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NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 13, 2018

Scientists Say Gene-Edited Babies Claim Is 'Wake-Up Call' For World
U.S. National Academy of Medicine, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and Chinese Academy of Sciences call for international gene-editing standards. Critics blast statement as inadequate.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2018

Fentanyl Surpasses Heroin As Drug Most Often Involved In Deadly Overdoses
When fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine, infiltrated the drug supply in the U.S. it had an immediate, dramatic effect on the overdose rate.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2018

Arctic Report Card Documents 'Cascading Effects' Of Warming Ocean Temperatures
The U.S. government says warming ocean temperatures and melting ice has resulted in the "most unprecedented transition in history" in the Arctic, leading to extreme weather events across the globe.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 11, 2018

Mystery Blast Sank The USS San Diego in 1918. New Report Reveals What Happened
A team of researchers had been trying to determine whether the armored cruiser was lost to sabotage, an accident or an attack.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 11, 2018

Local Newspaper Closures Come With Hefty Price Tag For Residents
Hundreds of newspapers have closed across the country. The loss of local reporting means fewer investigations into fraud and waste. That has had an impact on the budgets of cities and towns.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 10, 2018

How I Made It: The Professor From the Pueblo, Rodrigo Bañuelos
Latino USA catches up with Rodrigo Bañuelos at the Latinx in the Mathematical Sciences Conference at UCLA's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 10, 2018

Research Gaps Leave Doctors Guessing About Treatments For Pregnant Women
To protect a developing fetus from experimental drugs or treatments that might cause birth defects, pregnant women aren't included in many clinical trials. But that limits the safety evidence, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 07, 2018

World's First Insect Vaccine Could Help Bees Fight Off Deadly Disease
American foulbrood is an infectious disease that devastates honeybee hives. Scientists say they've created a vaccine for it, despite a big hurdle: Bees don't have antibodies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 07, 2018

Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies
Concerns over a Chinese scientist's claim that he created the first gene-edited babies grow with more questions about whether it worked and the possible harm he may have inflicted on the twin girls.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 05, 2018

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?
The fortuitous dip in emissions of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, during the past three years is over, as economies turn up. The trend in the near future looks grim, say climate scientists.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 05, 2018

Infections May Raise The Risk Of Mental Illness In Children
A large study of Danish kids finds that childhood infections are linked with a higher risk of developing some mental illnesses. The risk is highest in the months immediately following the infection.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2018

VIDEO: To Save A Fox, Scientists Took To Land, Air And Sea
When the world's population of Channel Island foxes started to vanish in the '90s, no one knew why. Bringing them back from near-extinction has meant unraveling a mystery that started with WWII.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2018

Study Shows Americans Are Meaner On Twitter Than Canadians
Canadian Twitter may truly be a nicer place. Researcher Bryor Snefjella says Canadians tend to tweet more positive words compared to their American counterparts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2018

Examining Differences Between Canadian And U.S. Tweets
David Greene talks to Bryor Snefjella, a researcher at McMaster University in Ontario, about why Canadian Twitter users tend to sound more positive than their American counterparts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2018

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?
Protein snacks and supplements are popular, but unless you're an extreme athlete or recovering from an injury, you may already get enough protein in your diet. Here's how to tell how much you need.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2018

Kids With Concussions Can Phase In Exercise, Screen Time Sooner Than Before
No longer do kids with concussions need to sit in dark rooms for days on end. For the first time in nearly a decade, the nation's pediatricians have loosened their guidance on concussion recovery.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 30, 2018

Changes In Brain Scans Seen After A Single Season Of Football For Young Players
MRI scans of the brains of young football players suggest that repeated blows to the head can change the shape of nerve fibers in the corpus callosum, which connects the two halves of the brain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 29, 2018

International Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies, But Rejects Moratorium
The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing issues a consensus on how scientists might responsibly move forward to create gene-edited babies in the wake of a rogue scientist's claims.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 29, 2018

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium
The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing issues a consensus on how scientists might responsibly move forward to create gene-edited babies in the wake of a rogue scientist's claims.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 28, 2018

News Brief: Paul Manafort, Lion Air Crash, Gene-Editing
Attorney for the Ex-Trump campaign chairman reportedly briefed Trump's legal team on Mueller probe. Indonesian investigators report on Lion Air crash. Chinese scientist defends gene-editing research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 28, 2018

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies
He Jiankui, who shocked the world by asserting he had genetically edited twin girls, faced growing criticism from other researchers as he spoke at a scientific conference in Hong Kong.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 28, 2018

Facing Backlash, Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies
He Jiankui, who shocked the world by asserting he had genetically edited twin girls, faced growing criticism from other researchers as he spoke at a scientific conference in Hong Kong.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 27, 2018

China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students
In a quest to rapidly advance its scientific depth and breadth, China is recruiting scientists from around the world. Some from the U.S. say the greater funding for school and research is freeing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 26, 2018

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Genetically Edit Babies, Report Says
According to The Associated Press, a Chinese scientist says that he has helped to create the first genetically edited babies. There's no independent confirmation of his claim.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 26, 2018

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR
A scientist says he created the first genetically edited babies using CRISPR to protect them from infection with the AIDS virus. The move has prompted immediate criticism as premature and reckless.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 25, 2018

Look Out Mars, Here Comes InSight
There's a new probe nearing Mars. After Monday's tricky landing, NASA's InSight spacecraft is to deploy a sensitive seismometer and temperature probe to let scientists explore the planet's interior.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 25, 2018

NASA Probe Lands Safely On Martian Surface
There's a new probe on Mars. After Monday's tricky landing, NASA's InSight spacecraft is to deploy a sensitive seismometer and temperature probe to let scientists explore the planet's interior.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 24, 2018

National Report Confirms Climate Change 'Is Affecting Every Sector,' Scientist Says
The economy could take a major hit if climate change continues at its current pace, according to the latest National Climate Assessment. NPR's Michel Martin speaks with climate scientist Michael Mann.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 15, 2018

Bringing Up Baby
This week we focus on the behavior of the youngest members of the human race. We try to translate the mysterious language of babies. And we ask, when should we step back and just let our children be?

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 15, 2018

Buzz, Buzz: Bitter Tasters Like Coffee Better
A genetic analysis of samples taken from a large UK health database suggest that people who are more sensitive than their peers to the bitter taste of caffeine tend to drink more coffee — not less.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 14, 2018

Maybe Neanderthals Weren't Quite So Nasty And Brutish
New research finds they sustained skull injuries at about the same rate as early modern humans. "I definitely think that it's evidence these guys were not beating each other up," one expert says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 13, 2018

Say Au Revoir To That Hunk Of Metal In France That Has Defined The Kilogram
A small cylinder called Le Grand K has defined the kilogram for more than a hundred years. But if a scratch ever rendered it lighter, the definition of the kilo literally shifted. Time for a change.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 13, 2018

How Can Schools Better Persuade Students To Show Up For Class?
Many schools give attendance awards to motivate students. A study found students who were awarded for perfect attendance went on to have more absences than their peers who weren't given the award.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 10, 2018

Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Disappoint In Long-Awaited Study Results
After years of debate, a major government funded study failed to find any overall benefit of taking widely used supplements to protect against heart disease or cancer.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 10, 2018

Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Mostly Disappoint In Long-Awaited Research Results
After years of debate, a major government funded study failed to find any overall benefit of taking widely used supplements to protect against heart disease or cancer.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2018

Scientists Spy On Bees, See Harmful Effects Of Common Insecticide
Bees exposed to a type of insecticides called neonicotinoids dramatically changed their behavior — becoming sluggish, antisocial and spending less time caring for the colony's young, researchers say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2018

Should Childhood Trauma Be Treated As A Public Health Crisis?
New research highlights the link between childhood trauma and mental illness and addiction in adulthood, leading some researchers to call it an issue as pressing as any infectious disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 08, 2018

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain
When people are feeling glum, it often means that brain areas involved in emotion and memory are communicating. Researchers have now observed the circuit in action in humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 07, 2018

Active Ingredient In Marijuana Reduced Alzheimer's-Like Effects In Mice
In mice genetically programmed to develop Alzheimer's symptoms, those given a synthetic version of a chemical in marijuana retained normal memory function.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 07, 2018

Is The Pentagon Modifying Viruses To Save Crops — Or To Wage Biological Warfare?
The Pentagon wants university researchers to find ways to protect crops in the field using infectious viruses carried by insects. Critics think it looks like bioweapons research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 06, 2018

These Flatworms Can Regrow A Body From A Fragment. How Do They Do It And Could We?
Biologists are keen to understand how a type of flatworm known as a planarian uses powerful stem cells to regenerate an entire body from a headless sliver of itself.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 04, 2018

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?
Working memory is where the brain keeps bits of information in everyday life handy. But brain scientists don't agree on how working memory works.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 02, 2018

Despite Warnings, FDA Approves Potent New Opioid Painkiller
Critics, including some leading anesthesiologists, say the drug is unnecessary, and they worry it will be diverted and abused. The Food And Drug Administration says it is addressing safety concerns.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 02, 2018

She Chose To 'Go Flat' And Wants Other Breast Cancer Survivors To Know They Can Too
After her double mastectomy, writer Catherine Guthrie came to embrace her new body, without breast reconstruction. But she's learned, women have to push the medical system to support this choice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 01, 2018

How Long Should Older Moms Wait Before Getting Pregnant Again?
As a woman ages, choosing when to try for a second or third child means weighing fertility odds against the risks of getting pregnant again too soon. A new study provides more data to help decide.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2018

For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival
Two new studies suggest that minimally invasive surgery for early stage cervical cancer patients leads to death and recurring disease more often than standard surgery through a large incision.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2018

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs
A new study found that birds' dinosaur relatives had eggs with traces of two pigments—a red-brown one and a blue-green one. In today's birds that might produce a color such as robin's egg blue.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2018

Social Stigma Is One Reason The Opioid Crisis Is Hard To Confront
The CDC estimated that 72,000 people died of drug overdoses in 2017. There are many reasons why the opioid crisis is so hard to confront. One of them is social stigma.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 30, 2018

When Adolescents Give Up Pot, Their Cognition Quickly Improves
When researchers convinced a group of young people to stop smoking pot, their cognition quickly improved. This adds to research warning against teen pot use, despite marijuana's growing acceptance.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 26, 2018

Should Self-Driving Cars Have Ethics?
To design a "moral machine," researchers updated a classic thought experiment for the autonomous vehicle age. But do we really want artificial intelligence making decisions on who lives or dies?

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 26, 2018

Scientists And Parents Band Together To Research Cures For Rare Childhood Cancer
A research start-up is connecting parents with scientists in hopes of sparking new research on diseases whose survival rates and treatment options haven't budged in 30 years

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 25, 2018

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists
A brain structure that helps us walk a straight line also appears to play a central role in emotional control and decision-making. The findings about the cerebellum challenge years of dogma.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 23, 2018

'Oldest Intact Shipwreck Known To Mankind' Found In Depths Of Black Sea
The vessel dates back 2,400 years to the days of ancient Greece. "This will change our understanding of shipbuilding and seafaring in the ancient world," says archaeologist Jon Adams.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2018

Microplastics Are Turning Up Everywhere, Even In Human Excrement
A very small study shows that microplastics are in human waste in many parts of the world. While it's not entirely clear what that means for our health, it might be a sign that we need to pull back.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2018

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium Or Dementia
Though widely prescribed in hospital intensive care units to treat hallucinations and other signs of delirium, Haldol and similar drugs are no better than a placebo for such patients, a study finds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2018

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium
Though widely prescribed in hospital intensive care units to treat hallucinations and other signs of delirium, Haldol and similar drugs are no better than a placebo for such patients, a study finds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2018

Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears
Two large studies show that age-related memory loss can be slowed significantly when older people promptly address hearing and vision loss.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 18, 2018

Grandma Was Right: Sunshine Helps Kill Germs Indoors
All kinds of bacteria live with us indoors, and some can make us sick. A new study shows that rooms exposed to light had about half the live bacteria found in rooms that were kept in darkness.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 18, 2018

Bye, Bye, Beer? Brewers Say They've Got A Plan On Climate Change
A scientific paper published this week predicts climate change will send beer prices skyrocketing and drastically reduce the barley crop. It got tons of media attention. But is beer really doomed?

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 18, 2018

Bye-Bye, Beer? Brewers Say They've Got A Plan On Climate Change
A scientific paper published this week predicts climate change will send beer prices skyrocketing and drastically reduce the barley crop. It got tons of media attention. But is beer really doomed?

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2018

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat
Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The USDA has approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2018

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' in 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks
A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2018

Distrust Of Health Care System May Keep Black Men Away From Prostate Cancer Research
Black men are hit hardest by prostate cancer, but they are underrepresented in research. Researchers held focus groups in three states to understand why.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 16, 2018

After Paul Allen Co-Founded Microsoft, He Changed Brain Science Forever
In 2003, Paul Allen created an institute to figure out how the human brain works. That institute has already made contributions that may turn out to be part of his greatest legacy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 16, 2018

2 Towns: Guess Which 1 Is Liberal And Which Is Conservative
A social scientist says some portion of people's political leanings can come from an unlikely source: their DNA.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 15, 2018

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Could Get A Cut?
Sometimes discoveries derived from patients' medical data become the foundation of new profit-making companies. A fledgling industry wants to help patients get a cut of the cash.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 15, 2018

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?
Sometimes discoveries derived from patients' medical data become the foundation of new profit-making companies. A fledgling industry wants to help patients get a cut of the cash.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 11, 2018

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns
A majority of Americans of European descent could be linked to third cousins, or closer relatives, using genealogy databases, a study finds. Soon it may be possible to identify nearly everyone by DNA.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 11, 2018

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision
Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process in the lab using human cells that grow into a functioning retina.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 10, 2018

How To Prevent Brain-Sapping Delirium In The ICU
People who suffer from prolonged delirium in the hospital are likely to develop long-term mental problems like dementia. Doctors have come up with techniques they say can reduce delirium in the ICU.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 10, 2018

When ICU Delirium Leads To Symptoms Of Dementia After Discharge
Up to half of all patients who survive emergency medical treatment in the intensive care unit have mental problems when they return home. Doctors studying the problem say it starts with delirium.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2018

After Prison, Many People Living With HIV Go Without Treatment
When HIV-positive people leave prison, they often lose access to medical care and the drugs that suppress the virus. It's a missed opportunity in the fight against HIV, public health advocates say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2018

Why Are Black Women Less Likely To Stick With A Breast Cancer Follow-up Treatment?
Black women are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women. One reason may be that they face economic and cultural barriers to taking the medications that can prevent recurrence.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2018

In Changing Climate, Endangered Right Whales Find New Feeding Grounds
North Atlantic right whales used to turn up large numbers off Maine's coast, but now, adapting to climate changes, they are being spotted further north in Gulf of St. Lawrence.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 08, 2018

Ancient Maya: Astrologists, Farmers ... And Salt Entrepreneurs?
Evidence from a site in Belize shows the Maya not only had large-scale salt-producing operations along the coast, they were also using salt to preserve fish for their extensive trade networks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 08, 2018

Ancient Maya: Astronomers, Farmers ... And Salt Entrepreneurs?
Evidence from a site in Belize shows the Maya not only had large-scale salt-producing operations along the coast, they were also using salt to preserve fish for their extensive trade networks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 08, 2018

Ancient Maya: Astronomists, Farmers ... And Salt Entrepreneurs?
Evidence from a site in Belize shows the Maya not only had large-scale salt-producing operations along the coast, they were also using salt to preserve fish for their extensive trade networks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Lemurs Provide Clues About How Fruit Scents Evolved
Researchers tested what kind of information the animal is able to discern from scent about whether a fruit is ripe. There's evidence that some fruits evolved to better signal ripeness to lemurs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Scientists Find What Could Be A History-Making Moon
Scientists have detected plenty of planets outside our solar system. Now, they say, they've found the first moon circling one of them.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Sexual Assault And Harassment May Have Lasting Health Repercussions For Women
In small study of middle-aged women, a history of sexual assault and workplace harassment was linked to health problems like hypertension, sleeplessness and depression.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Nobel Prize In Chemistry To Be Announced Wednesday
The Nobel Prize in chemistry, which honors researchers for advances in studying how molecules combine and interact, is being announced Wednesday by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Winners Of Nobel Prize In Chemistry Announced In Stockholm
Frances H. Arnold, an American chemist, has won half of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and George Smith of the U.S. and Sir Gregory Winter of the U.K will share the other half.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2018

Southern Diet Blamed For High Rates Of Hypertension Among Black Americans
Fried chicken, mac and cheese and sweet drinks: A study suggests Southern cuisine may be at the center of a tangled web of reasons why black people are more prone to hypertension than white people.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2018

Southern Diet Blamed For High Rates Of Hypertension Among Blacks
Fried chicken, mac and cheese and sweet drinks: A study suggests Southern cuisine may be at the center of a tangled web of reasons why blacks in America are more prone to hypertension than whites.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2018

A Small Planet With Big Implications
Astronomers have found a distant dwarf planet that appears to confirm the existence of Planet Nine, a giant planet lurking in the outer reaches of the solar system.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2018

Why More Men Don't Get Into The Field Of Nursing
Only about 10 percent of nurses in the U.S. are men. Research indicates that ideas of masculinity prevent men from pursuing a career in nursing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 27, 2018

Bones Reveal The Brontosaurus Had An Older, Massive Cousin In South Africa
The scientists think when this new dinosaur was alive, it was the largest creature ever to have walked the Earth. And unlike the lumbering creatures that came later, it could pop up on its hind legs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 26, 2018

Health And Human Services Says It's Reviewing Use Of Fetal Tissue For Research
The audit has been called a political gesture to placate anti-abortion groups that oppose use of the tissue. Fetal tissue has played a part in developing vaccines and medical treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 25, 2018

Building A Better Mosquito Trap — One Scientist Thinks He's Done It
A researcher in Australia has invented a low-tech, insecticide-free trap that might be able to reduce bites from a particularly pesky mosquito in some neighborhoods.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2018

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria
Scientists demonstrate that a "gene drive" can rapidly spread a genetic mutation through a species, perhaps providing a potent new weapon against malaria. But there are plenty of skeptics.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2018

Science Reveals How Fruit Keeps A Lid On Ripening Until The Time Is Right
Humans have harnessed the ripening power of the plant hormone ethylene for centuries, but a recent discovery of how a plant controls the hormone may lead to more precise human control of ripening.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 23, 2018

Teens Sleeping Too Much, Or Not Enough? Parents Can Help
Though teenagers need about nine hours of rest a night, most get only seven and are suffering. A new survey suggests their parents are struggling, too. Here's how to improve the quality of teen sleep.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 22, 2018

Study: Since The 1970s, Drug Overdoses Have Grown Exponentially
The research suggests that the ongoing opioid crisis may be part of a larger epidemic going back decades. The study also shows more users take multiple drugs — many of which are more potent.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 21, 2018

Remembrance For Walter Mischel, Psychologist Who Devised The Marshmallow Test
Walter Mischel had an idea that became a pop culture touchstone. He wanted to see if preschoolers seated in front of a marshmallow could delay their gratification. What did the experiment really mean?

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2018

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells
A Japanese research team made immature human eggs from stem cells that were derived from human blood. The technique brings scientists a step closer to being able to mass-produce human eggs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2018

In Lab Turned Casino, Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Risk-Taking Brain Area
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have identified a brain region in monkeys that influences their desire to take big risks. When this area is inactivated, the monkeys tend to hedge their bets.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2018

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy
The drug makes the usually antisocial creatures much more interested in friendly contact with other octopuses. It's one more sign that the chemistry of social behavior has deep evolutionary roots.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 19, 2018

Do IVF And Other Infertility Tech Lead To Health Risks For The Baby? Maybe
A small study of teens who were conceived via assisted reproductive technology finds a significant number already have hypertension and premature "age-related changes" in their blood vessels.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2018

Researchers Explore Gender Disparities In The Art World
A study of nearly 2 million art auction sales show paintings by women fetch less money than paintings by men. Gender disparities that plague many parts of the economy also affect the art world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2018

This Rapper Tried To Use Neuroscience To Get Over Her Ex
Dessa is a singer and writer from Minneapolis who spent years trying to fall out of love and get over her ex. Nothing seemed to help — until she visited a research lab for a brain scan.

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