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NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 13, 2019

Molecular Scissors Could Help Keep Some Viral Illnesses At Bay
A new technique uses the CRISPR molecule to snip away at the part of RNA viruses that allows them to spread infection by making copies of themselves.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 11, 2019

Silver-Backed Chevrotain, With Fangs And Hooves, Photographed In Wild For First Time
Scientists say their goal was to rediscover a type of chevrotain that had been "lost to science" for nearly 30 years. Chevrotains are the world's smallest hoofed mammal, or ungulate.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 11, 2019

Meditation Reduced The Opioid Dose She Needs To Ease Chronic Pain By 75%
For some patients in pain, opioids are still part of the long-term solution, doctors say. But by adding meditation, hypnosis or other treatments, the opioid dose can be reduced.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2019

You Can Get A Master's In Medical Cannabis In Maryland
The University of Maryland, Baltimore, now has a master's program dedicated to the science and therapeutics of medical weed because of a growing number of students looking for expertise in the field.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2019

Stress Over Mass Shootings, Health Care Access High Among Latinos, Survey Finds
A national survey by psychologists shows a significant rise in U.S. stress in 2019. Mass shootings, the election campaign and concerns about health care costs and access top the list of stressors.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 08, 2019

New Study Challenges The Assumption That Math Is Harder For Girls
Research shows that when boys and girls as old as 10 do math, their patterns of brain activity are indistinguishable. The finding is the latest challenge to the idea that math is harder for girls.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 08, 2019

Math Looks The Same In The Brains Of Boys And Girls, Study Finds
Brain scans of 104 boys and girls doing basic math tasks found no gender differences. The finding adds to the evidence that boys and girls start out with equal ability in math.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 07, 2019

Western Individualism May Have Roots In The Medieval Church's Obsession With Incest
Researchers combed Vatican archives to find records of how ancient church policies shaped Western values and family structures today.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 07, 2019

There's A Promising New Vaccine For One Of The World's Top Health Threats
Dengue afflicts nearly 400 million people worldwide every year, but a vaccine has remained elusive. New research offers a path forward.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 06, 2019

Scrubbing Your House Of Bacteria Could Clear The Way for Fungus
A new study in Brazil finds that urban apartments have more diverse fungi — some healthy, some potentially not — than villages in the Amazon rainforest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 06, 2019

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test
Attempts to use the gene-editing tool CRISPR to develop a treatment for cancer seem safe and feasible in the earliest findings from the first three patients. "So far, so good," scientists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 05, 2019

Hidden Brain: Does Going To Church Improve Your Mental Health?
It's been debated a long time: Does being part of organized religion improve your mental health? A new study finds that religion can buffer adolescents against depression.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 04, 2019

'The Great Pretender' Seeks The Truth About 'On Being Sane In Insane Places'
Journalist and Brain on Fire author Susannah Cahalan writes in an urgent, personal book that the '70s study by David Rosenhan had an outsized effect on psychiatry — and may have been fatally flawed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2019

How Deep Sleep May Help The Brain Clear Alzheimer's Toxins
A study of 11 sleeping brains sheds some light on the mysterious link between sleep problems and Alzheimer's disease. The flow of cerebrospinal fluid through the brain appears to be the key.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2019

For These Vampires, A Shared Blood Meal Lets 'Friendship' Take Flight
Common vampire bats might drink the blood of their prey, but it turns out that these fearsome beasts can be warm and fuzzy when it comes to their fellow bats.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 24, 2019

U.S. Travel Ban Disrupts The World's Largest Brain Science Meeting
Scientists from nations including Iran, Mexico, and India were refused visas to attend this year's Society for Neuroscience meeting in Chicago. Some researchers got stand-ins to present their work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 23, 2019

Teen Vapers Who Want To Quit Look For Help Via Text
Starting to vape is easy, but quitting a nicotine habit can be tough, teens are finding. Some vaping cessation programs have begun to reach out to teens where they live — on their phones.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2019

Hospitals Around The World Have A Dire Shortage Of Blood
The first global analysis of blood supply and demand finds that many developing countries are relying on risky emergency donations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2019

Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes
A new technique, dubbed 'prime editing,' appears to make it even easier to make very precise changes in DNA. It's designed to overcome the limits of the CRISPR gene editing tool.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2019

Keeping Your Blood Sugar In Check Could Lower Your Alzheimer's Risk
Diabetes can double a person's chances of developing Alzheimer's. Now researchers are beginning to understand the role of brain metabolism in the development of the dementia.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2019

Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant
Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 20, 2019

VIDEO: See A Controversial Swarm Of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In A Lab In Italy
NPR was the only news organization allowed into the lab to witness the moment the releases began this year. The goal is to create a powerful new weapon in the fight against malaria.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 18, 2019

What's Behind The Research Funding Gap For Black Scientists?
Black scientists more often seek grants for community health studies, but molecular-level research proposals win more funding. More diversity throughout the process could help close the gap, says NIH.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2019

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls. That's Not Good
The drive to make more milk has had an unsavory side effect: Cows have become more genetically similar and less fertile. Scientists are trying to recover valuable genetic variation that was lost.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 11, 2019

Canada's Decision To Make Public More Clinical Trial Data Puts Pressure On FDA
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration treats most data it gets on the development of new drugs and medical devices as confidential to companies. Critics say making the data public would help patients.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 10, 2019

After A Life Of Painful Sickle Cell Disease, A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help
She's the first patient with a genetic disorder to be treated with the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR. The treatment has wrapped up and now she's waiting to see if it brings relief.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 10, 2019

A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help With Pain Of Sickle Cell Disease
She's the first patient with a genetic disorder to be treated with the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR. The treatment has wrapped up, and now she's waiting to see if it brings relief.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2019

Zika: Researchers Are Learning More About The Long-Term Consequences For Children
A new review of research on the Zika virus since 2016 finds there is still much scientists don't understand about the pandemic — including when another may strike.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2019

Changing Your Diet Can Help Tamp Down Depression, Boost Mood
Depression symptoms dropped significantly in a group of young adults who ate a Mediterranean-style diet for three weeks. It's the latest study to show food can influence mental health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2019

How Outrage Is Hijacking Our Culture And Our Minds
It can feel impossible to escape outrage nowadays. Anger is present across our screens — from TV news to social media. New social science research asks: What's the effect of all this outrage?

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2019

3 Win Chemistry Nobel For Development Of Lithium-Ion Batteries
The prize was awarded jointly to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino." Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized our lives," the Nobel Committee said.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2019

New Research: China Is Winning Some Health-Care Battles — And Losing Others
A suite of new research shows the country beating infectious diseases over the last two decades. But deaths from lifestyle-related diseases like cancer and diabetes are on the rise.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2019

Ancient Greek Scroll's Hidden Contents Revealed Through Infrared Imaging
More than 200 years ago, a scroll damaged by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius was unrolled and pasted onto cardboard, even though it had writing on the back. New imagery shows some of what's hidden.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2019

Despite Thin Ice, Research Ship Finds Its Home In Frozen Floe For The Next Year
An ambitious Arctic expedition has reached a milestone. Researchers have found an ice floe to freeze into, from which they'll study Arctic systems from a ship and an observatory they'll construct.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2019

Researchers Are Freezing Their Ship Into Arctic Ice To Study Climate Change
An ambitious Arctic expedition has reached a milestone. Researchers have found a floe to freeze into, where they'll construct an observatory and study Arctic systems from a ship.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2019

We're Pulling Tuna Out Of The Ocean At Unprecedented — And Unsustainable — Rates
A new study finds that tuna harvests, including of some species considered "vulnerable," have increased by an astonishing 1,000% in the last 60 years — a rate some scientists warn is unsustainable.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2019

Irrigation For Farming Could Leave Many Of The World's Streams and Rivers Dry
A new study shows many of the world's streams and rivers could dry up because people are draining underground aquifers that sustain streams through dry periods. Climate change won't help matters.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2019

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops
Irreversible lung disease has started to show up among young workers who cut, grind and polish countertops made of increasingly popular "engineered" stone. The material is more than 90 percent silica.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 30, 2019

Pediatricians Stand By Meds For ADHD, But Some Say Therapy Should Come First
New treatment guidelines don't assuage concerns that some children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are being prescribed medication too soon, before behavioral interventions are tried.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 30, 2019

Just A Handful Of Nuts May Help Keep Us From Packing On The Pounds As We Age
U.S. adults put on about a pound a year on average. But people who had a regular nut-snacking habit put on less weight and had a lower risk of becoming obese over time, a new study finds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 28, 2019

UCLA Opens World's 1st Institute To Study Kindness
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with anthropology professor Daniel Fessler about UCLA's new Bedari Kindness Institute.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 26, 2019

Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains
Research finds that triathletes who train too hard can impair a brain area involved in achieving goals like winning a race. Fatigued athletes choose immediate gratification over long-term rewards.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 25, 2019

Prehistoric Babies Drank Animal Milk From A Bottle
The remnants of ruminant milk were found in tiny vessels buried with infants thousands of years ago. Scientists say the ancient "baby bottles" were sometimes shaped like "mythical animals."

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 25, 2019

Prehistoric Babies Drank Animal Milk From Bottles
The remnants of ruminant milk were found in tiny vessels buried with infants thousands of years ago. Scientists say the ancient baby bottles were sometimes shaped like "mythical animals."

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2019

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder
Labs are churning out more and more synthetic DNA for scientists who want to use it to reprogram cells. Some say the technology has outpaced government safety guidelines put in place a decade ago.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 23, 2019

Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help
Never mind a runner's high — the buzz some people say they get after a run. Neuroscientist Benedict Kolber was more interested in how to generate pain relief via a brisk walk. It can really work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 19, 2019

North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say
Researchers estimate that the bird population has fallen by a quarter since 1970. More than 90% of the loss can be attributed to just a dozen bird families, including sparrows, blackbirds and finches.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 19, 2019

Scientists Will Deliberately Encase Their Ship In Arctic Sea Ice
An ambitious Arctic expedition launches Friday. Scientists want to get their icebreaker stuck in the ice for a year so they can study the ice, ocean and atmosphere and how it's changing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2019

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies
Type 1 diabetes can be well managed with insulin if blood sugar is consistently monitored. But insurance rules can make it hard for patients to get the medical supplies their doctors say they need.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2019

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives
Pregnant women at high or even moderate risk of developing the life-threatening condition preeclampsia should consider taking a very small dose of aspirin daily to prevent it, doctors say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2019

CRISPR Gene-Editing May Offer Path To Cure For HIV, First Published Report Shows
Researchers safely used CRISPR gene-editing techniques in a patient with HIV. The research provides evidence the approach may be promising for treating HIV infection.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2019

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce 'Synthetic' Human Embryos
Researchers hope large numbers of very primitive, slightly incomplete human embryos will lead to new insights into early human development and ways to prevent miscarriages and birth defects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2019

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryo-Like Structures
Researchers hope large numbers of very primitive, slightly incomplete human embryos will lead to new insights into early human development and ways to prevent miscarriages and birth defects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2019

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids
Researchers hope large numbers of very primitive, embryo-like structures will lead to new insights into early human development and ways to prevent miscarriages and birth defects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2019

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals
Alternative tests are emerging, the agency says, such as computer modeling and tissue studies of cells grown in the lab. Environmental advocates say the move is too quick, and disregards human health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2019

How A Prenatal 'Bootcamp' For New Dads Helps The Whole Family
Prenatal classes often focus on Mom-to-be — on her shifting role and emotional needs, along with new skills. But if Dad gets sidelined early into a supporting role, research shows, everybody loses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2019

Opinion: Earth Has Survived Extinctions Before, It's Humans Who Are Fragile
Earth has experienced cataclysmic life-destroying events before. NPR's Scott Simon reflects on what this means for humans in the midst of climate change.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 06, 2019

How Should Scientists' Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?
Medical and genetic data from more than a million Americans are now in scientific databases. Some programs hoard the data, while others share widely with scientists, hoping to speed medical discovery.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 05, 2019

Vitamin E Suspected In Serious Lung Problems Among People Who Vaped Cannabis
New York officials say tests found high levels of vitamin E in cannabis vaping products used by people who developed lung damage. But it's only one of many possible causes still under investigation.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 04, 2019

The Other Twitterverse: Squirrels Eavesdrop On Birds, Researchers Say
A squirrel wondering if it's safe enough to forage for food apparently listens for the reassuring chatter of nearby birds, a study finds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 04, 2019

Fentanyl As A Dark Web Profit Center, From Chinese Labs To U.S. Streets
Fentanyl, Inc. author Ben Westhoff says the opioid, while useful in hospitals, is killing more Americans as a street drug than any other in U.S. history. Here's how it moves from China to your corner.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 03, 2019

Blind From A Bad Diet? Teen Who Ate Mostly Potato Chips And Fries Lost His Sight
A poor diet can lead to vision loss, experts say. For a teen, it's certainly rare, but a new case study documents blindness in a boy who ate lots of chips, white bread and bits of processed meat.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2019

Millennial And Gen-X Travelers: Need Another Measles Shot?
Americans born in the '70s and '80s may not be immune to measles, health officials say. If you're traveling to a country or region having an outbreak, consider a second dose of vaccine before you go.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 01, 2019

A New Bloodsucking Leech Species Found Hiding Outside Washington, D.C.
Smithsonian researcher Anna Phillips led the recent discovery of the new medicinal species. Its superficial similarities to a North American leech species helped prevent its detection before.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 01, 2019

Optimists For The Win: Finding The Bright Side Might Help You Live Longer
Pessimists may suspect this finding, but researchers who tracked the health outcomes of thousands of adults across many years found optimists were much more likely to reach 85. Optimism is teachable.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 31, 2019

UK Biobank Requires Earth's Geneticists To Cooperate, Not Compete
A project that shares medical information from 500,000 volunteers is driving innovative research around the world. The richness of the database means scientists are motivated to make it even better.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 30, 2019

Australia Says Great Barrier Reef Has 'Very Poor' Outlook, Climate Change To Blame
"Despite concerted efforts and investments, the condition of the Great Barrier Reef has declined since 2014, and this is largely due to the impacts from climate change," the main scientist said.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 29, 2019

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'
Researchers say clusters of human brain cells grown in the lab can spontaneously generate electrical patterns similar to the brain waves of 6-month-old fetus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 26, 2019

Study Questions Mainstay Treatment For Mild Asthma
Many of the 26 million Americans with asthma use a low-dose steroid inhaler daily to prevent symptoms. But a recent study raises questions about this strategy for people with mild, persistent asthma.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 22, 2019

Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm
NPR got exclusive access to the only lab known to be trying to edit the DNA in human sperm, which raises all the same thorny issues as modifying genes in human embryos

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2019

Naked And Unafraid: 6 Wild Facts About Naked Mole Rats
Picture a hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato — kinda cool, kinda weird. They also are extraordinarily long-lived. Researchers are lining up to study their secrets.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2019

Naked And Unafraid: The Secret Lives Of Naked Mole Rats
Picture a hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato — kinda cool, kinda weird. They also are extraordinarily long-lived. Researchers are lining up to study their secrets.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2019

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People
A detailed comparison of mouse and human brain tissue found differences that could help explain why mice aren't always a good model for human diseases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 20, 2019

Cigarettes Can't Be Advertised On TV. Should Juul Ads Be Permitted?
Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 19, 2019

Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away
A recent study found virtual reality experiences were better at easing pain than watching televised nature scenes. Immersive distraction seems key to the success, scientists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 15, 2019

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail
No ordinary pair of shorts, these were designed by Harvard scientists to work with the wearer's own leg muscles when walking or running, and might make a soldier's heavy loads easier to carry.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 12, 2019

2 Experimental Ebola Drugs Saved Lives In Congo Outbreak
Drugs tested in the Democratic Republic of Congo are effective in treating Ebola, scientists say. They have run a study in the midst of a deadly epidemic and in the face of armed assaults on doctors.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 09, 2019

Scientists Find Out How Leaping Maggots Leap
The scientists captured the acrobatic jumps of a tiny maggot-like creature with high-speed cameras to figure out how it does this trick with no arms, legs, or wings.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 07, 2019

Scientists Discover Prehistoric Giant 'Squawkzilla' Parrot, As Big As Small Child
The flightless bird weighed 15 pounds and was about 3 feet tall and probably feasted on other parrots. Study lead Trevor Worthy made the discovery after examining two 19-million-year-old leg bones.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 06, 2019

New Evidence Shows Popular Pesticides Could Cause Unintended Harm To Insects
Studies are revealing new, unintended threats that neonicotinoid pesticides pose to insects. The chemicals, widely used by farmers, are difficult to control because they persist in the environment.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 05, 2019

Pain Rescue Team Helps Seriously Ill Kids Cope In Terrible Times
An interdisciplinary team in San Francisco uses acupressure, massage, counseling and other methods, as well as medicine, to help kids get relief from chronic pain. But such pediatric centers are rare.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2019

Sesame Allergies Are Likely More Widespread Than Previously Thought
New research suggests allergies to sesame are comparably prevalent as those to some tree nuts. The findings come as the FDA weighs whether to require sesame to be listed as an allergen on food labels.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2019

Trust In Science Is Rising, Poll Finds
The proportion of people who say they have a "great deal" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest increased from 21% in 2016 to 35% in 2019, according to the Pew Research Center.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2019

Poll Finds Trust In Science Is Rising
The proportion of people who say they have a "great deal" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest increased from 21% in 2016 to 35% in 2019, according to the Pew Research Center.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2019

Trust In Scientists Is Rising, Poll Finds
The proportion of people who say they have a "great deal" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest increased from 21% in 2016 to 35% in 2019, according to the Pew Research Center.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 01, 2019

Turtle Embryos May Play A Role In Whether They Become Male Or Female
In many turtle species, sex is determined by temperature in the egg. That makes turtles particularly vulnerable to climate change. But scientists say the animals may have a way to shield themselves.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2019

Kids See Bearded Men As Strong — But Unattractive, Study Finds
New research shows that young children have a negative reaction to beards, but that changes as they get older. Children with bearded fathers did feel more warmly toward facial hair.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2019

Irritating Compounds Discovered In 'Vape Juice'
Research chemists who analyzed a number of flavored e-liquids found that some ingredients combine on the shelf to create "acetals" — compounds likely to irritate or inflame airways when inhaled.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2019

Irritating Compounds Can Show Up In 'Vape Juice'
Research chemists who analyzed a number of flavored e-liquids found that some ingredients combine on the shelf to create "acetals" — compounds likely to irritate or inflame airways when inhaled.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 29, 2019

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder
Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss., has sickle cell disease. She is the first patient ever to be publicly identified as being involved in a study testing the use of CRISPR for a genetic disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 29, 2019

Sickle Cell Patient Reveals Why She Is Volunteering For Landmark Gene-Editing Study
Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss., hopes the gene-editing technique CRISPR will relieve her lifelong suffering caused by the genetic blood disorder that affects millions of people around the world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 26, 2019

Dialysis Firm Cancels $524,600.17 Medical Bill After Journalists Investigate
This week, NPR profiled a Montana man who was billed nearly half a million dollars for 14 weeks of dialysis, after being caught in a dispute between insurer and the dialysis provider. Now he owes $0.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 26, 2019

Birds Are Trying To Adapt To Climate Change — But Is It Too Little, Too Late?
By breeding and migrating earlier, some birds are adapting to climate change. But it's probably not happening fast enough for some species to survive, according to new research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Decisions, Decisions: Some We Struggle To Make, Other's We Can't Forget
This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, decision-making. We learn why we often stumble when trying to make ourselves happy, and why certain decisions leave us wondering "what if?"

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Decisions, Decisions: Some We Struggle To Make, Others We Can't Forget
This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, decision-making. We learn why we often stumble when trying to make ourselves happy, and why certain decisions leave us wondering "what if?"

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Economists Say Trump Administration Is Over-Paying Farmers For Trade Losses
The Trump administration has released details of a $16 billion plan to compensate farmers who've lost money as a result of the trade dispute with China. Some economists say it's too generous.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Economists Say Trump Administration Is Overpaying Farmers For Trade Losses
The Trump administration has released details of a $16 billion plan to compensate farmers who've lost money as a result of the trade dispute with China. Some economists say it's too generous.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

A Warm Bedtime Bath Can Help You Cool Down And Sleep Better
Research suggests a warm bath or shower an hour or two before bedtime can help you unwind and fall asleep faster. Why? It will help lower your core temperature, and that's a circadian sleep signal.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Mistrust And Lack Of Genetic Diversity Slow Gains In Precision Medicine
Scientists hoping to get more diversity of ancestry among medical research volunteers need to grapple with the history of medical exploitation, says a Columbia University bioethicist.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 24, 2019

Improved Prosthetic Hand Has A Lighter Touch And Easy Grip
There's still much research to be done before the device is routinely useful. But one man was able to use it to gently grasp his wife's hand and feel her touch — an emotional moment, he says.

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