NEWS: NPR TOPICS: RESEARCH NEWS
Setup News Ticker
   NEWS: NPR TOPICS: RESEARCH NEWS
NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 21, 2020

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?
The U.S. government this week is pondering how much the public needs to know about funding decisions for studies and experiments that involve tinkering with already dangerous viruses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 21, 2020

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Risky Virus Research?
The U. S. government this week is pondering how much the public needs to be told about funding decisions for lab research that could make risky viruses even worse.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 21, 2020

More Data On The Midlife Crisis
An economist uses a broad range of data from 132 countries to understand why middle age is such a drag.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 20, 2020

NASA Taps Snowstorm-Chasing Team To Improve Forecasting
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Lynn McMurdie, a University of Washington professor and principal investigator for IMPACTS, NASA's new project to more accurately predict snowstorms.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 20, 2020

Patients Still Struggle To Balance High Costs Of MS Treatment, Despite Generic
Drugs to treat multiple sclerosis can run $70,000 a year or more. Patients hoped competition from a generic version of one of the most popular brands would spur relief, but prices went up. Here's why.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2020

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Bird-Like Flight
Birds change the shape of their wings far more than planes. The complexities of bird flight have posed a major design challenge for scientists trying to translate the way birds fly into robots.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2020

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight
Birds change the shape of their wings far more than planes. The complexities of bird flight have posed a major design challenge for scientists trying to translate the way birds fly into robots.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2020

Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth
Forty mice spent more than a month in orbit to test two approaches to strengthening muscle and bone in microgravity conditions. The results could help people with muscle and bone diseases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 15, 2020

Embryo Research To Reduce Need For In Vitro Fertilization Raises Ethical Concerns
Aiming to find a cheaper, easier way than IVF to ensure human embryos are healthy before implantation, researchers paid women to be inseminated, then flushed the embryos from their wombs for analysis.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 09, 2020

Tell Me A Story: What Narratives Reveal About The Mind
We live in a world of stories. They're in movies, books, and plays. They're even in the things that we buy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 09, 2020

Polly Share A Cracker? Parrots Can Practice Acts Of Kindness, Study Finds
Researchers found that African grey parrots voluntarily helped a partner get a food reward by giving the other bird a valuable metal token that could be exchanged for a walnut.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 03, 2020

Doulas Are Becoming Part Of The End-Of-Life Equation
According to The New England Journal of Medicine, more people are choosing to die at home rather than in a hospital. It's a trend that's shifting how we think about care at the end of life.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 02, 2020

Effort To Control Opioids In An ER Leaves Some Sickle Cell Patients In Pain
People with sickle cell disease aren't fueling the opioid crisis, research shows. Yet some ER doctors still treat patients seeking relief for agonizing sickle cell crises as potential addicts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 02, 2020

Researchers Have Found A Way To Improve TB Vaccine
The vaccine for tuberculosis has been around since the 1920s but it doesn't work very well. A new study shows that the vaccine could be far more effective if given at higher doses, intravenously.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 02, 2020

How Does The Way You Feel Shape The Way You Think About Your Life?
A recent study found students may inadvertently choose their college major, in part, based on how tired they were in the subject's introductory course — especially if it was an early morning class.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 31, 2019

Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Emotional Well-Being In 2020
Joy can be cultivated. Hostility often masks depression. As one year ends and another begins, these six insights and tips from psychologists offer hope for a good new year.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 31, 2019

Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020
Joy can be cultivated. Hostility often masks depression. As one year ends and another begins, these six insights and tips from psychologists offer hope for a good new year.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 25, 2019

A Young Mississippi Woman's Journey Through A Pioneering Gene-Editing Experiment
NPR tells the exclusive, behind-the-scenes story of the first person with a genetic disorder to be treated in the United States with the revolutionary gene-editing technique CRISPR.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2019

A Christmas Tree Thrives On Farms, Struggles In The Wild
The Fraser fir is found in a lot of homes around Christmas. But its wild cousins have been in decline for almost a century because of a small invasive pest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2019

Why Certain Poor Shepherds In Nativity Scenes Have Huge, Misshapen Throats
In some historical Nativity scenes, the shepherds have grossly enlarged thyroid glands — also known today as goiter. It's an apparent symbol of their poverty and iodine-deficient diet.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2019

Steam On, Steamboat: The World's Tallest Active Geyser Has Another Record Year
The world's tallest active geyser is Steamboat Geyser, in Yellowstone National Park. It's been on a real eruption streak lately and 2019 saw the most recorded eruptions in a calendar year.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2019

4 Out Of 5 Smokers Are Male But Research Shows That Number Is Dropping
The number of men who use tobacco has declined for the first time since the World Health Organization started tracking it. The shift is significant because 80 percent of smokers are men.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 20, 2019

CDC Confirms A THC Contaminant, Vitamin E Acetate, The Culprit In Most Vaping Deaths
The spate of more than 2,500 acute vaping-related lung injuries tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the decline, epidemiologists say, and the number of deaths has slowed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 20, 2019

CDC Confirms A THC Additive, Vitamin E Acetate, Is The Culprit In Most Vaping Deaths
The spate of more than 2,500 acute vaping-related lung injuries tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the decline, epidemiologists say, and the number of deaths has slowed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 20, 2019

CDC Confirms A THC Additive, Vitamin E Acetate, The Culprit In Most Vaping Deaths
The spate of more than 2,500 acute vaping-related lung injuries tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the decline, epidemiologists say, and the number of deaths has slowed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 19, 2019

How Online Grocery Delivery Could Help Alleviate Food Deserts
Delivery service could make it easier to access fresh, healthy food in these areas, a study finds. It lends support to a pilot program that lets people pay for these groceries with food stamps.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 18, 2019

Where A Child Grows Up Plays A Major Role In Future Opportunities
NPR got an early look at data showing vastly different opportunities for children of different races across the U.S. living just neighborhoods apart. Albany, N.Y., has some of the biggest inequities.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 17, 2019

Archaeologists Discover Ancient Greek Royal Tombs Dating Back 3,500 Years
Among the findings are a gold pendant with the image of an Egyptian goddess, suggesting wider interaction between ancient Greece and Egypt than previously known.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 17, 2019

What Ancient 'Chewing Gum' Can Tell Us About Life 5,700 Years Ago
For the first time ever, scientists managed to extract an entire human genome from the gum. It told them a lot about the person chewing it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 16, 2019

Vaping Nicotine Linked To Increased Risk Of Chronic Lung Disease
A new study suggests the use of e-cigarettes can increase smokers' and nonsmokers' risk of developing chronic lung disease, including conditions such as COPD, chronic bronchitis, emphysema or asthma.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 16, 2019

New Study Offers First Evidence Of Vaping's Long-Term Risks
The study finds that e-cigarettes are linked to increased risk of chronic lung diseases including emphysema, chronic bronchitis and COPD, as well as weakened immune defenses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 16, 2019

Teens With ADHD More Likely To Get Hooked On Nicotine, Research Shows
Vaping use among high school students is rising and that's likely driving an increase in nicotine use. Teenagers who may be more likely to get hooked are those with ADHD.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 14, 2019

Holiday Parties Make You Squirm? Here's How To Conquer Social Anxiety
People with social anxiety disorder fear their "fatal flaws" will be exposed by a wayward comment or other social misstep. If holiday parties send you spiraling, try these tips.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 11, 2019

44,000-Year-Old Indonesian Cave Painting Is Rewriting The History Of Art
In a cave in Indonesia, archaeologists have uncovered a stunning ancient painting of a hunting party that is thousands of years older than similar works found in Europe.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 10, 2019

Gene Therapy May Aid In Sickle Cell Disease Treatment
Scientists report progress using gene therapy to treat sickle cell disease, a common and devastating genetic blood disorder.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 05, 2019

Offshore Wind May Help The Planet — But Will It Hurt Whales?
New York has awarded two contracts for large offshore wind farms, with more anticipated. Researchers are surveying whales in the area to craft strategies to mitigate dangers to them and their habitat.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2019

Research Raises Concerns About Safety Of Hair Dyes, Chemical Straighteners
Researchers have found that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don't use these products.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2019

For HIV-Positive Babies, New Evidence Favors Starting Drug Treatment Just After Birth
Doctors used to worry that antiretroviral drugs were too powerful for HIV-positive newborns. More evidence is emerging that, in fact, early treatment can be safe and effective.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2019

The Psychology Behind When Emotions Turn Us Into Different People
In a fit of anger or in the grip of fear, many of us make decisions that we never would have anticipated. Researchers say it is very hard to understand how we'll act in certain situations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2019

Raiders Of The Lost Crops: Scientists Race Against Time To Save Genetic Diversity
Elephants, snakes and crocodiles? Researchers around the globe faced risky situations to gather wild relatives of key foods. That genetic pool could be vital to helping crops adapt to climate change.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2019

Life Expectancy Study Jolts Assumptions Made About Life In America
NPR's David Greene talks to Dr. Steven Woolf, lead author of a study that finds U.S. life expectancy is declining, and is not keeping pace with other wealthy countries.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 01, 2019

'Cosmic Crisp': Researchers Develop A New Apple
There's a new apple called the Cosmic Crisp. Kate Evans is one of the Washington State University researchers who helped develop it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 01, 2019

To Help Coral Reefs Come Back, Fake It (With Sound) 'Til Fish Make It
Researchers have found that by playing the sounds of healthy reefs in places where coral has died, fish are more readily attracted back, and help speed the reef's recovery.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 28, 2019

Study: For HIV-Infected Babies, Treatment Should Start At Birth
Every day, as many as 500 babies in sub-Saharan Africa are born with HIV. A study out of Botswana finds that if newborns are given treatment right away, the virus becomes almost undetectable.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 26, 2019

A Single Dose Of Ketamine Might Help Heavy Drinkers, Study Finds
Participants in the U.K. experimental study dramatically reduced their average alcohol intake for months after the initial dose. Ketamine has also been used to treat severe depression.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 25, 2019

Why Cash Aid Distributions Have A Beneficial Ripple Effect
Research suggests the most effective way to help poor people can be to give them no strings attached cash. A new study finds even neighbors who don't get the aid benefit from a big ripple effect.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 24, 2019

Young Researchers Feel Excitement And Sadness To See Arctic Ice That May Disappear
Young Arctic researchers get their first glimpse of sea ice — and reflect on how the ice caps may melt away over the course of their careers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 24, 2019

Excess Weight Can Weaken The Flu Shot
Scientists have come to realize that flu vaccines are less effective for people who are overweight or obese. Now researchers are trying to figure out why and hope to develop better vaccines.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 22, 2019

Helen Fisher: How Does Love Affect The Brain?
Helen Fisher says love is a biological drive and a survival mechanism. She discusses the science of love and how much control we have over who we love, how we love, and whether that love lasts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 20, 2019

The Loudness Of Vowels Helps The Brain Break Down Speech Into Syl-La-Bles
Syllables are the building blocks of spoken language. And now a study of brain activity hints at how we extract them from a stream of speech.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 13, 2019

Molecular Scissors Could Help Keep Some Viral Illnesses At Bay
A new technique uses the CRISPR molecule to snip away at the part of RNA viruses that allows them to spread infection by making copies of themselves.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 11, 2019

Silver-Backed Chevrotain, With Fangs And Hooves, Photographed In Wild For First Time
Scientists say their goal was to rediscover a type of chevrotain that had been "lost to science" for nearly 30 years. Chevrotains are the world's smallest hoofed mammal, or ungulate.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 11, 2019

Meditation Reduced The Opioid Dose She Needs To Ease Chronic Pain By 75%
For some patients in pain, opioids are still part of the long-term solution, doctors say. But by adding meditation, hypnosis or other treatments, the opioid dose can be reduced.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2019

You Can Get A Master's In Medical Cannabis In Maryland
The University of Maryland, Baltimore, now has a master's program dedicated to the science and therapeutics of medical weed because of a growing number of students looking for expertise in the field.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2019

Stress Over Mass Shootings, Health Care Access High Among Latinos, Survey Finds
A national survey by psychologists shows a significant rise in U.S. stress in 2019. Mass shootings, the election campaign and concerns about health care costs and access top the list of stressors.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 08, 2019

New Study Challenges The Assumption That Math Is Harder For Girls
Research shows that when boys and girls as old as 10 do math, their patterns of brain activity are indistinguishable. The finding is the latest challenge to the idea that math is harder for girls.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 08, 2019

Math Looks The Same In The Brains Of Boys And Girls, Study Finds
Brain scans of 104 boys and girls doing basic math tasks found no gender differences. The finding adds to the evidence that boys and girls start out with equal ability in math.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 07, 2019

Western Individualism May Have Roots In The Medieval Church's Obsession With Incest
Researchers combed Vatican archives to find records of how ancient church policies shaped Western values and family structures today.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 07, 2019

There's A Promising New Vaccine For One Of The World's Top Health Threats
Dengue afflicts nearly 400 million people worldwide every year, but a vaccine has remained elusive. New research offers a path forward.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 06, 2019

Scrubbing Your House Of Bacteria Could Clear The Way for Fungus
A new study in Brazil finds that urban apartments have more diverse fungi — some healthy, some potentially not — than villages in the Amazon rainforest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 06, 2019

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test
Attempts to use the gene-editing tool CRISPR to develop a treatment for cancer seem safe and feasible in the earliest findings from the first three patients. "So far, so good," scientists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 05, 2019

Hidden Brain: Does Going To Church Improve Your Mental Health?
It's been debated a long time: Does being part of organized religion improve your mental health? A new study finds that religion can buffer adolescents against depression.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 04, 2019

'The Great Pretender' Seeks The Truth About 'On Being Sane In Insane Places'
Journalist and Brain on Fire author Susannah Cahalan writes in an urgent, personal book that the '70s study by David Rosenhan had an outsized effect on psychiatry — and may have been fatally flawed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2019

How Deep Sleep May Help The Brain Clear Alzheimer's Toxins
A study of 11 sleeping brains sheds some light on the mysterious link between sleep problems and Alzheimer's disease. The flow of cerebrospinal fluid through the brain appears to be the key.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2019

For These Vampires, A Shared Blood Meal Lets 'Friendship' Take Flight
Common vampire bats might drink the blood of their prey, but it turns out that these fearsome beasts can be warm and fuzzy when it comes to their fellow bats.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 24, 2019

U.S. Travel Ban Disrupts The World's Largest Brain Science Meeting
Scientists from nations including Iran, Mexico, and India were refused visas to attend this year's Society for Neuroscience meeting in Chicago. Some researchers got stand-ins to present their work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 23, 2019

Teen Vapers Who Want To Quit Look For Help Via Text
Starting to vape is easy, but quitting a nicotine habit can be tough, teens are finding. Some vaping cessation programs have begun to reach out to teens where they live — on their phones.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2019

Hospitals Around The World Have A Dire Shortage Of Blood
The first global analysis of blood supply and demand finds that many developing countries are relying on risky emergency donations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2019

Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes
A new technique, dubbed 'prime editing,' appears to make it even easier to make very precise changes in DNA. It's designed to overcome the limits of the CRISPR gene editing tool.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2019

Keeping Your Blood Sugar In Check Could Lower Your Alzheimer's Risk
Diabetes can double a person's chances of developing Alzheimer's. Now researchers are beginning to understand the role of brain metabolism in the development of the dementia.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2019

Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant
Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 20, 2019

VIDEO: See A Controversial Swarm Of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In A Lab In Italy
NPR was the only news organization allowed into the lab to witness the moment the releases began this year. The goal is to create a powerful new weapon in the fight against malaria.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 18, 2019

What's Behind The Research Funding Gap For Black Scientists?
Black scientists more often seek grants for community health studies, but molecular-level research proposals win more funding. More diversity throughout the process could help close the gap, says NIH.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2019

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls. That's Not Good
The drive to make more milk has had an unsavory side effect: Cows have become more genetically similar and less fertile. Scientists are trying to recover valuable genetic variation that was lost.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 11, 2019

Canada's Decision To Make Public More Clinical Trial Data Puts Pressure On FDA
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration treats most data it gets on the development of new drugs and medical devices as confidential to companies. Critics say making the data public would help patients.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 10, 2019

After A Life Of Painful Sickle Cell Disease, A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help
She's the first patient with a genetic disorder to be treated with the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR. The treatment has wrapped up and now she's waiting to see if it brings relief.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 10, 2019

A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help With Pain Of Sickle Cell Disease
She's the first patient with a genetic disorder to be treated with the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR. The treatment has wrapped up, and now she's waiting to see if it brings relief.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2019

Zika: Researchers Are Learning More About The Long-Term Consequences For Children
A new review of research on the Zika virus since 2016 finds there is still much scientists don't understand about the pandemic — including when another may strike.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2019

Changing Your Diet Can Help Tamp Down Depression, Boost Mood
Depression symptoms dropped significantly in a group of young adults who ate a Mediterranean-style diet for three weeks. It's the latest study to show food can influence mental health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2019

How Outrage Is Hijacking Our Culture And Our Minds
It can feel impossible to escape outrage nowadays. Anger is present across our screens — from TV news to social media. New social science research asks: What's the effect of all this outrage?

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2019

3 Win Chemistry Nobel For Development Of Lithium-Ion Batteries
The prize was awarded jointly to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino." Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized our lives," the Nobel Committee said.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2019

New Research: China Is Winning Some Health-Care Battles — And Losing Others
A suite of new research shows the country beating infectious diseases over the last two decades. But deaths from lifestyle-related diseases like cancer and diabetes are on the rise.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2019

Ancient Greek Scroll's Hidden Contents Revealed Through Infrared Imaging
More than 200 years ago, a scroll damaged by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius was unrolled and pasted onto cardboard, even though it had writing on the back. New imagery shows some of what's hidden.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2019

Despite Thin Ice, Research Ship Finds Its Home In Frozen Floe For The Next Year
An ambitious Arctic expedition has reached a milestone. Researchers have found an ice floe to freeze into, from which they'll study Arctic systems from a ship and an observatory they'll construct.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2019

Researchers Are Freezing Their Ship Into Arctic Ice To Study Climate Change
An ambitious Arctic expedition has reached a milestone. Researchers have found a floe to freeze into, where they'll construct an observatory and study Arctic systems from a ship.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2019

We're Pulling Tuna Out Of The Ocean At Unprecedented — And Unsustainable — Rates
A new study finds that tuna harvests, including of some species considered "vulnerable," have increased by an astonishing 1,000% in the last 60 years — a rate some scientists warn is unsustainable.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2019

Irrigation For Farming Could Leave Many Of The World's Streams and Rivers Dry
A new study shows many of the world's streams and rivers could dry up because people are draining underground aquifers that sustain streams through dry periods. Climate change won't help matters.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2019

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops
Irreversible lung disease has started to show up among young workers who cut, grind and polish countertops made of increasingly popular "engineered" stone. The material is more than 90 percent silica.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 30, 2019

Pediatricians Stand By Meds For ADHD, But Some Say Therapy Should Come First
New treatment guidelines don't assuage concerns that some children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are being prescribed medication too soon, before behavioral interventions are tried.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 30, 2019

Just A Handful Of Nuts May Help Keep Us From Packing On The Pounds As We Age
U.S. adults put on about a pound a year on average. But people who had a regular nut-snacking habit put on less weight and had a lower risk of becoming obese over time, a new study finds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 28, 2019

UCLA Opens World's 1st Institute To Study Kindness
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with anthropology professor Daniel Fessler about UCLA's new Bedari Kindness Institute.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 26, 2019

Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains
Research finds that triathletes who train too hard can impair a brain area involved in achieving goals like winning a race. Fatigued athletes choose immediate gratification over long-term rewards.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 25, 2019

Prehistoric Babies Drank Animal Milk From A Bottle
The remnants of ruminant milk were found in tiny vessels buried with infants thousands of years ago. Scientists say the ancient "baby bottles" were sometimes shaped like "mythical animals."

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 25, 2019

Prehistoric Babies Drank Animal Milk From Bottles
The remnants of ruminant milk were found in tiny vessels buried with infants thousands of years ago. Scientists say the ancient baby bottles were sometimes shaped like "mythical animals."

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2019

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder
Labs are churning out more and more synthetic DNA for scientists who want to use it to reprogram cells. Some say the technology has outpaced government safety guidelines put in place a decade ago.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 23, 2019

Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help
Never mind a runner's high — the buzz some people say they get after a run. Neuroscientist Benedict Kolber was more interested in how to generate pain relief via a brisk walk. It can really work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 19, 2019

North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say
Researchers estimate that the bird population has fallen by a quarter since 1970. More than 90% of the loss can be attributed to just a dozen bird families, including sparrows, blackbirds and finches.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 19, 2019

Scientists Will Deliberately Encase Their Ship In Arctic Sea Ice
An ambitious Arctic expedition launches Friday. Scientists want to get their icebreaker stuck in the ice for a year so they can study the ice, ocean and atmosphere and how it's changing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2019

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies
Type 1 diabetes can be well managed with insulin if blood sugar is consistently monitored. But insurance rules can make it hard for patients to get the medical supplies their doctors say they need.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2019

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives
Pregnant women at high or even moderate risk of developing the life-threatening condition preeclampsia should consider taking a very small dose of aspirin daily to prevent it, doctors say.

  • CEOExpress
  • 1 Boston Place | Suite 2600
    Boston MA 02108
  • 617 482 1200
    617 299 8649 (fax)
  • Contact
  • As an Amazon Associate
    CEOExpress earns from
    qualifying purchases.

©1999-2020 CEOExpress Company LLC