we look at the host country of Qatar's labor and human rights record. "This is the deadliest major sporting event, possibly ever, in history," says Minky Worden of Human Rights Watch, who describes how millions of migrant workers from the world's poorest countries have faced deadly and forced labor conditions working on the $2 billion infrastructure. By one count, 6,500 migrant workers have died in Qatar since 2010, when it was awarded the right to host the games. "These are unprecedented labor rights abuses," says Worden, who claims "there's no ability if you're a migrant worker in Qatar to strike for your basic human rights."

Democracy Now
Nov 21, 2022

"An Act of Hate": 5 Dead in Shooting at Colorado LGBTQ Club on Eve of Transgender Day of Remembrance
A gunman wearing body armor and armed with an AR-15-style rifle attacked an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs late Saturday night, killing five people and injuring at least 25. Two Club Q patrons managed to disarm the shooter, a 22-year-old suspect with ties to an extremist family, before he was taken into police custody. The attack came on the the eve of Transgender Day of Remembrance, and police are investigating the attack as a potential hate crime. "This was an intentional act to push LGBTQ people back into the shadows," says Denver mayoral candidate Leslie Herod, who is the first LGBTQ African American to hold office in the Colorado General Assembly and considers Colorado Springs her hometown. Herod describes a "clear connection" between hateful anti-gay rhetoric and violence toward the LGBTQ community.

Democracy Now
Nov 21, 2022

U.N. Climate Summit Agrees to Historic Loss and Damage Fund But Rejects Calls to Phase Out Fossil Fuels
Rich countries agreed to establish a "loss and damage" fund at the close of the two-week-long U.N. climate summit in Egypt to help the Global South deal with the worst effects of the climate catastrophe. The fund is a major breakthrough for Global South countries, which have been demanding a similar mechanism for the past 30 years but faced opposition from the United States and other large polluting nations. Climate justice activist Asad Rehman says the fund is a "glimmer of hope" despite the summit ending with a massive expansion of carbon markets and delegates making "no progress" to phase out fossil fuels.

Democracy Now
Nov 21, 2022

Headlines for November 21, 2022
COP27 Delegates Agree on Historic "Loss and Damage" Deal But Make No Progress on Climate Catastrophe, Gunman Kills 5 in Attack on Colorado Springs LGTBQ Nightclub, U.N. Nuclear Body Warns Fighting Near Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Plant Is "Playing with Fire", Earthquake Kills at Least 56 People in Indonesia, Beijing Reports First COVID Deaths in 6 Months Amid Public Unrest, World Cup Kicks Off Under Cloud of Rights Abuses; Iran Soccer Captain Backs Protests Back Home, Iranian Actresses Arrested After Supporting Protests and Appearing Publicly Without Hijabs, 11 Civilians Killed as Turkish Airstrikes Target Kurdish-Held Parts of Syria and Iraq, Twitter CEO Elon Musk Restores Donald Trump's Banned Twitter Account, Ex-Justice Department Prosecutor Jack Smith Named Special Counsel in Trump Criminal Probes, Elizabeth Holmes Sentenced to 11 Years in Prison for Defrauding Theranos Investors, Calls Mount for Cryptocurrency Oversight After FTX Exchange Collapses, Biden Asks Supreme Court to Allow Student Debt Relief Program to Take Effect, Justice Alito Denies Whistleblower Claim He Leaked Landmark 2014 Decision Ahead of Ruling, New York Schools Banned from Using Native Mascots Without Consent, Hebe de Bonafini, Who Sought Justice for Victims of Argentina's Dictatorship, Dies at 93

Democracy Now
Nov 18, 2022

Exiled Russian Environmentalist: Russia's Uranium Sales to U.S. & Europe Help Putin Fund Ukraine War
We continue our coverage from the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, with prominent Russian environmentalist Vladimir Slivyak, co-chair of the Russian environmental organization Ecodefense and winner of the 2021 Right Livelihood Award for defending the environment and mobilizing grassroots opposition to the coal and nuclear industries in Russia. Slivyak says the Russian war in Ukraine, especially the Russian occupation of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, should serve as a warning to immediately transition to renewable energy sources, not nuclear energy, and to stop relying on fossil fuels. "As long as the United States and European Union continue to pay Vladimir Putin for uranium or fossil fuel, that means that this money will be used for the war in Ukraine. That means more people will die in Ukraine," he adds.

Democracy Now
Nov 18, 2022

Ukrainian Climate Scientist Says Fossil Fuels Enabled Russian War in Ukraine
We speak with prominent Ukrainian climate scientist Svitlana Krakovska at the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, about how the Russian war in Ukraine has intensified calls to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Krakovska is the head of the delegation of Ukraine to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC. "Fossil fuels: it's a root, it's an enabler of the Russian war on Ukraine," says Krakovska, adding that she feels hopeful that the conference will bring politicians and scientists together to instill positive change.

Democracy Now
Nov 18, 2022

"Fossil Fuels Fund Dictatorships": Ukrainian Climate Activist Suspended from COP27 over Russia Protest
Ukrainian climate activist Svitlana Romanko joins us after she was suspended from the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, when she accused Russian officials of war crimes and genocide at an event on Wednesday. Romanko is the founder and director of Razom We Stand, an organization demanding a total permanent embargo on Russian oil and gas. "It has been very clear that fossil fuels fund dictatorships all over the world," says Romanko, who has since left Egypt for her own safety. "We wanted to use our freedom of speaking and freedom of attending public gathering to confront people who came from the country which is in open war and … destroying our people."

Democracy Now
Nov 18, 2022

"A Near-Death Experience": U.K.-Egyptian Activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah Almost Dies on Prison Hunger Strike
The family of imprisoned British Egyptian human rights activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah visited him on Thursday for the first time since he ended his full hunger and water strike, which they say occurred after he collapsed inside his prison shower last week. El-Fattah had intensified his strike on the first day of the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh to draw international attention to the country's human rights violations and protest his seemingly indefinite imprisonment. We go to Cairo to speak with his aunt, Ahdaf Soueif, who was among the visitors and says El-Fattah may resume his hunger strike if the British government does not more aggressively demand his release. "It really breaks my heart to think of him going back on hunger strike when he is so thin and so weak," but the campaign so far "has left no one in any doubt that Alaa should be free," she says.

Democracy Now
Nov 18, 2022

Headlines for November 18, 2022
Negotiations over "Loss and Damage" Dominate Final Hours of COP27 Climate Summit, Nancy Pelosi, First Woman House Speaker, Steps Down from Democratic Leadership After 2 Decades, Democratic Rep. Katie Porter, Famous for Her "Whiteboard of Justice," Wins Reelection, Reelection Bid of Far-Right Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert Headed for Recount, Kremlin Hints at Prisoner Swap Involving Brittney Griner and Viktor Bout, State Department Says Saudi Crown Prince Has Immunity from Lawsuit over Khashoggi Killing, Blaze Kills 21 People at Jabaliya Refugee Camp in Gaza, World Cup Kicks Off in Shadow of Qatar's Human Rights, Labor Abuses, Adjunct Professors at NYC's New School Launch Indefinite Strike, Starbucks Workers Walk Out Nationwide to Protest Chain's Anti-Union Efforts , Hundreds of Twitter Workers Resign After Declining to Go "Hard Core" for Musk , Alabama Execution Called Off over Botched Attempt at Lethal Injection, Staughton Lynd, Civil Rights Activist and War Critic, Dies at Age 92

Democracy Now
Nov 17, 2022

At COP27 Indigenous Land Defenders from Mexico, Guatemala Warn "Green Capitalism" Creates Violence
We continue our coverage of the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, by asking what Indigenous leaders at the frontlines of the climate crisis are calling for from world leaders. We speak to Andrea Ixchíu, a land defender from Guatemala, and Rosa Marina Flores Cruz, an Afro-Indigenous activist from Mexico, who are both part of the Futuros Indígenas collective. They discuss how their countries' megaprojects and big business are devastating Indigenous communities. "Green capitalism is affecting our communities. It's displacing people. It's creating violence," says Ixchíu. Amid the murder and persecution of climate activists across Latin America, "defend[ing] the land is one of the most difficult and dangerous activities that we can do," says Cruz.

Democracy Now
Nov 17, 2022

Amazon Leader Welcomes Climate Vow from Brazil's Lula to End Deforestation with Indigenous Help
Brazilian President-elect Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva addressed world leaders at the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, on Wednesday, vowing to end deforestation of the Amazon rainforest and create a ministry to represent Indigenous peoples in his government. Brazil's new approach to climate change aims to reverse outgoing far-right President Jair Bolsonaro's policies that have devastated Indigenous lands. "With Lula's support, we can fight against deforestation and support Indigenous peoples in protecting and confronting the threats they face, including assassinations and human rights violations," says Gregório Mirabal, an Indigenous leader from the Venezuelan Amazon. His colleague Atossa Soltani, board president of Amazon Watch, translated for him.

Democracy Now
Nov 17, 2022

Indigenous Activists Tom Goldtooth & Eriel Deranger on the Link Between Colonialism & Climate Crisis
Democracy Now! is broadcasting live from COP27, the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, where hundreds of activists protested outside the plenary hall Thursday to demand climate justice. We speak to two Indigenous activists and land defenders at the summit, Eriel Tchekwie Deranger and Tom Goldtooth. "It is frontline communities, land defenders and Indigenous peoples that have experienced the loss of our territories at the hands of oil and gas and extractivism," says Deranger, executive director of Indigenous Climate Action and member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation. "Colonialism has to be addressed in these hallways, and there's been lack of political will around that," says Goldtooth, executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network and member of the Diné and Dakota nations.

Democracy Now
Nov 17, 2022

Headlines for November 17, 2022
GOP Wins Narrow House Majority; McConnell Reelected Senate Minority Leader, Senate Advances Bill to Codify Marriage Equality into Federal Law, Iran Steps Up Violence Against Protesters, Sentences Five Activists to Death, Russian Missiles Fall Across Ukraine as Grain Export Deal Extended for 120 Days, Poland Blames Russia for Deadly Blast Near Border with Ukraine, Family of Alaa Abd El-Fattah Still Has Not Seen Imprisoned British Egyptian Activist, U.S. Judge Gives Biden Administration 5Week Extension to End Title 42, Sen. Ossoff Grills ICE Official About Invasive Procedures Performed on Prisoners, Immigrant Rights Activists Welcome Migrants Bused to Philadelphia from Texas, Rep. Karen Bass Becomes First Woman, Second Black Person Elected as L.A. Mayor, NLRB Asks Court to Stop Starbucks from Firing More Workers as Retaliation for Unionizing, Joye Braun, Cheyenne River Sioux Water Protector and Policy Advocate, Dies at 53

Democracy Now
Nov 16, 2022

"A Carbon Bomb": Movement Grows Against EACOP East African Pipeline Funded by France's Total & China
COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, has been called the African COP, but many African climate activists cannot afford to attend. Broadcasting from the summit, we speak to Omar Elmawi, campaign coordinator for Stop the East African Crude Oil Pipeline, about the push to stop the construction of a major pipeline that would stretch 900 miles from Uganda to Tanzania. Key financial backers of the East African Crude Oil Pipeline include the French company Total and the China National Offshore Oil Company. "It's a project that is strongly being opposed by people in Uganda and the whole world, because it's going to be displacing over 100,000 people in East Africa, and it's also going to be causing a lot of impacts to nature," says Elmawi. He adds that the region should transition instead to renewable energy such as solar.

Democracy Now
Nov 16, 2022

"Climate Collateral": How Military Spending Fuels Environmental Damage
As the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, is underway, we look at how military spending accelerates the climate crisis. Wealthy nations' investments in armed forces not only exacerbates pollution but also often surpasses their climate financing by as much as 30 times, according to a new report by the Transnational Institute. It shows the money is available, "but it's been dedicated to military spending," says co-author Nick Buxton. Governments that import arms, like Egypt, are motivated by the desire for legitimacy and the "power to crack down on the civil society," adds Muhammad al-Kashef, human rights lawyer and migration activist.

Democracy Now
Nov 16, 2022

Who Should Pay for Climate Crisis? Global South Demands "Loss and Damage" from Wealthy Nations
We are broadcasting from COP27, the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, where poorer countries in the Global South that are weathering the worst effects of the climate crisis are calling for wealthy nations to pay reparations in the form of climate financing. "We need a global plan to phase out fossil fuels in a just and equitable manner," says Harjeet Singh, head of global political strategy with Climate Action Network and global engagement director of the Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty. He adds that the United States is the main impediment to "loss and damage" climate financing. "Money is available, but [the] U.S. has always blocked money going to poor people who are suffering from climate impacts," he says.

Democracy Now
Nov 16, 2022

Headlines for November 16, 2022
Poland Says Ukraine Likely Launched Missiles That Killed 2, Not a Deliberate Attack, Russian Missiles Rain Down on Ukraine as Zelensky Calls for G20 to Support Peace Plan, Judge Overturns Georgia Abortion Ban, Trump Announces 2024 Run Amid Ongoing Legal Troubles, Kevin McCarthy Wins GOP Nomination for House Speaker; Sen. Warnock Sues GA over Early Voting Rules, U.S. Judge Blocks Title 42, Which Has Expelled 2 Million Migrants Since 2020, Philadelphia Rights Activists Preparing for New Immigrant Bus from Texas, Intel Report Details How the UAE Spent Hundreds of Millions to Influence U.S. Foreign Policy, Lula Declares "Brazil Is Back" at COP27, Calls for Next Meeting to Take Place in Amazon, 11-Year-Old Licypriya Kangujam Confronts U.K. Minister over Criminalization of Climate Protests, Jennifer Siebel Newsom Testifies Harvey Weinstein Raped Her in 2005, Tesla Construction Workers Describe Exploitative, Dangerous Conditions at Texas Site, Sanitation Co. Accused of Using Child Labor in JBS Slaughterhouses, Walmart Agrees to $3.1 Billion Settlement over Opioids Crisis

Democracy Now
Nov 15, 2022

Vanessa Nakate Condemns Fossil Fuel Lobbying at U.N. Climate Talks as Global Warming Devastates Africa
At the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, we speak with prominent Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate about the impact of the climate crisis on the continent of Africa. Earlier today she spoke at a COP27 event and blasted world leaders for not doing more. She describes the need for wealthy nations gathered at the U.N. climate conference, particularly the U.S., to finance loss and damage for poorer nations in the Global South. "For the current and historic emitters, they need to take responsibility for the climate crisis, and they need to pay for this crisis," says Nakate.

Democracy Now
Nov 15, 2022

Hossam Bahgat on the "Full-Scale Human Rights Crisis" in Egypt as Country Hosts COP27
Broadcasting from COP27, the U.N. climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, we speak to leading Egyptian human rights advocate and journalist Hossam Bahgat about how authorities have launched a widespread crackdown on political dissent. Hundreds have been arrested, including lawyers and journalists, and police have been stopping people randomly on the streets of Cairo and other cities to search the contents of their phones. Meanwhile, imprisoned British Egyptian activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah has sent a letter notifying his family that he has stopped his hunger strike and asked for them to visit on Thursday. Bahgat disagrees with calls to boycott COP27, and gained entry through asking a foreign environmental group to include him. "Sustained engagement with the Egyptian government in public and private about its catastrophic human rights record can actually lead to some change," says Bahgat, executive director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights.

Democracy Now
Nov 15, 2022

Headlines for November 15, 2022
U.N. General Assembly Calls on Russia to Pay Reparations for Ukraine Invasion, After Meeting Xi Jinping, Biden Says U.S. Won't Provoke New Cold War with China, Egyptian Political Prisoner Alaa Abd El-Fattah Ends Hunger Strike, Israel Says It Won't Cooperate with FBI Probe into Killing of Shireen Abu Akleh, Thousands Flee Fighting Between Congolese Army and M23 Rebels in Eastern DRC, Katie Hobbs Defeats GOP Election Denier Kari Lake to Win Arizona Governor Race, Arizona Voters Approve In-State College Tuition for Undocumented Immigrants, Second Federal Court Blocks Biden's Student Debt Relief Program, Nearly 50,000 Student Workers Strike at All 10 University of California Campuses, UVA Lifts Shelter-in-Place Order After Police Arrest Alleged Gunman, Supreme Court Will Allow House Jan. 6 Committee to Subpoena Arizona GOP Leader, Pence Says He Was "Angered" by Trump's "Reckless" Actions on January 6, 2021, Amazon Plans to Lay Off 10,000 Workers, Digital Currency Prices Plummet as Regulators Probe Collapse of FTX, Google to Pay $392 Million to Settle Probe into Unwanted Tracking of Users' Locations, Climate Scientists Join Nonviolent Protests at Private U.S. Airports

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2022

Greenpeace: As Egypt Hosts COP27, Country's Agricultural Sector Ravaged by Impact of Climate Crisis
As the U.N. climate conference takes place in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, we look at the effects of the climate crisis for the host country, such as rising temperatures and sea levels in the Nile Delta. Ahmed El Droubi, Greenpeace regional campaign manager for the Middle East and North Africa, says "the most significantly impacted sector in Egypt is definitely the agricultural sector." Egyptians are calling for wealthy nations to be held accountable for causing the bulk of the climate crisis, only to be met with "temporary solutions that do not address the core of the climate crisis," he adds.

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2022

Biden & Xi Meet in Bali; Could This Help Cool U.S.-China Tensions & Reduce Risk of a Military Clash?
For the first time since taking office, President Biden met in person with Chinese President Xi Jinping Monday in Bali, Indonesia. We discuss how the meeting might affect rising tensions over Taiwan, where Nancy Pelosi visited earlier this year, and concerns over China's human rights violations. The goals of the meeting should be "for the two leaders to find a way to cool those tensions down and to find ways to reduce the risk of a military clash arising in the Pacific," says Michael Klare, defense correspondent at The Nation. As Chinese military drills near Taiwan threaten instability in the region, "the question is what's the best way to deter China from doing anything," says Orville Schell, director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society.

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2022

"No Climate Justice Without Human Rights": Groups Protest Inaction, Repression at U.N. Summit in Egypt
Democracy Now! is in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, where the COP27 U.N. climate conference has entered its second week amid protests against the host government's repression and world leaders' inaction on the climate crisis. We speak with Asad Rehman, executive director of War on Want and lead spokesperson for the Climate Justice Coalition, who risked arrest to participate in a climate justice protest along with hundreds of others in Egypt on Saturday. "You can't have the very people burning the planet sitting here and pretending to be drafting the solutions to it, and that's exactly what's happening in these climate negotiations," says Rehman. He says imprisoned Egyptian British activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah is "part and parcel of our struggle," as calls to free El-Fattah continue after he sent proof of life in a letter for the first time since beginning a full hunger and water strike last week. We also speak with Nigerian environmentalist Nnimmo Bassey, who says the perception that this is an African COP is "a big misnomer," as the African delegates feel largely excluded.

Democracy Now
Nov 14, 2022

Headlines for November 14, 2022
Democrats Retain Control of Senate After Narrow Victories in Arizona and Nevada, House of Representatives Remains Up for Grabs, But Democrats' Path to Majority Narrows, GOP Election Deniers Lose Races for Key Offices in Battleground States, Ukraine Recaptures Kherson After Eight-Month Russian Occupation, At COP27, Biden Apologizes over Trump's Actions on Climate, Doesn't Mention Loss & Damage, Climate Activists Rally at COP27 for Climate Reparations, Family of Egyptian Political Prisoner Alaa Abd El-Fattah Receives "Proof of Life" Letter, Biden Holds First Face-to-Face Meeting of Presidency with China's Xi Jinping, Turkey Blames Kurdish Separatists for Istanbul Bomb Blast That Killed 6, Iranian Court Issues First Death Sentence over Protests That Erupted in September, U.N. Envoy Calls on U.S. and Allies to Lift Sanctions on Syria, Citing Harm to Civilians, Israeli Troops Kill 19-Year-Old Palestinian Woman During Raid in Occupied West Bank, Ethiopia Agrees to Allow Humanitarian Access to War-Torn Tigray, A Shooter Is at Large After Killing 3 People on University of Virginia Campus, Biden Admin Extends TPS for Hundreds of Thousands, Twitter Lays Off More Workers, Forced to Halt "Checkmark" Subscription as Fake Accounts Flood Site

Democracy Now
Nov 11, 2022

"Carbon Billionaires": Oxfam Calls for Taxing Rich Who Profit from Emissions Fueling Climate Crisis
A new Oxfam analysis finds the investments of the world's richest people are emitting 3 million tons a year — more than a million times the average person's output. The report, titled "Carbon Billionaires," suggests a wealth tax could help fund urgent climate action in developing countries. The analysis shows "how much power and control a few people have over our economic system and, beyond that, our way of life, our survival as humanity," says Ashfaq Khalfan, climate justice director at Oxfam America. Khalfan also responds to U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry's new carbon offset proposal, which he calls a "distraction" that will delay action on public financing of climate action.

Democracy Now
Nov 11, 2022

Ranked-Choice Voting Backed in Midterm Ballot Measures, May Help "Crash-Proofing Our Democracy"
Voters in Nevada and a handful of cities across the United States appear poised to expand the use of ranked-choice voting in the aftermath of Tuesday's midterm elections. The election method allows voters to select multiple candidates in descending order of preference. It is used in many other countries, and supporters say it can reduce polarization and give more voice to independent voters. "The forces for ranked-choice voting are people who really care about our democracy," says George Cheung, director of More Equitable Democracy, who says ranked-choice voting "allows for truer representation of who we are as a community."

Democracy Now
Nov 11, 2022

Delia Ramirez: Illinois Elects First Latina Congressmember; Ran on Medicare for All, Immigration Reform
We speak with Congressmember-elect Delia Ramirez, who won her election for Illinois's newly redrawn 3rd Congressional District Tuesday, making her the first Latina elected to Congress from Illinois. Ramirez is a progressive Democratic state representative who is the daughter of Guatemalan immigrants and the wife of a DACA recipient. She campaigned on expanding healthcare and housing access for working people, as well as passing the DREAM Act. "I represent an electorate that is growing — an electorate that expects us to deliver to all people and put the politics to the side and make working families a priority," says Ramirez. "We understand the importance of multicultural coalition building for all working people."

Democracy Now
Nov 11, 2022

Headlines for November 11, 2022
Control of Senate Hangs in Balance as Vote Counting Continues in Arizona and Nevada, Arizona Officials Condemn Death Threats Against Election Workers, Republicans Edge Closer to Claiming House Majority , Democrats Tina Kotek and Maura Healey Become First Openly Lesbian Elected Governors , Ukraine Says It Liberated Dozens of Towns and Villages in Russian-Occupied Kherson, WSJ: South Korea to Sell Artillery for Ukraine in Confidential Arms Deal with U.S. , Ukraine's Zelensky Says Russia's Invasion Has Worsened Climate Crisis, Egypt Cracks Down on Dissent as Family of Hunger-Striking Political Prisoner Appeals to Biden , Biden to Meet with Xi Jinping Next Week on Sidelines of G20 Summit, China Sticks with "Zero COVID" Policy as Daily Cases Pass 10,000 , Israeli Forces Kill Two Palestinians in West Bank; Palestinian Rights Groups Testify to U.N. Panel, U.S. State Department Blasts Israeli Politician Ben-Gvir for "Celebrating Terrorism", Crew Finds Noose at Construction Site of Obama Presidential Library, Black Liberation Elder Mutulu Shakur Released from Prison with Just Months Left to Live, D.C. Sues NFL, Washington Commanders over Toxic Workplace Cover-Up, U.S. Judge Blocks Biden Student Relief Plan, 48,000 University of California Graduate Workers Poised to Strike Statewide, HarperCollins Workers Go on Strike to Demand Fair Pay and Benefits

Democracy Now
Nov 10, 2022

The Story of Baby O: Rebecca Nagle on the Supreme Court Case That Could Gut Native Sovereignty
The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in Haaland v. Brackeen, a case challenging the Indian Child Welfare Act and ultimately threatening the legal foundations of federal Indian law. ICWA was created in 1978 to address the systemic crisis of family separation in Native communities waged by the U.S. and requires the government to ensure foster children are adopted by members of their Indigenous tribes, as well as blood relatives, before being adopted by non-Indigenous parents. Now right-wing groups are supporting white foster parents to challenge the law as discriminatory. "Not only are our children on the line, but the legal foundation, the legal structure that defends the rights of Indigenous nations in the United States is literally at stake," says journalist Rebecca Nagle, who has been reporting on the case for years and says it's likely the Supreme Court will strike ICWA down. Nagle also comments on the oral arguments, saying the Supreme Court's majority has "many racist stereotypes in their minds about Native people."

Democracy Now
Nov 10, 2022

Progressive Prosecutors Win Key Races Despite GOP Attacks on Criminal Justice Reform
We look at the wave of progressive prosecutors elected in Tuesday's midterms and what the results mean for the movement to reform the criminal justice system. Voters have an "understanding that we can't incarcerate our way to safety," says law professor Lara Bazelon, who explains how progressive prosecutors won several key races in blue, purple and red states despite Republican candidates across the country campaigning with a focus on crime and public safety. "The progressive narrative, far from being dead, is very much alive."

Democracy Now
Nov 10, 2022

Democrats May Lose U.S. House Because New York Dem. Leaders Were Too Focused on Defeating the Left
The balance of power in Congress is still up in the air two days after Tuesday's midterm elections, and control of the Senate now rests on three states: Nevada, Arizona and Georgia. Meanwhile, Republicans have not yet won enough House seats to regain the majority, though there are still over 30 House races not yet decided. Many analysts say if Democrats lose control of the House, it may largely be because of New York state, where Republicans have flipped four congressional seats. Sochie Nnaemeka, director of the New York Working Families Party, says the "low-participation, low-energy election" was the result of the Democrats' "failed strategies at the state level." And Zohran Mamdani, New York state assemblymember for District 36, explains how GOP-favored redistricting, which he pins on Democratic leadership, "may be part of the reason why we do not hold the House." Both Nnaemeka and Mamdani are part of a growing coalition calling for the resignation of Jay Jacobs, chair of the state's Democratic Committee, who they say laid the ground for major Democratic losses to the GOP in Tuesday's midterm elections.

Democracy Now
Nov 10, 2022

Headlines for November 10, 2022
Control of U.S. Senate Hangs on Three Undetermined Races, Kevin McCarthy Announces Bid to Become House Speaker, Election Denier Kari Lake Trails by Razor-Thin Margin in Arizona Gubernatorial Race, Democrats Win Control of Executive and Legislature Branches in Four States, "Our Intention Is to Run Again": Biden Teases 2024 Plans, Iranian Protesters Face Torture in Prison as Lawmakers Vote in Favor of Death Penalty, Russia Orders Withdrawal of Occupied Ukrainian City of Kherson , Kremlin Threatens to Withdraw from Grain Export Deal Amid Global Food Insecurity Crisis, Hurricane Nicole Cuts Power, Creates Storm Surges on Florida's East Coast, Sweeping Report Warns of "Far-Reaching and Worsening" Climate Crises Across U.S., 600 COP27 Delegates Are Linked to Fossil Fuels; Activists Protest for Climate Reparations, Egyptian Authorities Take "Medical Intervention" on Hunger Striker Alaa Abd El-Fattah , Just Stop Oil Activists Have Disrupted the U.K.'s Busiest Highway Every Day This Week, U.K. Activist Throws Eggs at King Charles on Behalf of Victims of Police, Slavery, Colonialism

Democracy Now
Nov 09, 2022

Democratic Socialist Summer Lee's Victory in Penn. Gives Progressives a Boost in House
Pittsburgh community organizer Summer Lee was elected the first Black woman to represent Pennsylvania in Congress after winning the state's 12th Congressional District in Tuesday's midterm elections. Lee, currently a state representative, faced off against Republican Mike Doyle — who happened to share the same name as the outgoing Democratic incumbent. We speak with Aimee Allison, president and founder of She the People, who explains how Lee successfully fended off a massive negative ad campaign funded by the pro-Israel lobbying group AIPAC. Allison also speaks about the mayoral race in Los Angeles, where progressive Karen Bass is in a tight race with billionaire Rick Caruso, as well as other races where strong progressive candidates fell short. "The heartbreaking loss of some of the nation's best candidates demonstrates that the Democrats need to invest early and very, very strongly in these excellent candidates in order to protect and build up their capacity to turn out the votes," says Allison.

Democracy Now
Nov 09, 2022

Robert Reich: Democrats Can No Longer Compromise with "Authoritarian" Republicans
Former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich says President Biden must "push back as hard as he can" if Republicans take control of even one chamber in Congress following Tuesday's midterm elections. He says the administration needs to be clear there is no compromise on the debt ceiling, which he expects a Republican-controlled Congress would challenge, potentially triggering a repeat of the political crisis in 2011 under former President Obama.

Democracy Now
Nov 09, 2022

"Abortion Rights Are Deeply Popular": Voters Back Reproductive Freedom in State Ballot Initiatives
Voters supported the right to abortion in at least four of the five states where reproductive rights were on the ballot in Tuesday's midterm elections. "Abortion rights are deeply popular, and when you put the question before voters, they say yes," said The Nation's Amy Littlefield. She also discusses Vermont becoming the first state to enshrine abortion rights in its constitution, as well as the "historic win" in Kentucky, where voters defeated an anti-abortion ballot initiative.

Democracy Now
Nov 09, 2022

Georgia: Warnock-Walker Senate Race Could Head to Runoff; Gov. Kemp Defeats Abrams
Georgia Democratic Senator Raphael Warnock and his opponent Republican Herschel Walker will likely head to a runoff if neither candidate wins 50% of the vote needed to win the election outright. Warnock was able to capture more white and rural votes than Stacey Abrams, who lost to Georgia's incumbent Republican Governor Brian Kemp, explains ??LaTosha Brown, co-founder of Black Voters Matter Fund. "Voter suppression has had an impact in this election," says Brown, who joins us from Atlanta and notes how mail-in ballots in Georgia went down since 2018. We also continue our conversation with John Nichols, who describes the impact of gerrymandering in the tight House races and the Ohio Senate race, which he says was a "big loss for Democrats."

Democracy Now
Nov 09, 2022

Too Close to Call: Control of Senate Hinges on Races in Wisconsin, Georgia, Arizona & Nevada
The balance of power in Congress is still up in the air after Democratic candidates outperformed expectations in much of the country in Tuesday's midterm elections. Control of the Senate now rests on four states: Wisconsin, Georgia, Arizona and Nevada. We speak with The Nation's John Nichols, who says Democratic Senate candidate Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes could still close the gap with Republican incumbent Ron Johnson in Wisconsin, who now has the advantage. He also says that while Republicans look favored to win the Senate seat in Nevada, the race has ended up closer than expected. "Nevada can surprise you at the end," says Nichols.

Democracy Now
Nov 09, 2022

Headlines for November 9, 2022
Fetterman Beats Oz in PA Sen. Race; Warnock and Walker Likely Headed to Runoff in GA, Democrats Win Governor Races in MD, MA, WI, NY, PA; Republican Govs. Hold On to FL, TX, GA, Abortion Rights Win Big; Mixed Results for Ballot Measures on Marijuana, Voting, Slavery, Climate "Loss and Damage" Efforts Gain Support, But Major Polluter U.S. Refuses to Commit, Olaf Scholz, U.N. Human Rights Chief Call for Release of Alaa Abd El-Fattah in Sharm el-Sheikh, U.S. and Russia to Resume New START Talks Against Backdrop of Ukraine War, Russian Authorities Transfer Brittney Griner to Penal Colony, Al-Hol Refugee Camp in Syria Likened to "Open-Air Prison" for Children, Meta Lays Off 11,000 Workers in Company's Largest-Ever Staff Cuts, Tropical Storm Nicole to Make Landfall in Florida as Hurricane, Mexico City Mayor Accuses Authorities of Covering Up Murder of Young Woman

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2022

Election Protection Force Fights Voter Suppression: Racist Poll Workers, Vigilantes, Missing Ballots
We speak to Damon Hewitt, the head of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, which is spearheading nationwide efforts to protect the vote in Tuesday's midterm elections. Republicans at the national and state levels have tried to disqualify thousands of absentee and mail-in ballots in an effort to swing close races in battleground states like Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Hewitt describes how litigation has become a major part of the election process, given the increased number of election deniers and white supremacists who now hold positions as election officials. "When the casualness of racism is weaponized in the electoral process, that leads to voter suppression if we don't stand up," says Hewitt, who cautions that the final election results in Tuesday's midterms may take a couple of days. He suggests people report problems to the Election Protection hotline: 866-OUR-VOTE.

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2022

Report from NH: Could GOP Conspiracy Theorist General Don Bolduc Defeat Sen. Maggie Hassan?
We speak with New Yorker staff writer Sue Halpern about the Senate race in New Hampshire, where she says far-right Republican nominee Donald Bolduc is running a "vigorous campaign" against the incumbent Democratic Senator Maggie Hassan and spreading conspiracy theories that some schoolchildren were using litter boxes. "If Maggie Hassan loses, the Democrats might well lose the Senate," says Halpert, adding that New Hampshire is "a very swingy state" and the midterm outcomes there could surprise many people.

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2022

Indigenous Voters Helped Democrats Carry Arizona in 2020. Now Their Voting Rights Are Under Attack
Indigenous voters in Arizona who played a key role in catapulting Joe Biden to victory in 2020 are facing a sweeping rollback of their voting rights that may swing the state back to Republicans in Tuesday's midterms. "In 2020, Native voters understood that the election of Donald Trump was an existential problem," says New Yorker staff writer Sue Halpern, whose latest piece explores how voters on Arizona's Navajo, Apache and Hopi reservations are navigating the 2021 Supreme Court ruling that banned a common method of voting collection used by Indigenous voters. We also speak with Lydia Dosela, who is running efforts to get out the vote on Indigenous reservations in Arizona to make sure "all Native American voices are heard loud and clear."

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2022

Sunrise Movement on Midterm Election: If GOP Takes Congress, Climate Action Will Be Stalled, Reversed
The climate movement warns the midterm elections will either advance or torpedo climate initiatives in the U.S. This comes as climate activists and scientists at the U.N. climate summit in Egypt cautioned that the world is heading toward climate disaster without deeper cuts in planet-heating emissions. "We are up against a ticking time bomb of an unrelenting climate crisis and an economic crisis that is bearing down on working people," says Varshini Prakash of the Sunrise Movement, which has reached 3 million young voters to get out the vote in the midterms. Prakash also explains how parts of President Biden's climate legislation passed this year could be stalled or reversed if Republicans take back control of Congress in 2023.

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2022

Alaa Abd El-Fattah's Sister Speaks Out at U.N. Climate Summit as Pressure Grows on Egypt to Free Him
The family of the imprisoned Egyptian dissident Alaa Abd El-Fattah says they no longer know if he is still alive or if he is being force-fed, more than 50 hours after he stopped drinking water in an intensification of a six-month hunger strike. We feature an address by Alaa's sister Sanaa Seif at the U.N. climate summit in Sharm el-Sheikh. "The symbolic battle has been won by your show of support," says Seif. "I just hope his body and he is not sacrificed for it."

Democracy Now
Nov 08, 2022

Headlines for November 8, 2022
Election Day: GOP Sues to Disqualify Thousands of Mail-In Ballots in Key States, African Union Urges Richer Nations at COP27 to Pay Climate Reparations, Report: Ice Levels Collapsing at Levels "Unthinkable Just a Decade Ago", Egypt: Family of Alaa Abd El-Fattah Demands Proof He Is Still Alive in Prison, Dutch Authorities Arrest 100 Climate Activists for Blocking Jets at Amsterdam Airport, Ukraine Decries Russia's Forcible Evacuation of Occupied Kherson, U.S. & South Korea Continue Joint Air Drills Amid Mounting Tension on Peninsula, 89 Asylum Seekers Saved at Sea Finally Allowed to Disembark in Italy, Supreme Court Denies Second Challenge to Biden Student Debt Plan, Judge Temporarily Suspends Prison Sentence for Steve Bannon Due to Appeal, Elon Musk Endorses GOP as Account for League of Women Voters Is Suspended

Democracy Now
Nov 07, 2022

Musk Fires Half of Twitter's Workforce; Rights Orgs Urge Boycott of "Superspreader of Misinformation"
Alarm is growing over how the world's richest person, Elon Musk, is changing Twitter after he spent $44 billion to buy the influential social media platform. Musk fired nearly half of Twitter's workforce in a mass layoff Friday that gutted teams dedicated to human rights, artificial intelligence ethics and combating election misinformation, just days before Tuesday's midterm election. This comes after he met with over half a dozen civil rights groups amid concerns he will let misinformation and hate speech go unchecked. We speak with leaders from two of those groups: Nora Benavidez of Free Press and Free Press Action Fund, and Rashad Robinson of Color of Change. "Self-regulated companies are unregulated companies," says Robinson, who along with Benavidez says Musk has exacerbated already toxic conditions at Twitter and failed to see the "real and porous relationship between the online world and this offline real world." Both groups are urging advertisers to boycott Twitter unless Musk takes dramatic actions to safeguard rights on the platform.

Democracy Now
Nov 07, 2022

Voters to Decide on Abortion, Marijuana, Ranked-Choice Voting & Prison Labor in 2022 Midterm Ballot Initiatives
Across the United States, local voters will decide critical ballot initiatives related to reproductive freedom, voting rights, marijuana and slavery in Tuesday's midterm elections. Chris Melody Fields Figueredo of the Ballot Initiative Strategy Center says the initiatives like abortion could surprise some people, and says the recent Kansas vote to protect abortion shows reproductive health can transcend party lines. Fields Figueredo also explains how slavery is still enshrined in some state constitutions as a form of punishment, which she says has "led to mass incarceration of Black and Brown communities."

Democracy Now
Nov 07, 2022

Why Is AIPAC Spending Millions to Beat Summer Lee, a Democratic Socialist Running for Congress in PA?
With Democrats at risk of losing both the House and Senate in Tuesday's midterms, we speak with Justice Democrats spokesperson Waleed Shahid about the progressives favored to win congressional seats. Texas city councilmember and former labor organizer Greg Casar, Illinois state Representative Delia Ramirez and Pennsylvania community organizer Summer Lee have all been endorsed by Justice Democrats, who are best known for helping catapult members of the Squad to victory in 2018. "I think that we'll continue to see these progressives expand the horizon on issues that working-class communities care about," says Shahid, who critiques the Democratic Party for weak messaging on the economy. Shahid also discusses how the pro-Israel lobbying group AIPAC is pouring money into defeating progressive candidates like Summer Lee.

Democracy Now
Nov 07, 2022

Headlines for November 7, 2022
Biden, Obama Campaign for Fetterman in PA, Warn Voters Against Erosion of Democracy in Final Pitches, Judges Rule on Last-Minute Voting Challenges Days Ahead of Midterms, Rights Advocates Raise Alarm over Firings, Changes at Twitter Under Elon Musk, Ukraine Officials Warn Residents to Prepare for Cold, Dark Winter, WSJ: U.S. Nat'l Sec. Adviser Meeting with Russian Officials over Nuclear Risk, COP27 Kicks Off as U.N. Head Warns "We Are on a Highway to Climate Hell", COP27 President Says Climate Compensation on Official Summit Agenda, Egyptian Hunger Striker Alaa Abd El-Fattah gives up water as COP27 Opens, COP27 Attendees Warned Egypt May Use App to Spy on Critics and Silence Dissent, Iranian Lawmakers Demand Death Sentences for Anti-Government Protesters, Syrian Government Attack on Displaced People Camp Kills 9, Italian Authorities Leave 250 Asylum Seekers Stranded Aboard Rescue Ships, Airline Crash in Tanzania Leaves 19 Dead, Iowa Teen Who Killed Rapist Escapes Probation Center, CDC Warns of "Tripledemic" of Influenza, RSV and COVID-19

Democracy Now
Nov 04, 2022

Dept. of Homeland Security Ramps Up Efforts to Police Online Speech on Ukraine, COVID & Afghanistan
Documents obtained by The Intercept reveal the Department of Homeland Security is working with private tech companies to fight online speech that undermines support for the U.S. government. We speak to one of the co-authors of The Intercept's report, investigative journalist Lee Fang, who says the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act signed into law in 2018 by then-President Donald Trump expanded the government's power to reshape online discourse. "These documents raise clear civil liberty concerns, concerns around the First Amendment and if the government is trying to shape the kind of news we see," says Fang.

Democracy Now
Nov 04, 2022

Meet the New Yorkers Welcoming Asylum Seekers Bused to City After Hostile Reception at U.S. Border
As thousands of asylum seekers continue to arrive on buses in New York, we speak with a man from Venezuela about his journey, and two New Yorkers who have been helping since August to welcome them with dignity and ensure they get the housing, food and other assistance they need. "The system here in New York City is not created for this type of community, which is the migrants that are arriving," says former asylum seeker, Adama Bah. "It is our job as New Yorkers to be able to welcome them in this city that is a so-called sanctuary city," adds Power Malu, with the group Artists, Athletes and Activists. Bah and Malu also discuss how their work is being repeated nationwide.

Democracy Now
Nov 04, 2022

From Terrorist Backer to Kingmaker: Itamar Ben-Gvir & Israeli Far Right Help Netanyahu Regain Power
Benjamin Netanyahu is set to return as Israel's prime minister, with Tuesday's election results showing his Likud Party and far-right allies winning enough seats to form a parliamentary majority. This includes far-right lawmaker Itamar Ben-Gvir, who openly supports the ethnic cleansing of Palestinians, vows to crack down on the LGBTQ community and was once convicted of racist incitement against Arabs. "This is going to be a whole new level of power for the extreme right in the government," says Natasha Roth-Rowland, editor and writer at 972 Magazine, who studies right-wing Jewish extremism.

Democracy Now
Nov 04, 2022

Headlines for November 4, 2022
Far-Right Coalition Wins Most Seats in Israel's Knesset, Returning Netanyahu to Power, Russian Troops Signal Withdrawal from Occupied Kherson, UN Nuclear Agency Finds No Evidence to Back Russian "Dirty Bomb" Claims in Ukraine, Imran Khan Survives Assassination Attempt, Accuses Pakistan's PM of Plotting His Death, UN Warns of Melting Glaciers and Says Rich Countries Aren't Meeting Climate Pledges, Egyptian Political Prisoner Alaa Abd el-Fattah to Escalate Hunger Strike as COP27 Opens, Civil Society Groups Urge Biden Not to Send Troops to Haiti, Call for Haitian-Led Dialog, UN General Assembly Votes to Condemn US Embargo of Cuba for 30th Straight Year, Elon Musk Begins Mass Layoffs at Twitter, Meets With Civil Rights Groups, University of California Student Workers Overwhelmingly Approve Nov. 14 Strike, Protesters Demand Closure of Rikers Island Jail After 18th Prisoner Death of 2022

Democracy Now
Nov 03, 2022

Tigray Peace Deal: Surprise Agreement Ends Two Years of Civil War in Ethiopia, Brings "Big Relief"


Democracy Now
Nov 03, 2022

African Nations Reliant on Grain Imports Seek Ukraine Diplomacy as U.S. & Europe Align Against Russia
We look at the impact of the war in Ukraine on the continent of Africa with Adebayo Olukoshi, an international relations scholar based in Johannesburg, South Africa. African nations import much of their grain. With their significant dependency on Ukrainian wheat and fertilizer in the Global South, "there is a wish for much more investment in diplomacy" between Ukraine and Russia, says Olukoshi. He says many African nations have more amicable relations with Russia due to the Soviet Union's support for anticolonial struggles before its dissolution.

Democracy Now
Nov 03, 2022

Ukraine "Skeptical" of Ceasefire Russia Could Use to Cement Occupation, Even as Grain Exports Resume
As G7 leaders discuss supporting Ukrainian defense forces against Russia, we speak with Richard Gowan, U.N. director at the International Crisis Group, about the possibility of diplomacy to end the war. It is possible for the U.N. to help broker a peace deal, says Gowan. However, "the Ukrainians are very skeptical about accepting a ceasefire because they fear that Russia will pause hostilities, but it won't pull its troops back from the territories it's seized since February," he adds.

Democracy Now
Nov 03, 2022

Egypt Arrests Hundreds in Crackdown Before COP27 Climate Summit; Pressured to Free Alaa Abd El-Fattah
Egyptian authorities have arrested hundreds in a crackdown on dissenting voices ahead of COP27, the U.N. climate conference which starts Sunday in Sharm El-Sheikh. Fifteen Nobel laureates have signed an open letter asking world leaders to pressure Egypt into releasing its many political prisoners, including human rights activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah, who plans to intensify his six-month hunger strike by forgoing water on the opening day of the climate summit. "He's organizing all of us from his prison cell," says Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous.

Democracy Now
Nov 03, 2022

Headlines for November 3, 2022
Ethiopia Agrees to Peace in Tigray After Two Years of War, Ukraine Nuclear Plant on Emergency Generators After Fighting Severs Power Lines, U.N. Security Council Denies Russia Probe of U.S. Biological Weapons Claims, Pentagon Confirms Active-Duty U.S. Troops Are Deployed Inside Ukraine, Oath Keepers Militia Leader Sought to Contact Trump After Jan. 6 Insurrection, Biden Warns U.S. Democracy Imperiled by Political Violence , Trump's Lawyers Saw Clarence Thomas as Key to Overturning 2020 Election, Wisconsin Candidate Says, "Republicans Will Never Lose Another Election After I'm Elected Governor", Trump Aide Kash Patel Granted Immunity to Testify Over Mar-a-Lago Documents, Fears of Recession Grow as Federal Reserve Raises Interest Rates Further, Israeli Soldiers Kill 2 More Palestinians As Netanyahu Clinches Premiership, Ex-Pakistan PM Imran Khan Survives Shooting at Rally, Judge Sentences Parkland Mass Shooter Nikolas Cruz to Life Without Parole, Jackson Officials Say Water Finally Safe to Drink; Flint Residents Ask Judge to Replace Lead Pipes

Democracy Now
Nov 02, 2022

"Working People Everywhere Have Had It": SEIU Pres. Mary Kay Henry on Unions Mobilizing for Midterms
We look at the high stakes of the midterm elections for workers, including in key battleground states. Mary Kay Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union, says they are campaigning to empower working people, especially infrequent voters of color and new immigrants, to vote in their best interests. "We have got to make our votes a demand, and not a show of support for candidates that are with us one day and against us the next," says Henry.

Democracy Now
Nov 02, 2022

How to End the War in Ukraine: Matt Duss and Ray McGovern Debate U.S. Policy on Russia, NATO & More
As the U.S. pours billions in military aid into Ukraine, we host a debate on the Biden administration's response to the war and U.S. policy toward Russia amid increasing calls among progressives for a diplomatic end to the conflict. We speak to former Bernie Sanders foreign policy adviser Matt Duss, now a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Ray McGovern, a former CIA analyst who specialized in the Soviet Union. "Everyone understands that at some point there will need to be a negotiation to bring this war to a close, but I think the tension within the progressive community comes to when and how that diplomacy actually takes place," says Duss. McGovern stressest that U.S. policymakers must understand Russia's motivations, saying Russia sees the eastward expansion of NATO as threatening its core interests akin to how the United States viewed the Cuban Missile Crisis in the 1960s. "We need to go back and figure out how this all started in order to figure out how to end it," says McGovern.

Democracy Now
Nov 02, 2022

Headlines for November 2, 2022
Russia Rejoins Grain Export Deal; Water and Power Restored in Kyiv Following Russian Attacks, Benjamin Netanyahu Poised to Return to Israeli Leadership With Far-Right Alliance, Jair Bolsonaro Refuses to Admit Defeat But Allows Presidential Transition to Move Ahead, North Korea Launches 23 Missiles, Warns U.S. & South Korea Over War Games, U.S. Judge Limits Voter Intimidation By Far-Right Vigilantes; PA Says Undated Absentee Ballots Invalid, Liz Cheney Stumps for Democrat Elissa Slotkin, Backs Tim Ryan Against Trump Supporter J.D. Vance, Abrams Makes Final Push in GA Gov. Race as Biden Speaks to Voters in Florida, SCOTUS Blocks Transfer of Trump Tax Documents, Rules Lindsey Graham Must Testify in GA 2020 Probe, Biden Admin Weighing Sending Haitian Asylum Seekers to Guantánamo Bay, Dozens of Migrants Missing After Two Shipwrecks off Greek Coast, Nobel Laureates Draw Attention to Egypt's Jailing of Activists Ahead of COP27, Egypt Releases Detained Climate Activist Ajit Rajagopal Amid Crackdown on Protests, Just Stop Oil Activists Take Aim At U.K. Gov't Buildings to Highlight Climate Crisis, Rapper Takeoff Killed in Houston Shooting, NYC Starbucks/Amazon Go Workers File Union Petition; NLRB Says Ithaca Starbucks Must Reopen, Investigation into 1921 Greenwood Race Massacre Uncovers Another 17 Bodies

Democracy Now
Nov 01, 2022

Who Killed Malcolm X? New York to Pay $36 Million for Two Men Wrongfully Jailed For 1965 Murder
The city and state of New York have agreed to pay $36 million to settle lawsuits on behalf of two men wrongly convicted and imprisoned for decades for the 1965 assassination of Malcolm X. Muhammad Aziz and Khalil Islam were exonerated last year for the murder after investigators found "serious miscarriages of justice" in the case. They each spent more than 20 years in prison for a crime they did not commit, and Islam died in 2009 before his record was cleared. We speak to civil rights lawyer David Shanies, who represented the men in their lawsuit, and scholar Abdur-Rahman Muhammad, who helped spark the reopening of the case, and was featured in the 2020 Netflix documentary series "Who Killed Malcolm X?"

Democracy Now
Nov 01, 2022

End the Occupation: Norwegian Refugee Council Warns Israeli Elections May Empower Extremist Parties
As Israel holds national elections amid increasing crackdowns on Palestinians in the occupied West Bank, we speak with Jan Egeland, secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council, who is in Jerusalem and has been speaking with Palestinian families in the Occupied Territories. He is calling on Israel to end its decades-long occupation. He describes the ongoing Israeli demolition of Palestinian homes and the growth of illegal settlements, and says the situation is likely to get worse after elections as the political parties expected to make major gains are "in favor of illegal settlements, colonization of occupied land and the displacement of Palestinian families."

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