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Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 15, 2018

'The Party' Review: Caustic War of Words Will Knock the Wind Out of You
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 6, 2018 is:

logomachy ? \loh-GAH-muh-kee\  ? noun
1 : a dispute over or about words

2 : a controversy marked by verbiage



Examples:
"All politics is local, and that goes double for school politics. But just what does 'local' mean? Georgians are going to have an argument about that word between now and the November referendum on the proposed Opportunity School District. A great logomachy over localism, if you like." — Kyle Wingfield, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 11 Sept. 2016

"Not that anyone could accuse this city of lacking logophiles—that's 'lovers of words,' if you have to ask. But where could word warriors go to engage in spirited logomachy?" — Ron Fletcher, The Boston Globe, 29 Apr. 2007



Did you know?
It doesn't take much to start people arguing about words, but there's no quarrel about the origin of logomachy. It comes from the Greek roots logos, meaning "word" or "speech," and machesthai, meaning "to fight," and it entered English in the mid-1500s. If you're a word enthusiast, you probably know that logos is the root of many English words (monologue, neologism, logic, and most words ending in -logy

Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 14, 2018

'Loveless' Review: Bad Parenting as Putin-Era Metaphor in Devastating Russian Drama
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 5, 2018 is:

spavined ? \SPAV-ind\  ? adjective
1 : affected with swelling

2 : old and decrepit : over-the-hill



Examples:
The team is sadly spavined, and the new coaching staff will have to look to rebuild over the next couple of seasons.

"Large and medium-sized canvases in varying stages of completion covered most of the wall space in the studio, a long, windowless room that was once an auto-body shop, and the floor was a palimpsest of rags, used paper palettes, brushes, spavined art books, … and other debris." — Calvin Tomkins and Dodie Kazanjian, The New Yorker, 10 Apr. 2017



Did you know?
"His horse [is] … troubled with the lampas, infected with the fashions, full of windgalls, sped with spavins...." Petruchio's poor, decrepit horse in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is beset by just about every known equine malady, including a kind of swelling in the mouth (lampas), skin lesions (fashions), tumors on his fetlocks (windgalls), and bony enlargements on his hocks (spavins). The spavins alone can be enough to render a horse lame and useless. In the 17th century, "spavined" horses brought to mind other things that are obsolete, out-of-date, or long past their pri

Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 14, 2018

'Early Man' Review: Animated Caveman-Soccer Comedy Shoots, Sort-Of Scores
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 5, 2018 is:

spavined ? \SPAV-ind\  ? adjective
1 : affected with swelling

2 : old and decrepit : over-the-hill



Examples:
The team is sadly spavined, and the new coaching staff will have to look to rebuild over the next couple of seasons.

"Large and medium-sized canvases in varying stages of completion covered most of the wall space in the studio, a long, windowless room that was once an auto-body shop, and the floor was a palimpsest of rags, used paper palettes, brushes, spavined art books, … and other debris." — Calvin Tomkins and Dodie Kazanjian, The New Yorker, 10 Apr. 2017



Did you know?
"His horse [is] … troubled with the lampas, infected with the fashions, full of windgalls, sped with spavins...." Petruchio's poor, decrepit horse in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is beset by just about every known equine malady, including a kind of swelling in the mouth (lampas), skin lesions (fashions), tumors on his fetlocks (windgalls), and bony enlargements on his hocks (spavins). The spavins alone can be enough to render a horse lame and useless. In the 17th century, "spavined" horses brought to mind other things that are obsolete, out-of-date, or long past their pri

Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 12, 2018

'Double Lover' Review: French Thriller's Two Sides of Same Steamy, Kinky Coin
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 3, 2018 is:

tucket ? \TUCK-ut\  ? noun
: a fanfare on a trumpet



Examples:
"By this time the tucket was sounding cheerily in the morning, and from all sides Sir Daniel's men poured into the main street and formed before the inn." — Robert Louis Stevenson, The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses, 1888

"… Leonard Bernstein came on to lead a thunderous performance of 'Fanfare for the Common Man,' a series of ear-blasting tuckets and bass-drum explosions that Mr. Copland wrote in 1943...." — Donal Henahan, The New York Times, 15 Nov. 1985



Did you know?
Tucket can be found most notably in the stage directions of several of William Shakespeare's plays. In King Lear, for example, a tucket sounds to alert the Earl of Gloucester of the arrival of the Duke of Cornwall (Act II, Scene i). The word tucket likely derives from the obsolete English verb tuk, meaning "to beat the drum" or "to sound the trumpet." These days, the word fanfare itself refers to a sounding of trumpets made, for example, in celebration or to alert one of another's arrival. The presence of fanfare might be the reason that tucket is rarely used in contemporary English.







Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 09, 2018

'Golden Exits' Review: Brooklynites-Behaving-Badly Indie Boasts Stars, Chops
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 31, 2018 is:

irrupt ? \ih-RUPT\  ? verb
1 : to rush in forcibly or violently

2 : (of a natural population) to undergo a sudden upsurge in numbers especially when natural ecological balances and checks are disturbed

3 : to become active or violent especially suddenly : erupt



Examples:
"Montaigne was attuned to the kind of 'involuntary' memory that would one day fascinate Proust: those blasts from the past that irrupt unexpectedly into the present, perhaps in response to a long-forgotten taste or smell." — Sarah Bakewell, How to Live, 2010

"Purple finches and pine siskins both are expected to irrupt southward due to poor cone crops in the Northeast and Canada." — James McCarthy, Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 3 Oct. 2016



Did you know?
Irrupt and erupt have existed side-by-side since the former entered the English language in the 1800s (erupt had been a part of the language for over two centuries at that point). Both are descendants of the Latin verb rumpere, which means "to break," but irrupt has affixed to it the prefix ir- (in the sense "into") while erupt begins with the prefix e- (meaning "out"). So "to irrupt" was o

Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 08, 2018

'Fifty Shades Freed' Review: Welcome to the Most Painful 'Shades' of All
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 30, 2018 is:

tincture ? \TINK-cher\  ? noun
1 : a solution of a medicinal substance in an alcoholic solvent

2 a : a characteristic quality : cast

b : a slight admixture : trace

3 : color, tint

4 : a heraldic metal, color, or fur



Examples:
"You can find turmeric in powder culinary spice form and in its whole root form, as well as in tincture, tablets, and capsules." — Aly Walansky, PopSugar, 21 Dec. 2017

"Yet, while there is nothing Roth despises more than the cheap turn of 'consolation'—the moments in a play or a book where everyone discovers love and feels better—the real arc of Roth's career, as he presents it here, has a tincture of hope." — Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, 13 Nov. 2017



Did you know?
Tincture derives from the same root as tint and tinge—the Latin verb tingere, meaning "to moisten or dip." Tincture specifically derives via Middle English from the Latin tinctus, the past participle of tingere. When the word first appeare

Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 08, 2018

'The 15:17 to Paris' Review: Clint Eastwood's Take on IRL Heroism Derailed by Boredom
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 30, 2018 is:

tincture ? \TINK-cher\  ? noun
1 : a solution of a medicinal substance in an alcoholic solvent

2 a : a characteristic quality : cast

b : a slight admixture : trace

3 : color, tint

4 : a heraldic metal, color, or fur



Examples:
"You can find turmeric in powder culinary spice form and in its whole root form, as well as in tincture, tablets, and capsules." — Aly Walansky, PopSugar, 21 Dec. 2017

"Yet, while there is nothing Roth despises more than the cheap turn of 'consolation'—the moments in a play or a book where everyone discovers love and feels better—the real arc of Roth's career, as he presents it here, has a tincture of hope." — Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, 13 Nov. 2017



Did you know?
Tincture derives from the same root as tint and tinge—the Latin verb tingere, meaning "to moisten or dip." Tincture specifically derives via Middle English from the Latin tinctus, the past participle of tingere. When the word first appeare

Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 06, 2018

'Black Panther' Review: Marvel's History-Making Superhero Movie's a Masterpiece
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 28, 2018 is:

popinjay ? \PAH-pin-jay\  ? noun
: a strutting supercilious person



Examples:
"Who does that guy think he is?" Amanda asked in regard to the popinjay who strolled into the restaurant demanding to be seated instantly.

"[Ryan] Gosling plays the motormouthed popinjay, a tough talker who's actually quite skittish about his bloody job." — Sean P. Means, The Salt Lake Tribune, 23 May 2016



Did you know?
Popinjays and parrots are birds of a feather. Popinjay, from the Middle French word papegai, is the original name for a parrot in English. The French word, in turn, came from the Arabic word for the bird, babgha'. Parrot, which English speakers adopted later, is probably a modification of the Middle French perroquet, which is also the source of the English parakeet. In the days of Middle English, parrots were rare and exotic, and it was quite a compliment to be called a popinjay after such a beautiful bird. But by the 1500s, parrots had become more commonplace, and their gaudy plumage and vulgar mimicry helped popinjay develop the pejorative sense we use today.







Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Feb 02, 2018

'Winchester' Review: Real-Life Ghost Story Haunted By Sheer God-Awfulness
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 24, 2018 is:

contrite ? \KAHN-tryte\  ? adjective
: feeling or showing sorrow and remorse for a sin or shortcoming



Examples:
"… York did in fact say he was sorry and was contrite about making that mistake." — Mark Purdy, The San Jose Mercury News, 1 Jan. 2017

"… several lawmakers called for stronger rules that compel companies to meet minimum cybersecurity standards…. But, as in years past, these efforts have yet to produce any new laws. In the meantime, the average person can do little except monitor their credit reports and hope that contrite companies—shamed by security researchers—will learn from their mistakes." — Hayley Tsukayama, The Daily Herald (Everett, Washington), 23 Dec. 2017



Did you know?
A person who is contrite may have rubbed someone the wrong way and caused bruised feelings—and there is a hint about the origins of the word in that thought. Contrite came to English by way of Anglo-French from the Latin verb conterere, meaning "to grind" or "to bruise." Conterere, in turn, was formed by combining the prefix com-, meaning "with" or "together," and terere, "to rub." If you've guessed that trite is a cousin of contrite (through terere), you are correct. Other terere descendants in English include detriment and very possibly the familiar verb

Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Jan 31, 2018

'A Fantastic Woman' Review: Oscar-Nominated Trans Melodrama Is She-Persisted Triumph
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 22, 2018 is:

leonine ? \LEE-uh-nyne\  ? adjective
: of, relating to, suggestive of, or resembling a lion



Examples:
"Jamie has a leonine aspect, with a high clear brow and soft curls eddying over his ears and along his collar." — Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Harper's, March 2009

"You're a kid; you want to escape. Maybe to Edwardian England, maybe to an island of dancing lemurs, maybe through the rear of a magical wardrobe into a land of snow and ice waiting for a leonine king to bring back the sun." — Lawrence Toppman, The Charlotte Observer, 9 Mar. 2017



Did you know?
Leonine derives from Latin leo, meaning "lion," which in turn comes from Greek leon. Leon gave us an interesting range of words: leopard (which derives from leon combined with pardos, a Greek word for a panther-like animal); dandelion (which came by way of the Anglo-French phrase dent de lion—literally, "lion's tooth"); and chameleon (which combines leon with the Greek chamai, meaning "on the ground"); as well as the names Leo, Leon, and Leonard. But the dancer's and gymnast's leotard is not named for its wearer's cat-like movements. Rather, it was simply named after its inventor

Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Jan 26, 2018

'Maze Runner: The Death Cure' Review: Third Time's a Yawn for YA Dystopia Series


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Jan 25, 2018

'The Insult' Review: Oscar-Nominated Lebanese Legal Drama Crackles With Intensity


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Jan 17, 2018

'12 Strong' Review: He-Man War Movie Is Horse of a Different Color


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Jan 16, 2018

'The Final Year' Review: Posthumous Portrait of Obama's Presidency Will Have You in Tears


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Jan 13, 2018

'Proud Mary' Review: Taraji P. Henson Gunned Down By Her Own Action Flick


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Jan 10, 2018

'The Commuter' Review: All Aboard Liam Neeson's Gleefully Absurd 'Taken' on a Train


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Jan 04, 2018

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 29, 2017

'Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool' Review: Annette Bening Brings the Showbiz Pain


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 23, 2017

'Hostiles' Review: Brutal Western Puts Christian Bale in Path of Violence, Grace


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 23, 2017

'Molly's Game' Review: Jessica Chastain Turns Poker Biopic Into Royal Flush


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 21, 2017

'Phantom Thread' Review: Paul Thomas Anderson's Ode to Obsession Is Spellbinding


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 21, 2017

'Bright' Review: Will Smith's 'L.A.P.D. of the Rings' Is Just South of Dim


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 20, 2017

Review: 'The Greatest Showman' Is 'a Shrill Blast of Nothing'


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 20, 2017

'All the Money in the World' Review: Christopher Plummer 'Aces' Spacey Role


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 19, 2017

'Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle' Review: Sequel Barely Squeaks by on Charm


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 19, 2017

'Downsizing' Review: Matt Damon Shines in 'Bracing Comedy of Shocking Gravity'


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 14, 2017

'The Post' Review: Steven Spielberg's Journalistic Thriller Could Not Be More Timely


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 12, 2017

'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' Review: This Is the Epic You've Been Looking For


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 08, 2017

'Quest' Review: Moving Doc on Philly Family Makes the Personal Political


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Dec 06, 2017

'I, Tonya' Review: Tonya Harding Biopic Is the Movie We Need Right Now


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Nov 30, 2017

'Wonder Wheel' Review: Kate Winslet Singes in Woody Allen's Dour Drama


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Nov 27, 2017

'The Disaster Artist' Review: James Franco Takes on Worst Movie Ever - and Wins


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Nov 27, 2017

'The Shape of Water' Review: Guillermo del Toro's Girl-Meets-Monster Romance Is a Gem


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Nov 22, 2017

'Coco' Review: Pixar's Day-of-the-Dead Gem Is as Lively as They Come


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Nov 21, 2017

‘Darkest Hour' Review: Gary Oldman Gives Us a Fearsome, Oscar-Worthy Churchill


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Nov 21, 2017

‘Darkest Hour'' Review: Gary Oldman Gives Us a Fearsome, Oscar-Worthy Churchill


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Nov 20, 2017

'Call Me By Your Name' Review: Steamy Tale of First Love Is Sexiest Film of 2017


Rolling Stone Movie Reviews
Nov 17, 2017

'Wonder' Review: Family Tearjerker Avoids Cloying Cliches (for the Most Part)


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