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   NEWS: NPR TOPICS: RESEARCH NEWS
NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2022

Death metal singers have a vocal counterpart ... in bats
Bats and death metal singers have more in common than a love of the dark. A new study has found that some of bats' lower frequency calls appear to use a technique similar to death metal growling.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2022

In the hunt for a male contraceptive, scientists look to stop sperm in their tracks
For decades birth control research focused on women. Now there's a new push to develop gels, pills or other products that could keep men from getting their partners pregnant.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 02, 2022

With one dose, new drug may cure sleeping sickness. Could it also wipe it out?
This often fatal disease found in many African countries is painful and lengthy to treat. But a single oral dose proved incredibly effective in a clinical trial, raising hopes of eradication.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 30, 2022

Study: Alzheimer's drug shows modest success slowing declines in memory, thinking
In a large study, the experimental Alzheimer's drug lecanemab reduced the rate of cognitive decline by 27 percent in people in the early stages of the disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 16, 2022

What makes us dance? It really is all about that bass
A recent study in the journal Current Biology found that people danced 12% more when very low frequency bass was played.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 15, 2022

Researchers dig into why nose-picking is a common behavior
New research shows that a type of primate known as an aye-aye loves picking its nose. Researchers say the findings raise interesting questions about why nose-picking is such a common behavior.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 11, 2022

It turns out that chimpanzees and gorillas can form lasting friendships
Two decades of research in Nouabalé-Ndoki Park in the Republic of Congo found the primates foraging alongside each other, wrestling, seeking out their pals — and occasionally making threats.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 10, 2022

Inaudible, low-frequency bass makes people boogie more on the dancefloor
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with neuroscientist Daniel Cameron, who found that inaudible, low-frequency bass appears to make people boogie nearly 12% more on the dancefloor.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 06, 2022

How do our brains decide to remember something positively or negatively?
NPR's Ayesha Rascoe speaks to researcher Hao Li about a new study that shows how the brain ascertains experiences as positive or negative.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 06, 2022

New research finds bumblebees like to play with toys
A new study shows that young bumblebees like to play with toys, mirroring the behavior of young mammals. Bumblebees are also the first insects observed to engage in object play.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 05, 2022

If bumblebees can play, does it mean they have feelings? This study suggests yes
Scientists wanted to learn whether bees, like humans and other mammals, had any interest in playing for fun's sake. They say they have evidence that bees do, and that could change how we view insects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 04, 2022

Daylight saving time ends Sunday. Here are 4 things you should know
More than a third of U.S. states now support the idea of making daylight saving time permanent. It's already in effect for about eight months of the year.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 03, 2022

Dozens of species were assumed to be mute — until they were recorded making sounds
Some animals like birds and frogs are famous for the sounds they make. But have you ever heard a turtle talk? Most turtles were thought to not make sounds at all — before researchers went deep.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 01, 2022

What causes Alzheimer's? Study puts leading theory to 'ultimate test'
Researchers are launching a make-or-break study to test the conventional wisdom about what causes Alzheimer's disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2022

Smiling faces might help the drug ketamine keep depression at bay
In a recent small study, the antidepressant effects of ketamine lasted longer when an intravenous dose was followed with computer games featuring smiling faces or words aimed at boosting self-esteem.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 29, 2022

Talking to strangers might make you happier, a study on 'relational diversity' finds
A study finds that we are happier the more we talk with different categories of people — colleagues, family, strangers — and the more evenly our conversations are spread out among those groups.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 26, 2022

Most teens who start puberty suppression continue gender-affirming care, study finds
A new study from a Dutch clinic found that 98% of transgender adolescents who received puberty suppression treatment went on to continue gender-affirming treatment.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 23, 2022

Researchers have found a link between chemical straighteners and uterine cancer
NPR's Ayesha Rascoe speaks to Alexandra White of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences about the link between chemical hair straighteners and uterine cancer.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 22, 2022

The fastest ever laundry-folding robot is here. And it's likely still slower than you
Researchers and companies have tried over the years to automate the chore with limited success. Using a brand new method, researchers have taught a robot to fold a record 30-40 garments per hour.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2022

Health department medical detectives find 84% of U.S. maternal deaths are preventable
More than half of these deaths occur well after the mom leaves the hospital. To save lives, mothers need more support in the "fourth trimester, that time after the baby is born," one researcher says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 19, 2022

Researchers uncover the first Neanderthals that are related to each other
Researchers have uncovered the first Neanderthals that are related to each other. The finding shows that these ancient people lived in clans similar to those of modern humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 19, 2022

Hair straightening chemicals may increase women's risk of uterine cancer, study finds
The findings are a concern for Black women, researchers say, who are far more likely to report using straightening products such as relaxers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 15, 2022

A black hole is releasing some strange burps, baffling scientists
Astronomers were stunned to find that the black hole was emitting energy, two years after it pulled apart a star that had come too close.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 14, 2022

Brain cells in a lab dish learn to play Pong — and offer a window onto intelligence
A dish of brain cells learned to play the 1970s video game Pong. The research could help computers become more intelligent

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 13, 2022

Colonoscopies save lives. Doctors push back against European study that casts doubt
Colon cancer specialists worry that results of a study published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine could be misconstrued, and keep patients from getting lifesaving cancer screening.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 12, 2022

Human cells in a rat's brain could shed light on autism and ADHD
Scientists have devised a new model for studying disorders like autism spectrum disorder and ADHD. It uses clusters of human brain cells grown inside the brain of a rat.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 06, 2022

How glaciers melted 20,000 years ago may offer clues about climate change's effects
New research out of the British Antarctic Survey found thousands of underground channels left by ice age glacial melt. The findings could improve the accuracy of modern-day models of sea level rise.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2022

These LSD-based drugs seem to help mice with anxiety and depression — without the trip
Scientists have made a drug based on LSD that seems to fight depression without producing a psychedelic experience.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2022

The Nobel chemistry prize is awarded to 3 people for their work in attaching molecules
This year's Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded in equal parts to Carolyn R. Bertozzi, Morten Meldal and K. Barry Sharpless for developing way of "snapping molecules together."

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2022

3 scientists share Nobel Prize in physics for their work on quantum information
This year's Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to research on how light and matter act on an atomic scale.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 03, 2022

The Nobel prize in medicine has been awarded for research on evolution
This year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine has been awarded to Swedish scientist Svante Pääbo for his discoveries on human evolution.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2022

Why your bad boss will probably lose the remote-work wars
Since 2020, office workers have waged an epic battle to work remotely. They're mostly winning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2022

Daily 'breath training' can work as well as medicine to reduce high blood pressure
Research finds five to 10 minutes daily of a type of strength training for muscles used in breathing can help anyone reduce or prevent high blood pressure. The training can also help elite athletes.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2022

Scientists have found a mineral stronger than diamond
Scientists have found a mineral stronger than diamond. They say lonsdaleite could be used to fortify industrial tools like drill bits and saw blades - AND teach us about the evolution of earth.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2022

Scientists debate how lethal COVID is. Some say it's now less risky than flu
They argue the threat posed by COVID has lessened because of preexisting immunity and access to treatment. Plus, some deaths may be incorrectly blamed on COVID. Others caution it's too soon to tell.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 12, 2022

With early Alzheimer's in the family, these sisters decided to test for the gene
For some people, a rare genetic mutation makes dementia inescapable. Three sisters have decided to confront fate with a genetic test and have joined a research project on possible treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2022

7 fun facts about sweat
Perspiration can be a stinky nuisance as temperatures climb, but scientists say we shouldn't sell sweat short. There's so much more to the briny stuff than meets the eye.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2022

Amputation in a 31,000-year-old skeleton may be a sign of prehistoric medical advances
The skeleton of a young adult found in a cave in Indonesia that is missing its left foot and part of its left leg reveal the oldest known evidence of an amputation, according to a new study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2022

A newly discovered planet 40% larger than Earth may be suitable for life
It's one of two new planets that were recently found about 100 light years from Earth, both of which take just days to orbit their own sun.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 23, 2022

Spiders show signs of REM-like activity, raising the question: Do they dream?
A team of researchers filmed jumping spiders overnight and observed behaviors that mirror rapid eye movement sleep in other species. It helps that baby jumping spiders have translucent exoskeletons.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 18, 2022

What's behind the FDA's controversial strategy for evaluating new COVID boosters
Some scientists are alarmed that the agency plans to evaluate the next generation of boosters by reviewing mouse studies alone. Others say there's no time to waste waiting for human trials.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 12, 2022

A cataclysmic flood is coming for California. Climate change makes it more likely.
There's a long history of massive inland flooding in California. New research finds that climate change has already doubled the odds it happens again.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 08, 2022

COVID sewage surveillance labs join the hunt for monkeypox
Wastewater testing has proved a reliable early alarm bell for COVID-19 outbreaks. U.S. researchers are now adapting the approach to track the explosive spread of monkeypox, and maybe other viruses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 08, 2022

An island in the Galápagos reintroduced iguanas after nearly 200 years of extinction
The Galápagos land iguana is back on Santiago Island. That's thanks to some help from a team of conservationists.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 01, 2022

Why the American Dream is more attainable in some cities than others
A blockbuster new study reveals a key factor explaining rates of upward mobility.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 31, 2022

This fish evolved to walk on land — then said 'nope' and went back to the water
In a move reflective of a viral meme, a new study shows that an ancient fish really did evolve to walk out of the water, only to then go back to the sea.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2022

A lot of predictions were made about COVID's social impact. How did they hold up?
NPR's Scott Simon asks Wharton School management professor Ethan Mollick about research into pandemic predictions and how to make the people around you happy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 26, 2022

Fossil shows fish evolved to walk on land — then went back to the water
After an ancient fish developed legs, its newly discovered descendent Qikiqtania wakei went back to swimming in open water.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 23, 2022

Baby talk is a universal phenomenon
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Courtney Hilton about his research that centers on how people talk to babies around the world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 23, 2022

The science is in: Everyone recognizes and uses baby talk with infants
The features of baby talk — softer tone, higher pitch, almost unintelligible vocabulary — are global. Researchers made over 1,500 recordings in urban, rural and Indigenous communities.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 14, 2022

A woodpecker's brain takes a big hit with every peck: study
A new study refutes the popular idea that a woodpecker's brain is cushioned from the violent impacts of pecking. It offers a different reason the birds avoid brain damage.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 14, 2022

Over-the-counter birth control pills are available worldwide. The U.S. may be next
Birth control pills are available in the U.S. only with a prescription. Now a drugmaker is asking the FDA to approve a progestin-only contraceptive that would be available without one at pharmacies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2022

A new species of giant water lily has been discovered
Botanists have discovered a new giant water lily with lilly pads that can grow to nearly 10 feet wide. Researchers previously thought there were only two species of giant water lillies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 07, 2022

The story of Fred the mastodon, who died looking for love
A mastodon named Fred, also known as the Buesching mastodon, is a distant relative of the modern elephant. His remains reveal the story of his life and violent end.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 04, 2022

Thanks to researchers, face mites are getting an image makeover
New research suggests face mites, long considered parasites, might actually be helpful to humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 01, 2022

Underwater noise pollution is disturbing ocean life, researchers say
Whales, seals and other marine mammals need their keen hearing for communication and for finding food. But it's being damaged by a range of constant sounds. Ship engines and oil drilling for example.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 30, 2022

Scientists say they've solved a 700-year-old mystery: Where and when Black Death began
For centuries, scientists and historians have wondered where the Black Death — the deadliest pandemic in recorded history — came from. New research sheds light on the ancient disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2022

Monkeypox outbreak in U.S. is bigger than the CDC reports. Testing is 'abysmal'
The testing system set up by the CDC actually deters doctors from ordering a monkeypox test, and many physicians aren't familiar with the disease, resulting in too few tests and little tracking.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 24, 2022

Factual climate change reporting can influence Americans positively, but not for long
Climate change has impacted the world's water, air and land masses. But today's news media isn't designed to reinforce public belief, say researchers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 23, 2022

How 'superworms' could help solve the trash crisis
A new study from Australia shows that larvae of the darkling beetle can eat polystyrene — the material behind plastic foam.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2022

COVID vaccines are finally here for young kids. But the logistics aren't easy
NPR talks to Claire Hannan, who has helped navigate vaccine rollouts in all 50 states, about some of the challenges involved in quickly getting shots out to millions of young kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 16, 2022

Omicron poses about half the risk of long COVID as delta, new research finds
Some scientists estimate that cases of long COVID from omicron will still rise, however, because of high transmissibility and the misconception that people don't have to worry about catching it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2022

CTE is rare in brains of deceased service members, study finds
Despite a high risk of brain injuries, military personnel rarely develop a disabling brain condition often found in former boxers and football players.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 09, 2022

Researchers are developing prosthetics that have a sense of touch
A team at the University of Pittsburgh is working to connect prosthetic arms and legs with the nervous system to give patients a sense of touch.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 09, 2022

Researchers work to create a sense of touch in prosthetic limbs
A team at the University of Pittsburgh is equipping artificial hands and feet with sensors that are linked to a person's own nervous system. Preliminary results, though limited, are promising.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2022

A marble slab in storage turned out to be an ancient Greek yearbook
An ancient Greek inscription on a marble slab has been sitting in a museum for over 130 years. Researchers have learned it's a list of young men who had graduated from a military training class.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2022

A volcano's song could contain clues to its future eruptions, scientists hope
Scientists have recorded a song coming from a volcano. They think the musical notes may someday be useful for predicting when a dangerous eruption might occur.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 02, 2022

Researchers have identified the world's largest underwater plant
It covers almost 80 square miles off the coast of Western Australia. It looks like a massive meadow of seagrass, but it is actually a single seedling that's been cloning itself over and over again.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 28, 2022

A drug for HIV appears to reverse a type of memory loss in mice
In mice, the HIV drug maraviroc restored a system that links new memories that are made around the same time. The finding could help treat memory problems in people.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 26, 2022

Encore: The United States' only native parrot is being studied, to save it
We know the bird can mimic human speech; now a researcher is trying to understand parrot-to-parrot communication. He's looking at the red-crowned parrot, which is the only parrot native to the U.S.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 26, 2022

Research shows policies that may help prevent mass shootings — and some that don't
The amount of resources devoted to studying gun violence is paltry compared to its public health impact. Still the evidence shows certain policies might help prevent mass shootings.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 23, 2022

Study finds microscopic life in 830-million-year-old crystal - and it might be alive!
A recent study in the journal Geology finds microorganisms trapped in an 830-million-year-old salt crystal. The researchers say it might still be alive.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2022

Johns Hopkins' students solve a modern-day problem: messy lunches
The engineering students invented something called "Tastee Tape" — possibly the world's first edible tape that can stick to food. Gone are the days of burritos, gyros and wraps falling apart.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2022

The case for revolutionizing child care in America
A new book argues that greater public support for parents is critical for the brain development of America's kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 16, 2022

Missouri scientists work to save lake sturgeon by electronically tracking them
With a decreasing population of lake sturgeon, nine states have listed the species as endangered. To protect them, scientists are studying where lake sturgeon travel before and after they reproduce.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 15, 2022

A landmark study tracks the lasting effect of having an abortion — or being denied one
The Turnaway Study followed nearly 1,000 women who sought abortions, interviewing them regularly for years to understand the impact on their mental and financial wellbeing.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 14, 2022

Scientists successfully grow plants in soil from the moon
The study makes use of lunar soil samples collected from Apollo 11, 12 and 17.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2022

In thimble-sized pots, researchers wanted to see if the moon could grow food
Decades ago, Apollo astronauts gathered hundreds of pounds of lunar rocks and dirt. Last year, NASA loaned scientists at the University of Florida some of the soil, and they sprouted seedlings.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 12, 2022

This is the first image of the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way
"We finally have the first look at our Milky Way black hole, Sagittarius A*," an international team of astrophysicists and researchers from the Event Horizon Telescope team said.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 11, 2022

Youthful spinal fluid could help treat Alzheimer's disease, study suggests
The memory of aging mice improved when they received a substance found in the spinal fluid of young animals and young people. The finding suggests a new approach to treating Alzheimer's disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2022

Firearm-related homicide rate skyrockets amid stresses of the pandemic, the CDC says
The rate of U.S. gun homicides jumped nearly 35% in 2020 to the highest level in more than 25 years. And gaps widened for groups already at the highest risk, especially Black men and boys.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 05, 2022

A popular program for teaching kids to read just took another hit to its credibility
Reading Recovery is one of the world's most widely used reading intervention programs for young children. A new study questions its long-term impact.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2022

A new study tells us to hold the stereotypes on dog breeds
A new study published this week indicates that a dog's breed does not dictate its personality and temperament.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 28, 2022

Your dog is a good boy, but that's not necessarily because of its breed
A new study based on thousands of DNA sequences and owner surveys finds that less than 10% of a dog's behavior — like howling, herding or retrieving — can be explained by its breed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 28, 2022

Moderna asks FDA to authorize first COVID-19 vaccine for very young children
The company says a low-dose version of its vaccine triggers an immune response in children ages 6 months to less than 6 years equivalent to what has protected older children and adults.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 26, 2022

Brain scans may reveal a lot about mental illness, but not until studies get bigger
Scientists are using MRI scans to understand how mental illness shows up in the bran. But new research raises concerns that existing studies are not reliable because the sample sizes are too small.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 25, 2022

MIT researchers confirm that it's hard to split the filling evenly in an Oreo
Twist apart an Oreo and the creme filling usually ends up mostly on one side. Researchers concluded there's no secret. The production process makes it almost impossible to split the filling evenly.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 22, 2022

Firearms overtook auto accidents as the leading cause of death in children
The change occurred in 2020, researchers say. Overall firearm-related deaths increased 13.5% between 2019 and 2020, but such fatalities for those 1 to 19 years old jumped nearly 30%.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 20, 2022

Taylor Swift was the inspiration for the name of a new millipede species
The Swift Twisted-Claw Millipede, or Nannaria swiftae, was among several new species found in Tennessee.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 19, 2022

Climate change fueled extreme rainfall during the record 2020 hurricane reason
Human-induced climate change fueled one of the most active hurricane seasons on record in 2020, with rainfall totals up to 10% higher than in the pre-industrial era, according to a new study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 19, 2022

Climate change fueled extreme rainfall during the record 2020 hurricane season
Human-induced climate change fueled one of the most active hurricane seasons on record in 2020, with rainfall totals up to 10% higher than in the pre-industrial era, according to a new study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 19, 2022

Moderna says its new 'bivalent' vaccine shows promise against COVID variants
The company says this version targets both the original coronavirus and the beta variant, and appears to provide broader and longer-lasting protection against different strains, including omicron.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 16, 2022

Individual grants fuel diverse research, from break dancing to enslaved beer brewers
The National Endowment for the Humanities recently announced grants for 245 projects, including research on Latina members of the military, Black women brewers, and the history of break dancing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 15, 2022

Encore: Babies and toddlers know that swapping saliva is a sure sign of love
A study suggests babies are aware that people who are willing to share saliva, through kissing or sharing spoons, have especially close relationships. (Story aired on ATC on Jan. 20, 2022.)

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 13, 2022

A record number of Yellowstone wolves have been killed. Conservationists are worried
States neighboring Yellowstone National Park have eased rules on hunting wolves, resulting in the most being killed in nearly a century

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 12, 2022

How much energy powers a good life? Less than you're using, says a new report
Americans use nearly four times the energy researchers say is needed to live a happy, healthy and prosperous life.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 10, 2022

Charles Darwin's notebooks return to Cambridge after being missing for 20 years
Last month, two of Charles Darwin's notebooks that had been missing from the Cambridge University Library for 20 years were returned.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 07, 2022

Solar panels that can generate electricity at night have been developed at Stanford
While standard solar panels can provide electricity during the day, this device can be a "continuous renewable power source" during the day and at night.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 07, 2022

A new study suggests that mushrooms can communicate
A scientist at the University of the West of England inserted electrodes into four species of fungi, and discovered that the mushrooms seem to use electrical impulses to communicate internally.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 07, 2022

Scans reveal the brain's early growth, late decline and surprising variability
A study of more than 120,000 brain scans shows rapid growth before age 2 and accelerating decline after age 50. The results may one day help pick up abnormalities in the developing brain.

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