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NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

Ellie Goulding Likes Her '90s Rock Political and Her Social Media Inspiring
The British pop star, who's releasing her first album in five years, "Brightest Blue," also has Kate Bush and an Almodóvar film on her list of cultural must-haves.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

Julianna Barwick Left Her Ghosts in New York. Then the Healing Began.
The musician became a star on the city's experimental music scene, but her personal life spiraled into chaos. A move to Los Angeles unlocked her creativity and let her find joy again.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

The Sumptuous, Sour Music of Cory Smythe
"Accelerate Every Voice," a new album, is a step forward in another facet of this dazzling pianist's career: composing.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

A Survivor of Sexual Assault Speaks Out
Lacy Crawford told her story when she was a student at St. Paul's School. Few people listened. Now she's telling it again.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

‘P-Valley' Dances to a Different Tune
This new Starz drama is set in a strip club but "pulses with the female gaze," said the creator, Katori Hall. Its premise is that sex work is as worthy of exploration as any other kind of work.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

Cavorting in Hot Springs, Ark., During Its Sin-Soaked Heyday
"The Vapors," by David Hill, brings the mobsters, gamblers, drinkers and crooked politicians to life in an exuberant history of a now-forgotten capital of sleaze.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

A Lakeside Family Vacation Goes Awry in This Debut Novel
David James Poissant's "Lake Life" tests the limits of a family's capacity for love and forgiveness.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

After a Copycat Murder, Reopening an Old Case and Old Wounds
Take bored boys. Add lucid dreaming. Shake vigorously. Welcome to Alex North's dark thriller, "The Shadows."

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

Who Saves an Emergency Room Doctor? Her Patients
Michele Harper's memoir could not be more timely. Also, if think your job is stressful, take a walk in this author's white coat.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

What's Wrong With Men in America?
Two new story collections reveal the toxicities of (mostly white) masculinity, from the frat house to the Midwestern farm.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

What Happens When Your Baby Isn't Who You Expected?
In "Raising a Rare Girl," Heather Lanier writes about a daughter who has Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

A Novel of Sexual Obsession Has Something to Say About How We Tell Stories
"22 Minutes of Unconditional Love," by Daphne Merkin, muses on the process of making up stories while recounting a young woman's torrid affair with an older man.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

How Do You Tell Your Child He Is Undocumented?
In Lysley Tenorio's debut novel, "The Son of Good Fortune," the Filipino-American journey is over before the story even begins.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

In ‘The Golden Cage,' a Kept Woman Grabs the Keys to the Kingdom
Camilla Lackberg shows how stifled ambition never really goes away. It just bides its time.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

In ‘Want,' a Lost Friendship and the Anxieties of the Modern Family
Lynn Steger Strong's new novel follows a Brooklyn wife and mother through professional failure, bankruptcy and the legacy of her past traumas.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

A Sudden Tragedy Leads to Unsinkable Family Secrets
Set in Atlantic City in the 1930s, Rachel Beanland's debut novel wades through heartbreak.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

What if You Didn't Know Who You Were? What if No One Did?
In Robin Wasserman's new novel, "Mother Daughter Widow Wife," a young woman found on a city bus has no identification, no memory, and no one looking for her.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

The Moral of These Stories? ‘You Are Not as Special as You Think'
In "Cool for America," Andrew Martin's characters are caught in a lingering post-adolescence, stretching for a certainty that eludes them.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

When Bonnie Met Clyde
Christina Schwarz's fifth novel tells the life story of half of the famous duo, showing the loneliness of life on the lam.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

Who Is Duchess Goldblatt?
A memoir from a Twitter celebrity doesn't name names, but it does provide an entertaining back story.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

Jeff VanderMeer's Young Adult Novel Is a Madcap Magical Mash-Up
Fans of his Borne trilogy, whether young or old, will find much to enjoy in "A Peculiar Peril."

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

On the Path to Recovery, One Step at a Time Is Easier Said Than Done
Erica C. Barnett's memoir, "Quitter," chronicles her long and winding road to an alcohol-free life.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

Ben Ehrenreich's Dispatches From the Beginning and End of the World
In "Desert Notebooks," a study of arid America reveals the roots of our present calamities.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

When American Politics Turned Toxic
Julian E. Zelizer's "Burning Down the House" sees Newt Gingrich's rise in Congress as a turning point in political history.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 07, 2020

What's on TV Tuesday: ‘The Truth' and Jim Jefferies
Watch a family drama starring Catherine Deneuve and Juliette Binoche, or stream a new Netflix special by the Australian comic Jim Jefferies.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Paapa Essiedu Knows ‘I May Destroy You' Is Hard to Watch
The actor, who plays Kwame on the HBO show, discusses assumptions about sexual assault, his character's survival mechanisms and why the show needs room to breathe.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

‘Hamilton' and the Historical Record: Frequently Asked Questions
The Disney filmed version has fans wondering what's accurate. Historians are fans, too, and they have answers, along with caveats.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Charlie Daniels, Fiddling Force in Country and Rock, Dies at 83
He was a singer, songwriter, bandleader and a blazing fiddle player on hits like "The Devil Went Down to Georgia." His politics swung, too, from left to right.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

In Nick Cordero's Death, a Reminder of Covid-19's Unknowns
The Broadway star died from the coronavirus, despite being just 41 and in apparent good health. Cases like his, experts said, are growing.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Dulce Nunes, Bossa Nova Star of the 1960s, Dies at 90
She was best-known for the 1964 album "Poor Little Rich Girl." Ms. Nunes died of Covid-19.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Actors' Equity Signs Off on Live Theater in the Berkshires
Theaters in the Berkshires are planning live shows, "Godspell" and "Harry Clarke," with limited audiences and virus-related protocols in place. One will be indoors, and one outdoors.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

How a Brooklyn Artist Is Making Black Women Her Focus
Through her Essential Workers series, Aya Brown, 24, has shined a spotlight on the Black women in New York who work in hospitals, schools and retail.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Charlie Daniels, Who Bridged Country and Rock, Dies at 83
He was a singer, songwriter, bandleader and a blazing fiddler on hits like "The Devil Went Down to Georgia."

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

University of Kentucky Is Sued Over Mural With Slavery Scene
An alumnus has filed a suit to save a fresco at the University of Kentucky that depicts enslaved people; a Black artist whose work is shown with it also wants the mural to stay.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Cherokee Women Aim for a Better Life in ‘Crooked Hallelujah'
In her debut novel, Kelli Jo Ford summons the details of minimum-wage existence in the last quarter of the 20th century.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Hip-Hop's Deluxe Editions Rule the Billboard Album Chart
The Atlanta rapper Lil Baby notched a fifth week at No. 1 and Lil Durk returned to No. 2 with recently refreshed releases.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Ennio Morricone, Oscar-Winning Composer of Film Scores, Dies at 91
His vast output included atmospheric music for spaghetti westerns in his native Italy and scores for some 500 movies by a Who's Who of directors.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Simon & Schuster Names Dana Canedy New Publisher
Ms. Canedy, a former journalist at The New York Times and the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes, will run the namesake imprint at one of the country's largest book publishers.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

U.K. Announces $2 Billion Bailout to Help Keep the Arts Afloat
After a weekslong campaign, artists in Britain welcomed the move, which will provide support to recipients like "local basement" music venues and museums.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

From ‘Game of Thrones' to Digital Couture
Carice van Houten, the Red Priestess, brings an Iris van Herpen dress to life in a short film.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Commuting, and Confronting History, on a Remote Canadian Railway
The Tshiuetin line, the first railroad in North America owned and operated by First Nations people, is a symbol of reclamation and defiance for the communities it serves.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Jarvis Cocker Keeps Hearing That Voice
Returning with a new band, Jarv Is, the onetime Pulp leader explains how David Bowie saved his life and why he can't give up songwriting — yet.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

These Radical Black Thrillers Fantasized About Dismantling the Police
In the late 1960s and early 1970s, a series of novels by Black authors married revolutionary politics with pulp fiction. Their plotlines remain distressingly relevant.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

Ennio Morricone, Influential Creator of Music for Modern Cinema, Dies at 91
The Italian composer wrote atmospheric scores for spaghetti westerns and some 500 films by a Who's Who of international directors.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 06, 2020

What's on TV Monday: ‘The God of High School' and ‘Personal Problems'
The Crunchyroll original anime series makes its debut. And the final film by the director Bill Gunn arrives on Mubi.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 05, 2020

Broadway Actor Nick Cordero Dead at 41 of Coronavirus
The Broadway actor's battle with the coronavirus was followed closely by many as his wife chronicled his experience on social media.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 05, 2020

Nick Cordero, Nominated for Tony as Tap-Dancing Tough Guy, Dies at 41
The Broadway actor's battle with the coronavirus was followed closely by many as his wife chronicled his experience on social media.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 05, 2020

‘Perry Mason' Season 1, Episode 3 Recap: If the Teeth Fit …
For all its brooding and disfigured corpses, the series is also showing it has a lighter side.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 05, 2020

Review: ‘Les Blancs' Is an Anguished Play for an Anguished Moment
This Lorraine Hansberry play, set in the 1960s in a fictional African country, speaks incisively to the American present.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 05, 2020

‘Bébé's Kids' Shared a Lesson About Racial Injustice
This 1992 animated movie about Black children running into trouble at a theme park is meant to be a comedy. But for one viewer, it no longer seems so funny.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 05, 2020

What's on TV Sunday: ‘Ganja & Hess' and ‘Outcry'
Revisit Bill Gunn's low-budget vampire horror film, and catch Showtime's new investigative mini-series.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

Nikolai Fadeyechev, Elegant Bolshoi Dancer, Is Dead at 87
He was acclaimed for his noble style, and for being a partner who showed off his ballerinas and did not compete with them.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

Marc Fumaroli, Defender of French Culture, Is Dead at 88
A leading historian, he wrote and taught in defense of the French language and its heritage and against "globish English."

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

Black in America, Through a Camera
In a photography show and auction Jamel Shabazz and others take an up-close look at Black culture and community.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

What to Do At Home This Week
See the Mona Lisa, up your baking skills and get some answers to your salacious questions about dinosaurs.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

8 Picture Books That Let Young Minds Wonder and Wander on Their Own
These journeys of the imagination explore what it means to be human.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

‘I Am Here to Prove You Wrong'
At Miss Muslimah USA, a pageant for young Muslim women, the complexity of modesty is on full display.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

Beyond Broadway, the Show Does Go On
Watching through windshields. Audiences of two. An elbow bump instead of a kiss. Theaters across the country find novel ways to play in a pandemic.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

Where You Can See the Cast of 'Hamilton' Now
Since their time in the Broadway show, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Leslie Odom Jr. and company have gone on to movies, TV and theater.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

Where You Can See the Stars of ‘Hamilton' Now
Since their time in the Broadway show, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Leslie Odom Jr. and company have gone on to movies, TV and theater.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

Newt Gingrich and the Dawn of a Toxic Political Era
In "Burning Down the House," Julian Zelizer shows how Gingrich was able to exploit the profound developments since Watergate to his lasting advantage.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 04, 2020

What's on TV Saturday: ‘Family Romance, LLC' and Fireworks
Werner Herzog's documentary explores Japan's rent-a-family industry. And fireworks displays will be broadcast from New York and Washington.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Lonnie Wheeler, 68, Dies; Helped Ballplayers Tell Their Stories
A longtime sportswriter, he collaborated with Hank Aaron, Bob Gibson and Mike Piazza on their autobiographies. "I was there," he once said, "to make the subject more literary."

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Goodbye to a Symbol That Told Black Americans to ‘Know Your Place'
The Mississippi flag is finally coming down.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Rudolfo Anaya, a Father of Chicano Literature, Dies at 82
His coming-of-age novel "Bless Me, Ultima" reframed the way many in New Mexico viewed their own history, even as school districts tried to ban it.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Saroj Khan, Choreographer Who Made Bollywood Sparkle, Dies at 71
Beginning in the industry as a child actress, Ms. Khan went on to choreograph some of the most memorable performances of the 1980s and '90s.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

11 of Our Best Weekend Reads
The tragic history of "I can't breathe." Why you can have a kid or a job right now, not both. How Brooklyn Drill went global. Farewell, Carl Reiner. And more.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Lifting the Cone of Silence From Black Composers
Listen to how artists have explored what it means — and could mean — to be American.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Margaret Morton, Photographer at Home With the Homeless, Dies at 71
For nearly two decades, she chronicled communities on the edge of society in elegant photographs that drew comparisons to the work of Jacob Riis.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

We Got ‘Hamilton.' Why Can't We Stream Every Broadway Show?
Even in lockdown, it's still hard to cut a streaming deal for a professional show. Here what viewers can expect, for now.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Protesting U.S. Immigration Policies, Artists Aim for the Sky
This Independence Day, 70 artists are having messages of solidarity and defiance typed in the sky to highlight the plight of immigrants held in detention centers.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Kanye West Dips a Toe in the Moment, and 10 More New Songs
Hear tracks by Blackpink, Jorja Smith, Washed Out and others.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Lin-Manuel Miranda's 'Hamilton' and Disney : A Timeline
Disney is streaming a live-capture film of "Hamilton." It's just the latest chapter in a deepening relationship between the company and the musical's creator.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Frederick Douglass, Seen Up Close
Yale has acquired a renowned private collection relating to the abolitionist and orator, including rarely seen family scrapbooks that offer a window onto his complicated private life.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

My Life Under Mississippi's Racist Flag
It waved to us again and again: Know your place.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Comfort Viewing: 3 Reasons I Love ‘Grand Designs'
It's a bit like "The Great British Baking Show," but in this series, the goal is to build dream homes, not frangipani and iced buns. It's also deeply human.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Don't Call Him Machine Gun Kelly
The rapper and actor has a real name: Colson Baker. And he's finding his voice during the lockdown.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

Playing Beethoven's Piano Sonatas Changed How I Hear Them
Our chief classical critic took on the daunting Opus 110 in college, and now relishes risky recordings.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 03, 2020

What's on TV Friday: ‘Young Ahmed' and ‘Hamilton'
The latest movie from Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne is on Criterion Channel. And a film of the Broadway musical "Hamilton" debuts on Disney .

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

Guggenheim Opens Investigation Into Basquiat Show After Racism Complaints
After nearly a quarter of all employees signed onto a letter accusing executives of racism and mismanagement, the museum has hired a lawyer to start an independent investigation.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

‘Jurassic Park': Where the Wild Things Are
Our critics and readers make a return trip to the movie that kicked off a franchise. Does the blockbuster hold up in a summer without one?

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

How Much Watching Time Do You Have This Weekend?
Check out a trippy, philosophical new cartoon, or take a fresh look at an old classic.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

How Do We See Each Other in a ‘Market Society'?
A graphic review of Karl Polanyi's seminal work "The Great Transformation," which charted the social effects of capitalism.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

New in Paperback: ‘The Yellow House' and ‘Night Boat to Tangier'
Six new paperbacks to check out this week.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

What Keeps America Divided?
"Let Them Eat Tweets," by Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson, examines the ways in which the wealthy control the Republican Party.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

10 New Books We Recommend This Week
Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

Freddy Cole, Performer Who Emerged From Nat's Shadow, Dies at 88
Like his famous older sibling, he played the piano and sang. But he used his music to insist, "I'm Not My Brother, I'm Me."

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

How ‘365 Days' Became One of Netflix's Worst-Reviewed Big Hits
Critically panned, the steamy Polish flick is a streaming success thanks to TikTok teenagers and curious fans. But there's also a growing backlash from those who say it glorifies rape culture.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

Hugh Downs, Perennial Small-Screen Fixture, Is Dead at 99
A longtime host of both "Today" and "20/20," he held the Guinness-certified record for most total hours on commercial network television for many years.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

TikTok Stars Tati and Devin Will Meet
Two rising stars on the app have amassed a huge audience by playing along with their followers' fantasy of romance.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

Berkshires Museums Announce Reopening Plans Under Phase 3
Mass MoCA, the Norman Rockwell Museum and the Clark Art Institute will reopen this month, with programming changes and social-distancing measures.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

Coldcut Tony Allen and African Artists = Studio Electricity
Keleketla! is a studio assemblage of musicians from four continents, creating thoroughly hybridized music with African voices up front.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

Review: Apple-Picking Time Again, in ‘And So We Come Forth'
Richard Nelson's fictional family returns, but for the first time this drama of connection in the age of American bewilderment feels smaller than life.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

‘The Truth' Review: Being Catherine Deneuve
Following his Palme d'Or-winning "Shoplifters," the Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda visits some of the glories of France.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

8 Things to Do This Fourth of July Weekend
Our culture writers offer suggestions for celebrating Independence Day, and what to watch or listen to without leaving your home.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

The Gallery Where Stevie Wonder Was a Regular
Linda Goode Bryant discusses her career — from art dealer to urban farmer — with the artist Senga Nengudi.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

‘Liberty Bell' Tolls for Sites Where History Is Alive and Kicking
Nancy Baker Cahill uses augmented reality to explore the meaning of historical sites from the Rockaways in New York to Selma, Ala. Is public art embellishing our heritage, or defacing it?

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

A Nostalgic Look at Independence Days of Yesteryear
Viewed now in the midst of a pandemic, these archival Independence Day photographs — showing large crowds, close contact and communal celebrations — elicit an added measure of nostalgia.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

‘The Baby-Sitters Club' Defies and Exceeds Expectations
With a fresh voice and a winning cast, this Netflix update of the popular book series is the throwback that 2020 needs.

NYTimes Arts
Jul 02, 2020

Queer Kids, Nerds and Sword Fights: It's the Hot School Play
"She Kills Monsters" is hugely popular in high schools and colleges. Even in lockdown, performers have found novel ways to make the battles come alive.

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