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Democracy Now
Mar 19, 2019

The Military-Industrial Complex: Trump's Ties to Boeing in Spotlight Amid Probes of 737 MAX 8 Jets
The Trump administration's close ties to Boeing are facing new scrutiny in the wake of deadly plane crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia involving the Boeing 737 MAX 8 jet. President Trump has publicly praised Boeing hundreds of times in his two years in office and participated in efforts to sell its planes, including the 737 MAX series, to countries and airlines around the world. Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg praised Trump's support at a dinner last August at Trump's Bedminster, New Jersey, golf club. Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan, who was appointed by Trump, spent 31 years as a Boeing executive. And Trump's former U.N. ambassador, Nikki Haley, has been nominated to the Boeing board of directors. We speak to William Hartung, the director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy. His recent piece in The Nation is titled "A Former Boeing Executive Is Now Running the Pentagon."

Democracy Now
Mar 19, 2019

ACLU: The U.S. Is Acting Like an Authoritarian Regime by Barring ICC Officials Probing War Crimes
The Trump administration has barred International Criminal Court investigators from entering the United States. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced Friday that the U.S. will start denying visas to members of the ICC who may be investigating alleged war crimes by the U.S. military in Afghanistan. In September, national security adviser John Bolton threatened U.S. sanctions against ICC judges if they continued to investigate alleged war crimes committed by U.S. troops in Afghanistan. A 2016 ICC report accused the U.S. military of torturing at least 61 prisoners in Afghanistan during the ongoing war. The report also accused the CIA of subjecting at least 27 prisoners to torture, including rape, at CIA prison sites in Afghanistan, Poland, Romania and Lithuania. We speak with Jamil Dakwar, director of the Human Rights Program at the American Civil Liberties Union.

Democracy Now
Mar 19, 2019

"They Are Us": New Zealand Mourns After Mosque Attacks Killed 50 Including Refugees & Immigrants
Burials are beginning in New Zealand as the country mourns the loss of 50 Muslim worshipers gunned down in two mosques in Christchurch by a white supremacist Friday. It was the deadliest attack in New Zealand's history. The worshipers killed in the Christchurch massacre came from around the world. Most of them were immigrants, or refugees who had come to New Zealand seeking safety. Six Pakistanis, four Jordanians, four Egyptians and at least three Bangladeshis are among the dead. The Palestinian Authority's foreign ministry said that six of the victims were of Palestinian origin. We speak with Eva Nisa, a lecturer in religious studies at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Her recent article for Middle East Eye is titled "New Zealand has been a home to Muslims for centuries, and will remain so."

Democracy Now
Mar 19, 2019

Headlines for March 19, 2019
New Zealand Mourns Victims of Mosque Terror Attack, Calls for Support of Muslims, Lawmakers to Hold Hearing on Rise of White Nationalism, HuffPost: 7 Active U.S. Military Are Members of Far-Right "Identity Evropa", Mozambique: Cyclone Idai Death Toll Could Top 1,000, Nebraska: Flooding Submerges Air Force Base, NYT: Saudi Crown Prince Approved Campaign to Silence Opponents, U.N. Condemns Israel for Use of Lethal Force on Gaza Protesters, New Brexit Vote Blocked Less Than 2 Weeks from Deadline, France to Crack Down on "Yellow Vest" Protests, Dutch Police Arrest Suspect Who Shot and Killed 3 People in Utrecht, Mexico: Journalist and Radio Host Santiago Barroso Killed by Gunmen, Venezuelan Opposition Takes Control of Diplomatic Properties in U.S., Nicaragua: Police Arrest Over 100 as Protesters Call for Release of Political Prisoners, House Judiciary Cmte Receives 10,000s of Documents in Trump Probe, Report: U.S. Gov't Operates "Secret Shelters" for Unaccompanied Migrant Youth, Sen. Warren Calls for Ending Electoral College, Ex-President Bush Attends Naturalization Ceremony, Rep. Steve King Posts Facebook Meme Imagining New Civil War, U.S. Veterans for Peace Held in Ireland After Protest at Military Base

Democracy Now
Mar 18, 2019

A Global Strike for Climate Change: 1.4 Million Students Walk Out of Class Demanding Action
Up to 1.4 million children around the world took part in a global climate strike on Friday to demand world leaders do more to address the dangers of climate. The mass protests were sparked by 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, who has skipped school every Friday to sit outside the Swedish parliament to demand leaders act on climate change. Democracy Now! was in the streets of New York City on Friday with the young activists. We speak with 18-year-old Alysa Chen, one of the organizers of the walkout at New York City's Bronx High School of Science.

Democracy Now
Mar 18, 2019

Former Neo-Nazi: President Trump May Be Complicit in Growing Threat of White Supremacy
President Donald Trump is refusing to acknowledge the global rise of white nationalism in the wake of the hate-fueled New Zealand massacre that left 50 Muslim worshipers dead on Friday. Police have arrested and charged 28-year-old white supremacist Brenton Tarrant with the killings. Before the attacks, Tarrant published a manifesto in which he praised Trump as "a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose" and described immigrants as "invaders." On the same day, Trump claimed there was an "invasion" occurring on the southern border, signing his first presidential veto rejecting a resolution reversing his declaration of a national emergency on the U.S.-Mexico border. We speak with Christian Picciolini, the founder of Free Radicals Project, a nonprofit helping people disengage from hate and violent extremism. He was a leading neo-Nazi skinhead and far-right extremist in the 1980s and '90s. He is the author of "White American Youth: My Descent into America's Most Violent Hate Movement—and How I Got Out." We also speak with Khaled Beydoun, a law professor at the University of Arkansas and author of "American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear."

Democracy Now
Mar 18, 2019

State-Sponsored Islamophobia & Trump's Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric Embolden Right-Wing Terrorists
Fifty people are dead, and millions around the globe are mourning, following the massacre at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday. The terrorist attack unfolded during Friday prayer, when a lone gunman and avid white supremacist opened fire on worshipers while live-streaming the attack on Facebook. It was the deadliest shooting in the country's modern history. The youngest of the dead is 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim. Police have arrested and charged a 28-year-old Australian white supremacist named Brenton Tarrant with the killings. Tarrant published a manifesto praising President Donald Trump as "a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose." Trump has refused to acknowledge the global rise of white nationalism in the wake of the attack. We speak with Khaled Beydoun, a law professor at the University of Arkansas and the author of "American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear." He says, "There's an underbelly of anti-Muslim animus that facilitates the emergence of the very brazen Islamophobia we see today, weaponized by people like President Trump or by terrorists on the ground in places like New Zealand who commit massacres like we saw on Friday."

Democracy Now
Mar 18, 2019

After Deadly 1996 Massacre, Australia Overhauled Its Gun Laws. New Zealand Now Plans to Do the Same
New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has vowed to change the country's gun laws following the deadly Christchurch massacre Friday that left 50 people dead and millions around the globe mourning following the massacre. The terrorist attack unfolded at two mosques during Friday prayer, when a lone gunman and avid white supremacist opened fire on worshipers while live-streaming the attack on Facebook. It was the deadliest shooting in the country's modern history. The shooter reportedly used five guns to carry out the attack, including two semiautomatic assault weapons. We speak with Rebecca Peters, an international arms control advocate and member of the International Action Network on Small Arms. She led the campaign to reform Australia's gun laws after the 1996 Port Arthur massacre, when a gunman shot dead 35 people at a cafe. After the attack, Australia cracked down on gun violence, outlawing automatic and semiautomatic rifles. More than 640,000 weapons were turned in to authorities in a nationwide buyback.

Democracy Now
Mar 18, 2019

Headlines for March 18, 2019
New Zealand PM to Reform Gun Laws as Death Toll from Mosque Terrorist Attack Hits 50, Trump Denies Threat of White Nationalist Terrorism, WH Chief of Staff Mulvaney: "The President Is Not a White Supremacist", Trump Issues First Veto over Nat'l Emergency Resolution, "Clear Similarities" Found Between Ethiopian Airlines & Lion Air Crashes, U.S. to Deny Visas for ICC Investigators over Afghanistan Probe, The Philippines Withdraws from ICC over Duterte Drug War Investigation, Students Take to Streets for International "Youth Climate Strike", Extreme Weather in Midwest Brings Massive Floods, Kills 2 in Nebraska, At Least 120 Killed by Cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe & Mozambique, Indonesia: Flooding Kills At Least 77 in Papua, Israel: Court Bans Leader of Racist Far-Right Party, Overturns Ban on Arab Party, Denver: Immigrant Rights Activist Takes Sanctuary Again, Sues ICE, Kentucky: Judge Temporarily Blocks Draconian "Fetal Heartbeat Law", Bernie Sanders 2020 Campaign Staff Unionize, Sen. Gillibrand Launches 2020 Bid, Announces Rally at Trump Hotel

Democracy Now
Mar 15, 2019

Journalist's Struggle to Find Bone Marrow Match Exposes Racial Disparity in National Registry
A nationwide campaign has been launched to find a blood stem cell donor for a 29-year-old journalist who was recently diagnosed with an aggressive form of leukemia. Liyna Anwar is an Indian-American producer who used to work at StoryCorps. She desperately needs a stem cell transplant, but she does not match any of her family members or the 19 million people in a national registry. Her search for a match is made more difficult because South Asians are underrepresented in the national registry. A campaign urging people of South Asian descent to donate stem cells has been launched in Anwar's name. It's called #SwabForLiyna. We speak with her brother Dr. Abbas Anwar and an expert on acute myelogenous leukemia, Dr. Azra Raza. We also speak with Dave Isay, the founder of StoryCorps.

Democracy Now
Mar 15, 2019

Anand Giridharadas: College Bribery Scandal Highlights How America is Rigged for Wealthy & Powerful
As the fallout continues over the elite college admissions scandal that investigators nicknamed "Operation Varsity Blues," we speak with journalist Anand Giridharadas, author of "Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World." His book examines how the so-called elite class of America have worked the system to maintain and consolidate power and wealth, even while claiming to help people and "change the world" through charity. On Wednesday, Giridharadas tweeted: "The college bribery scam is not a college bribery scam. It is a master class in how America—governed by a cheater, ruled by rule breakers, managed by a class that confuses its privilege for merit—functions."

Democracy Now
Mar 15, 2019

White Supremacist Kills 49 Muslim Worshipers in New Zealand as Islamophobic Hate Crimes Rise Globally
In New Zealand, a white right-wing extremist killed 49 people in an attack on two mosques in the city of Christchurch during Friday prayers. It is the deadliest shooting in New Zealand's history. Police have arrested and charged a 28-year-old Australian man named Brenton Tarrant with the attack. The gunman live-streamed the attack and published a manifesto in which he praised President Donald Trump as "a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose." We speak with human rights activist and lawyer Qasim Rashid, who recently launched a campaign to run for a seat in the Virginia state Senate. And we speak with Farid Hafez, a lecturer and researcher at the University of Salzburg, senior research fellow at The Bridge Initiative at Georgetown University and expert on Islamophobia.

Democracy Now
Mar 15, 2019

Headlines for March 15, 2019
49 Dead as Far-Right Shooter Opens Fire on New Zealand Mosques, President Trump Threatens Political Opponents With Violence, Connecticut Court Allows Sandy Hook Parents to Sue Gun Maker, Students Walk Out of Schools to Protest Gun Violence, Senate Rebukes Trump's Border Emergency Declaration, House Votes 420-0 to Make Mueller Report Public, Schoolchildren in Over 100 Countries Strike to Demand Climate Action, Swedish Climate Activist Greta Thunberg Nominated For Nobel Prize, NYC to Spend $500 Million Protecting Manhattan From Climate Change, Interior Official Hails Trump for Distracting Media From Drilling Plans, Irish Prime Minister Brings Boyfriend to Meeting With Mike Pence, Israel Bombs Gaza Strip After Two Rockets Fired Toward Tel Aviv, Tropical Cyclone Hits Mozambique, Already Hard-Hit by Deadly Floods, British Lawmakers Want a "Brextension" on Plans to Leave E.U., Brazil Marks One-Year Anniversary of Marielle Franco Assassination

Democracy Now
Mar 14, 2019

Until We Reckon: Mass Incarceration, Violence & the Radical Possibilities of Restorative Justice
A staggering 2.2 million people are locked up in America's sprawling prison system, and more than half of those currently confined in state prisons have been convicted of violent crime. In order to radically reduce the prison population and transform criminal justice in this country, author and community organizer Danielle Sered argues that reformers must reckon with violent crime and come up with radically new ways to address it. She lays out a path for this transformation in her new unflinching book, "Until We Reckon." Sered has spent nearly a decade working directly with people that have committed violent acts and survivors of violence as the executive director of Common Justice, a Brooklyn-based organization that offers alternatives to incarceration for people charged with violent felonies. Her experience anchors her book as she calls for a complete overhaul of the way we've been taught to think about crime, punishment and justice. We speak with Sered about restorative justice and how incarceration perpetuates the very violence it is meant to curb.

Democracy Now
Mar 14, 2019

Impeaching Trump: Pelosi Says It's "Not Worth It," But Progressive Democrats Push Ahead
Democratic lawmakers are continuing to push for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, despite House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaking out against impeachment in an interview earlier this week. Impeachment rumors have been swirling since the Democrats regained control of the House in January. Congressmember Rashida Tlaib of Michigan said last week that she will formally introduce articles of impeachment this month. We speak with John Bonifaz, an attorney and political activist specializing in constitutional law and voting rights. He is the co-founder and president of Free Speech for People, one of the organizations calling for Trump's impeachment.

Democracy Now
Mar 14, 2019

Regime Change Via Sanctions? U.S. Uses International Finance System to Strangle Venezuelan Economy
Venezuelan officials say power will be largely restored in the country today after a week-long blackout across much of the country. The cause of the blackout remains in dispute. The United States blamed it on years of neglect of the Venezuelan energy system, but Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro accused the U.S. military of launching a "cyberattack against the electrical, telecommunication and internet systems." The blackout comes amid a growing political crisis in Venezuela as U.S.-backed opposition groups attempt to topple Maduro's government. On Monday, the United States announced it was withdrawing remaining diplomatic staff from its embassy in Caracas. We speak with Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research and president of Just Foreign Policy. His latest piece for The New Republic is headlined "The Reality Behind Trump's Coalition for Regime Change in Venezuela."

Democracy Now
Mar 14, 2019

Headlines for March 14, 2019
Trump Orders Boeing 737 MAX Planes Grounded After Fatal Crashes, Senate Votes to End U.S. Support for Saudi-Led War on Yemen, Pompeo Defends Support for Saudi Arabia Amid Reports of Torture, Senate Poised to Block Trump's National Emergency Declaration, Former Trump Campaign Chair Sentenced to 43 More Months in Prison, U.N. Warns Arctic on Pace to Warm by 5 Degrees Celsius by 2050, Spanish Investigators Link CIA to Attack on North Korean Embassy, Brazil: Two Gunmen Kill 8, Reportedly Inspired by Columbine Massacre, Nigeria: Lagos Building Collapse Kills 10 and Traps Schoolchildren, British MPs Reject "No-Deal" Brexit in Latest Blow to Theresa May, Senate Confirms Neomi Rao and Paul Matey to Federal Bench, ICE Using Vast Surveillance Database to Target Immigrants, Facebook Faces Criminal Probe for Sharing Private Data with Tech Giants, California Gov. Gavin Newsom Signs Moratorium on Death Penalty, Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke Joins 2020 Presidential Race, Activists Demand Cancelation of Puerto Rico's $72 Billion Public Debt

Democracy Now
Mar 13, 2019

As Joe Biden Hints at Presidential Run, Andrew Cockburn Looks at His "Disastrous Legislative Legacy"
Speculation is mounting that former Vice President Joe Biden will soon enter the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. As a longtime senator from Delaware, Biden has previously run twice for the Democratic nomination. The last time was in 2008, when he ultimately became then-Senator Barack Obama's running mate. While a new campaign would seek to capitalize on Biden's two terms as vice president, it would also invite scrutiny of his Senate record in a Democratic political climate that is notably more progressive today than it was when Biden last sought the nomination. We speak with Andrew Cockburn, Washington editor for Harper's magazine. His latest piece is headlined "No Joe! Joe Biden's disastrous legislative legacy."

Democracy Now
Mar 13, 2019

Cheating, Bribes & Lies: DOJ Charges Dozens of Rich Parents & Coaches in College Admission Scandal
Operation Varsity Blues. That's the name of a sweeping federal probe into what the Justice Department calls the biggest college admissions scam the agency has ever uncovered. On Tuesday, 50 people, including 13 college coaches, were arrested for taking part in a scheme where wealthy parents paid exorbitant bribes to secure spots for their unqualified children in elite schools, including Yale, Stanford, Georgetown, UCLA, USC and Wake Forest. Prosecutors have charged 33 parents, including Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin; Loughlin's husband, the fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli; and Bill McGlashan, a founder of TPG Capital, one of the largest private equity investment firms in the world. We speak with Ivory Toldson, professor of counseling psychology at Howard University and president of Quality Education for Minorities. His new book is titled "No BS (Bad Stats): Black People Need People Who Believe in Black People Enough Not to Believe Every Bad Thing They Hear About Black People."

Democracy Now
Mar 13, 2019

Ralph Nader's Grandniece Died in Ethiopian Plane Crash; Now He Is Urging Boycott of Boeing Jet
Calls are growing for the United States to ground all Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes in the wake of a devastating plane crash in Ethiopia Sunday that left 157 people dead. It is the aircraft model's second fatal crash in the past five months. An Indonesian flight of the same plane type crashed last October, killing 189 people. In response, two-thirds of the 737 MAX 8s have been pulled from service. At least 41 countries across the globe, from China to Turkey to India, have grounded their fleets of the aircraft until a thorough safety review is conducted. Despite international outcry, the United States and Canada are continuing business as usual. We speak with Ralph Nader, longtime consumer advocate, corporate critic and former presidential candidate. His great-niece, Samya Stumo, died on Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Nader wrote an open letter to Boeing titled "Passengers First, Ground the 737 MAX 8 Now!" And we speak with William McGee, aviation journalist for Consumer Reports. He is the author of "Attention All Passengers: The Airlines' Dangerous Descent."

Democracy Now
Mar 13, 2019

Headlines for March 13, 2019
Prosecutors Charge Actors, CEOs, Coaches in College Bribery Scandal, More Boeing Planes Grounded as Details of Technical Problems Emerge, California Gov. Gavin Newsom Announces Death Penalty Moratorium, Dems Seek to Expand Immigration Protections with Dream and Promise Act, Brazil: 2 Ex-Police Officers Arrested over Murder of Marielle Franco, U.S. Withdraws Diplomatic Staff from Venezuela as Blackout Continues, U.K.: Lawmakers Reject New Brexit Deal as Deadline Looms, Cardinal Pell Sentenced to 6 Years for Sexually Abusing Boys, Israeli Forces Shoot and Kill 2 Palestinian Men in West Bank, U.N.: At Least 535 Killed in December Attacks in Western DRC, Negotiators: Progress Made But No Deal After Afghan Peace Talks, Study: Pollution Disproportionately Affects Minorities But Caused by White People, Local Sheriffs Create "2nd Amendment Sanctuaries," Defying Gun Control, Dems Grill Wells Fargo CEO over Abusive Practices, DAPL, Private Prisons

Democracy Now
Mar 12, 2019

The Fight for Hampshire College: How One School's Financial Calamity Exposes a Crisis in Higher Ed
Students and faculty are fighting to save Hampshire College from unprecedented financial crisis and potential collapse, following a series of devastating cuts and administrative decisions. In January, Hampshire College President Miriam Nelson announced the board of trustees and senior administrators would seek to merge the school with a "strategic partner." The announcement was followed by staff layoffs in the school's development and admissions offices, and news that the school would not be admitting a full class in the fall. We host a discussion with Hampshire professor Margaret Cerullo; Hampshire senior Desta Cantave, who is also a member of Hampshire Rise Up; and Hampshire College trustee William Null.

Democracy Now
Mar 12, 2019

Justice for Stephon Clark: Protests Erupt As DA Fails to Charge Cops Who Killed Unarmed Black Father
Protests in Sacramento continue more than a week after the county's district attorney announced the two police officers who shot and killed 22-year-old, unarmed African American Stephon Clark in his grandmother's backyard last year will not face criminal charges. Since the news broke, organizers have joined walkouts at local colleges and high schools, demonstrations at the City Council, an ongoing occupation of a Sacramento police station, a die-in at UC Davis and a protest in one of the city's wealthiest neighborhoods that led to 84 arrests. This marks the 34th consecutive police shooting review in which Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert found that the officers acted legally, according to The Sacramento Bee. We speak with Berry Accius, founder of Voice of the Youth and a Sacramento community activist.

Democracy Now
Mar 12, 2019

Trump's New Budget Slashes Medicare and Bolsters Military in an "Attack on the Poor & Middle Class"
President Trump is seeking $8.6 billion to fund a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border, and an almost 5 percent increase in military spending. Meanwhile, Trump is calling for drastic cuts to domestic spending, including cutting $845 billion from Medicare spending over the next decade. Trump also wants to slash funding for the Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent and the Interior Department's budget by 14 percent. We speak with David Cay Johnston, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, and founder and editor of DCReport.org.

Democracy Now
Mar 12, 2019

We Will See Trump's Tax Returns: David Cay Johnston Predicts Probes Will Uncover President's Secrets
The New York Times is reporting New York Attorney General Letitia James issued subpoenas late Monday to Deutsche Bank and Investors Bank for records related to the Trump Organization. This comes just weeks after Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen testified before Congress that Trump had inflated his assets in financial statements. New York state regulators subpoenaed the Trump Organization's insurance broker, Aon, after Cohen's testimony. The House Judiciary Committee also recently requested documents from 81 people and groups in Trump's inner circle. We speak with David Cay Johnston, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, and founder and editor of DCReport.org. His most recent book is titled "It's Even Worse Than You Think: What the Trump Administration Is Doing to America."

Democracy Now
Mar 12, 2019

Headlines for March 12, 2019
2020 Budget Boosts Border Wall & Military Funding, Slashes Domestic Programs, NY AG Probe Targets Deutsche Bank's Ties to Trump Org., Rep. Pelosi: Trump "Not Worth" Impeaching, Algerian Pres. Bouteflika Will Not Seek 5th Term, Delays Election, U.N.: 2018 Deadliest Year for Syrian Children, U.N.: Airstrikes in Yemen Kill 22 Women and Children, Iranian Human Rights Lawyer Sotoudeh Sentenced to 38 Years, Colombia: Indigenous Activist Killed Amid Mounting Violence, Food Stamps Cut for 1.4 Million Puerto Ricans, Fox News' Tucker Carlson Calls Iraqis "Semiliterate Primitive Monkeys" in Surfaced Recording, Increasing Bans on Boeing 737 MAX 8 Flights After Ethiopian Airlines Disaster, Facebook Temporarily Takes Down Warren Campaign Ads Critical of Facebook, 2020 DNC Will Be Held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Olympic Athlete and Stanford Student Kelly Catlin Dies by Suicide

Democracy Now
Mar 11, 2019

Greenwald: White House Spread False Story About Venezuela Burning Aid Trucks to Win Support for War
An investigation by The New York Times has found that several trucks carrying so-called humanitarian aid that were set ablaze during a showdown at the Colombia-Venezuela border last month were not caused by President Nicolás Maduro's forces, as was widely reported at the time by the media and Trump administration officials. We speak with Glenn Greenwald, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and one of the founding editors of The Intercept. His latest piece is "NYT's Exposé on the Lies About Burning Aid Trucks in Venezuela Shows How U.S. Government and Media Spread Pro-War Propaganda."

Democracy Now
Mar 11, 2019

Glenn Greenwald: Chelsea Manning's Refusal to Testify Against WikiLeaks Will Help Save Press Freedom
Chelsea Manning has been sent back to jail after refusing to answer questions before a grand jury investigating WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange. Manning, a U.S. Army whistleblower, had been subpoenaed by federal prosecutors in Virginia's Eastern District to appear for questioning about her 2010 leak to WikiLeaks of hundreds of thousands of State Department and Pentagon documents about the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We speak with Glenn Greenwald, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and one of the founding editors of The Intercept.

Democracy Now
Mar 11, 2019

"I Know No One More Patriotic": Daniel Ellsberg Praises Chelsea Manning After She Is Jailed Again
U.S. Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning has been sent back to jail after refusing to answer questions before a grand jury investigating WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange. Manning had been subpoenaed by federal prosecutors in Virginia's Eastern District to appear for questioning about her 2010 leak to WikiLeaks of hundreds of thousands of State Department and Pentagon documents about the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Manning was imprisoned from 2010 to 2017 for the leak. President Obama commuted her sentence before he left office. We speak with Pentagon Papers whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg about the significance of Chelsea Manning's actions.

Democracy Now
Mar 11, 2019

Journalists, Lawyers & Activists Targeted in Sweeping U.S. Intelligence Gathering Effort on Border
Newly revealed documents show the U.S. government created a secret database of activists and journalists who were documenting the Trump administration's efforts to thwart a caravan of migrants hoping to win asylum in the U.S. An investigation from San Diego's NBC 7 revealed the list was shared among Homeland Security Investigations, ICE, Customs and Border Protection and the FBI. It included the names of 10 journalists—seven of whom are U.S. citizens—along with nearly four dozen others listed as "organizers" or "instigators." House Democrats are now calling for the full disclosure of the government's secret list. We speak with one of the activists targeted by the government, Nicole Ramos, director of Al Otro Lado's Border Rights Project. The project works with asylum seekers in Tijuana, Mexico. We also speak with Ryan Devereaux, staff reporter at The Intercept. In early February, he wrote an article titled "Journalists, Lawyers, and Activists Working on the Border Face Coordinated Harassment from U.S. and Mexican Authorities."

Democracy Now
Mar 11, 2019

Headlines for March 11, 2019
Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Crashes, Killing All 157 On Board, Judge Jails Chelsea Manning For Refusing to Testify About Wikileaks, Trump to Request $8.6 Billion for Border Wall in 2020 Budget, 1000s More Could Join ACLU Lawsuit over Trump Family Separation Policy, House Passes Election Reform Act Despite GOP Resistance, NYT Report Contradicts U.S. Claim That Maduro Responsible for "Aid" Convoy Fire, Guaidó to Declare Emergency as NYT Reports U.S. Sanctions Exacerbate Blackout, Netanyahu: "Israel Is Not a State of All Its Citizens", Gaza: Israeli Forces Shoot Palestinian Protesters, Killing 1, Fox Host Under Fire for Saying Rep. Omar's Hijab Unconstitutional, Erik Prince Admits He Met with Trump Campaign in 2016, Ex-Owner of Spa in Sex Trafficking Ring Sold Chinese Execs "Access" to Trump, Sen. Warren Wants to Break Up Tech Giants Incl. Amazon, Facebook & Google

Democracy Now
Mar 08, 2019

Lost Children Archive: Valeria Luiselli's New Novel Bears Witness to the U.S. Immigration Crisis
Days after Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen defended President Trump's declaration of a national emergency at the southern border, we speak with Valeria Luiselli about her new book, "Lost Children Archive." It chronicles one family's journey from New York to the southwestern U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona as the mother researches the plight of migrant children seeking refuge in the United States.

Democracy Now
Mar 08, 2019

Debate Over Ilhan Omar Highlights New Willingness in U.S. to Question Power of Pro-Israeli Lobby
Following a week of debate surrounding Democratic Congressmember Ilhan Omar's comments about U.S. foreign policy in Israel, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a resolution Thursday condemning anti-Semitism, anti-Muslim discrimination, white supremacy and other forms of hate. We host a discussion with Gideon Levy, Haaretz columnist and member of the newspaper's editorial board; Phyllis Bennis, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies who serves on the national board of Jewish Voice for Peace; and Remi Kanazi, a Palestinian-American poet, writer and organizer based in New York City.

Democracy Now
Mar 08, 2019

It's Time to Tell the Truth: Israeli Journalist Gideon Levy Supports Ilhan Omar's Critique of Israel
The House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a resolution Thursday condemning anti-Semitism, anti-Muslim discrimination, white supremacy and other forms of hate, following a week of debate among congressional Democrats. The controversy began after some lawmakers accused Democratic Congressmember Ilhan Omar of invoking anti-Semitic tropes while questioning U.S. foreign policy on Israel. The House leadership initially drafted a resolution condemning anti-Semitism in what was seen as a direct rebuke of Omar. But many progressive Democrats said Omar, one of the first two Muslim Congresswoman in U.S. history, was unfairly being singled out. The split within the Democratic Party forced the leadership to withdraw its initial resolution and then present a much broader one. Congressmember Ilhan Omar voted for and praised the new resolution in a joint statement with fellow Muslim lawmakers Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and André Carson of Indiana. We speak with Gideon Levy, Haaretz columnist and member of the newspaper's editorial board. His latest piece is headlined "Keep It Up, Ilhan Omar."

Democracy Now
Mar 08, 2019

Ilhan Omar in Her Own Words: I Know What Hate Feels Like
The House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a resolution Thursday condemning anti-Semitism, anti-Muslim discrimination, white supremacy and other forms of hate. The vote was 407 to 23, with nearly two dozen Republicans voting against it. The vote capped a week of intense debate among congressional Democrats that began after some lawmakers accused Democratic Congressmember Ilhan Omar of invoking anti-Semitic tropes while questioning U.S. foreign policy on Israel at an event last week. Omar said, "I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is OK for people to push for allegiance to a foreign country." While the media has largely focused on this single sentence in her remarks, few have heard her broader comments. We hear from Ilhan Omar in her own words, speaking last week at Busboys and Poets in Washington, D.C.

Democracy Now
Mar 08, 2019

Headlines for March 8, 2019
Former Trump Campaign Chair Paul Manafort Sentenced to 47-Month Term, House Condemns Anti-Semitism and Bigotry Amid Debate over Ilhan Omar, Venezuelan President Maduro Blames U.S. Sabotage for Massive Blackout, Israel Bans Coalition of Arab Parties from April Election, France: Archbishop of Lyon Sentenced for Child Sexual Abuse Cover-Up, Greenland's Melt Is Accelerated by Rainfall, Even During Winter, Chelsea Manning Jailed for Contempt After Refusing to Testify on WikiLeaks, Sacramento, CA: Protests Continue over Killing of Stephon Clark, Florida: Ex-Cop Guilty in Shooting Death of Black Motorist, Boulder, CO: Cop Filmed Drawing Pistol on Black Man Cleaning His Yard, NYC Drops Rape Charges Against Ex-Cops Accused of Assaulting Woman in Custody, Erie, PA: Union Workers End Strike at Wabtec Locomotive Plant, El Salvador Court Frees 3 Women Convicted of Having Abortions, Spanish Women Strike as International Women's Day Marked Worldwide

Democracy Now
Mar 07, 2019

U.S. Has Supplied UAE $27B in Arms Despite Nation's Links to Torture, Mercenaries & Child Soldiers
We look at how U.S. weapons are supporting the ongoing devastation in Yemen with William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy. He is the author of a new report about the role the United Arab Emirates has played in Yemen. It is titled "'Little Sparta': The United States-United Arab Emirates Alliance and the War in Yemen." We also speak with Ruhan Nagra, the executive director of the University Network for Human Rights, and Radhya Al-Mutawakel, chairperson of the Mwatana Organization for Human Rights. They recently published an investigation into the role of U.S. and European bombs in civilian deaths in Yemen.

Democracy Now
Mar 07, 2019

War Crimes in Yemen? U.S. & U.K. Arms Killed & Injured Nearly 1,000 Civilians in Saudi-Led Attack
As Yemen faces the world's worst humanitarian crisis, a major new report has been released documenting the role that the U.S. and Europe have played in the deaths of hundreds of civilians in the Saudi- and UAE-led war on Yemen. A group of organizations, including a Yemen-based human rights organization, released the damning report on Wednesday, claiming that between April 2015 and April 2018, 27 coalition attacks killed at least 203 civilians and injured at least 749 people. The report found that 22 of the attacks likely involved weapons produced in the United States. The other five attacks were carried out either with weapons produced in the United Kingdom or with parts produced in both the U.S. and the UK. We speak with Ruhan Nagra, the executive director of the University Network for Human Rights, and Radhya Al-Mutawakel, chairperson of the Mwatana Organization for Human Rights. They are co-authors of "Day of Judgment: The Role of the US and Europe in Civilian Death, Destruction, and Trauma in Yemen."

Democracy Now
Mar 07, 2019

Bacevich: Questioning U.S.-Israel Ties Has Long Been Impermissible in Congress, But That's Changing
House Democrats will vote today on a resolution condemning anti-Semitism. The resolution is seen as a direct rebuke of recent comments by Minnesota Congressmember Ilhan Omar questioning the U.S.'s relationship with Israel—even though the draft resolution does not explicitly name the freshman congressmember. The vote was indefinitely delayed Wednesday after a revolt from progressive Democrats, but House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer reportedly announced Thursday in a closed-door meeting that the vote would move forward. We speak with Andrew Bacevich, retired colonel and Vietnam War veteran, author and professor emeritus of international relations and history at Boston University.

Democracy Now
Mar 07, 2019

Andrew Bacevich: The U.S.-Saudi Relationship Is a Principal Source of Instability in the Middle East
We look at a number of recent developments in U.S.-Saudi relations, a day after the Senate Foreign Relations Committee held a confirmation hearing for retired four-star general John Abizaid to become U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia. On Monday, the Trump administration gave a private briefing to senators on the investigation into the murder of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, who was killed inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul in October. Senators slammed the briefing for providing no new information. Meanwhile, The New York Times has revealed new details about the jailing and torture of a doctor with U.S. citizenship in Saudi Arabia. Walid Fitaihi is a Harvard-trained doctor who has been jailed without charge since 2017. We speak with Andrew Bacevich, a retired colonel and Vietnam War veteran, author and professor emeritus of international relations and history at Boston University, and William Hartung, director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy.

Democracy Now
Mar 07, 2019

Headlines for March 7, 2019
DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen Denies Migrants Are Held in Cages, ICE Kept "Anti-Trump Protest Spreadsheet" to Track NYC Activists, U.S. Kept Secret List of Journalists and Activists at Southern Border, Trump Ends Reporting Requirement of Civilian Deaths from U.S. Drones, Report Details U.S. Role in Civilian Deaths from Saudi-Led War in Yemen, Syria: Hundreds of ISIS Fighters Surrender to Kurdish Forces, Sen. Martha McSally Says She Was Raped by Superior in U.S. Air Force, Second Judge Blocks Trump Admin's Citizenship Question on 2020 Census, Michael Cohen to Congress: White House Lawyer Edited 2017 Testimony, NASA Plane Barred from Monitoring Pollution After Hurricane Harvey, Trump Administration Proposes Ending Protections for Gray Wolves, FDA Finds Asbestos in Cosmetics from Claire's and Justice Brands, R. Kelly Arrested for Failure to Pay $160,000 in Child Support, Mark Zuckerberg Claims Facebook Will Become "Privacy-Focused", Democrats Introduce Bill to Restore Net Neutrality, House Vote on Anti-Semitism Back on Amid Debate Over Rep. Ilhan Omar's Critique of Israel

Democracy Now
Mar 06, 2019

Greg Grandin on "The End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in the Mind of America"
As the Senate appears poised to pass a resolution to overturn President Trump's national emergency declaration to build a wall along the southern border, we speak with historian Greg Grandin about his new book, "The End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in the Mind of America." Grandin writes in his book, "The wall might or might not be built. But even if it remains only in its phantasmagorical, budgetary stage, a perpetual negotiating chip between Congress and the White House, the promise of a two-thousand-mile-long, thirty-foot-high ribbon of concrete and steel running along the United States' southern border serves its purpose. It's America's new myth, a monument to the final closing of frontier. It's a symbol of a nation that used to believe that it had escaped history, or at least strode atop history, but now finds itself trapped by history, and of a people who used to think they were captains of the future, but now are prisoners of the past." Greg Grandin is a professor at New York University and a Pulitzer Prize finalist.

Democracy Now
Mar 06, 2019

Jayapal: Democrats Are Ready to Issue Subpoenas If White House Blocks New Requests for Documents
The House Judiciary Committee launched a wide-ranging investigation Monday into President Trump, his businesses and his allies, as lawmakers probe possible obstruction of justice, corruption and other crimes and abuses of power. The committee requested documents from at least 81 people or groups, who now have a March 18 deadline to respond. The list includes his sons Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump, his son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner, WikiLeaks, AMI chief David Pecker, the Department of Justice, the FBI, Trump's charities and the founder of private security firm Blackwater, Erik Prince—who is also the brother of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. We speak with Rep. Pramila Jayapal, who serves on the House Judiciary Committee.

Democracy Now
Mar 06, 2019

Rep. Jayapal: We Must Protect Rep. Ilhan Omar's Right to Critique U.S. Foreign Policy on Israel
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other top Democrats are expected to bring a resolution condemning anti-Semitism to a House vote this week in a direct rebuke of recent comments by Minnesota Congressmember Ilhan Omar questioning the U.S.'s relationship with Israel. After facing criticism, the Democratic leadership added language in the resolution condemning anti-Muslim bias, as well. We speak to Rep. Pramila Jayapal, who says, "I just want to make sure that we are protecting the right for the first Muslim woman to be in Congress and to question, legitimately, foreign policy toward Israel."

Democracy Now
Mar 06, 2019

Rep. Pramila Jayapal: Medicare for All Will Lower Costs & Expand Healthcare Coverage to Everyone
More than 100 Democratic lawmakers are co-sponsoring a new House bill to dramatically revamp healthcare in the United States by creating a Medicare-for-all system funded by the federal government. This comes at a time when as many as 30 million Americans have no health insurance and tens of millions more are either underinsured or struggling to pay their health insurance premiums. We speak with Democratic Congressmember Pramila Jayapal of Washington, who announced the bill last week.

Democracy Now
Mar 06, 2019

Headlines for March 6, 2019
NY Regulators Probe Trump Org. Insurance Company, BLM Occupies Sacramento Police Dept. After Police Get Off for Killing Stephon Clark, Whistleblower: Chicago PD Tried to Falsify Report on Shooting of Unarmed Black Teen, House Updates Anti-Semitism Resolution to Include Islamophobia, Alabama Tornado Kills At Least 23, 8 Still Missing, U.K. Labour Leader Calls for End to Israeli Arms Sales, Egypt: Noted Photojournalist Shawkan Released After 5 Years in Jail, White House Rejects Dems' Request for Security Clearance Info, CNN: Trump Pressured Staff to Grant Security Clearance for Ivanka , GOP Senators Confirm 37-Year-Old Judge with Anti-LGBT History, JPMorgan Chase to Stop Serving Private Prisons, Students Protest Yale's Investments in Fossil Fuels, Puerto Rican Debt, Hampshire College Students Stage Sit-In in Face of Closure Threat

Democracy Now
Mar 05, 2019

"How to Hide an Empire": Daniel Immerwahr on the History of the Greater United States
"How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States." That's the title of a new book examining a part of the U.S. that is often overlooked: the nation's overseas territories from Puerto Rico to Guam, former territories like the Philippines, and its hundreds of military bases scattered across the globe. We speak with the book's author, Daniel Immerwahr, who writes, "At various times, the inhabitants of the U.S. Empire have been shot, shelled, starved, interned, dispossessed, tortured and experimented on. What they haven't been, by and large, is seen." Immerwahr is an associate professor of history at Northwestern University.

Democracy Now
Mar 05, 2019

Inside the Secretive U.S. Air War in Somalia: How Many Civilians Have Died as Strikes Escalate?
The Trump administration is rapidly escalating a secretive air war in Somalia. According to the think tank New America, at least 252 people have been killed in around two dozen U.S. airstrikes in Somalia so far this year. The U.S. has already carried out more strikes in Somalia in 2019 than in any single year under President Obama. In addition to the air war, the Pentagon reportedly has about 500 U.S. troops on the ground in Somalia, including many special operations forces. For years, the U.S. has attempted to aid the Somali government by targeting members of al-Shabab, but the effort has increased dramatically under Trump, and it has come with little congressional oversight or media attention. We speak with Amanda Sperber, a freelance journalist who reports from Nairobi, Kenya, and Mogadishu, Somalia. Her new article for The Nation is titled "Inside the Secretive US Air Campaign in Somalia."

Democracy Now
Mar 05, 2019

Headlines for March 5, 2019
Judiciary Committee Launches Probe into 81 Trump Associates and Groups, New Yorker Report Details Trump's Deep Ties to Fox News, Groundwater in 39 States Contaminated by Coal Ash Waste, Dem Leaders Rebuke Alleged Anti-Semitic Remarks by Rep. Omar, U.S. Closes Jerusalem Consulate, Rights Groups Say Jailed Saudi Women Activists Tortured, Sexually Assaulted, Report: Khashoggi's Body Was Burned in Oven at Saudi Diplomat's Home, NYT: Detained U.S. Citizen Allegedly Tortured in Saudi Custody , South Korea Calls for Resumption of Talks Between Trump and Kim, North Carolina Reschedules 9th District Election After Voter Fraud Scandal, Outrage After Photos of Orange County Teens Doing Nazi Salute Go Viral, ICE Releases 15 Babies from Texas Immigration Jail, 21 States Sue Trump Admin over Abortion Gag Order, NYC: Immigration Activist Okoumou Put Under House Arrest over Protests

Democracy Now
Mar 04, 2019

The Infiltrators: How Undocumented Activists Snuck Into Immigration Jail to Fight Deportations
An immigrant rights activist has been detained in Florida just weeks after he appeared in an acclaimed film at the Sundance Film Festival about activists infiltrating and exposing for-profit immigrant detention jails. Claudio Rojas was apprehended on Wednesday by Immigration and Customs Enforcement after an annual check-in and is now being held at Krome Detention Center, where he faces immediate deportation. His lawyer says his arrest is linked to the film featuring his activism. It's called "The Infiltrators." The gripping hybrid documentary/dramatic feature was a smash success at Sundance and will play at the Miami Film Festival Tuesday. But Claudio Rojas will not be there to see it. "The Infiltrators" is based on the incredible true story of undocumented immigrants who purposely got themselves arrested by federal authorities in order to infiltrate the Broward Transitional Center in Florida and organize the detainees within its walls. Democracy Now! spoke with the film's co-director, Alex Rivera, and two activists featured in the film, Viridiana Martinez and Mohammad Abdollahi, at the Sundance Film Festival.

Democracy Now
Mar 04, 2019

It Is Time to Indict Israel: Norman Finkelstein on Growing Push for ICC to File War Crimes Charges
Israeli forces have killed 183 Palestinians since weekly Great March of Return demonstrations began in Gaza nearly a year ago targeting Israel's heavily militarized separation barrier. That's according to a new United Nations inquiry that found Israeli forces may have committed war crimes and crimes against humanity by targeting unarmed children, journalists and the disabled in Gaza. The report was released by the U.N. Human Rights Council on Thursday. We speak with Norman Finkelstein, scholar and author of "Gaza: An Inquest into Its Martyrdom," and Sara Hossain, a member of the U.N. independent commission that led the Gaza investigation.

Democracy Now
Mar 04, 2019

U.N. Finds Israel Intentionally Shot Children, Journalists & the Disabled During Gaza Protests
A United Nations inquiry has found Israeli forces may have committed war crimes and crimes against humanity by targeting unarmed children, journalists and the disabled in Gaza. The report, released by the U.N. Human Rights Council on Thursday, looked at Israel's bloody response to weekly Great March of Return demonstrations, launched by Palestinians in Gaza nearly a year ago, targeting Israel's heavily militarized separation barrier. The report found Israeli forces have killed 183 Palestinians—almost all of them with live ammunition. The dead included 35 children. Twenty-three thousand people were injured, including over 6,000 shot by live ammunition. We speak with Sara Hossain, a member of the U.N. independent commission that led the Gaza investigation.

Democracy Now
Mar 04, 2019

Headlines for March 4, 2019
House Dems to Probe Trump's Allies, DOJ in Wake of Cohen Testimony, Sen. Rand Paul Likely to Oppose Nat'l Emergency in Decisive Vote, Deported Central American Parents Seek Reunification with Children, W. Virginia GOP Under Fire After Poster Linking Rep. Omar to 9/11 Causes Outrage, U.S. and South Korea Roll Back Joint Military Exercises, Shelling in Kashmir Kills 7 as Pakistan & India Appear to Ease Tensions, Israeli Forces Kill 2 Palestinians After Reported Car Ramming, Venezuelan Opposition Leader Guaidó Set to Return to Country, Algeria: Pres. Says He Will Not Serve Full Term, If Elected, as Protests Continue, Oakland: Teachers Reach Deal to End Strike, Increase Pay by 11%, Sacramento DA: No Charges for Officers Who Killed Stephon Clark, Bernie Sanders Kicks Off 2020 Run in Brooklyn, New York, Ex-Colorado Gov. Hickenlooper Announces 2020 Presidential Bid

Democracy Now
Mar 01, 2019

Age of Surveillance Capitalism: "We Thought We Were Searching Google, But Google Was Searching Us"
Corporations have created a new kind of marketplace out of our private human experiences. That is the conclusion of an explosive new book that argues big tech platforms like Facebook and Google are elephant poachers, and our personal data is ivory tusks. Author Shoshana Zuboff writes in "The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power": "At its core, surveillance capitalism is parasitic and self-referential. It revives Karl Marx's old image of capitalism as a vampire that feeds on labor, but with an unexpected turn. Instead of labor, surveillance capitalism feeds on every aspect of every human's experience."

Democracy Now
Mar 01, 2019

Meet the Kids Who Confronted Sen. Feinstein: We're the Ones Who Will Have to Live with It
Youth climate activists as young as 7 years old confronted California Senator Dianne Feinstein last week in San Francisco, demanding she sign on to the Green New Deal. We speak with 12-year-old Rio and his sister, 10-year-old Magdalena, who were among the protesters who spoke to Senator Feinstein. They are members of Earth Guardians San Francisco Bay Area Crew.

Democracy Now
Mar 01, 2019

Teen Climate Activist to Sen. Dianne Feinstein: We Need the Green New Deal to Prevent the Apocalypse
"We're the ones affected." Those are the words of youth climate activists who confronted California Senator Dianne Feinstein last week in San Francisco, demanding she sign on to the Green New Deal. In a video of the interaction that has since been seen across the country, Feinstein dismissed the children—some as young as 7 years old—asking her to take bold action on climate change. We speak with the youth climate activists who confronted the senator: 16-year-old Isha Clarke, 12-year-old Rio and his 10-year-old sister Magdalena.

Democracy Now
Mar 01, 2019

Activist Faces Prison for Climbing Statue of Liberty & Southwest Key HQ to Protest Family Separation
Last week, immigrant activist Patricia Okoumou climbed the Southwest Key building in Austin, Texas, to protest the company jailing immigrant children. Now a judge in New York will decide whether to revoke her bail from her first arrest, when she climbed the Statue of Liberty on July 4 to protest President Trump's "zero tolerance" policy. Okoumou was with the group Rise and Resist on July 4 last year as they dropped a banner from the statute that read "ABOLISH ICE." She broke away from the group and climbed all the way to Lady Liberty's left foot, where she continued to protest and refused to leave until she was arrested. She has since pleaded not guilty to trespassing, interference with government agency functions and disorderly conduct. Her sentencing is scheduled for March 19, but prosecutors claim her latest protest was a violation of the terms of her bond, and she has been ordered back to court today. She joins us just hours before her appearance.

Democracy Now
Mar 01, 2019

Headlines for March 1, 2019
U.N. Human Rights Panel: Israel May Have Committed War Crimes in Gaza, Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu to Be Indicted on Corruption Charges, NYT: Trump Intervened to Give Security Clearance to Jared Kushner, In Peace Talks with Taliban, U.S. Floats Afghanistan Troop Withdrawal, Somalia: At Least 15 Dead in Twin Suicide Bombings, North Korea Disputes Trump's Account of Why Kim-Trump Summit Failed, Immigrant Groups Cite "Alarming Increase" in Babies Jailed by ICE, House Approves Bill to Extend Gun Purchase Waiting Period, Lawmakers Seek Interview of Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg, Virginia's First Lady Apologizes for Handing Cotton to Black Students, Ex-Coal Lobbyist Andrew Wheeler Confirmed as EPA Administrator, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee to Make Climate Change Centerpiece of Presidential Run, Swedish Teen Greta Thunberg Leads Belgian School Strike for Climate

Democracy Now
Feb 28, 2019

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Grills Michael Cohen, Laying Out Plan to Probe More Trump Crimes
Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez questioned Michael Cohen about President Trump's shady tax dealings at Wednesday's hearing, presenting a roadmap for investigators to look further into Trump's crimes. We speak with independent journalist Marcy Wheeler, who says, "In five minutes, this freshman congresswoman just laid out a whole investigative plan for three more topics into Donald Trump's potentially criminal activities." Wheeler covers national security and civil liberties on her website EmptyWheel.net.

Democracy Now
Feb 28, 2019

A Criminal in the Oval Office? Michael Cohen Accuses Trump of Lying, Racism & Illegal Activity
In an explosive 5-hour hearing on Capitol Hill Wednesday, President Trump's former personal attorney Michael Cohen accused his old boss of committing multiple criminal acts before and during his presidency. Cohen provided evidence that Trump had violated campaign finance laws by paying hush money to women, accused the Trump Foundation of committing fraud by using the tax-exempt organization for personal purposes, and said Trump lied when he said he couldn't release his tax returns because they were being audited. He also claimed that Trump had advance knowledge that WikiLeaks was preparing to publish a trove of emails to hurt Hillary Clinton's campaign in the run-up to the 2016 election. Cohen confirmed the president repeatedly checked in about the status of a proposed Trump Tower Moscow project well into the 2016 campaign, despite public claims to the contrary. But he said he had seen no direct evidence that Trump had colluded with Russia during the 2016 campaign. The testimony came two months before Cohen is scheduled to begin a 3-year prison sentence for lying to Congress, a series of financial crimes and campaign violations. We speak with Marcy Wheeler, an independent journalist who covers national security and civil liberties. She runs the website EmptyWheel.net.

Democracy Now
Feb 28, 2019

"The Korean People Want Peace": Christine Ahn on Trump Walking Away from N. Korea Nuclear Talks
A historic summit to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula ended without an agreement Thursday, after talks between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un fell apart. Their second summit meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam, failed after Kim Jong-un demanded that the U.S. lift all sanctions on North Korea in exchange for dismantling the Yongbyon enrichment facility—an important North Korean nuclear site. We speak with Christine Ahn, founder and executive director of Women Cross DMZ, a global movement of women mobilizing to end the Korean War.

Democracy Now
Feb 28, 2019

"The Korean People Want Peace:" Christine Ahn on Trump Walking Away from N. Korea Nuclear Talks
A historic summit to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula ended without an agreement Thursday, after talks between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un fell apart. Their second summit meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam, failed after Kim Jong-un demanded that the U.S. lift all sanctions on North Korea in exchange for dismantling the Yongbyon enrichment facility—an important North Korean nuclear site. We speak with Christine Ahn, founder and executive director of Women Cross DMZ, a global movement of women mobilizing to end the Korean War.

Democracy Now
Feb 28, 2019

Headlines for February 28, 2019
Trump Walks Away from Summit as North Korea Demands End to Sanctions, Michael Cohen Tells Congress Trump Committed Multiple Criminal Acts, Pakistan to Return Downed Fighter Pilot Amid Tensions with India, Russia Developing New Missiles as U.S. Withdraws from INF Treaty, Venezuelan Opposition Leader Juan Guaidó Meets Brazil's Bolsonaro, No Mention of Yemen or Khashoggi Murder as Jared Kushner Meets Saudi Prince, State Department Will Not Intervene in Saudi Hit-and-Run Murder Case, House Passes Bill to Toughen Background Checks for Gun Buyers, House Democrats Unveil Medicare-for-All Legislation, North Carolina: GOP Consultant Arrested over Voter Fraud Scheme, Texas: Judge Blocks Purge of Naturalized Citizens from Voter Rolls, Senate to Vote on Confirmation of Andrew Wheeler as EPA Chief, London: 9 "Extinction Rebellion" Activists Arrested at Oil Conference

Democracy Now
Feb 27, 2019

Disarmament Expert on N. Korea Summit: An International Process Is Needed to Reduce Nuclear Threat
President Trump is meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un today in Vietnam in their second summit to discuss denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. We speak with physicist, nuclear expert and disarmament activist Zia Mian. He is co-director of the Program on Science and Global Security at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University. He is the co-author of "Unmaking the Bomb: A Fissile Material Approach to Nuclear Disarmament and Nonproliferation."

Democracy Now
Feb 27, 2019

dream hampton on Making "Surviving R. Kelly" & the Grassroots Activists That Helped Bring Him Down
R. Kelly was released from jail in Chicago on Monday, three days after he was arrested and charged with 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual assault. The charges involve four women and girls, three of whom were under the age of 17 at the time of the alleged crimes. A judge set bail at a million dollars and forced the singer to surrender his passport. Almost immediately after he posted bond and pleaded not guilty on Monday, Kelly was spotted at a McDonald's in downtown Chicago—a spot his accusers say he used to frequent to prey on young girls. Kelly has been accused of abuse, predatory behavior and pedophilia throughout his career but has avoided criminal conviction despite damning evidence and multiple witnesses. Last month, the explosive documentary series "Surviving R. Kelly" thrust the case back into the spotlight. We speak with the documentary's executive producer, dream hampton.

Democracy Now
Feb 27, 2019

CodePink's Medea Benjamin on Peace Delegation to Iran & Fallout from U.S. Withdrawal of Nuke Deal
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is reportedly refusing to accept the resignation of his foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, who quit suddenly in a surprise move announced via Instagram Monday. Zarif played a central role in the negotiations leading to the 2015 Iran nuclear deal. Last year, President Trump withdrew from the landmark deal despite international condemnation of the move and U.N. inspectors saying Iran was adhering to the agreement. Zarif did not offer any reason for his resignation, simply writing, "I sincerely apologize for the inability to continue serving and for all the shortcomings during my service." We speak with Medea Benjamin, co-founder of CodePink and author of several books, including "Inside Iran: The Real History and Politics of the Islamic Republic of Iran." She met with Zarif in Tehran just hours before he announced his resignation. We also speak with physicist, nuclear expert and disarmament activist Zia Mian. He is co-director of the Program on Science and Global Security at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University.

Democracy Now
Feb 27, 2019

As India and Pakistan Issue Veiled Nuclear Threats, New Ceasefire Urged to Defuse Kashmir Conflict
Tensions are escalating between the nuclear-armed rivals India and Pakistan. Pakistan claims it has shot down two Indian military jets and captured a pair of Indian jet pilots, and India claims it has foiled an attempt by Pakistan to bomb military installations inside India. This comes a day after India carried out airstrikes inside Pakistan for the first time since 1971. India claimed it was targeting a camp of the militant separatist group Jaish-e-Mohammed, which claimed responsibility for a recent attack in the Indian-administered region of Kashmir that killed more than 40 Indian soldiers. India accused Pakistan of being directly involved in plotting the bombing. Pakistan denied the claim. Meanwhile, there are reports that Pakistani and Indian ground forces have exchanged gunfire in more than a dozen locations. We speak with physicist, nuclear expert and disarmament activist Zia Mian. He is co-director of the Program on Science and Global Security at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University. He is the co-author of "Unmaking the Bomb: A Fissile Material Approach to Nuclear Disarmament and Nonproliferation."

Democracy Now
Feb 27, 2019

Headlines for February 27, 2019
Michael Cohen to Testify to Congress as Explosive Accusations Against Trump Revealed, Trump & Kim Meet as Vietnam Summit Overshadowed by Cohen Hearing, India & Pakistan Ratchet Up Attacks as Fear of Nuclear Showdown Grows, House Votes to Block Trump National Emergency Declaration, Trump Official Admits He Ignored Warnings on Risks of Family Separation, Thousands of Migrant Minors Reported Sexual Abuse While in Gov't Custody, Honduran Woman Gives Birth to Stillborn While Detained by ICE, Dems Introduce New Voting Rights Legislation, House Bill Protects Over 1 Million Acres of Wilderness, Creates New Nat'l Sites, Ohio Voters Win Legal Protections for Lake Erie, Chicago Will Elect Its 1st Black Woman Mayor as Race Heads to Runoff, NYC: Voters Elect Jumaane Williams as New Public Advocate, Locomotive Workers Strike After Massive Merger Threatens Contracts, Oakland Teachers Enter 5th Day of Strike, United Methodist Church Reaffirms Ban on Same-Sex Marriage & Gay Clergy, Noted Disability Rights Activist Dies After Being Denied Medication

Democracy Now
Feb 26, 2019

Incarceration Is a Deadly Health Risk: Former Chief Medical Officer of NYC Jails Speaks Out
The former chief medical officer of New York City jails has just published a remarkable new book about the health risks of incarceration. The book is titled "Life and Death in Rikers Island." Dr. Homer Venters offers unprecedented insight into what happens inside prison walls to create new health risks for incarcerated men and women, including neglect, blocked access to care, physical and sexual violence, and brutality by corrections officers. Venters further reveals that when inmates become ill, are injured or even die in custody, the facts of the incident are often obscured. We speak to Dr. Venters and Jennifer Gonnerman, staff writer for The New Yorker magazine.

Democracy Now
Feb 26, 2019

U.S. Accused of Trying to Unconstitutionally Strip Citizenship of U.S.-Born Woman Who Joined ISIS
With the self-proclaimed Islamic State on the verge of losing its last area of control in Syria, nations around the world are debating what do with the men and women who joined ISIS but now want to return home. Here in the United States, the debate centers on a 24-year-old U.S.-born woman who left her family in Alabama in 2014 and moved to Syria, where she lived in the ISIS-controlled caliphate. While in Syria, Hoda Muthana married a series of ISIS fighters, all of whom died in battle. Now she is living in a refugee camp in Syria with her 18-month-old son but is seeking to return to the United States, setting off a constitutional debate. Last week, President Trump tweeted, "I have instructed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and he fully agrees, not to allow Hoda Muthana back into the Country!" The Trump administration is claiming Muthana is not a U.S. citizen, even though she was born in the United States and has been issued U.S. passports. We speak to her family's attorney, Charlie Swift, the director of the Constitutional Law Center for Muslims in America.

Democracy Now
Feb 26, 2019

Headlines for February 26, 2019
India Launches Airstrikes in Pakistan Amid Mounting Tension, U.S. Announces New Sanctions on Venezuela as Lima Group Opposes Military Intervention, Univision Reporter Jorge Ramos Briefly Detained in Venezuela, Trump and Kim to Meet in Vietnam for 2nd North Korean Summit, Reports: Michael Cohen to Accuse Trump of Criminal Conduct in Congressional Hearing, Climate Change May Cause Cloud Die-Off, Increase Rate of Warming, U.K.: Corbyn Could Back 2nd Referendum as Brexit Deadline Looms, U.N. Court: U.K. Should Give Up Control of Chagos, U.N.: Sec.-General Warns Against Collapse of Arms Control Treaties, Iran Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif Resigns, Somalia: U.S. Airstrike Kills 35 al-Shabab Fighters, Algeria: Popular Protests Call for End to Ailing President's Rule, Cubans Ratify New Constitution Reaffirming Socialism as "Irrevocable", Japan: Okinawans Reject Relocation of U.S. Base in Referendum, Guatemala Bill Could Free Perpetrators of Genocide, Torture, Australian Cardinal Pell Convicted of Sexuallly Assaulting Boys, Ex-Trump Staffer Accuses Him of Forcibly Kissing Her, Climate Activists Stage Protest at Sen. McConnell's Office

Democracy Now
Feb 25, 2019

The Coup Has Failed & Now the U.S. Is Looking to Wage War: Venezuelan Foreign Minister Speaks Out
Venezuela's opposition is calling on the United States and allied nations to consider using military force to topple the government of Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence is heading to Bogotá, Colombia, today to meet with regional leaders and Venezuela's self-proclaimed president, opposition leader Juan Guaidó. The meeting follows a dramatic weekend that saw the Venezuelan military blocking the delivery of so-called humanitarian aid from entering the country at the Colombian and Brazilian borders. At least four people died, and hundreds were injured, after clashes broke out between forces loyal to Maduro and supporters of the opposition. The United Nations, the Red Cross and other relief organizations have refused to work with the U.S. on delivering aid to Venezuela, which they say is politically motivated. Venezuela has allowed aid to be flown in from Russia and from some international organizations, but it has refused to allow in aid from the United States, describing it as a Trojan horse for an eventual U.S. invasion. On Sunday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Maduro's days in office are numbered. We speak with Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza, who has recently held secret talks with Trump's special envoy Elliott Abrams.

Democracy Now
Feb 25, 2019

Headlines for February 25, 2019
Venezuela: 4 Dead as Violence Spikes Over "Aid" Standoff, U.S. Ratchets Up Threats Against Venezuelan Government, New Yorkers Protest Against U.S. Intervention in Venezuela, Trump Moves to Withdraw Funds, Impose Gag Order on Abortion Providers, Trump and Kim Jong-un to Meet in Vietnam for 2nd Summit, Michael Cohen to Testify Before Congress, Congress Expected to Subpoena Trump Admin over Family Separation, House Dems to Vote on Bill Blocking Nat'l Emergency Declaration, Sudan: President Declares State of Emergency Amid Ongoing Protests, Nigeria: Scores Killed in Election Violence, U.N.: Record Number of Civilians Killed in Afghanistan in 2018, Gaza: Israeli Forces Kill Teenager at Weekly Protest, Israel: Netanyahu Allies with Far-Right, Racist Group, Trump Announces Delay of Tariff Hike on Chinese Goods, Sen. Feinstein Dismisses Youth Activists' Call for Green New Deal, Trump to Nominate GOP Donor Kelly Knight Craft as Ambassador to U.N., R. Kelly Charged with Aggravated Sexual Assault, Patriots Owner Robert Kraft Charged in Sex Trafficking Sting, Sen. Warren Says She Will Not Accept Donations for Access, Oscars Celebrates Firsts for Diverse Filmmakers, Spike Lee Tells Viewers to Vote in 2020, Boots Riley Calls Out U.S. Intervention in Venezuela at Spirit Awards

Democracy Now
Feb 22, 2019

"The Green Book: Guide to Freedom": How African Americans Safely Navigated Jim Crow America
The Academy Awards take place this weekend, and one of the top contenders is the movie "Green Book," which has renewed interest in the history of "The Negro Motorist Green Book." So today we look at a remarkable new documentary called "The Green Book: Guide to Freedom," that offers a real look at the history of a travel guide that helped African Americans safely navigate Jim Crow America. The film premieres Monday on the Smithsonian Channel and details the violence, insults and discrimination black travelers faced on the road, as well as the pride and sense of community they felt in the safe spaces they created around the country, in the form of restaurants, hotels and vacation retreats. We feature excerpts and speak with writer and director Yoruba Richen, professor in the documentary program in the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY.

Democracy Now
Feb 22, 2019

"The Green Book: Guide to Freedom:" How African Americans Safely Navigated Jim Crow America
The Academy Awards take place this weekend, and one of the top contenders is the movie "Green Book," which has renewed interest in the history of "The Negro Motorist Green Book." So today we look at a remarkable new documentary called "The Green Book: Guide to Freedom," that offers a real look at the history of a travel guide that helped African Americans safely navigate Jim Crow America. The film premieres Monday on the Smithsonian Channel and details the violence, insults and discrimination black travelers faced on the road, as well as the pride and sense of community they felt in the safe spaces they created around the country, in the form of restaurants, hotels and vacation retreats. We feature excerpts and speak with writer and director Yoruba Richen, professor in the documentary program in the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY.

Democracy Now
Feb 22, 2019

This Is Not Humanitarian Aid: A Maduro Critic in Venezuela Slams U.S. Plan to Push Regime Change
We go to Caracas, Venezuela, for an update on the escalating standoff between President Nicolás Maduro and opposition leader and self-proclaimed president Juan Guaidó. Guaidó claims he is preparing to deliver humanitarian aid from the Colombian border Saturday. Maduro has rejected the plan, saying the effort is part of a broader attempt to overthrow his regime. This comes as Trump's special envoy to Venezuela and right-wing hawk, Elliott Abrams, is leading a U.S. delegation traveling by military aircraft to the Colombian border, supposedly to help deliver the aid. The United Nations, the Red Cross and other relief organizations have refused to work with the U.S. on delivering that aid to Venezuela, which they say is politically motivated. We speak with Venezuelan sociologist Edgardo Lander, a member of the Citizen's Platform in Defense of the Constitution. "This certainly is not humanitarian aid, and it's not oriented with any humanitarian aims," Lander says. "This is clearly a coup carried out by the United States government with its allies, with the Lima Group and the extreme right wing in Venezuela."

Democracy Now
Feb 22, 2019

Headlines for February 22, 2019
North Carolina Orders New Congressional Election Due to GOP Voting Fraud, Oakland Teachers' Strike Enters Second Day, Judge: Alex Acosta Broke Law in 2008 over Sex Abuser Jeffrey Epstein Plea Deal, Elliott Abrams Heads to Colombia as Tension Mounts on Venezuelan Border, CodePink's Medea Benjamin Disrupts Venezuelan Opposition Event in D.C., U.S. to Keep 200 Troops in Syria Despite Trump Withdrawal Pledge, Vatican Hosts Historic Summit on Clerical Sex Abuse, White Nationalist Coast Guard Lieutenant Used Work Computer to Research Mass Killings, Record Number of Hate Groups Reported in U.S., Prosecutors Drop Criminal Charges for Four No More Deaths Volunteers, Judge Places Gag Order on Roger Stone over Instagram Post, U.S. Banks Made $28 Billion in Additional Profit, Thanks to Trump Tax Code, Pharmaceutical Firm Defends Charging $375,000 for a Medication Once Given Away for Free, Thousands Rally in Spain to Protest Trial of Catalan Separatist Leaders, Nicaragua: Ortega Vows to Reopen Talks as Opposition Demands Prisoner Release, Suspected U.S. Mercenaries Leave Haiti Days After Being Held on Weapons Charges

Democracy Now
Feb 21, 2019

The Uninhabitable Earth: Unflinching New Book Lays Out Dire Consequences of Climate Chaos
"It is worse, much worse, than you think." That's the opening line of a damning new book by journalist David Wallace-Wells that offers an unflinching look at the growing climate catastrophe. "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming" sounds the alarm about the climate crisis and the need for swift and radical action to save the planet from unimaginable destruction. We speak to Wallace-Wells about the rapid heating of the planet, which he says could reach more than 4 degrees Celsius by 2100.

Democracy Now
Feb 21, 2019

Climate Denier to Head New Trump Panel Despite Once Comparing Climate Scientists to Nazis
The White House is reportedly organizing a new committee to examine whether climate change poses a threat to national security, to be led by notorious climate change denier, Princeton University professor emeritus William Happer. Observers say his involvement in the "Presidential Committee on Climate Security" indicates the Trump administration wants to undermine findings within the national security community that climate change poses a severe threat to human safety. William Happer is a National Security Council senior director who has long claimed increasing the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will actually benefit humans. He has compared the fight against climate change to the Holocaust, saying, "The demonization of carbon dioxide is just like the demonization of the poor Jews under Hitler." We speak with journalist David Wallace-Wells, deputy editor and climate columnist for New York magazine. His new book is titled "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming."

Democracy Now
Feb 21, 2019

Ending the Punishment of Poverty: Supreme Court Rules Against High Fines & Civil Asset Forfeiture
In a major victory for civil liberties advocates, the Supreme Court has unanimously ruled to limit the practice of civil asset forfeiture—a controversial practice where police seize property that belongs to people suspected of crimes, even if they are never convicted. On Wednesday, the court ruled the Eighth Amendment protects people from state and local authorities imposing onerous fines, fees and forfeitures to generate money. The case centered on an Indiana man named Tyson Timbs, whose Land Rover was seized when he was arrested for selling drugs. The vehicle was worth $42,000—more than four times the $10,000 maximum fine Timbs could receive for his drug conviction under state law. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled in Timbs's favor. Writing on behalf of the justices, Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, "The historical and logical case for concluding that the 14th Amendment incorporates the Excessive Fines Clause is overwhelming." We speak with Lisa Foster, co-director of the Fines and Fees Justice Center. Her organization filed an amicus brief in the Supreme Court case. Foster is a retired California judge. She served in the Justice Department during the Obama administration and led the department's efforts to address excessive fines and fees.

Democracy Now
Feb 21, 2019

Headlines for February 21, 2019
White Supremacist Coast Guard Lt. Had "Hit List" of Democratic Targets, Trump Considering Anti-Science Adviser to Head Climate Change Committee, SCOTUS Limits State and Local Civil Asset Forfeiture, Massive Fire Kills At Least 80 in Bangladesh, Mexico: 2 Radio Journalists Killed in Past Week, U.N. Warns of Oil Company Complicity in South Sudan Mass Atrocities, Egypt Executes 9 Men over 2015 Prosecutor Killing Amid Claims of Torture, Syria: Civilians Evacuated from ISIS Enclave, Trump Says Alabama Woman Who Joined ISIS Should Not Be Allowed Back in U.S., West Virginia Teachers End Strike After Killing Pro-Charter Bill, Oakland Teachers Go on Strike, House Dems Prepare Measure to Block Trump's Nat'l Emergency, Roger Stone to Appear in Court over Instagram Post Showing Judge Next to Crosshairs, Michael Cohen Will Publicly Testify Before Congress, Reports: Special Counsel Mueller Could Wrap Up Probe Next Week, Ex-NYC Congressmember Joe Crowley Joins Corporate Lobby Firm, Bernie Sanders Raises Record $6 Million After Launching 2020 Bid, Police Arrest Jussie Smollett, Accuse Actor of Staging His Attack, Activist Climbs Southwest Key Bldg to Protest Migrant Children Detentions, El Paso Organizers Protest Border Patrol Museum

Democracy Now
Feb 20, 2019

Saudis Facing Criminal Charges in the U.S. Keep Disappearing. Is the Kingdom Helping Them Escape?
A growing number of Saudi students are vanishing while facing serious criminal charges in the U.S. Federal law enforcement officials are now launching an investigation into the suspicious disappearances to probe if the Saudi government was involved and how. We speak with Shane Dixon Kavanaugh, The Oregonian reporter who broke the story about the spate of Saudi student disappearances. He found that in at least four cases the Saudi government paid a defendant's bail and legal fees before he disappeared. In one case, police believe Saudi officials snuck a Saudi national out of the country on a private plane using a fake passport so he could avoid being tried for killing a 15-year-old Portland teenager in a hit-and-run.

Democracy Now
Feb 20, 2019

Saudi Scholar: My Father Faces the Death Penalty in Saudi Arabia for Supporting Human Rights
While the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul in October sparked international outrage, far less attention has been paid to the ongoing Saudi repression at home. We speak with Abdullah Alaoudh, whose father has been locked up in solitary confinement in Saudi Arabia for his political activism since September 2017. Prior to his arrest, prominent Islamic scholar Salman Alodah had been a vocal critic of the Saudi monarchy who had called for elections with 14 million Twitter followers. But for the past 17 months, Salman Alodah has been silenced. He was one of dozens of religious figures, writers, journalists, academics and civic activists arrested as part of a crackdown on dissent in 2017 overseen by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. We speak with Alodah's son Abdullah Alaoudh. He is a senior fellow at Georgetown University in the Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding.

Democracy Now
Feb 20, 2019

Trump Admin's Secretive Talks to Sell Saudi Arabia Nuclear Technology Spark New Fear of Arms Race
House Democrats are accusing the Trump administration of moving toward transferring highly sensitive nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia in potential violation of U.S. law. Critics say the deal could endanger national security while enriching close allies of President Trump. Saudi Arabia is considering building as many as 16 nuclear power plants by 2030, but many critics fear the kingdom could use the technology to develop nuclear weapons and trigger a nuclear arms race in the Middle East. We speak with Democratic Congressmember Ro Khanna of California and Isaac Arnsdorf, a reporter with ProPublica. Arnsdorf first wrote about the intense and secretive lobbying effort to give nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia in 2017. His reporting was cited in the House report.

Democracy Now
Feb 20, 2019

Headlines for February 20, 2019
Dems Probe White House Plan to Transfer Nuclear Technology to Saudis, West Virginia Teachers Celebrate as Lawmakers Halt Pro-Charter School Bill, NYT: Trump Asked DOJ to Put Loyalist In Charge of "Hush Money" Probe, Trump to Nominate Transportation Sec. Jeffrey Rosen as Deputy AG, Trump Signs Order to Establish "Space Force", France: 20,000 Protesters Denounce Surge in Anti-Semitic Attacks, Haiti: Police Arrest 5 Americans Amid Political Unrest, WaPo: Pope Ignored Claims of Sexual Abuse Against Deaf Children, Women Survivors of Church Sexual Abuse Speak Out, Arkansas Signs "Trigger" Abortion Ban into Law, Illinois Adopts $15 Minimum Wage, CNN Under Fire for Hiring GOP Operative to Oversee 2020 Coverage, High School Student Nick Sandmann Sues The Washington Post, Alabama Publisher Calls for KKK to Lynch and Raid Democrats, Justice Thomas Wants Court to Reconsider Libel Law for Public Figures, Wallace Broecker, Pioneering Climate Scientist Who Popularized Term "Global Warming," Dies at 87

Democracy Now
Feb 19, 2019

Amazon's Defeat in NYC Galvanizes Movement to End Billion-Dollar Corporate Welfare
New York City is still reeling since Amazon announced last week that it was scrapping plans to build a major office facility in Queens. The decision came under mounting pressure from grassroots activists and local politicians who opposed the deal. Amazon had announced the project in November after New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio offered Amazon nearly $3 billion in tax subsidies to come to the city. But local politicians and community organizers rallied against the tech giant and won. The lawmakers who took down Amazon say their victory is just the beginning of a major fight against tax subsidies for huge companies—which they call "corporate welfare." We speak with New York State Assemblymember Ron Kim, who helped fight Amazon and introduced the End of Corporate Welfare Act to the state Legislature earlier this month.

Democracy Now
Feb 19, 2019

Venezuela in Crisis: As U.S. Pushes Regime Change, Fear Grows of Civil War & Famine
President Trump called for regime change in Venezuela, Cuba and Nicaragua on Monday, in a major speech urging the Venezuelan military to abandon its support for President Nicolás Maduro and to support self-proclaimed Venezuelan president Juan Guaidó. During the speech, Trump said the U.S. seeks a peaceful transition of power in Venezuela, but that all options remain on the table. This comes as a new book out by former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe reveals Trump privately discussed going to war with Venezuela in 2017. Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro responded to Trump's speech in Miami by accusing him of engaging in Nazi-like discourse. We speak with Venezuelan economist Francisco Rodríguez, who headed the Venezuelan National Assembly's Economic and Financial Advisory Office under Hugo Chávez. We also speak with Vijay Prashad, director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research and chief editor of LeftWord Books. He is the author of several books, including "The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South."

Democracy Now
Feb 19, 2019

Headlines for February 19, 2019
Trump Attacks President Maduro at Miami Rally, Calls on Military to Defect, President Maduro Fires Back at Trump Attacks on Socialism, Daily Beast: U.S. Considering Extending TPS to Venezuelans, Senator Bernie Sanders Announces 2020 Presidential Bid, Sen. Warren to Unveil Universal Child Care Plan, West Virginia Teachers Launch Strike, 16 States Sue over Trump's Nat'l Emergency Declaration, Mexican Migrant Dies While in Border Patrol Custody, Transgender Salvadoran Woman Killed After Deportation from U.S., Syria: Bomb Attacks Kill 15 in Idlib, UAE Buys $1.6 Billion in Arms from Raytheon, Yemen: Warring Parties Agree to Start Hodeidah Withdrawal, Kashmir: 9 Killed in Gunfight as India-Pakistan Tensions Mount, GOP Election Fraud Revealed in North Carolina Congressional Race, Iowa Will Not Appeal Ruling on "Fetal Heartbeat" Law, Portland Police Under Fire over Friendly Texts with Far-Right Leader, Justice Ginsburg Returns to SCOTUS After Cancer Surgery

Democracy Now
Feb 18, 2019

Birmingham Civil Rights Group Reoffers Award to Angela Davis—But She Says Community Should Decide
The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute sparked international outrage in January when it rescinded the Fred L. Shuttlesworth award for civil rights icon Angela Davis, soon after the Birmingham Holocaust Education Center sent a letter urging the board to reconsider honoring her due to her support of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement. Facing swift and widespread outcry, the institute then reversed its decision and reinstated the award, but Davis has yet to accept it. Democracy Now! spoke with the president and CEO of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, Andrea Taylor, on Saturday, before an alternate event celebrating Angela Davis hosted by the Birmingham Committee for Truth and Reconciliation. We also spoke with DeJuana Thompson, founder of Woke Vote and a chair of the Birmingham Committee for Truth and Reconciliation.

Democracy Now
Feb 18, 2019

Angela Davis Returns to Birmingham, Reflecting on Palestinian Rights & Fight for Freedom Everywhere
Civil rights icon and scholar Angela Davis returned to her hometown of Birmingham, Alabama, over the weekend. She originally planned the visit to receive the Fred L. Shuttlesworth Human Rights Award from the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, but the institute withdrew the award last month, soon after the Birmingham Holocaust Education Center sent a letter urging the board to reconsider honoring Davis due to her support of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement targeting the Israeli government and Israeli institutions. Facing swift and widespread outcry, the institute then reversed its decision and reinstated the award. But Angela Davis has yet to say if she will accept it. More than 3,000 people gathered Saturday evening for an alternative event to honor Davis hosted by the Birmingham Committee for Truth and Reconciliation. The event featured a conversation between Davis and Princeton professor Imani Perry, who is also from Birmingham.

Democracy Now
Feb 18, 2019

Jewish Activists Hold Solidarity Shabbat Defending Angela Davis in Birmingham & Across U.S.
Jewish supporters of Angela Davis across the nation held solidarity Shabbat on Friday evening, the night before the civil rights icon had been expected to receive the Fred L. Shuttlesworth Human Rights Award from the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. The institute rescinded the honor in January due to Davis' support of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement targeting the Israeli government and Israeli institutions. The institute later reversed this decision after international outcry, but Davis has yet to accept the award. Democracy Now! was in Birmingham on Friday and attended a Shabbat in support of Angela Davis.

Democracy Now
Feb 18, 2019

Headlines for February 18, 2019
Trump Faces Legal & Political Challenges After Calling Nat'l Emergency, NYC: Protesters Take to Streets After Nat'l Emergency Declaration, Aurora, IL Gunman Kills 5, Injures 6 After Being Terminated, Venezuela Ejects European Lawmakers as Aid Standoff Ratchets Up, Sen. Rubio Steps Up Attacks on Cuba While in Colombia, Iran Says Israel and U.S. Escalating Chance of War in Middle East, Haitian Gov't Announces Spending Cuts in Attempt to Quell Unrest, Nigeria: Bomb Kills At Least 8, Hours Before Gov't Postpones Elections, Pope Francis Defrocks Cardinal McCarrick over Sexual Abuse Crimes, SCOTUS to Hear Trump Admin's Census Citizenship Question, Heather Nauert Withdraws from U.N. Ambassadorship Consideration, Judge Sentences Man to 10 Years in Racist Hurricane Katrina Shooting, Kaepernick and Reid Settle Grievances with NFL

Democracy Now
Feb 15, 2019

Ibram X. Kendi on Frederick Douglass: "The Only Way We Can Be Defeated Is If We Stop Struggling"
As we celebrate the remarkable life and legacy of Frederick Douglass on his 201st birthday, we are joined by Ibram X. Kendi, a professor of history and international relations and founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. Kendi spoke Thursday night at the Library of Congress at an event honoring Frederick Douglass. He is the National Book Award-winning author of "Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America" and a contributing editor at The Atlantic.

Democracy Now
Feb 15, 2019

Ibram X. Kendi on Surviving Cancer & His Anti-Racist Reading List for Virgina Gov. Northam
As we celebrate the remarkable life and legacy of Frederick Douglass on his 201st birthday, we are joined by Ibram X. Kendi, a professor of history and international relations and founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. Kendi spoke Thursday night at the Library of Congress at an event honoring Frederick Douglass. He is the National Book Award-winning author of "Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America" and a contributing editor at The Atlantic.

Democracy Now
Feb 15, 2019

Ibram X. Kendi on Surviving Cancer & His Anti-Racist Reading List for Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam
As we celebrate the remarkable life and legacy of Frederick Douglass on his 201st birthday, we are joined by Ibram X. Kendi, a professor of history and international relations and founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. Kendi spoke Thursday night at the Library of Congress at an event honoring Frederick Douglass. He is the National Book Award-winning author of "Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America" and a contributing editor at The Atlantic.

Democracy Now
Feb 15, 2019

Agitate, Agitate, Agitate: A Key Lesson from Abolitionist Frederick Douglass on His 201st Birthday
This month marks the 201st birthday of the renowned abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass was born into slavery around 1818. He died a free man in 1895. Thursday night, leaders from around the country gathered at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., to honor the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass as part of a ceremony culminating a year of events marking the bicentennial of the birth of the celebrated abolitionist, politician, writer, feminist, educator, entrepreneur and diplomat. We are joined by Kenneth Morris Jr., Frederick Douglass's great-great-great-grandson, president of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives, and also the great-great-grandson of Booker T. Washington. He says the lesson he hopes young activists will take from his great-great-great-grandfather Frederick Douglass is: "Agitate. Agitate. Agitate. ... It's really important that activists and young people understand that they can lift their voices and agitate."

Democracy Now
Feb 15, 2019

"Agitate, Agitate, Agitate!": Great-Great-Great-Grandson Echoes Frederick Douglass on 201st Birthday
This month marks the 201st birthday of the renowned abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass was born into slavery around 1818. He died a free man in 1895. Thursday night, leaders from around the country gathered at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., to honor the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass as part of a ceremony culminating a year of events marking the bicentennial of the birth of the celebrated abolitionist, politician, writer, feminist, educator, entrepreneur and diplomat. We are joined by Kenneth Morris Jr., Frederick Douglass's great-great-great-grandson, president of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives, and also the great-great-grandson of Booker T. Washington. He says the lesson he hopes young activists will take from his great-great-great-grandfather Frederick Douglass is: "Agitate. Agitate. Agitate. ... It's really important that activists and young people understand that they can lift their voices and agitate."

Democracy Now
Feb 15, 2019

Asylum Seekers Are Being Imprisoned in an Abandoned Factory in Mexico Under Trump Admin Policy
As Trump plans to declare a national emergency, we look at what some have called the real humanitarian crisis at the border. Riot police in northern Mexico blocked hundreds of desperate Central American migrants Wednesday as they tried to escape an abandoned factory complex where they've been imprisoned while waiting for the U.S. to process their asylum claims. More than 1,700 migrants have been held in the maquiladora in the Mexican border town of Piedras Negras since February 5, after they arrived in a caravan of people seeking asylum in the U.S. The vast majority have remained prisoners at the site, after the Trump administration adopted a "Remain in Mexico" policy for asylum seekers—processing just 15 asylum applications per day at the nearby Eagle Pass border crossing. We hear from a migrant adult and child who spoke with the Texas-based immigrant rights group RAICES, and get an update from Erika Andiola, chief advocacy officer for RAICES, the Texas-based Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services.

Democracy Now
Feb 15, 2019

Immigrant Activists: Democrats Are Capitulating to Trump by Approving Border, DHS Funding
President Trump is expected to declare a national emergency today to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border despite opposition from Congress, after he signs the latest spending bill, which includes nearly $1.4 billion to build 55 miles of new border barriers out of steel, far less than the $5.7 billion he requested. Congressmembers Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib issued a statement that they voted against the bill because it gives more funding to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. "That is the right thing to do. We've been pushing for Democrats to do the right thing, to stop playing [Trump's] games," says our guest Erika Andiola, chief advocacy officer for RAICES, the Texas-based Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services.

Democracy Now
Feb 15, 2019

New Interior Sec. David Bernhardt May Violate Trump's Ethics Rule on Lobbyists in His Administration
According to an ethics complaint Public Citizen filed recently with the Interior Department's ethics official and inspector general, President Trump's selection of David Bernhardt as secretary of the Interior Department appears to have violated Trump's executive order barring officials from working on any issues they had lobbied on in the two years prior to joining the administration. The complaint notes Bernhardt lobbied extensively on the Endangered Species Act, most recently on behalf of the Westlands Water District in 2016, when he reported lobbying on "potential legislation regarding the Bureau of Reclamation and the Endangered Species Act." We speak with Public Citizen President Robert Weissman.

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