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   NEWS: NPR TOPICS: RESEARCH NEWS
NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2021

Researchers pinpoint when the Vikings came to Canada. It was exactly 1,000 years ago
It has long been known that the Vikings arrived in the Americas sometime before Christopher Columbus. Now, a new article in the journal Nature concludes the exact year was 1021.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2021

Researchers put a date on when the Vikings arrived in Canada: exactly 1,000 years ago
It's long been known that the Vikings arrived in the Americas sometime before Christopher Columbus. Now, a new article in the journal Nature pinpoints the exact year: 1021.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 21, 2021

Why helping people pay rent can fight the pandemic
A family in Houston and a plumber in Maryland couldn't afford rent, which pushed them into crowded living quarters. During the COVID-19 pandemic, that common predicament has increased viral spread.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 20, 2021

In a major scientific advance, a pig kidney is successfully transplanted into a human
The kidney, which came from a genetically altered pig, worked normally and showed no signs of rejection. It's seen as a significant step toward using animal organs for life-saving transplants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 14, 2021

The dinosaur extinction led to lots of new mammals and birds — and snakes to eat them
After the dinosaurs disappeared, the world saw an explosion of birds and mammals. But a study suggests a burst of new snakes appeared, too, with diets to match the newly expanding array of animals.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 13, 2021

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best
Should people who get a COVID booster get a different vaccine from their original shot? The results of a highly anticipated study suggest that in some cases the answer may be yes.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 12, 2021

A Nobel Prize For A Revolution In Economics
David Card, Joshua Angrist, and Guido Imbens win a Nobel Prize for revolutionizing how economics is done.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 07, 2021

Researchers found a new species of water bear fossilized in a hunk of ancient amber
Research into the evolution of tardigrades has been severely hindered by a lack of fossils. This new discovery could offer researchers insight into how the creatures lived millions of years ago.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 07, 2021

Diet soda may prompt food cravings, especially in women and people with obesity
New research adds to growing concern over zero-calorie drinks. Consuming artificial sweeteners may confuse our body, leading to increased hunger and weight gain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 06, 2021

New brain maps could help the search for Alzheimer's treatments
Scientists have created detailed maps of the brain area that controls movement in mice, monkeys and people. The maps could help explain human ailments like Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2021

NIH Director Francis Collins is stepping down after 12 years
Collins has been director of the National Institutes of Health since 2009 and served under three U.S. presidents. NIH is the largest funder of basic and clinical biomedical research in the world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2021

Francis Collins, one of the longest-serving heads of NIH, is stepping down
Collins has been director of the National Institutes of Health since 2009 and served under three U.S. presidents. NIH is the largest funder of basic and clinical biomedical research in the world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2021

As he steps down as the head of NIH, he has a warning about future pandemics
Francis Collins has served longer than any other director of the National Institutes of Health since 1971. He tells NPR he did not anticipate the culture wars taking over scientific fact.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2021

Francis Collins, the longest-serving head of NIH, is stepping down
Collins has been director of the National Institutes of Health since 2019 and served under three U.S. presidents. NIH is the largest funder of basic and clinical biomedical research in the world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2021

The Nobel Prize in physics honors work on climate change and complex systems
The Nobel Prize in physics was awarded for work on disorder, fluctuations and the ability to predict a changing climate.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2021

Researcher explains how girls are socialized to have limited political ambition
Miryah Holman, associate professor of political science at Tulane University, tells NPR about her research team's latest study on how socialization limits young girls' interest in politics.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 29, 2021

New Study Finds More Than A Third Of COVID-19 Patients Have Symptoms Months Later
The symptoms, such as headache, fatigue and cognitive dysfunction, persist or recur months after diagnosis, far more often than they do for the flu, researchers say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 29, 2021

Gene-Editing Experiment Improves Sight In Patients With Impaired Vision
For the first time, scientists are reporting they restored vision to people blinded by a rare genetic disorder by infusing the revolutionary gene-editing technique directly into cells inside the body.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 29, 2021

A Gene-Editing Experiment Let These Patients With Vision Loss See Color Again
In a first, doctors injected the gene-editing tool CRISPR directly into cells in patients' eyes. The experiment helped these vision-impaired patients see shapes and colors again.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 28, 2021

Pfizer Submits Favorable Initial Data To The FDA On Kids' COVID-19 Vaccine Trial
Pfizer and BioNTech say they plan to submit a formal request for emergency use authorization of their vaccine in young children "in the coming weeks."

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 23, 2021

NASA's Got A New, Big Telescope. It Could Find Hints Of Life On Far-Flung Planets
The James Webb Space Telescope will let scientists study small, rocky planets around distant stars in more detail than ever before. After decades of work, it could head into orbit later this year.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2021

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later
Intensive rehabilitative therapy that starts two to three months after a stroke may be key to helping the injured brain rewire, a new study suggests. That's later than covered by many insurance plans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 15, 2021

Scientists Trained Cows Where To Pee. It Could Help The Environment
Turns out cows can be potty trained as easily as toddlers. Researchers in Germany put the task to the test and 11 out of 16 cows learned to use the "MooLoo" when they had to go.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 14, 2021

Pufferfish Toxin Holds Clues To Treating 'Lazy Eye' In Adults
The visual problem is usually treated in kids by temporarily covering the other eye with a patch. But that doesn't always work. Research now shows crucial brain rewiring can happen in adulthood, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 14, 2021

How A Blistering Housing Market Could Be Making Wildfires Even More Dangerous
California Homes Are Burning. Why Are They Still Increasing In Value?

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 13, 2021

What We Know About Breakthrough Infections And Long COVID
As the Delta variant causes more vaccinated people to get "breakthrough infections," concerns are rising that even the vaccinated could develop long COVID symptoms in rare cases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2021

Sheltering Inside May Not Protect You From The Dangers Of Wildfire Smoke
Tens of millions of Americans are forced to live with wildfire smoke now every year. New research shows that it's more invasive than previously thought, infiltrating homes, schools and offices.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2021

It's Time For A Flu Shot. Here's What You Need To Know
With all the talk about COVID-19 vaccines and boosters, it's easy to forget that there's another respiratory virus poised to strike. We tackle questions about why a flu vaccine matters now.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 06, 2021

Across The COVID-Ravaged South, High-Level Life Support Is Difficult To Find
ECMO, the highest level of mechanical life support, functions as a temporary heart and lungs for some of COVID-19's sickest patients. But the waitlist is too long for many patients who need it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2021

CDC Warns Against Off-Label Use Of COVID Vaccine
Using the COVID vaccine "off-label" — whether that's for booster shots or young children — may be tempting to some vaccine providers, but the CDC warns it could get them into trouble.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 01, 2021

Your Dog May Know If You've Done Something On Purpose, Or Just Screwed Up
An experiment involving dog treats suggests our canine pals may understand the difference when a human withholds a treat by accident versus doing it on purpose. But don't press your luck.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 30, 2021

These Researchers May Have Just Found The Planet's Northernmost Island
The scientists initially thought they had arrived at Oodaaq, an island discovered in 1978. They instead wound up on an undiscovered island further north.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 23, 2021

New Evidence Points To Antibodies As A Reliable Indicator Of Vaccine Protection
After vaccination, antibody levels can help predict how much protection a COVID shot offers, scientists are learning. The finding could speed up the development of future vaccines.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2021

Many ERs Fail People Who Struggle With Addiction. These New Approaches Might Help
Starting treatment for addiction in the emergency room greatly improves the chances recovery will last, experts say. Cutting red tape, hiring advocates and Uber vouchers can all make a difference.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 19, 2021

Bats Love To Babble — Just Like Humans
New research finds that sac-winged bat pups — a species of bat found in Central and South America — like to "babble" in ways that are remarkably similar to human babies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 19, 2021

Supercomputer Calculates Pi To A Record-Breaking 62.8 Trillion Digits
Swiss scientists and a supercomputer recently calculated Pi to trillions of decimal points. It took 108 days to run the calculation.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 19, 2021

COVID Booster Shots Are Coming. Here's What You Need To Know
If all goes to plan, Americans who got Pfizer or Moderna shots can get a third dose eight months after their last jab. Here's why health officials think you'll need one.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 18, 2021

Researchers Studying Daddy Longlegs' Genes Created A 'Daddy Shortlegs'
The arachnids, also known as harvestmen, can use their legs like a curling marsupial tail — or as a sensor, or for courtship. They can also simply detach one, in case of emergency.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 17, 2021

Even Moderate COVID Restrictions Can Slow The Spread Of The Virus — If They're Timely
Mask mandates and other interventions can help stop a surge, even where vaccination rates are low, say scientists who combed through states' data. When they start and how long they last matters.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 13, 2021

A Study In Bangladesh Tripled The Rate Of Mask Wearing. Can It Help In The U.S.?
Researchers looked at the impact of free masks, text reminders, celebrity endorsements. It's unclear If the best strategies will help counter anti-mask sentiment in the U.S. during the delta surge.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 13, 2021

A Study In Bangladesh Tripled The Rate Of Mask-Wearing. Can It Help In The U.S.?
Researchers looked at the impact of free masks, text reminders and celebrity endorsements. It's unclear if the best strategies will help counter anti-mask sentiment in the U.S. during the delta surge.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 11, 2021

Got Plans For Sept. 24, 2182? This Big Asteroid Might, Too
A NASA mission to a potentially dangerous asteroid has let researchers map out its future trajectory like never before.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 11, 2021

Vaccinating During Pregnancy Has Become Even More Urgent As ICU Beds Fill Up
Only about 23% of those currently pregnant in the U.S. have been vaccinated against COVID-19, statistics show. And with the delta variant surging, those who are unvaccinated are especially vulnerable.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 10, 2021

How 'The Pet Revolution' Unleashed A New Top Dog In America
A new book argues we've seen a fundamental shift in the treatment of pets since 1998.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 10, 2021

How To Keep Your Child Safe From The Delta Variant
Some public health experts are also parents of little kids, and have to strategize to keep those too young to be vaccinated safe from getting or spreading the delta variant. Here are their tips.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 09, 2021

Climate Scientists Have Announced A Landmark Warning About The Future Of The Planet
In a landmark report, the world's top climate scientists are warning that Earth is headed toward unprecedented warming. Preventing the worst effects will demand a U-turn away from use of fossil fuels.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 09, 2021

This Sweet White Flower Is Actually A Sneaky Carnivore, Scientists Discovered
Carnivorous plants are rare, but now botanists say they've found one that's long been overlooked. It lives just outside Vancouver and in other parts of the Pacific Northwest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 09, 2021

This Sweet White Flower Is Actually A Sneaky Carnivore, Scientists Discover
Carnivorous plants are rare, but now botanists say they've found one that's long been overlooked. It lives just outside Vancouver, British Columbia, and in other parts of the Pacific Northwest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 03, 2021

Sports Science Is Changing How Female Olympians Train. It Could Help You, Too
U.S. Olympic heptathlete Annie Kunz says tracking her monthly cycles and learning she needs to eat more and get more naps when she's fatigued has already improved her athletic performance.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 03, 2021

Why Even The Most Elite Investors Do Dumb Things When Investing
A new study finds finance professionals fail at their jobs in a surprising way. There are lessons for all of us.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 03, 2021

There's A Way You Can Beat The Best Investors. You've Just Got To Know When To Sell
A new study finds finance professionals fail at their jobs in a surprising way. There are lessons for all of us.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 28, 2021

How An Altered Strand Of DNA Can Cause Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes To Self-Destruct
For the first time, scientists have shown that a new kind of genetic engineering can crash populations of malaria-spreading mosquitoes.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 27, 2021

The Behavioral Economics Manifesto Gets Revised
We speak with the Nobel Prize-winning founder of behavioral economics about the new — and last — version of his classic book, Nudge.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 22, 2021

Oh Flock! Clever Cockatoos Are More Culturally Complex Than We Thought
Cockatoos in Sydney have become expert trash bin burglars. Scientists say birds in different neighborhoods have taught each other different techniques to open the bins, a sign of cultural complexity.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 22, 2021

Tips And 'Service With A Smile' Rules Fuel Sex Harassment In Restaurants, Study Says
The authors say their research is the first to show an empirical link between tipping and forced friendliness to sex harassment. More than 70% of female restaurant workers report being harassed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 22, 2021

Tips And Service With A Smile Drive Sexual Harassment In Restaurants, Study Finds
The authors say their research is the first to empirically link tipping and forced friendliness to sexual harassment. More than 70% of female restaurant workers report being harassed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 19, 2021

How To Heat-Proof Your Summer Workout
With much of the U.S. already sweltering this summer, even avid runners, hikers and bikers are wilting. We've got 10 strategies from experts on how to enjoy hot weather exercise without keeling over.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 19, 2021

How To Stay Safe When You Work Out In The Heat
With much of the U.S. already sweltering this summer, even avid runners, hikers and bikers are wilting. We've got 10 strategies from experts on how to enjoy hot weather exercise without keeling over.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 13, 2021

Why Clearing Brazil's Forests For Farming Can Make It Harder To Grow Crops
Clearing natural forests in Brazil in order to grow crops like soybeans has actually made it harder to grow those crops. That's because deforestation makes the weather hotter and drier.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 13, 2021

It's Summer, And That Means The Mysterious Return Of Glacier Ice Worms
On mountaintop glaciers of Alaska, Washington and Oregon, billions of tiny black worms are tunneling upward, to the barren, icy surface. What lures them, and how do they survive the frozen depths?

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 11, 2021

You Can Learn A Thing Or Two From Dinosaur Poop
There's a lot to be learned from fossilized dinosaur dung. Paleontologist Martin Qvarnstrom and entomologist Emmanuel Arriaga-Varela detail some of their discoveries.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2021

A 51,000-Year-Old Bone Carving Supports Neanderthals' Creativity
Scientists have discovered a giant deer toe bone, engraved by Neanderthals — a hint that our ancient cousins had conceptual imagination.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 03, 2021

You Could Save A Child From Drowning This Summer. Here's How
A swimmer of any skill level might need your help, and preventing a drowning takes closer supervision of the kids than you might think. The distress signs can be subtle and quick.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2021

When A City-Size Star Becomes A Black Hole's Lunch, The Universe Roils
It's a smackdown of one space monster by another: Scientists have made unprecedented observations of two black holes gobbling two neutron stars — among the weirdest space collisions ever detected.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2021

When A City-Sized Star Becomes A Black Hole's Lunch, The Universe Roils
It's a smack down of one space monster by another: Scientists have made unprecedented observations of two black holes gobbling two neutron stars — among the weirdest space collisions ever detected.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 28, 2021

Protecting The Immuno-Compromised Against COVID Could Be Key To Ending The Pandemic
Vaccines may not be as effective for those who are immuno-compromised. Protecting them needs to be made a top priority, says researchers — to keep them safe and to slow the emergence of variants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2021

Flesh-Eating Parasites May Be Expanding Their Range As Climate Heats Up
Scientists caution that as the planet warms, more Americans could be exposed to disfiguring varieties of the Leishmania parasite. Overtreatment can be a problem, too, experts warn.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 24, 2021

Baby Dinosaur Bones Found In The Alaska Arctic Suggest They Lived There Year-Round
Researchers have found hundreds of baby dinosaur bones in the Alaskan Arctic — suggesting dinosaurs may have lived at cold northern latitudes year round.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 24, 2021

A New Study Suggests Dinosaurs Might Not Have Been As Cold-Blooded As We Thought
Researchers have found hundreds of baby dinosaur bones in the Alaskan Arctic, suggesting that dinosaurs may have lived at cold northern latitudes year-round.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 23, 2021

Alien Planet-Hunters In Hundreds Of Nearby Star Systems Could Spot Earth
Potentially, observers in plenty of solar systems could have detected Earth sometime in the last 5,000 years. More stars will soon move into positions that would let them see our planet.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2021

A New Way To Understand Automation
We speak with one of the leading scholars of automation about its evolving impacts on society.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2021

Delta Variant Of The Coronavirus Could Dominate In U.S. Within Weeks
More contagious than other variants, and maybe more likely to cause severe disease, Delta is spreading so fast it could cause yet another U.S. surge this summer or fall, according to new research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2021

Fauci Warns Dangerous Delta Variant Is The Greatest Threat To U.S. COVID Efforts
More contagious than other variants, and maybe more likely to cause severe disease, Delta is spreading so fast it could cause yet another U.S. surge this summer or fall, according to new research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2021

Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic
A new CDC study finds that people who provide unpaid care for their children or adult loved ones are twice as likely as noncaregivers to have experienced depression or anxiety, or thoughts of suicide.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2021

COVID Vaccines In Teens And Myocarditis: What You Need To Know
Health officials have been investigating an extremely rare side-effect of vaccination with the mRNA vaccines in young people: heart inflammation that's mostly mild and temporary.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2021

Pfizer's COVID Vaccine In Teens And Myocarditis: What You Need To Know
Health officials are investigating reports of mostly mild, temporary and treatable heart inflammation that may or may not be causally linked to vaccination with with an mRNA vaccine against COVID-19.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 16, 2021

5 Ways To Stop Summer Colds From Making The Rounds In Your Family
Run-of-the-mill runny noses and coughs are back, after a break during the pandemic's height, when so many of us were circulating less and wearing masks. Here's how to keep household viruses at bay.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2021

Tackling 'Energy Justice' Requires Better Data. These Researchers Are On It
President Biden's climate plans call for spending big on energy efficiency. New research could help make sure it actually targets the poor and minority households that most need it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2021

Lyme Disease-Carrying Ticks Are Turning Up On California's Beaches
The blood-sucking critters are capable of thriving along the western coast, according to new research. Though experts don't exactly know how they're picking up the bacteria that causes the illness.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 10, 2021

In Montana, Crisis Support Teams Offer Alternatives To Policing Mental Health
Montana now has six mobile crisis response teams — up from one in 2019 — with more in the works. Each team has a different makeup, but all use mental health support to diffuse tricky situations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 09, 2021

Women Now Drink As Much As Men - Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope
Women aren't just upping their drinking, researchers say. Increasingly they are "drinking to cope," instead of for pleasure — which accelerates the risk of alcohol use disorder and its health damage.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 09, 2021

Women Now Drink As Much As Men — Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope
Women aren't just upping their drinking, researchers say. Increasingly they are "drinking to cope," instead of for pleasure — which accelerates the risk of alcohol use disorder and its health damage.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 09, 2021

Women Now Drink As Much As Men And Suffer Health Effects More Quickly
Women aren't just upping their drinking, researchers say. Increasingly they are "drinking to cope," instead of for pleasure — which accelerates the risk of alcohol use disorder and its health damage.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 08, 2021

As Long As A Basketball Court: Australia's Largest Dinosaur Confirmed
"Cooper," a gargantuan dinosaur that roamed the Outback, is first of its kind found outside South America. The new species had long necks and tails, four legs and ate plants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 08, 2021

Dinosaur Found In Australia Was 2 Stories Tall And The Length Of A Basketball Court
"Cooper," a gargantuan dinosaur that roamed the Outback, is the first of its kind found outside South America. The new species had a long neck and tail, as well as four legs, and ate plants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2021

A New Type Of COVID-19 Vaccine Could Debut Soon
Instead of putting genetic instructions into people whose cells then make a viral protein, the vaccines from Novavax, Medicago and Sanofi carry a spike protein payload.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2021

New Type Of COVID Vaccine Could Debut Soon
Instead of putting genetic instructions into people whose cells then make a viral protein, the vaccines from Novavax, Medicago and Sanofi carry a spike protein payload.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2021

Right Whales Are Shrinking In Numbers— New Study Shows They're Also Shrinking In Size
North Atlantic right whales now grow about three feet shorter than they did 40 years ago. Research suggests a leading cause is the damage human activity inflicts on the critically endangered mammals.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2021

Endangered Right Whales Are Shrinking. Scientists Blame Commercial Fishing Gear
A new study concludes that endangered right whales born today will end up smaller than adult whales in the past. Researchers say stress from getting caught in fishing gear stunts the mammals' growth

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 01, 2021

Why Jumping Spiders Spend All Night Hanging Out—Literally
Little is known about the night-time habits of tiny creatures all around us. Take the jumping spider--it mysteriously can spend much of the night suspended in mid-air, hanging by a thread.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 01, 2021

Why Jumping Spiders Spend All Night Hanging Out — Literally
Little is known about the night-time habits of tiny creatures all around us. Take the jumping spider--it mysteriously can spend much of the night suspended in mid-air, hanging by a thread.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 30, 2021

After 50 Years, U.S. Opens The Door To More Cannabis Crops For Scientists
Until recently, plants from only one U.S. facility were approved for use in research. Adding new suppliers will accelerate understanding of cannabis' health effects and possible therapeutic uses.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 29, 2021

Scientists Say These Monkeys Use An 'Accent' To Communicate With Their Foe
In the Amazon rainforest, one species of monkey changed their territorial call to better communicate with a competing species.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 29, 2021

Amid Growing Anti-Asian Racism, A Call For More Research Into Its Health Effects
Many Asian Americans live daily with the corrosive effects of racism and racialized violence, yet there's very little research funded on Asian American health.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 27, 2021

CDC Approach To Breakthrough Infections Sparks Concerns
The CDC has decided to focus investigations of cases in which the COVID-19 vaccines fail on people who get hospitalized or die, but critics say that's short-sighted.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 27, 2021

CDC Move To Limit Investigations Into COVID Breakthrough Infections Sparks Concerns
The CDC will now track only cases of breakthrough infections in which COVID-19 vaccines fail on people who get hospitalized or die. But critics say that's shortsighted and cuts off valuable data.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 26, 2021

Controversial New Guidelines Would Allow Experiments On More Mature Human Embryos
An influential scientific society has recommended scrapping a long-standing taboo on studying human embryos in lab dishes beyond 14 days and green lit a long list of other sensitive research.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2021

How Medical Jargon Can Make COVID Health Disparities Even Worse
There's a lot of room for dangerous misunderstanding when doctors and public health officials talk to diverse groups about COVID-19. Health literacy projects aim to dispel confusion in all languages.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2021

Avoid Medical Jargon To Shrink COVID Health Disparities, Say Patient Advocates
There's a lot of room for dangerous misunderstanding when doctors and public health officials talk to diverse groups about COVID-19. Health literacy projects aim to dispel confusion in all languages.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2021

Dozens Of Animals Laugh Too, Study Shows
A new study in the journal Bioacoustics found that 65 different species of animals have their own form of laughter. Study co-author Sasha Winkler describes the sounds animals make during play.

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