NEWS: NPR TOPICS: RESEARCH NEWS
Setup News Ticker
   NEWS: NPR TOPICS: RESEARCH NEWS
NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 22, 2018

Scientists Search For Causes Of Preterm Birth And Better Ways To Test For Risk
Preterm birth, a leading cause of death in infants, remains stubbornly hard to prevent. Researchers are on the hunt for a better understanding of what causes it and better ways to diagnose risk.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 20, 2018

Replacing Vacant Lots With Green Spaces Can Ease Depression In Urban Communities
When researchers cleaned up vacant lots and planted grass and trees in poor neighborhoods in Philadelphia, residents' mental health improved.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 19, 2018

Migrating Arctic Geese Are Confused, Exhausted By Rising Temperatures
Warmer weather means that barnacle geese fly faster to their breeding grounds, leaving them too tired to lay eggs right away. By the time they're ready, the babies have missed the best food.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 18, 2018

A Spike In Liver Disease Deaths Among Young Adults Fueled By Alcohol
Deaths due to liver disease have increased among the young — and heavy drinking is to blame.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 18, 2018

Physicists Go Small: Let's Put A Particle Accelerator On A Chip
A tiny accelerator could be useful in medicine as well as basic science. Instead of speeding up beams of electrons through giant tunnels, the aim here is to build accelerators on semiconductor chips.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2018

Scientists Hunt A Test For Chronic Injury In Living Brains
Doctors are closer to a test in living people that could help diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease that's been linked to concussions and other repeated brain assaults.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2018

Scientists Hunt For A Test To Diagnose Chronic Brain Injury In Living People
Doctors are closer to a test in live brains that could help diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease that's been linked to concussions and other repeated brain assaults.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2018

More Screen Time For Teens Linked To ADHD Symptoms
A new study finds that teens who engage in frequent texting, social media use and other online activities daily are more likely to develop symptoms of ADHD.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 16, 2018

Surfing For Science: A New Way To Gather Data For Ocean And Coastal Research
Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography hope to turn surfers into citizen scientists by equipping them with a "smartfin" that gathers data as they surf.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 16, 2018

Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too
Hot weather can influence cognitive performance, according to new research. Young adults living in non-air-conditioned dorms during a heat wave performed worse on math and attention tests.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 12, 2018

Researchers Study Thousands Of Ticks Collected By The People They Bit
Researchers invited the public to help them study the geographic spread of ticks that carry pathogens that can sicken humans. People were eager to oblige by sending in the pesky bugs that bit them.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 10, 2018

Want A Creative Spark? Get To Know Someone From Another Culture
We find comfort in the familiar, but do we find creativity? New research supports the claim that diverse teams are more innovative.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2018

To Repel Ticks, Try Spraying Your Clothes With A Pesticide Derived from Mums
Just in time for summer hikes and outdoor play: A study finds that the ticks that often convey Lyme disease become unable to bite, and soon die after exposure to clothing treated with permethrin.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2018

To Repel Ticks, Try Spraying Your Clothes With A Pesticide That Mimics Mums
Just in time for summer hikes and outdoor play, a study finds that the ticks that often convey Lyme disease become unable to bite, and soon die, after exposure to clothing treated with permethrin.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2018

With More Opioid Use, People Are More Likely To Get Caught Up In The Justice System
A new study shows Americans with opioid addiction are more likely to have been arrested or convicted of a crime, suggesting a need to involve cops, courts and jails in treating addiction.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 04, 2018

Scientists Hope Lab-Grown Embryos Can Save Rhino Species From Extinction
Only two northern white rhinos remain, and they're both female. But researchers said Wednesday that they successfully have created embryos using sperm collected from the males before they died out.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 04, 2018

The Other Victims: First Responders To Violent Disasters Often Suffer Alone
Some firefighters, EMTS and police officers say recent mass shootings have brought to the surface their own trauma, buried over years on the job. Many find it hard to open up and seek help.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 03, 2018

For Women Over 30, There May Be A Better Choice Than The Pap Smear
A new study adds weight to the evidence that an HPV test can more accurately test for cervical cancer risk than a Pap smear.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 03, 2018

Surf And Turf: To Reduce Gas Emissions From Cows, Scientists Look To The Ocean
When cows burp, they emit the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere. But by adding seaweed to the cows' diets, researchers are noticing a dramatic reduction in methane production.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 02, 2018

Coffee Drinkers Are More Likely To Live Longer. Decaf May Do The Trick, Too
The latest study to link coffee and longevity adds to a growing body of evidence that, far from a vice, the brew can be protective of good health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2018

Microbial Magic Could Help Slash Your Dinner's Carbon Footprint
In one year, fertilizer production in the U.S. emitted as much carbon dioxide as two million cars. What if we could help plants make their own nitrogen so they wouldn't need man-made chemicals?

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 28, 2018

Baseball Umpires Don't Get Overtime. Does That Affect Extra Innings?
Researchers find that during extra innings, baseball umpires make calls in a way that tends to end games sooner. This seems to be because umpires aren't given additional money to work extra innings.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 27, 2018

What Can Cancer Specialists Learn From Patients Who Beat All The Odds?
A Harvard Medical School project aims to become the first national registry for exceedingly rare cancer patients who respond mysteriously well to treatments that failed to help others.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2018

Pregnant Women: Avoid Soft Cheeses, But Do Get These Shots
Doctors want to remind moms to get certain vaccines while pregnant. Whooping cough in particular can be deadly for newborns, but only about 50 percent of pregnant women get the vaccine.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2018

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise
If you are bitten by a Lone Star tick, you could develop an unusual allergy to red meat. And as this tick's territory spreads beyond the Southeast, the allergy seems to be spreading with it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 24, 2018

How Police Killings Lead To Poor Mental Health In The Black Community
A recent study published in The Lancet Medical journal shows that police killings of unarmed black men leads to poor mental. NPR's Michel Martin talks with study co-author Dr. Atheendar Venkataramani.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 24, 2018

Tweeting Oncologist Draws Ire And Admiration For Calling Out Hype
A young cancer doctor uses social media to skewer what he sees as overblown claims for "precision medicine." That doesn't make him hugely popular at cancer research meetings.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 21, 2018

Keystone Virus Makes First Known Jump From Mosquitoes To Humans
A 16-year-old Florida boy is the first person known to have become infected, researchers say. Symptoms in humans include a rash and mild fever.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 21, 2018

Keystone Virus Makes Jump From Mosquitoes To Human For First Time
The first known human case of the virus was identified in a Florida teen after a year of tests. Known symptoms include fever and a severe rash, but it's unclear if it causes brain inflammation.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 21, 2018

Long-Extinct Gibbon Found Inside Tomb Of Chinese Emperor's Grandmother
A Chinese tomb has turned up evidence of a new species of long-extinct ape. The gibbon, called Junzi imperialis, lived and died alongside its imperial human caretaker.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 21, 2018

Researchers Find Herpes Viruses In Brains Marked By Alzheimer's Disease
Two herpes viruses that cause skin rashes in toddlers may accelerate Alzheimer's disease when they infect brain cells. The finding suggests antiviral drugs might help protect the brain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 21, 2018

Some DNA Dismissed As 'Junk' Is Crucial To Embryo Development
Formerly considered useless, or maybe a parasite, the stretch of DNA known as LINE-1 actually plays "a key role" in creating an embryo and embryonic stem cells, research shows.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 21, 2018

Koko The Gorilla Dies; Redrew The Lines Of Animal-Human Communication
Koko fascinated and elated millions of people with her facility for language and ability to interact with humans. She also gave people a glimpse of her emotions.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 20, 2018

The Science Behind The World Cup Ball
For every World Cup, there's a custom official ball. But how does the Telstar 18 actually stack up? To find out, scientists stuck it in a wind tunnel with a bunch of sensors.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2018

Nursery For Giant Manta Rays Discovered In Gulf Of Mexico
Sightings of baby mantas are rare, but the Flower Garden Banks Marine Sanctuary appears to be a safe playground for newborns to adolescents.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2018

Drinking Alcohol Can Raise Cancer Risk. How Much Is Too Much?
A study finds light drinkers have the lowest combined risk of getting cancer and dying prematurely — lower than nondrinkers. Alcohol is estimated to be the third-largest contributor to cancer deaths.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2018

Report For Defense Department Ranks Top Threats From 'Synthetic Biology'
A committee of experts examined about a dozen different synthetic biology technologies that could be potentially misused. For each, they considered how likely it was to be usable as a weapon.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2018

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together
Infants do better with their parents, studies find, as long as parents have support to get and stay clean. This program starts during pregnancy, to rally and train a strong family support network.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2018

An Alternative To Foster Care For Babies Born To Opioid-Addicted Moms
Infants do better with their parents, studies find, as long as parents have support to get and stay sober. This program starts during pregnancy, to rally and train a strong family support network.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2018

As Carbon Dioxide Levels Rise, Major Crops Are Losing Nutrients
As the level of carbon dioxide in the air rises because of climate change, scientists are trying to pin down how plants are impacted. There's evidence that it's changing many important plants we eat.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 18, 2018

Zillow Data Used To Project Impact Of Sea Level Rise On Real Estate
A study by the Union of Concerned Scientists examined how real estate values were affected in 23 coastal states. Florida has the most to lose, according to the research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 15, 2018

Credibility Concerns Lead NIH To End Study Of Alcohol's Health Effects
Scientists and National Institutes of Health officials met with alcohol company executives and appeared to solicit money from them in violation of government policy. The NIH canceled the study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 14, 2018

Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?
The jury's been out on whether low vitamin D blood levels increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Researchers say a new review involving more than 12,000 people strongly suggests the answer is yes.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 14, 2018

U.S. Suicide Rates Are Rising Faster Among Women Than Men
You can help prevent suicide, researchers say, by knowing the signs and reaching out. More boys and men in the U.S. take their own lives than women and girls, but that difference has narrowed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 14, 2018

U.S. Suicides Rates Are Rising Faster Among Women Than Men
You can help prevent suicide, researchers say, by knowing the signs and reaching out. More boys and men in the U.S. take their own lives than women and girls, but that difference has narrowed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2018

Errors Trigger Retraction Of Study On Mediterranean Diet's Heart Benefits
An anesthesiologist who taught himself statistics identified flaws in an influential study that claimed to prove the Mediterranean diet has cardiovascular benefits. The 2013 paper is being retracted.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2018

Antarctica Has Lost More Than 3 Trillion Tons Of Ice In 25 Years
Antarctica's ice is melting faster than was thought, say scientists who recently completed the most exhaustive assessment of the ice sheet to date.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 12, 2018

1 in 3 Adults In The U.S. Take Medications That Can Cause Depression
200 medications have depression as a possible side effect. Now, a new study finds people who take these drugs are, in fact, more likely to be depressed. The more drugs you take, the higher the risk.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 12, 2018

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression
Depression is a possible side effect of 200 medications. Now, a new study finds people who take these drugs are, in fact, more likely to be depressed. The more drugs you take, the higher the risk.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 12, 2018

New Research On Sound Could Make Tornado Warnings More Accurate
Forecasters have gotten better giving advance notice of when tornadoes might strike. Now, there's a new technology that may help researchers even more: listening for the sounds of a tornado that humans can't hear.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 12, 2018

Clicker Training For Dogs Is Adapted To Help Surgeons Learn Quickly
The clicker became a popular tool for dog training in the 1980s. It has also caught on with humans — helping people to become better dancers, fishermen, golfers, and now, surgeons.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2018

After High School, Young Women's Exercise Rates Plunge
After they lose access to high school sports, young women — especially young women of color — generally get less exercise than they should, a study suggests, and far less exercise than young men get.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2018

How Hunger Pangs Can Make Nice People 'Hangry'
For someone to become "hangry," context is key. People need to be in a negative situation or subject to negative stimuli to have a hangry response.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2018

More Rain, More Development Spell Disaster For Some U.S. Cities
Climate change is increasing the frequency of rainstorms in many parts of the U.S., and those storms bring more rain. Many communities don't have the drainage systems needed to handle all the water.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 07, 2018

How Did Easter Islanders Lift Statues' 13-Ton Hats? Researchers May Have The Answer
3-D models show that grooves had been worn down the center of the stones, suggesting that a technique known as parbuckling might have been used.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 07, 2018

He Started Vaping As A Teen And Now Says Habit Is 'Impossible To Let Go'
Public health officials worry vaping is an emerging disaster that could reverse years of decline in smoking by young people. What's the latest evidence that e-cigarettes are a gateway to tobacco?

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2018

Hurricanes Are Moving More Slowly, Which Means More Damage
Hurricanes are moving more slowly than they used to. That means storms are dumping more rain and doing more damage when they make landfall, as Hurricane Harvey did when it lingered over Houston.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2018

Inside The Ukrainian Clinic Making '3-Parent Babies' For Women Who Are Infertile
A clinic in Kiev, Ukraine, stirs controversy by making babies with DNA from three different people to help women who are infertile bear children. It's the only clinic known to be doing this right now.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2018

Clinic Claims Success In Making Babies With 3 Parents' DNA
A clinic in Kiev, Ukraine, stirs controversy by making babies with DNA from three different people to help women who are infertile bear children. It's the only clinic known to be doing this right now.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 05, 2018

Physicists Say They Have Evidence For A New Fundamental Particle
Physicists' understanding of the nature of the universe has taken a blow. An experiment with neutrinos has produced a result that breaks the rules scientists think govern the subatomic world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 04, 2018

Therapy Made From Patient's Immune System Shows Promise For Advanced Breast Cancer
An experimental therapy seems to have eradicated cancer in a patient with metastatic breast cancer who had failed every other treatment. The goal is to reliably repeat that success in more people.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2018

For Some Breast Cancer Patients, The Chemo Decision Just Got Easier
Thousands of breast cancer patients could now safely avoid chemotherapy thanks to a major study of women with moderate risk of recurrence.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 01, 2018

Researchers Want To Show HIV-Positive Organ Donation Is Safe And Can Save Lives
Hundreds of otherwise viable organs that are HIV-positive are wasted each year, while HIV-positive patients in need of transplants languish on waiting lists. Researchers want to change that.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 01, 2018

Study Aims To Show Transplants Between HIV-Positive Patients Are Safe, Save Lives
Hundreds of otherwise viable organs that are HIV-positive are wasted each year, while HIV-positive patients in need of transplants languish on waiting lists. Researchers want to change that.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 31, 2018

New Research On Parents And Favoritism
Parents may think they treat their children equally, but new research shows that parents show bias when forced to choose between spending on sons and daughters.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 31, 2018

Admit It, Parents: You Play Favorites With The Kids
Parents may think they treat their children equally, but new research shows that parents show bias when forced to choose between spending on sons and daughters.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 30, 2018

For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial Intelligence
Scientists are training computers to read CT scans and in the hopes they could catch pancreatic cancer early.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 30, 2018

Get Screened Earlier For Colon Cancer, Urges American Cancer Society
Noting a sharp rise in colorectal cancer among younger people, the American Cancer Society now suggests that healthy adults get their first screening five years earlier — at age 45.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 30, 2018

Get Screened Earlier For Colorectal Cancer, Urges American Cancer Society
Noting a sharp rise in colorectal cancer among younger people, the American Cancer Society now suggests that healthy adults get their first screening five years earlier — at age 45.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 29, 2018

How Scientists In Kenya Are Trying To Understand Cow Emissions
Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and livestock account for a lot of the gas produced in agriculture. In Kenya, climate scientists are experimenting with different types of feed to reduce the amount cows burp.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 28, 2018

Great White Sharks Have A Secret 'Cafe,' And They Led Scientists Right To It
These sharks have a hidden life that's becoming a lot less hidden, thanks to a scientific expedition that was years in the making.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 25, 2018

Traces Of Opioids Found In Seattle-Area Mussels
Researchers said the discovery of pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs in local harbors is not uncommon, but the agency noted that this is the first time that oxycodone has been found in shellfish.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2018

A Warming Planet Could Zap Nutrition From Rice That Feeds The World
Scientists found that exposing rice to high levels of carbon dioxide causes it to lose valuable nutrients like iron, zinc, and B vitamins. But some varieties are better at resisting than others.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2018

As The Planet Warms, We'll Be Having Rice With A Side Of CO2
Scientists found that exposing rice to high levels of carbon dioxide causes it to lose valuable nutrients like iron, zinc, and B vitamins. But some varieties are better at resisting than others.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 23, 2018

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids
A study of patients with low back pain finds that those who got physical therapy first needed fewer pricey scans and surgeries and had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs" for treatment overall.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2018

Scientists Take A Ride On The Pacific's 'Shark Highway'
Biologists knew the sharks sometimes traveled from waters off Costa Rica south to the Galapagos Islands, but they'd never actually witnessed it.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 21, 2018

Levees Make Mississippi River Floods Worse, But We Keep Building Them
For more than 150 years, scientists have known that levees increase flood risk on the Mississippi River. That hasn't stopped local officials from building up levees in response to more severe floods.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2018

Report: Most Former Research Chimps Should Move To Retirement Sanctuaries
A working group convened by the National Institutes of Health looked at where chimps that had been used in research should live now. Unless relocating chimps would endanger them, a sanctuary is best.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2018

Why The $#%& Can't He Wash The Dishes?! The Chores That Can Sink A Relationship
A study finds that washing dishes is a big deal for women when it comes to the division of labor. But it taps into an even bigger idea — that women are emotionally exhausted by household management.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2018

A Pregnant Rhino In California Could Save A Related Subspecies
Researchers announced Thursday that they impregnated "Victoria" through artificial insemination. It is a step toward saving the critically endangered northern white rhino.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2018

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach
From bass to lobster, hundreds of species that live along U.S. coastlines are projected to migrate north over the next 80 years, making them harder to catch and manage. It's already happening.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 16, 2018

Test of Herceptin Finds Briefer Treatment Might Work, With Fewer Side Effects
An aggressive form of breast cancer — HER2-positive tumors — often shrink with Herceptin treatment, but side effects can be tough. Researchers say a shorter course of the drug may be a good option.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 16, 2018

Test of Herceptin Finds Briefer Treatment Can Work, With Fewer Side Effects
An aggressive type of breast cancer — a HER2-positive tumor — often shrinks with Herceptin treatment, but side effects can be tough. Researchers say a shorter course of the drug may be a good option.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 16, 2018

Why Do Some Lizards Have Green Blood?
Scientists are trying to figure out how green-blooded lizards might benefit from the unusual pigment. The answer could provide new insights into human illnesses like jaundice and malaria.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 16, 2018

Hospitals See Growing Numbers Of Kids And Teens At Risk For Suicide
The number of children and teens who visited the hospital for suicidal thoughts or attempts doubled from 2008 to 2015. Rates were highest during the school year.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 15, 2018

Kids Are Taking Fewer Antibiotics, More ADHD Meds
Doctors are prescribing fewer drugs to children, especially antibiotics. But use of certain drugs include ADHD medications has increased.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 12, 2018

Researchers Tackle Gun Violence Despite Lack of Federal Funding
Despite a federal ban on funding the study of gun violence, researchers have published hundreds of studies in recent years exploring risk factors and solutions to the problem.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 11, 2018

Earth's 'Bigger, Older Cousin' Maybe Doesn't Even Exist
In 2015, to great fanfare, NASA announced a planet discovery considered a milestone in the hunt for another Earth. But now some researchers say it's not clear that this planet actually exists.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 11, 2018

From Collards to Maple Syrup, How Your Identity Impacts The Food You Like
When people are reminded of their cultural roots, the food representing that culture tastes better. Scientists could harness that food and identity association to help people eat more healthfully.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 11, 2018

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?
Two big studies aim to rigorously test what could be a revolutionary treatment for a common and deadly disease: sepsis. Many doctors are awaiting the results before changing their practice.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2018

The Bigger The Mother Fish, The More Babies She Has
Plus-sized mamma fish have a size advantage over their petite counterparts: They can produce more eggs, and those eggs produce larger fish. It's a reminder that protecting big fish matters.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 09, 2018

Tobacco Smoke Residue Can Become Airborne Again Indoors
Researchers have found that residue stuck on smokers' clothes, furniture or other surfaces can become airborne and pollute indoor air.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 09, 2018

Artificial Intelligence Takes Scientists Inside Living Human Cells
Diseases like cancer involve changes that occur inside a cell — and usually out of sight. A new technology can reveal a cell's inner workings, using inexpensive graphics processors from video games.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 08, 2018

Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii's Erupting Volcano Has No End In Sight
Scientists are closely tracking the eruption at Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano. But there's still a lot that they don't know about the eruption — most notably, when it's going to be over.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 08, 2018

Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii Volcano Eruption Has No End In Sight
Scientists are closely tracking the eruption at Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. But there's still a lot that they don't know about the eruption — most notably, when it's going to be over.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 08, 2018

For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom's Recovery
Early findings on infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome are reassuring, and doctors are optimistic that normal development can continue. Making sure parents are treated for addiction is key.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 07, 2018

Lyme Disease Is On The Rise Again. Here's How To Prevent It
The tick-borne illness is spreading north and south — about 300,000 U.S. cases a year. As scientists work on better diagnostic tests and surveillance tools, you can take steps to cut your risk.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 02, 2018

How Did Birds Lose Their Teeth And Get Their Beaks? Study Offers Clues
Modern birds are dinosaurs without toothy jaws, and with bigger brains. Newly published research fills in some of the missing links in their evolution.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 01, 2018

Experimental Lung Treatment Could Make Breathing Easier
Lung surfactant coats tiny air sacs in the lung. Without it, every breath is a struggle, like blowing up millions of little balloons. With surfactant, breathing is as easy as blowing soap bubbles.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 01, 2018

In Gerrymandered Districts, Constituents Likely To Lose Economic Security
The researchers believe this is because politicians in gerrymandered districts are less likely to advocate for goods on behalf of their constituents.

  • CEOExpress
  • 1 Boston Place | Suite 2600
    Boston MA 02108
  • 617 482 1200
    617 299 8649 (fax)
  • Contact

©1999-2018 CEOExpress Company LLC