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NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 21, 2019

World's Largest Bee Is Spotted For First Time In Decades
The bee towers over its apian cousins. Females have been recorded as being at least an inch and a half long. Add to that a pair of gigantic mandibles, and it's a bee like no other.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 20, 2019

Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab
The insects were created, using CRISPR, to carry a powerful "gene drive." The mosquitoes could provide a potent weapon against malaria, but they raise fears about unpredictable environmental effects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2019

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer
Remarkably little is known about the fundamentals of how a woman carries a baby inside her. Two Columbia University researchers aim to change that, to reduce the number of kids born too soon.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 17, 2019

Volunteers Fight Bad Science
James Heathers is a postdoctoral researcher at Northeastern University, who looks for mistakes for fun. He speaks to NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks about errors published in scientific papers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 14, 2019

Racial Disparities In Cancer Incidence And Survival Rates Are Narrowing
African-Americans still have the highest death rate and the lowest survival rate of any U.S. racial or ethnic group for most cancers. But the "cancer gap" between blacks and whites is shrinking.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 14, 2019

World Health Organization Forms Committee To Guide Editing Of Human Genes
WHO acted in reaction to a Chinese scientist's announcement in 2018 that he had created the world's first gene-edited babies, a step that highlighted the need for uniform gene-editing guidelines.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 13, 2019

When Teens Threaten Violence, A Community Responds With Compassion
After years of being beaten up, this teen decided to take justice into his own hands. A school district in Oregon showed him a better way to solve his problems.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 13, 2019

Hungry Deer May Be Changing How Things Sound In The Forest
Sound travels differently through open fields than the woods. When deer eat up bushes, small trees and other forest plants, it affects the transmission of bird calls and other natural sounds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 13, 2019

Bugs Vs. Superbugs: Insects Offer Promise In Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance
With the rise of antibiotic-resistant infections, scientists are exploring nature to find new disease-fighting compounds. They're finding them in surprising new places: the microbiomes of insects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 12, 2019

NASA Says Ultima Thule Actually Looks Like A Pancake And A Walnut
They had initially thought the object four billion miles from Earth looked like a snowman. The New Horizons spacecraft flew by it on New Year's Day and new images give scientists a clearer picture.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 12, 2019

Wreckage Of WWII Aircraft Carrier Found In The South Pacific Ocean
The Hornet played a role in several key events in the war - including the Doolittle Raid on Japan and the Battle of Midway. Researches have located it three miles below the surface.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 07, 2019

Why Morning People May Have A Health Edge Over Night People
A new study suggests that being a morning person makes you slightly less susceptible to depression or mental illness. It, however, is not a very big effect.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2019

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down
Researchers say the metabolism of a woman's brain remains higher than a man's throughout a lifetime. And that may help with late-life creativity and learning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2019

Scans Show Women's Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down
Researchers say the metabolism of a woman's brain remains higher than a man's throughout a lifetime. And that may help with late-life creativity and learning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2019

If You're Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed
Physicians have been taught to look for signs of hopelessness, sadness and lack of motivation to help them diagnose depression. But anger as a depression symptom is less often noticed or addressed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 01, 2019

News Brief: Senate Rebuke, Opioid Lawsuit, Gene-Editing Embryos
Senate rebukes Trump's Syria decision. Legal documents allegedly detail allegations of years of deceptive opioid practices. A new experiment in the U.S. aimes at creating gene-edited human embryos.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 01, 2019

New U.S. Experiments Aim To Create Gene-Edited Human Embryos
Despite outrage over gene editing in China that affected the birth of twins, research is underway in the U.S. to assess the safety and effectiveness of CRISPR tools to edit genes in human embryos.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 31, 2019

Exploring The Mysterious Origins Of Mars' 3-Mile-High Sand Pile
Space scientists on Earth have improvised a tool on the Mars rover to help them figure out how a giant mountain on the Red Planet came to be. Their surprising conclusion: It's likely windswept sand.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 31, 2019

Sick And Tired? Scientists Find Protein That Puts Flies To Sleep And Fights Infection
In the search for what triggers sleep, researchers stumbled upon a link between sleep and the immune system. A single fly gene gets turned on in sick flies, inducing sleep and an immune response.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 31, 2019

Uptick In Butterfly Census Could Be A Fluke, Researchers Caution
Environmentalists say the number of monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico's forests is up dramatically. That's good news after years of drastic decline, but researchers warn it might not last.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 30, 2019

Massive Starfish Die-Off Is Tied To Global Warming
Sea stars along the Pacific Coast are dying in the largest disease epidemic ever documented in a wild marine species. New research suggests warmer water is making the disease even more deadly.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 25, 2019

Steep Climb In Benzodiazepine Prescribing By Primary Care Doctors
U.S. prescriptions for Valium, Ativan and other benzodiazepines have shot up since 2003, statistics show, especially for chronic pain. Roughly half those prescriptions are from primary care providers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 24, 2019

VIDEO: Inventor Inspired By Childhood Memories Of Fungus
As a child on a New York farm, Eben Bayer helped his dad shovel wood chips in the barn. That's where he noticed a stretchy web of fungus that became the basis of his biodegradable packing material.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 23, 2019

Why Camera Angles And Bias Support Different Opinions
Accounts vary of what happened when students faced an Native American elder in Washington. Steve Inskeep talks to Adam Benforado, author of Unfair who argues camera angles undermine our legal system.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 22, 2019

Why Did So Many Americans Trust Russian Hackers' Election Propaganda?
Investigations of Russian influence on the 2016 election have tended to focus on the role of social media. Researchers are also exploring the psychological vulnerability that hackers exploited.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 21, 2019

Researchers Find A Web Of Factors Behind Multiple Sclerosis
It's looking like MS strikes when a variety of triggers gang up to impair neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Researchers are using their new knowledge to search for treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 17, 2019

Scientists Find Brain Cells That Make Pain Hurt
Researchers have pinpointed the neurons that give pain its unpleasant edge. By turning these neurons off in mice, the scientists relieved the unpleasantness of pain without numbing sensation.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2019

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly
Whether it's exercise or housework, older Americans who move their bodies regularly may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions and other signs of dementia.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2019

Bacteria In Worms Make A Mosquito Repellent That Might Beat DEET
An insect-killing bacteria that lives inside a parasitic worm might hold the key to developing a powerful new repellent.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 14, 2019

From Couch Potato To Fitness Buff: How I Learned To Love Exercise
Creating an exercise habit doesn't mean you have to spend hours sweating on a treadmill. Start small, build up slowly and remember that all movement counts — even vacuuming, if you do it vigorously.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 14, 2019

Report: Americans Are Now More Likely To Die Of An Opioid Overdose Than On The Road
Americans now have a 1 in 96 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to a new analysis from the National Safety Council.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 10, 2019

Severe Flu Raises Risk Of Birth Problems For Pregnant Women, Babies
Pregnant women in intensive care with severe cases of the flu have a higher risk of giving birth to babies prematurely. The risk of breathing problems for the baby is also substantially higher.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 10, 2019

Should Hyping Edible Bugs Focus On The Experience Instead Of The Environment?
A new study shows that when ads made hedonistic marketing claims, such as "exotic" or "delicious," rather than targeting environmental interests, more people were willing to try eating insects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 09, 2019

A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa 1,000 A.D.
Analysis of fossilized dental tartar of a medieval woman buried in a German monastery reveals specks of blue to be lapis lazuli — a luxurious pigment used to create gorgeous illuminated manuscripts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 09, 2019

A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa A.D. 1000
Analysis of fossilized dental tartar of a medieval woman buried in a German monastery reveals specks of blue to be lapis lazuli — a luxurious pigment used to create gorgeous illuminated manuscripts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 08, 2019

Why Consumers Systematically Give Inflated Grades For Poor Service
A study shows that rating systems for online marketplaces are prone to inflation, because raters feel pressured to leave high scores.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 03, 2019

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops
Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, the foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. They hope it leads to bigger harvests of food.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 02, 2019

Why Millions Of Kids Can't Read, And What Better Teaching Can Do About It
The instruction many students get is not based on the overwhelming scientific evidence about how kids turn spoken sounds into letters and words on a page.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 01, 2019

Could Exercising In Frigid Temperatures Make Us Healthier?
As a freezing winter drives many of us indoors, some extreme athletes embrace the cold as a great way to burn calories and retrain the immune system while working out. Not so fast, physiologists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 01, 2019

Research Supports Claims That Teeth Worsen Without Fluoridated Water
Using Medicaid payment data from towns in Alaska that have rejected fluoride in recent years, a new study supports dentists' claims that teeth get worse when the water supply is not fluoridated.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 31, 2018

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive
Adorable babies and cute puppies can make us happy. But researchers say their cuteness can be so overwhelming that it unleashes some ugly thoughts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 29, 2018

How To Help Kids Overcome Their Fear Of Doctors And Shots
Half of the parents of young children in a recent survey said their kids fear going to the doctor. Some admit skipping vaccines and needed appointments. Here's how to nip medical anxiety in the bud.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 25, 2018

What Gifts Are The Best? Social Science Researchers Investigate
A study shows gift-givers and gift-recipients differ on ideas about best gifts. Whereas recipients prefer sentimental gifts, gift-givers tend to opt for presents that match the recipient's interests.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2018

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain
A question about heading soccer balls inspired a series of experiments to understand how the brain changes shape when someone's head takes a hit.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2018

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health
A growing body of research shows keeping a log of what you are thankful for can lower stress, help you sleep better, and may even reduce the risk of heart disease. But it's not for everyone.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 22, 2018

Researchers Show Parachutes Don't Work, But There's A Catch
A study found parachutes were no more effective than backpacks in preventing harm to people jumping from aircraft. The researchers' tongue-in-cheek experiment makes a deeper point about science.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 21, 2018

Huge Martian Crater 'Korolev' Appears Topped With Miles Of Pristine Snow
The European Space Agency's new images show a 51-mile-wide ice-filled depression in the surface of Mars caused by the impact of a meteorite or other celestial body.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 21, 2018

The World Has A New Largest-Known Prime Number
The Mersenne prime was discovered by a computer in Ocala, Fla., on Dec. 7. Mathematicians have spent the past two weeks verifying the calculations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 21, 2018

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression
Research suggests the winter blues are triggered by specialized light-sensing cells in the retina that communicate directly with brain areas involved in mood.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 19, 2018

Why Aren't More Users Of Opioids Or Meth Screened For Hepatitis C?
As the number of people who inject drugs and share needles has soared, the rate of infection with Hep C has climbed too. Yet many drug treatment patients aren't tested for the liver-damaging virus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 18, 2018

Surgeon General Warns Youth Vaping Is Now An 'Epidemic'
U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams issued a forceful advisory about vaping by U.S. teenagers, saying electronic cigarette use among young people has reached levels that require urgent action.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 17, 2018

Medical Detectives: The Last Hope For Families Coping With Rare Diseases
When Nikki and Danny Miller's two young sons developed strange symptoms, they began searching for a diagnosis. Their odyssey ended when a team of medical sleuths solved the case.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 13, 2018

Scientists Say Gene-Edited Babies Claim Is 'Wake-Up Call' For World
U.S. National Academy of Medicine, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and Chinese Academy of Sciences call for international gene-editing standards. Critics blast statement as inadequate.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2018

Fentanyl Surpasses Heroin As Drug Most Often Involved In Deadly Overdoses
When fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine, infiltrated the drug supply in the U.S. it had an immediate, dramatic effect on the overdose rate.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2018

Arctic Report Card Documents 'Cascading Effects' Of Warming Ocean Temperatures
The U.S. government says warming ocean temperatures and melting ice has resulted in the "most unprecedented transition in history" in the Arctic, leading to extreme weather events across the globe.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 11, 2018

Mystery Blast Sank The USS San Diego in 1918. New Report Reveals What Happened
A team of researchers had been trying to determine whether the armored cruiser was lost to sabotage, an accident or an attack.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 11, 2018

Local Newspaper Closures Come With Hefty Price Tag For Residents
Hundreds of newspapers have closed across the country. The loss of local reporting means fewer investigations into fraud and waste. That has had an impact on the budgets of cities and towns.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 10, 2018

How I Made It: The Professor From the Pueblo, Rodrigo Bañuelos
Latino USA catches up with Rodrigo Bañuelos at the Latinx in the Mathematical Sciences Conference at UCLA's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 10, 2018

Research Gaps Leave Doctors Guessing About Treatments For Pregnant Women
To protect a developing fetus from experimental drugs or treatments that might cause birth defects, pregnant women aren't included in many clinical trials. But that limits the safety evidence, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 07, 2018

World's First Insect Vaccine Could Help Bees Fight Off Deadly Disease
American foulbrood is an infectious disease that devastates honeybee hives. Scientists say they've created a vaccine for it, despite a big hurdle: Bees don't have antibodies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 07, 2018

Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies
Concerns over a Chinese scientist's claim that he created the first gene-edited babies grow with more questions about whether it worked and the possible harm he may have inflicted on the twin girls.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 05, 2018

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?
The fortuitous dip in emissions of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, during the past three years is over, as economies turn up. The trend in the near future looks grim, say climate scientists.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 05, 2018

Infections May Raise The Risk Of Mental Illness In Children
A large study of Danish kids finds that childhood infections are linked with a higher risk of developing some mental illnesses. The risk is highest in the months immediately following the infection.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2018

VIDEO: To Save A Fox, Scientists Took To Land, Air And Sea
When the world's population of Channel Island foxes started to vanish in the '90s, no one knew why. Bringing them back from near-extinction has meant unraveling a mystery that started with WWII.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2018

Study Shows Americans Are Meaner On Twitter Than Canadians
Canadian Twitter may truly be a nicer place. Researcher Bryor Snefjella says Canadians tend to tweet more positive words compared to their American counterparts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2018

Examining Differences Between Canadian And U.S. Tweets
David Greene talks to Bryor Snefjella, a researcher at McMaster University in Ontario, about why Canadian Twitter users tend to sound more positive than their American counterparts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2018

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?
Protein snacks and supplements are popular, but unless you're an extreme athlete or recovering from an injury, you may already get enough protein in your diet. Here's how to tell how much you need.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 03, 2018

Kids With Concussions Can Phase In Exercise, Screen Time Sooner Than Before
No longer do kids with concussions need to sit in dark rooms for days on end. For the first time in nearly a decade, the nation's pediatricians have loosened their guidance on concussion recovery.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 30, 2018

Changes In Brain Scans Seen After A Single Season Of Football For Young Players
MRI scans of the brains of young football players suggest that repeated blows to the head can change the shape of nerve fibers in the corpus callosum, which connects the two halves of the brain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 29, 2018

International Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies, But Rejects Moratorium
The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing issues a consensus on how scientists might responsibly move forward to create gene-edited babies in the wake of a rogue scientist's claims.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 29, 2018

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium
The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing issues a consensus on how scientists might responsibly move forward to create gene-edited babies in the wake of a rogue scientist's claims.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 28, 2018

News Brief: Paul Manafort, Lion Air Crash, Gene-Editing
Attorney for the Ex-Trump campaign chairman reportedly briefed Trump's legal team on Mueller probe. Indonesian investigators report on Lion Air crash. Chinese scientist defends gene-editing research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 28, 2018

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies
He Jiankui, who shocked the world by asserting he had genetically edited twin girls, faced growing criticism from other researchers as he spoke at a scientific conference in Hong Kong.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 28, 2018

Facing Backlash, Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies
He Jiankui, who shocked the world by asserting he had genetically edited twin girls, faced growing criticism from other researchers as he spoke at a scientific conference in Hong Kong.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 27, 2018

China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students
In a quest to rapidly advance its scientific depth and breadth, China is recruiting scientists from around the world. Some from the U.S. say the greater funding for school and research is freeing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 26, 2018

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Genetically Edit Babies, Report Says
According to The Associated Press, a Chinese scientist says that he has helped to create the first genetically edited babies. There's no independent confirmation of his claim.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 26, 2018

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR
A scientist says he created the first genetically edited babies using CRISPR to protect them from infection with the AIDS virus. The move has prompted immediate criticism as premature and reckless.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 25, 2018

Look Out Mars, Here Comes InSight
There's a new probe nearing Mars. After Monday's tricky landing, NASA's InSight spacecraft is to deploy a sensitive seismometer and temperature probe to let scientists explore the planet's interior.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 25, 2018

NASA Probe Lands Safely On Martian Surface
There's a new probe on Mars. After Monday's tricky landing, NASA's InSight spacecraft is to deploy a sensitive seismometer and temperature probe to let scientists explore the planet's interior.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 24, 2018

National Report Confirms Climate Change 'Is Affecting Every Sector,' Scientist Says
The economy could take a major hit if climate change continues at its current pace, according to the latest National Climate Assessment. NPR's Michel Martin speaks with climate scientist Michael Mann.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 15, 2018

Bringing Up Baby
This week we focus on the behavior of the youngest members of the human race. We try to translate the mysterious language of babies. And we ask, when should we step back and just let our children be?

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 15, 2018

Buzz, Buzz: Bitter Tasters Like Coffee Better
A genetic analysis of samples taken from a large UK health database suggest that people who are more sensitive than their peers to the bitter taste of caffeine tend to drink more coffee — not less.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 14, 2018

Maybe Neanderthals Weren't Quite So Nasty And Brutish
New research finds they sustained skull injuries at about the same rate as early modern humans. "I definitely think that it's evidence these guys were not beating each other up," one expert says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 13, 2018

Say Au Revoir To That Hunk Of Metal In France That Has Defined The Kilogram
A small cylinder called Le Grand K has defined the kilogram for more than a hundred years. But if a scratch ever rendered it lighter, the definition of the kilo literally shifted. Time for a change.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 13, 2018

How Can Schools Better Persuade Students To Show Up For Class?
Many schools give attendance awards to motivate students. A study found students who were awarded for perfect attendance went on to have more absences than their peers who weren't given the award.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 10, 2018

Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Disappoint In Long-Awaited Study Results
After years of debate, a major government funded study failed to find any overall benefit of taking widely used supplements to protect against heart disease or cancer.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 10, 2018

Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Mostly Disappoint In Long-Awaited Research Results
After years of debate, a major government funded study failed to find any overall benefit of taking widely used supplements to protect against heart disease or cancer.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2018

Scientists Spy On Bees, See Harmful Effects Of Common Insecticide
Bees exposed to a type of insecticides called neonicotinoids dramatically changed their behavior — becoming sluggish, antisocial and spending less time caring for the colony's young, researchers say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2018

Should Childhood Trauma Be Treated As A Public Health Crisis?
New research highlights the link between childhood trauma and mental illness and addiction in adulthood, leading some researchers to call it an issue as pressing as any infectious disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 08, 2018

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain
When people are feeling glum, it often means that brain areas involved in emotion and memory are communicating. Researchers have now observed the circuit in action in humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 07, 2018

Active Ingredient In Marijuana Reduced Alzheimer's-Like Effects In Mice
In mice genetically programmed to develop Alzheimer's symptoms, those given a synthetic version of a chemical in marijuana retained normal memory function.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 07, 2018

Is The Pentagon Modifying Viruses To Save Crops — Or To Wage Biological Warfare?
The Pentagon wants university researchers to find ways to protect crops in the field using infectious viruses carried by insects. Critics think it looks like bioweapons research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 06, 2018

These Flatworms Can Regrow A Body From A Fragment. How Do They Do It And Could We?
Biologists are keen to understand how a type of flatworm known as a planarian uses powerful stem cells to regenerate an entire body from a headless sliver of itself.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 04, 2018

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?
Working memory is where the brain keeps bits of information in everyday life handy. But brain scientists don't agree on how working memory works.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 02, 2018

Despite Warnings, FDA Approves Potent New Opioid Painkiller
Critics, including some leading anesthesiologists, say the drug is unnecessary, and they worry it will be diverted and abused. The Food And Drug Administration says it is addressing safety concerns.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 02, 2018

She Chose To 'Go Flat' And Wants Other Breast Cancer Survivors To Know They Can Too
After her double mastectomy, writer Catherine Guthrie came to embrace her new body, without breast reconstruction. But she's learned, women have to push the medical system to support this choice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 01, 2018

How Long Should Older Moms Wait Before Getting Pregnant Again?
As a woman ages, choosing when to try for a second or third child means weighing fertility odds against the risks of getting pregnant again too soon. A new study provides more data to help decide.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2018

For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival
Two new studies suggest that minimally invasive surgery for early stage cervical cancer patients leads to death and recurring disease more often than standard surgery through a large incision.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2018

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs
A new study found that birds' dinosaur relatives had eggs with traces of two pigments—a red-brown one and a blue-green one. In today's birds that might produce a color such as robin's egg blue.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2018

Social Stigma Is One Reason The Opioid Crisis Is Hard To Confront
The CDC estimated that 72,000 people died of drug overdoses in 2017. There are many reasons why the opioid crisis is so hard to confront. One of them is social stigma.

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