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NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 22, 2019

Meal Kits Have A Smaller Carbon Footprint Than Grocery Shopping, Study Says
While it may seem that heaps of plastic from meal kit delivery services make them less environmentally friendly than traditional grocery shopping, a new study suggests that's not necessarily true.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 22, 2019

Meal Kits Have Smaller Carbon Footprint Than Grocery Shopping, Study Says
While it may seem that heaps of plastic from meal kit delivery services make them less environmentally friendly than traditional grocery shopping, a new study suggests that's not necessarily true.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 22, 2019

Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS
PFAS are a family of chemicals accumulating in the soil, rivers, drinking water and the human body. How much exposure to these substances in clothes, firefighting foam and food wrap is too much?

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 22, 2019

'Invisibilia' Team Takes A Deep Dive Into The Science Of Desire
Most of us have a "type" — certain quirks and qualities we're just more into, that pique our sexual desire. But why are we attracted to the people we're attracted to?

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 18, 2019

Tiny Earthquakes Happen Every Few Minutes In Southern California, Study Finds
A new catalog of Southern California earthquakes is 10 times larger than its predecessor list. The details of frequent, small quakes help scientists study what triggers large, destructive ones.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 18, 2019

News Brief: Mueller Report, North Korea, Brain Tests On Dead Pigs
The redacted version of the Mueller report is released Thursday. North Korea announces it has tested a new "tactical guided weapon." Scientists have restored some function in the brains of dead pigs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 17, 2019

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease
The latest advance is not only encouraging news for patients with severe compromised immunodeficiency. It's a test case for all those scientists working to develop better gene therapy techniques.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 17, 2019

Climate Change Was The Engine That Powered Hurricane Maria's Devastating Rains
Maria was the rainiest hurricane known to have hit the island. Scientists say a storm of its severity is nearly five times more likely to occur today, with warmer air and oceans, than in the 1950s.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 17, 2019

Study Examined Germ Levels In Men's Beards Versus Dogs
Researchers wanted to know whether they could use the same MRI scanners for dogs and people. They swabbed the machines used by 18 bearded men and 30 dogs. The beards had higher microbial levels.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 17, 2019

Hidden Brain: America's Changing Attitudes Toward Gay People
Public opinion about gay rights has shifted enormously in the United States over the past few decades. What are some of the factors that have led to this historic change in attitudes?

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 16, 2019

First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Gene-Editing Human Trials Get Underway
This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness, and sickle cell disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 16, 2019

First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway
This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 16, 2019

Scientists Plan To Start Human Trials Testing CRISPR Soon
The powerful gene-editing technique is moving out of the lab and into the clinic. Trials will use CRISPR to try to treat a variety of diseases, ranging from cancer and blindness to blood disorders.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 14, 2019

Do You Love Lying In Bed? Get Paid By NASA To Do It For Space Research
Researchers are currently looking for candidates who will stay in bed 24 hours a day, seven days a week for 60 straight days for a study on how the body adapts to weightlessness.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 14, 2019

High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out
A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 12, 2019

Should We Have Empathy For Those We Hate?
The latest episode of NPR's Podcast Invisibilia examines the history of empathy in American culture. In this era of political polarization, empathy has fallen out of fashion.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 10, 2019

Ancient Bones And Teeth Found In A Philippine Cave May Rewrite Human History
Islands in Southeast Asia were clearly important in the evolution of early humans, say scientists who have turned up 50,000-year-old remains of what they suspect is a previously unknown human species.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 10, 2019

Ancient Bones And Teeth Found In A Philippines Cave May Rewrite Human History
Islands in Southeast Asia were clearly important in the evolution of early humans, say scientists who have turned up 50,000-year-old remains of what they suspect is a previously unknown human species.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 10, 2019

A Black Hole Is Photographed For First Time By Massive Telescope Project
"For the first time we have seen what we thought was unseeable," said Event Horizon Telescope Director Shep Doeleman, as the first image of a black hole was released.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 10, 2019

Earth Sees First Image Of A Black Hole
Every image you've ever seen of a black hole has been a simulation. Until now. "We have seen what we thought was unseeable," said Event Horizon Telescope Director Shep Doeleman.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 10, 2019

Watch: Earth Gets Its First Look At A Black Hole
"Getting a direct view of a black hole is the ultimate dream for a lot of physicists," as astrophysicist Adam Frank wrote for NPR.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 09, 2019

Porcupine Barbs For Better Wound Healing
Surgeons would love to find a replacement for surgical staples — one that doesn't aggravate wounds on the way in and out. Bioengineers think they've found the right model — a porcupine's quill.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 09, 2019

Are Plastic Bag Bans Garbage?
A national movement to ban plastic bags is gaining steam, but these restrictions may actually hurt the environment more than help it. Human nature, hard truths, and what kind of bag to use anyway?

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 07, 2019

Big Cities, Bright Lights And Up To 1 Billion Bird Collisions
When birds migrate, they can become attracted to and disoriented by artificial lights. The result: they end up colliding with skyscrapers and other buildings.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 06, 2019

Opinion: Can Stonehenge Offer A Lesson For Brexit?
As the U.K. continues to debate over the state of Brexit, NPR's Scott Simon looks at how a new discovery at Stonehenge might offer a lesson in coming together.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 04, 2019

Cats Don't Fetch, But Know Their Names As Well As Dogs, Researchers Say
In the study by Japanese researchers, cats reacted to their own name. Researchers say it's the first evidence showing cats can understand spoken words.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 04, 2019

Cats Might Not Act Like It, But They Know Their Names As Well As Dogs, Study Says
In the study by Japanese researchers, cats reacted to their own name. Researchers say it's the first evidence showing cats can understand spoken words.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 04, 2019

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize
This week we consider what we misunderstand about newspapers - from their long history of hype, to the hidden price we pay when they close.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 03, 2019

Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds
Some 11 million deaths annually are linked to diet-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease, a study finds. Researchers say that makes diet the leading risk factor for deaths around the world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 02, 2019

Step 1: Build A House. Step 2: Set It On Fire
After back-to-back hurricanes and wildfires, insurers are looking for more-resilient construction materials. That means building model homes and then blowing off their roofs or setting them on fire.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 28, 2019

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us
Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. The finding could lead to new approaches for better repellents.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 27, 2019

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water
Fresh water quenches thirst almost instantly, but salt water doesn't. New research shows how cells in the gut and on the tongue help the brain keep just the right concentration of salt in our bodies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 26, 2019

VIDEO: Head Lice Up Close, And All Too Personal
Claws of the louse that afflicts human scalps fit neatly around a single human hair. Louse eggs stick to hair shafts with a sort of glue. Maybe the best remedy for you and the kids? Comb, baby, comb.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 26, 2019

Sparkle Unicorns And Fart Ninjas: What Parents Can Do About Gendered Toys
Toys are more pink and blue than ever before, experts say. But before you ban the sparkle unicorns and foam-dart blasters, consider other ways to help kids expand their play possibilities.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 25, 2019

Duke Whistleblower Gets More Than $33 Million In Research Fraud Settlement
Duke University is paying the U.S. government $112.5 million to settle accusations that it submitted bogus data to win federal research grants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 24, 2019

Need A Can't-Miss Wheel Of Cheese? Try Playing It Some Hip-Hop
Researchers exposed cheese to different genres of music for 24 hours a day over six months to find out that hip-hop might create the tastiest cheese.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 21, 2019

Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave Begins
Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising — up 113 percent on average each year from 2013 to 2016. Dealers are adding cheap fentanyl to the illicit drug supply, and some users get it accidentally.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 21, 2019

Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave
Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising — up 113 percent on average each year from 2013 to 2016. Dealers are adding cheap fentanyl to the illicit drug supply, and some users get it accidentally.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 19, 2019

U.S. Mathematician Becomes First Woman To Win Abel Prize, 'Math's Nobel'
"I find that I am bored with anything I understand," Karen Uhlenbeck once said. That sentiment is part of why she won what many call the Nobel of mathematics Tuesday.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 19, 2019

Researchers Examine Who's Better At College Basketball's Free-Throw Line
March Madness is here, and college basketball is in the spotlight. When it comes to making free throws, who is better: College players who would eventually go pro, or players who would never go pro?

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 16, 2019

Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut
With expanding markets for hemp and marijuana, some students believe that taking the class could help their careers. "I'm definitely interested in the plant and where it can go," Madison Blake said.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 15, 2019

Google Employee Is Credited With Calculating Most Accurate Value Of Pi
Emma Haruka Iwao has computed over 31 trillion of its digits. She and her team calculated 31,415,926,535,897 digits of pi — crushing a 2016 record by trillions of digits.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 14, 2019

Did Cooking Really Give Us The F-Word?
Some linguists are arguing that the advent of softer food, thousands of years ago, led to changes in biting patterns and eventually, to more frequent use of sounds like "f" and "v" in human language.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 13, 2019

Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies
An international group of 18 prominent scientists and bioethicists is calling for countries around the world to impose a moratorium on the creation of babies whose genes have been altered in the lab.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 13, 2019

Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies
An international group of 18 prominent scientists and bioethicists is calling for countries around the world to impose a moratorium on the creation of babies whose genes have been altered in the lab.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 10, 2019

Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants
Getting DNA into plant cells is tricky. Researchers have tried using infectious bacteria, as well as gene guns that shoot gold bullets. Then a physicist came up with a new approach almost by accident.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 08, 2019

A Gulp Of Genetically Modified Bacteria Might Someday Treat A Range Of Illnesses
Researchers think genetically engineered versions of microbes that can live in humans could help treat some rare genetic disorders and perhaps help with Type 1 diabetes, cirrhosis and cancer.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 07, 2019

An Antibody-Inspired Small Molecule Could Make For A Better Flu Treatment
To outsmart influenza, researchers are leveraging the biological information encoded in infection-fighting antibodies to design new drugs. One attempt neutralizes near-lethal levels of flu in mice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 07, 2019

Why Partisanship Changes How People React To Noncontroversial Statements
New research finds that partisans agree with bumper sticker slogans — unless they are told that those slogans were made by a leader of the opposing party.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 05, 2019

How Much Is Today's HIV Research Centered Around The Search For A Cure?
For the second time ever, a man's HIV infection has been sent into remission. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Rowena Johnston, director of research for the Foundation for AIDS Research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 05, 2019

London Patient Cleared Of HIV
Doctors in London say they've successfully treated an HIV patient, but the treatment is dangerous and expensive. The news comes 12 years after a different patient was declared cured of AIDS.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 28, 2019

Scientists Shocked By Rare, Giant Sunfish Washed Up On California Beach
They initially thought it was a type of fish known to swim near Santa Barbara. But by collaborating with Australian scientists, they found it was a species never before documented in North America.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 26, 2019

Double-Booked Surgeons: Study Raises Safety Questions For High-Risk Patients
Most patients do fine, research suggests, when the lead surgeon steps away to begin another procedure. But patients who are older or have underlying medical conditions sometimes fare worse.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 21, 2019

World's Largest Bee Is Spotted For First Time In Decades
The bee towers over its apian cousins. Females have been recorded as being at least an inch and a half long. Add to that a pair of gigantic mandibles, and it's a bee like no other.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 20, 2019

Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab
The insects were created, using CRISPR, to carry a powerful "gene drive." The mosquitoes could provide a potent weapon against malaria, but they raise fears about unpredictable environmental effects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2019

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer
Remarkably little is known about the fundamentals of how a woman carries a baby inside her. Two Columbia University researchers aim to change that, to reduce the number of kids born too soon.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 17, 2019

Volunteers Fight Bad Science
James Heathers is a postdoctoral researcher at Northeastern University, who looks for mistakes for fun. He speaks to NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks about errors published in scientific papers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 14, 2019

Racial Disparities In Cancer Incidence And Survival Rates Are Narrowing
African-Americans still have the highest death rate and the lowest survival rate of any U.S. racial or ethnic group for most cancers. But the "cancer gap" between blacks and whites is shrinking.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 14, 2019

World Health Organization Forms Committee To Guide Editing Of Human Genes
WHO acted in reaction to a Chinese scientist's announcement in 2018 that he had created the world's first gene-edited babies, a step that highlighted the need for uniform gene-editing guidelines.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 13, 2019

When Teens Threaten Violence, A Community Responds With Compassion
After years of being beaten up, this teen decided to take justice into his own hands. A school district in Oregon showed him a better way to solve his problems.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 13, 2019

Hungry Deer May Be Changing How Things Sound In The Forest
Sound travels differently through open fields than the woods. When deer eat up bushes, small trees and other forest plants, it affects the transmission of bird calls and other natural sounds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 13, 2019

Bugs Vs. Superbugs: Insects Offer Promise In Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance
With the rise of antibiotic-resistant infections, scientists are exploring nature to find new disease-fighting compounds. They're finding them in surprising new places: the microbiomes of insects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 12, 2019

NASA Says Ultima Thule Actually Looks Like A Pancake And A Walnut
They had initially thought the object four billion miles from Earth looked like a snowman. The New Horizons spacecraft flew by it on New Year's Day and new images give scientists a clearer picture.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 12, 2019

Wreckage Of WWII Aircraft Carrier Found In The South Pacific Ocean
The Hornet played a role in several key events in the war - including the Doolittle Raid on Japan and the Battle of Midway. Researches have located it three miles below the surface.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 07, 2019

Why Morning People May Have A Health Edge Over Night People
A new study suggests that being a morning person makes you slightly less susceptible to depression or mental illness. It, however, is not a very big effect.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2019

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down
Researchers say the metabolism of a woman's brain remains higher than a man's throughout a lifetime. And that may help with late-life creativity and learning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2019

Scans Show Women's Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down
Researchers say the metabolism of a woman's brain remains higher than a man's throughout a lifetime. And that may help with late-life creativity and learning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2019

If You're Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed
Physicians have been taught to look for signs of hopelessness, sadness and lack of motivation to help them diagnose depression. But anger as a depression symptom is less often noticed or addressed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 01, 2019

News Brief: Senate Rebuke, Opioid Lawsuit, Gene-Editing Embryos
Senate rebukes Trump's Syria decision. Legal documents allegedly detail allegations of years of deceptive opioid practices. A new experiment in the U.S. aimes at creating gene-edited human embryos.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 01, 2019

New U.S. Experiments Aim To Create Gene-Edited Human Embryos
Despite outrage over gene editing in China that affected the birth of twins, research is underway in the U.S. to assess the safety and effectiveness of CRISPR tools to edit genes in human embryos.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 31, 2019

Exploring The Mysterious Origins Of Mars' 3-Mile-High Sand Pile
Space scientists on Earth have improvised a tool on the Mars rover to help them figure out how a giant mountain on the Red Planet came to be. Their surprising conclusion: It's likely windswept sand.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 31, 2019

Sick And Tired? Scientists Find Protein That Puts Flies To Sleep And Fights Infection
In the search for what triggers sleep, researchers stumbled upon a link between sleep and the immune system. A single fly gene gets turned on in sick flies, inducing sleep and an immune response.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 31, 2019

Uptick In Butterfly Census Could Be A Fluke, Researchers Caution
Environmentalists say the number of monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico's forests is up dramatically. That's good news after years of drastic decline, but researchers warn it might not last.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 30, 2019

Massive Starfish Die-Off Is Tied To Global Warming
Sea stars along the Pacific Coast are dying in the largest disease epidemic ever documented in a wild marine species. New research suggests warmer water is making the disease even more deadly.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 25, 2019

Steep Climb In Benzodiazepine Prescribing By Primary Care Doctors
U.S. prescriptions for Valium, Ativan and other benzodiazepines have shot up since 2003, statistics show, especially for chronic pain. Roughly half those prescriptions are from primary care providers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 24, 2019

VIDEO: Inventor Inspired By Childhood Memories Of Fungus
As a child on a New York farm, Eben Bayer helped his dad shovel wood chips in the barn. That's where he noticed a stretchy web of fungus that became the basis of his biodegradable packing material.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 23, 2019

Why Camera Angles And Bias Support Different Opinions
Accounts vary of what happened when students faced an Native American elder in Washington. Steve Inskeep talks to Adam Benforado, author of Unfair who argues camera angles undermine our legal system.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 22, 2019

Why Did So Many Americans Trust Russian Hackers' Election Propaganda?
Investigations of Russian influence on the 2016 election have tended to focus on the role of social media. Researchers are also exploring the psychological vulnerability that hackers exploited.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 21, 2019

Researchers Find A Web Of Factors Behind Multiple Sclerosis
It's looking like MS strikes when a variety of triggers gang up to impair neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Researchers are using their new knowledge to search for treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 17, 2019

Scientists Find Brain Cells That Make Pain Hurt
Researchers have pinpointed the neurons that give pain its unpleasant edge. By turning these neurons off in mice, the scientists relieved the unpleasantness of pain without numbing sensation.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2019

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly
Whether it's exercise or housework, older Americans who move their bodies regularly may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions and other signs of dementia.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2019

Bacteria In Worms Make A Mosquito Repellent That Might Beat DEET
An insect-killing bacteria that lives inside a parasitic worm might hold the key to developing a powerful new repellent.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 14, 2019

From Couch Potato To Fitness Buff: How I Learned To Love Exercise
Creating an exercise habit doesn't mean you have to spend hours sweating on a treadmill. Start small, build up slowly and remember that all movement counts — even vacuuming, if you do it vigorously.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 14, 2019

Report: Americans Are Now More Likely To Die Of An Opioid Overdose Than On The Road
Americans now have a 1 in 96 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to a new analysis from the National Safety Council.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 10, 2019

Severe Flu Raises Risk Of Birth Problems For Pregnant Women, Babies
Pregnant women in intensive care with severe cases of the flu have a higher risk of giving birth to babies prematurely. The risk of breathing problems for the baby is also substantially higher.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 10, 2019

Should Hyping Edible Bugs Focus On The Experience Instead Of The Environment?
A new study shows that when ads made hedonistic marketing claims, such as "exotic" or "delicious," rather than targeting environmental interests, more people were willing to try eating insects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 09, 2019

A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa 1,000 A.D.
Analysis of fossilized dental tartar of a medieval woman buried in a German monastery reveals specks of blue to be lapis lazuli — a luxurious pigment used to create gorgeous illuminated manuscripts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 09, 2019

A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa A.D. 1000
Analysis of fossilized dental tartar of a medieval woman buried in a German monastery reveals specks of blue to be lapis lazuli — a luxurious pigment used to create gorgeous illuminated manuscripts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 08, 2019

Why Consumers Systematically Give Inflated Grades For Poor Service
A study shows that rating systems for online marketplaces are prone to inflation, because raters feel pressured to leave high scores.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 03, 2019

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops
Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, the foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. They hope it leads to bigger harvests of food.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 02, 2019

Why Millions Of Kids Can't Read, And What Better Teaching Can Do About It
The instruction many students get is not based on the overwhelming scientific evidence about how kids turn spoken sounds into letters and words on a page.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 01, 2019

Could Exercising In Frigid Temperatures Make Us Healthier?
As a freezing winter drives many of us indoors, some extreme athletes embrace the cold as a great way to burn calories and retrain the immune system while working out. Not so fast, physiologists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 01, 2019

Research Supports Claims That Teeth Worsen Without Fluoridated Water
Using Medicaid payment data from towns in Alaska that have rejected fluoride in recent years, a new study supports dentists' claims that teeth get worse when the water supply is not fluoridated.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 31, 2018

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive
Adorable babies and cute puppies can make us happy. But researchers say their cuteness can be so overwhelming that it unleashes some ugly thoughts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 29, 2018

How To Help Kids Overcome Their Fear Of Doctors And Shots
Half of the parents of young children in a recent survey said their kids fear going to the doctor. Some admit skipping vaccines and needed appointments. Here's how to nip medical anxiety in the bud.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 25, 2018

What Gifts Are The Best? Social Science Researchers Investigate
A study shows gift-givers and gift-recipients differ on ideas about best gifts. Whereas recipients prefer sentimental gifts, gift-givers tend to opt for presents that match the recipient's interests.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2018

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health
A growing body of research shows keeping a log of what you are thankful for can lower stress, help you sleep better, and may even reduce the risk of heart disease. But it's not for everyone.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2018

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain
A question about heading soccer balls inspired a series of experiments to understand how the brain changes shape when someone's head takes a hit.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 22, 2018

Researchers Show Parachutes Don't Work, But There's A Catch
A study found parachutes were no more effective than backpacks in preventing harm to people jumping from aircraft. The researchers' tongue-in-cheek experiment makes a deeper point about science.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 21, 2018

Huge Martian Crater 'Korolev' Appears Topped With Miles Of Pristine Snow
The European Space Agency's new images show a 51-mile-wide ice-filled depression in the surface of Mars caused by the impact of a meteorite or other celestial body.

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