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NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2018

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium Or Dementia
Though widely prescribed in hospital intensive care units to treat hallucinations and other signs of delirium, Haldol and similar drugs are no better than a placebo for such patients, a study finds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2018

Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears
Two large studies show that age-related memory loss can be slowed significantly when older people promptly address hearing and vision loss.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 18, 2018

Grandma Was Right: Sunshine Helps Kill Germs Indoors
All kinds of bacteria live with us indoors, and some can make us sick. A new study shows that rooms exposed to light had about half the live bacteria found in rooms that were kept in darkness.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 18, 2018

Bye, Bye, Beer? Brewers Say They've Got A Plan On Climate Change
A scientific paper published this week predicts climate change will send beer prices skyrocketing and drastically reduce the barley crop. It got tons of media attention. But is beer really doomed?

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 18, 2018

Bye-Bye, Beer? Brewers Say They've Got A Plan On Climate Change
A scientific paper published this week predicts climate change will send beer prices skyrocketing and drastically reduce the barley crop. It got tons of media attention. But is beer really doomed?

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2018

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat
Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The USDA has approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2018

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' in 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks
A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2018

Distrust Of Health Care System May Keep Black Men Away From Prostate Cancer Research
Black men are hit hardest by prostate cancer, but they are underrepresented in research. Researchers held focus groups in three states to understand why.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 16, 2018

After Paul Allen Co-Founded Microsoft, He Changed Brain Science Forever
In 2003, Paul Allen created an institute to figure out how the human brain works. That institute has already made contributions that may turn out to be part of his greatest legacy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 16, 2018

2 Towns: Guess Which 1 Is Liberal And Which Is Conservative
A social scientist says some portion of people's political leanings can come from an unlikely source: their DNA.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 15, 2018

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Could Get A Cut?
Sometimes discoveries derived from patients' medical data become the foundation of new profit-making companies. A fledgling industry wants to help patients get a cut of the cash.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 15, 2018

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?
Sometimes discoveries derived from patients' medical data become the foundation of new profit-making companies. A fledgling industry wants to help patients get a cut of the cash.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 11, 2018

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns
A majority of Americans of European descent could be linked to third cousins, or closer relatives, using genealogy databases, a study finds. Soon it may be possible to identify nearly everyone by DNA.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 11, 2018

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision
Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process in the lab using human cells that grow into a functioning retina.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 10, 2018

How To Prevent Brain-Sapping Delirium In The ICU
People who suffer from prolonged delirium in the hospital are likely to develop long-term mental problems like dementia. Doctors have come up with techniques they say can reduce delirium in the ICU.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 10, 2018

When ICU Delirium Leads To Symptoms Of Dementia After Discharge
Up to half of all patients who survive emergency medical treatment in the intensive care unit have mental problems when they return home. Doctors studying the problem say it starts with delirium.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2018

After Prison, Many People Living With HIV Go Without Treatment
When HIV-positive people leave prison, they often lose access to medical care and the drugs that suppress the virus. It's a missed opportunity in the fight against HIV, public health advocates say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2018

Why Are Black Women Less Likely To Stick With A Breast Cancer Follow-up Treatment?
Black women are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women. One reason may be that they face economic and cultural barriers to taking the medications that can prevent recurrence.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2018

In Changing Climate, Endangered Right Whales Find New Feeding Grounds
North Atlantic right whales used to turn up large numbers off Maine's coast, but now, adapting to climate changes, they are being spotted further north in Gulf of St. Lawrence.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 08, 2018

Ancient Maya: Astrologists, Farmers ... And Salt Entrepreneurs?
Evidence from a site in Belize shows the Maya not only had large-scale salt-producing operations along the coast, they were also using salt to preserve fish for their extensive trade networks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 08, 2018

Ancient Maya: Astronomers, Farmers ... And Salt Entrepreneurs?
Evidence from a site in Belize shows the Maya not only had large-scale salt-producing operations along the coast, they were also using salt to preserve fish for their extensive trade networks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 08, 2018

Ancient Maya: Astronomists, Farmers ... And Salt Entrepreneurs?
Evidence from a site in Belize shows the Maya not only had large-scale salt-producing operations along the coast, they were also using salt to preserve fish for their extensive trade networks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Lemurs Provide Clues About How Fruit Scents Evolved
Researchers tested what kind of information the animal is able to discern from scent about whether a fruit is ripe. There's evidence that some fruits evolved to better signal ripeness to lemurs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Scientists Find What Could Be A History-Making Moon
Scientists have detected plenty of planets outside our solar system. Now, they say, they've found the first moon circling one of them.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Sexual Assault And Harassment May Have Lasting Health Repercussions For Women
In small study of middle-aged women, a history of sexual assault and workplace harassment was linked to health problems like hypertension, sleeplessness and depression.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Nobel Prize In Chemistry To Be Announced Wednesday
The Nobel Prize in chemistry, which honors researchers for advances in studying how molecules combine and interact, is being announced Wednesday by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2018

Winners Of Nobel Prize In Chemistry Announced In Stockholm
Frances H. Arnold, an American chemist, has won half of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and George Smith of the U.S. and Sir Gregory Winter of the U.K will share the other half.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2018

Southern Diet Blamed For High Rates Of Hypertension Among Black Americans
Fried chicken, mac and cheese and sweet drinks: A study suggests Southern cuisine may be at the center of a tangled web of reasons why black people are more prone to hypertension than white people.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2018

Southern Diet Blamed For High Rates Of Hypertension Among Blacks
Fried chicken, mac and cheese and sweet drinks: A study suggests Southern cuisine may be at the center of a tangled web of reasons why blacks in America are more prone to hypertension than whites.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2018

A Small Planet With Big Implications
Astronomers have found a distant dwarf planet that appears to confirm the existence of Planet Nine, a giant planet lurking in the outer reaches of the solar system.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2018

Why More Men Don't Get Into The Field Of Nursing
Only about 10 percent of nurses in the U.S. are men. Research indicates that ideas of masculinity prevent men from pursuing a career in nursing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 27, 2018

Bones Reveal The Brontosaurus Had An Older, Massive Cousin In South Africa
The scientists think when this new dinosaur was alive, it was the largest creature ever to have walked the Earth. And unlike the lumbering creatures that came later, it could pop up on its hind legs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 26, 2018

Health And Human Services Says It's Reviewing Use Of Fetal Tissue For Research
The audit has been called a political gesture to placate anti-abortion groups that oppose use of the tissue. Fetal tissue has played a part in developing vaccines and medical treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 25, 2018

Building A Better Mosquito Trap — One Scientist Thinks He's Done It
A researcher in Australia has invented a low-tech, insecticide-free trap that might be able to reduce bites from a particularly pesky mosquito in some neighborhoods.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2018

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria
Scientists demonstrate that a "gene drive" can rapidly spread a genetic mutation through a species, perhaps providing a potent new weapon against malaria. But there are plenty of skeptics.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2018

Science Reveals How Fruit Keeps A Lid On Ripening Until The Time Is Right
Humans have harnessed the ripening power of the plant hormone ethylene for centuries, but a recent discovery of how a plant controls the hormone may lead to more precise human control of ripening.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 23, 2018

Teens Sleeping Too Much, Or Not Enough? Parents Can Help
Though teenagers need about nine hours of rest a night, most get only seven and are suffering. A new survey suggests their parents are struggling, too. Here's how to improve the quality of teen sleep.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 22, 2018

Study: Since The 1970s, Drug Overdoses Have Grown Exponentially
The research suggests that the ongoing opioid crisis may be part of a larger epidemic going back decades. The study also shows more users take multiple drugs — many of which are more potent.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 21, 2018

Remembrance For Walter Mischel, Psychologist Who Devised The Marshmallow Test
Walter Mischel had an idea that became a pop culture touchstone. He wanted to see if preschoolers seated in front of a marshmallow could delay their gratification. What did the experiment really mean?

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2018

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells
A Japanese research team made immature human eggs from stem cells that were derived from human blood. The technique brings scientists a step closer to being able to mass-produce human eggs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2018

In Lab Turned Casino, Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Risk-Taking Brain Area
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have identified a brain region in monkeys that influences their desire to take big risks. When this area is inactivated, the monkeys tend to hedge their bets.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2018

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy
The drug makes the usually antisocial creatures much more interested in friendly contact with other octopuses. It's one more sign that the chemistry of social behavior has deep evolutionary roots.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 19, 2018

Do IVF And Other Infertility Tech Lead To Health Risks For The Baby? Maybe
A small study of teens who were conceived via assisted reproductive technology finds a significant number already have hypertension and premature "age-related changes" in their blood vessels.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2018

Researchers Explore Gender Disparities In The Art World
A study of nearly 2 million art auction sales show paintings by women fetch less money than paintings by men. Gender disparities that plague many parts of the economy also affect the art world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2018

This Rapper Tried To Use Neuroscience To Get Over Her Ex
Dessa is a singer and writer from Minneapolis who spent years trying to fall out of love and get over her ex. Nothing seemed to help — until she visited a research lab for a brain scan.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 17, 2018

Childhood Trauma And Its Lifelong Health Effects More Prevalent Among Minorities
The largest study of its kind shows a high prevalence of adverse childhood experiences — or ACEs — across the population, but especially among some vulnerable groups.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 14, 2018

Russians Allegedly Targeted Lab Studying Chemical Weapons
Russian agents were allegedly planning to hack into a Swiss laboratory that was analyzing nerve agents used in March against a former Russian spy and his daughter.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 13, 2018

Study: BPA Safety
An FDA scientist will present the results of a large government study on the safety of the plastic additive BPA.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 13, 2018

Government Study Of BPA Backs Its Safety, But Doesn't Settle Debate
The plastic additive BPA got a clean bill of health in a two-year government study involving thousands of rats. But scientists worried about BPA's risks say the study has flaws.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 13, 2018

WATCH: Flapping Robot Sheds Light On How Fruit Flies Move
The scientists were inspired by the super-agile fruit fly. And by designing this robot, they've figured out some of the mysteries of one of the fly's fanciest maneuvers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 13, 2018

Migrating Birds Avoid Bad Weather — Which Makes Their Paths Predictable
Scientists have developed a forecast model for predicting mass bird migrations, based in part on weather patterns.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 12, 2018

World Fungi Report
A new report from the Kew Gardens in London is billed as the first comprehensive report on the state of the world's fungi.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 12, 2018

More Older Americans Are Turning To Marijuana
As marijuana gains popularity among people 65 and older, geriatricians call for more research on how it affects elderly patients. Shifts in metabolism as we age can intensify any drug's side effects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2018

What's Mine Is Yours, Sort Of: Bonobos And The Tricky Evolutionary Roots Of Sharing
Bonobos are much more likely than common chimpanzees to share their food, a study suggests. But researchers who study sharing say human kids are more helpful and cooperative than either species.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2018

Scientists Study Barn Owls To Understand Why People With ADHD Struggle To Focus
Research on the brains of barn owls suggests that attention problems like ADHD may involve a brain circuit that usually helps us ignore distractions.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2018

East Coast Scientists Win Patent Case Over Medical Research Technology
Scientists affiliated with Harvard and MIT have been battling with colleagues at University of California, Berkeley over who deserves patents for a revolutionary technology used in medical research. On Monday, the east coast scientists won their case in a federal appeals court.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 09, 2018

Infectious Theory of Alzheimer's Disease Draws Fresh Interest
Money has poured into Alzheimer's research, but until very recently not much of it went toward investigating infection in causing dementia. A million dollar prize may lead more scientists to try.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2018

Biologist Wants Americans To Taste A Rainbow Of Pomegranates
As a child, John Chater remembers trying different kinds of pomegranates in his grandfather's yard. It spurred him to pursue a dream of diversifying America's crop beyond the red Wonderful variety.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2018

What's The Evidence That Supervised Drug Injection Sites Save Lives?
Proposals in several cities to offer drug users access to a safe space to consume drugs have caused a political stir, but what do we really know about the effectiveness of safe injection sites?

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 06, 2018

Migration 101: It Doesn't Come Naturally For Moose And Sheep
A study suggests large mammals must learn to migrate — and they aren't exactly quick studies. It takes decades before a herd can effectively move across land to find the best food.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 06, 2018

'Predatory Bacteria' Might Be Enlisted In Defense Against Antibiotic Resistance
Microbe-eating-microbes are found in "almost every ecosystem on Earth," says a defense department scientist who hopes bacteria of this type might one day be deployed to fight human infections.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 05, 2018

Inspired By Her Own Pain, A Researcher Explores Alternatives To Opioid Treatments
New options for non-addictive pain treatment are sorely needed. One researcher is borrowing from the field of cancer nanomedicine to test an idea that could bring relief to chronic pain sufferers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 04, 2018

Competition Fuels Schadenfreude, Research Shows
Schadenfreude is an emotion most people try to hide. But research shows people are more likely to exhibit this feeling if they are die-hard fans of a particular sports team.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2018

Do Sustainable Certifications For Coffee Really Help Coffee Growers?
A global development research organization study suggests that there's little data showing whether growers benefit from sustainably certifying their coffee because they are difficult to monitor.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 31, 2018

Noxious Mix of Smoke And Pollution Stresses Health In California's Heartland
Low-income residents living near highways and agricultural and industrial zones are getting hit with a "double whammy" as wildfire smoke drifts to areas where the air is often polluted already.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 30, 2018

Can You Handle The Truth?
This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, we explore why people often avoid telling the truth — to others, and to themselves.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 29, 2018

Psssst: Parenting Twins Can Be Depressing
Expectant parents of twins and other multiples may be ready for the joy and extra physical demands of caring for more than one baby. But few know the risk of depression and anxiety runs higher, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 29, 2018

Pssst: Parenting Twins Can Be Depressing
Expectant parents of twins and other multiples may be ready for the joy and extra physical demands of caring for more than one baby. But few know the risk of depression and anxiety runs higher, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 29, 2018

Ketamine, A Promising Depression Treatment, Seems to Act Like An Opioid
A Stanford research team finds that ketamine's ability to quickly relieve depression depends on activating the brain's opioid system. The finding raises new questions about the drug's safety.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 28, 2018

Need To Track A Submarine? A Harbor Seal Can Show You How
Harbor seals use sensors in their whiskers to help discern predator from prey. It's all about the way the water whirls, say scientists who are now training computers to be better trackers, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 28, 2018

Record High Number Of STD Infections In U.S., As Prevention Funding Declines
The U.S. has the highest rates of sexually transmitted disease cases in the industrialized world, say health trackers, with chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis reaching 2.3 million cases in 2017.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 28, 2018

Too Frail To Retire? Humans Ponder The Fate Of Research Chimps
Lab chimps used in medical studies are being retired to a forested sanctuary. But scientists and workers who care for the animals say some older chimps aren't healthy enough to make the transition.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 28, 2018

Critics Trying To Stop A Big Study Of Sepsis Say The Research Puts Patients At Risk
The consumer advocacy group Public Citizen also says the multicenter study of life-threatening sepsis will at best produce confusing results. A Harvard doctor and designer of the research disagrees.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2018

What Makes A Human Brain Unique? A Newly Discovered Neuron May Be A Clue
The human brain isn't just bigger than a mouse brain. It contains at least one kind of brain cell that isn't found in rodents.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2018

Toddlers Like Winners, But How They Win Matters
Unlike other primates, human toddlers watching a competition don't appreciate victors who shove rivals out of the way. Even little kids prefer high status characters who aren't bullies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2018

In Psychology And Other Social Sciences, Many Studies Fail The Reproducibility Test
Many social sciences experiments couldn't be reproduced in a new study, thus calling into question their findings. The field of social science is pushing hard to improve its scientific rigor.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 26, 2018

So Far, More Heat Waves Do Not Mean More Heat Deaths
The spread of air conditioning may have kept some people from dying in this summer's extreme heat. But studies project more heat-related illnesses as the climate warms.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 24, 2018

Survival Of The Sluggish: Scientists Find An Upside To A Low Metabolism
A study of 5 million years of mollusks suggests that laziness could be a good survival strategy: species that have gone extinct had higher metabolic rates than the ones that exist today.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 23, 2018

Scientists Are Puzzled By Mysterious Lights In The Sky. They Call Them STEVE
Scientists don't know what's causing the aurora-like phenomenon, which has been known to amateur photographers for decades but only recently came to the attention of researchers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 22, 2018

Ancient Bone Reveals Swingin' Sex Lives Of Neanderthals
Genomic sequencing reveals new evidence of interbreeding among different groups of our ancient relatives. A scientist calls the find "almost too lucky to be true."

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 22, 2018

Ancient Bone Reveals Surprising Sex Lives Of Neanderthals
Genomic sequencing reveals new evidence of interbreeding among different groups of our ancient relatives. A scientist calls the find "almost too lucky to be true."

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2018

For Cervical Cancer Screening, Women Over 30 Can Now Choose The HPV Test Only
HPV testing is now seen as equally effective as Pap tests for cervical cancer screening. An influential federal advisory group has changed guidelines for how women over 30 should get tested.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2018

Researchers Study Prolonged Effects Of Wildfire Smoke Exposure
Life threatening wildfires that burn hundreds of homes dominate the headlines. But prolonged smoke is what will actually affect hundreds of thousands of people living in and around fire-prone areas.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2018

The Smoke In Redding, Calif., Is So Thick You Can't See The Sun Most Days
Prolonged smoke across the West Coast will affect hundreds of thousands of people living in and around fire-prone areas. Scientists are warning of a lengthening — and worsening — smoke season.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2018

Researchers Examine What Social Isolation Can Do To Men's Health
Our circle of friends may shrink as we age, and researchers say this is especially grave news for men's physical and mental health. (This piece originally aired on May 20, 2018 on Morning Edition).

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 20, 2018

Why Are Black And Latino Kids More Likely To Die Of Certain Cancers?
There's a big survival gap between white and minority children when it comes to some childhood cancers. It turns out growing up in poverty explains a lot of the difference.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 20, 2018

Vacation Days Piling Up? Here's How To Get The Most Out Of A Short Vacation
Americans forfeited about 200 million days of paid vacation leave last year. And many U.S. workers now take shorter, partial week vacations. But even a mini-break can be good for your health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 19, 2018

Why Hospitals Are Getting Into The Real Estate Business
These days hospitals are looking for ways to improve health in their communities to prevent illness and control costs. One hospital in Ohio decided that health might start with affordable housing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 18, 2018

Should You Get That Scan? Your Doctor Might Not Be Great At Helping You Decide
In a new study, researchers found that doctors are better at explaining the benefits of a common cancer screening that its potential downsides. But overtesting comes with risks and costs of its own.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 16, 2018

Babies Born Dependent On Opioids Need Touch, Not Tech
A pediatrician is working to make sure every hospital in Kansas can give babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome the soft start they need, ideally right next to their mothers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 16, 2018

Researchers Figure Out How To Break Spaghetti Into Only 2 Pieces
It's almost impossible to break a piece of dry spaghetti into exactly two pieces. Mathematicians at MIT have figured out how to do it. And all it takes is a twist.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 16, 2018

A Grand Noodle Riddle, Cracked: Here's How To Snap Spaghetti Into Just 2 Pieces
Humankind has long been taunted by the puzzle. Well, we've got some breaking news, folks — or at any rate some big news about breaking: The answer involves one very big twist.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 16, 2018

Scientists Race To Improve 'Living Drugs' To Fight Cancer
To outwit cancer, researchers are working on better ways to teach patients' immune system to root out and kill malignant cells. A promising approach involves cells that attack cancer two ways at once.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 13, 2018

Despite FDA Caution, Doctors Say Lasers May Help With Vaginal Pain And Dryness
The FDA recently warned against using lasers for so-called "vaginal rejuvenation" treatments to reshape or tighten the vagina. But one kind of laser treatment might have gotten a bad rap.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 13, 2018

Ambitious 'Human Cell Atlas' Aims To Catalog Every Type Of Cell In The Body
Already the project has revealed a previously unknown type of cell in the windpipe that might play a role in cystic fibrosis — and lead to a new treatment, scientists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 12, 2018

New Study Sheds Light On Depression In Teens And Parents
There is a new study on the effect treating teens for depression has on their parents. It suggests just treating teens has benefits for parents.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 10, 2018

Families Choose Empathy Over 'Tough Love' To Rescue Loved Ones From Opioids
Families are starting to adopt an approach that stresses compassion instead of harsh consequences for loved ones with addiction. Their goal? Keep them alive long enough to recover.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 09, 2018

Sending Letters About Their Patients' Overdoses Changes Doctors' Prescribing Habits
Many doctors never find out when a patient dies from an overdose. A new study shows that when find out, it can alter the way they prescribe addictive drugs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 09, 2018

Scientists Discover The Secret Weapon Of Stomach Viruses
New research finds that stomach infections, like norovirus and rotavirus, have a special way to get to us hard — and fast. That knowledge could lead to new, more effective treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 08, 2018

Boxers Or Briefs? Experts Disagree Over Tight Underwear's Effect On Male Fertility
The jury's still out on whether underwear preference matters to male fertility, but men who wear tight underwear were found to have slightly lower sperm counts in a new study.

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