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NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2021

Fighting Weight: How Military Recruiters Take On Obesity, Case By Case
A decade ago, Army recruiters started coaching individuals to help them lose weight so they could enlist. It's not an official Army program, but has become necessary to recruitment, many say.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2021

Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says
MIT bioengineer Linda Griffith spent years in debilitating pain before she was diagnosed with a condition often neglected in research. Her focus on the basic biology could lead to better treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2021

Freshly-Made Plutonium From Outer Space Found On Ocean Floor
Something went boom in outer space and sent radioactive stardust our way, and it's just been found at the bottom of the ocean.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2021

Freshly Made Plutonium From Outer Space Found On Ocean Floor
Something went boom in outer space and sent radioactive stardust our way, and it's just been found at the bottom of the ocean.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2021

FAQ: What You Need To Know About Pfizer's COVID Vaccine And Adolescents
Adolescents age 12 and older are now eligible to be vaccinated against COVID-19, the FDA says. Buy when and where, and what about younger kids? You have questions. We have answers.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2021

Cats Take 'If I Fits I Sits' Seriously, Even If The Space Is Just An Illusion
If you've spent any time around cats, you've seen them curl up in cozy spaces. A new study on feline cognition shows that they also like to sit in snug squares created by a kind of optical illusion.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2021

News Brief: COVID-19 Vaccine, Clashes In Jerusalem, Gene-Editing Experiment
The FDA is expected to authorize the Pfizer vaccine for 12 to 15-year-olds. Security ramped up for Jerusalem Day parade. Experiment could restore vision for some patients with genetic disorders.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2021

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision
The unprecedented study involves using the gene-editing technique CRISPR to edit a gene while it's still inside a patient's body. In exclusive interviews, NPR talks with two of the first participants.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 08, 2021

Will My Sense Of Smell Ever Return? Olfactory Insights From COVID And Beyond
COVID-19 has renewed interest in a key way humans perceive the world. A reporter who hasn't been able to tell the scent of a rose from a sweaty gym shoe for decades takes heart in the latest science.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 07, 2021

Vaccination Against COVID 'Does Not Mean Immunity' For People With Organ Transplants
For most people, COVID-19 vaccines promise a return to something akin to normal life. But for the hundreds of thousands of Americans who have a transplanted organ, it's a different story.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 04, 2021

Trees Talk To Each Other. 'Mother Tree' Ecologist Hears Lessons For People, Too
Ecologist Suzanne Simard says trees are "social creatures" that communicate with each other in remarkable ways — including warning each other of danger and sharing nutrients at critical times.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2021

Carolyn Freiwald: What Can Our Teeth Tell Us About Where We Come From?
Much of our ancestral histories can be found in our bones. Archaeologist Carolyn Friewald traces the story of human migration through the hidden clues in our bones and our teeth.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 28, 2021

25 Down And 71,632 To Go: Scientists Seek Genomes Of All Critters With A Backbone
Biologists say newly efficient and accurate gene sequencing techniques have allowed them to fairly quickly detail full genomes and find overlooked genes in a broad range of 25 important species.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 23, 2021

Man's Ancient Friend: 6,000-Year-Old Dog Remains Found On Arabian Peninsula
As archeologists in Saudi Arabia excavated an ancient tomb last year, they were surprised to find what's believed to be the earliest example of dog domestication in the region.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 21, 2021

The Secret Mission To Unearth Part Of A 142-Year-Old Experiment
Scientists in Michigan went out in the dead of night to dig up part of an unusual long-term experiment. It's a research study that started in 1879 and is handed from one generation to the next.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 18, 2021

Researcher Studies How Messaging On COVID-19 Disparities Affects Policy Preferences
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with professor Evan Lieberman about the study he co-authored looking at how sharing information about the pandemic's racial disparities affect peoples' policy opinions.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 18, 2021

The Incredible Shrinking And Growing Brains Of Indian Jumping Ants
A new study of Indian jumping ants shows they have the ability to shrink and expand their brains — a first for any insect.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 18, 2021

OPINION: Doctors Should Be More Candid With Their Patients
As a doctor, I was eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine in December, but I also was pregnant, and there wasn't yet much data to inform my decision. What I needed was a different kind of information.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 15, 2021

Scientists Create Early Embryos That Are Part Human, Part Monkey
An international team has put human cells into monkey embryos in hopes of finding new ways to produce organs for transplantation. But some ethicists still worry about how such research could go wrong.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 13, 2021

A Mystery Under Study: How, Why And When COVID Vaccines Aren't Fully Protective
COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective but don't always provide perfect protection. Some vaccinated people later exposed to the virus still get sick. Why and how often that happens is under study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 13, 2021

CDC Studies 'Breakthrough' COVID Cases Among People Already Vaccinated
COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective but don't always provide perfect protection. Some vaccinated people later exposed to the virus still get sick. Why and how often that happens is under study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 07, 2021

Drugs Targeting Immune Response To COVID-19 Show Promise
Researchers are reporting some progress in their search for drugs that tamp down the overwhelming immune reaction that can kill a patient with COVID-19.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 06, 2021

Woman Gets New Windpipe In Groundbreaking Transplant Surgery
A medical team in New York City says it has performed the first complete surgical transplant of a trachea. These kinds of transplants are one of the last big transplant challenges.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 02, 2021

Mummified Parrots Reveal 'Sophisticated' Trade In Ancient South American Desert
Scientists found remains of parrots in the Atacama desert, far from the birds' home in the Amazon. The discovery allowed scientists to reconstruct ancient trading routes used to transport the birds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 01, 2021

Mice That Hear Imaginary Sounds May Help Explain Hallucinations In People
An experiment that induced imaginary sounds in both people and mice could help explain how brain disorders like schizophrenia cause hallucinations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 29, 2021

Scientists Get Closer To Redefining The Length Of A Second
A group of scientists from Boulder, Colo., compared three different atomic clocks. It's a step toward redefining the length of a second.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 27, 2021

Scientific Specimens Are Going Online, But Much Remains Hidden In Storage
From fish in jars to rare seeds and microbes, hundreds of millions of biological specimens are stored around the U.S., and caretakers are trying to make them accessible for future research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 25, 2021

OPINION: 5 Ways To Make The Vaccine Rollout More Equitable
Getting the COVID-19 vaccine into most Americans' arms will involve much more than a good supply and logistics. Values such as equity, deep listening, and informed choice are crucial, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 21, 2021

European Scientists Zero In On AstraZeneca Blood Clot Link
A rare blood clotting condition has occurred in some people after receiving the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. If the new research is correct, it could mean that blood clots could be easily treated.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 19, 2021

Emily Levesque: How Have Telescopes Transformed Our Understanding Of The Universe?
Astronomers once gazed at the night sky and charted the stars using their naked eyes. Astrophysicist Emily Levesque describes how generations of telescopes have unlocked the wonders of the universe.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 16, 2021

How A Building Block of Life Got Created In a Flash
Lightning strikes may have supplied a key ingredient that allowed life to emerge on the early Earth, according to a new study of "fossilized" lightning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 12, 2021

Hark! Glow-In-The-Dark Shark Sparks Biology Landmark
A kitefin shark is the largest known bioluminescent vertebrate, according to a new study. The shark lives in the dimly lit "twilight zone" of the ocean, and may glow to camouflage itself as it hunts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 08, 2021

A 300-Year-Old Tale Of One Woman's Quest To Stop A Deadly Virus
In 1721, London was in the grips of a deadly smallpox epidemic. One woman learned how to stop it, but her solution sowed political division.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 07, 2021

Scientists Observe First Ever 'Space Hurricane'
A storm of electrons created the first known "space hurricane" over the North Pole. Professor Mike Lockwood from the University of Reading in the U.K. talks about the newly-published findings.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 07, 2021

Why Cuttlefish Are Smarter Than We Thought
Cuttlefish, the squishy sea creatures, showed impressive self-control in an experiment. It means they have something in common with primates.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 05, 2021

Study Finds Wildfire Smoke More Harmful To Humans Than Pollution From Cars
In Southern California, pollutants from wildfire smoke caused up to a 10% increase in hospital admissions. Researchers say there's a need for better air monitoring and public health programs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 04, 2021

Why Scientists Aim To Make A Drone Nearly As Small As A Mosquito
Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are trying to match the flexibility and resilience of an insect with a more muscular generation of mini-drones.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 02, 2021

Utah Considers State Park Named For Utahraptor Dinosaur
Utah is considering naming a new park in honor of dinosaurs discovered there. Researchers expect to uncover more Utahraptor bones — provided they can get them out of a massive block of rock.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 02, 2021

Reading A Letter That's Been Sealed For More Than 300 Years — Without Opening It
A signed, sealed but not delivered letter from 1697 has finally been read with the help of a high-tech scan that looked inside without breaking its seal.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 02, 2021

Reading A Letter That's Been Sealed For More Than 300 Years—Without Opening It
A signed, sealed, but not delivered letter from 1697 has finally been read with the help of a high-tech scan that looked inside without breaking its seal.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 02, 2021

5 Medical Appointments You Should Stop Putting Off
If you've been delaying routine medical care in the past year, now's the time to catch up, doctors say. The consequences of missing some key screenings and health checkups can be lethal.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 01, 2021

To Help Farmworkers Get COVID-19 Tests And Vaccine, Build Trust And A Safety Net
Getting COVID-19 tests and vaccine to essential workers on commercial farms and in meatpacking plants requires more than a pop-up clinic miles away. A positive test can be financially devastating.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 28, 2021

CDC Panel Endorses Johnson & Johnson's One-Dose COVID-19 Vaccine
Advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voted to endorse the emergency use of a single dose of a vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson. A study showed it was 66% effective in the U.S.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 27, 2021

Scientists Talked To People In Their Dreams. They Answered
Scientists have found that two-way communication is possible with someone who is asleep and dreaming. Specifically, lucid dreaming — dreaming while being aware you're dreaming.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 23, 2021

Do 'Tight' Cultures Fare Better In The Pandemic Than 'Loose' Cultures?
That's the question posted by a study in The Lancet Planetary Health. In case you're wondering, the United States is characterized as "loose." And Singapore is "tight."

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 23, 2021

Why 'Tight' Cultures May Fare Better Than 'Loose' Cultures In A Pandemic
A new study in The Lancet Planetary Health finds that cultural attitudes may explain the stark differences in how countries experience the pandemic.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2021

Ancient Trees Show When The Earth's Magnetic Field Last Flipped Out
A precise record of the last major reversal of the Earth's magnetic poles can be found in ancient trees. Researchers say this event 42,000 years ago had a huge impact on the planet and ancient humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2021

What A 30,000-Person Survey Reveals About Day-To-Day Life In The Pandemic
The responses reveal the impact on living standards in nine low- and middle-income countries — and may help governments find a way to help citizens most in need.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2021

American Life Expectancy Dropped By A Full Year In The First Half Of 2020
The group that suffered the largest drop in life expectancy was Black males — a decline of 3 years. Hispanic males also saw a large decrease, with a decline of 2.4 years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2021

American Life Expectancy Dropped By A Full Year In 1st Half Of 2020
The group that suffered the largest drop in life expectancy was Black males — a decline of three years. Hispanic males also saw a large decrease, with a decline of 2.4 years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 16, 2021

COVID-19 Vaccine: Don't Miss 2nd Dose Because Of Scheduling Glitches
After getting one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, some people are having trouble getting their second shot. Here's how to maximize the likelihood you'll get both doses, to be fully immunized.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 16, 2021

COVID-19 Vaccine: Don't Miss Your 2nd Dose Because Of Scheduling Glitches
Even after getting one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, some people are having trouble getting their second shot. Here's how to maximize the likelihood you'll get both doses, to be fully immunized.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 15, 2021

A Look At The New U.S. Coronavirus Variants
In recent months, we've learned about several new variants of the coronavirus that have popped up in the U.S. Scientists recently reported seven new and distinct variants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 15, 2021

Tracking New Coronavirus Variants In The U.S.
Scientists have identified new coronavirus variants popping up around the U.S. Ailsa Chang speaks with Vaughn Cooper about how well the U.S. is equipped to track the emergence of these new strains.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 10, 2021

Why A Musician Breathed New Life Into a 17,000-Year-Old Conch Shell Horn
A seashell found in a French cave appears to have been modified by prehistoric people so that it could be used like a trumpet, making it a new addition to the Stone Age orchestra.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 09, 2021

8-Year-Old Calls Out NPR For Lack Of Dinosaur Stories
How can All Things Considered consider all things without considering dinosaurs? That's the question posed by 8-year-old Leo Shidla of Minneapolis.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 08, 2021

Elon Musk Funds $100 Million XPrize For Pursuit Of New Carbon Removal Ideas
The goal, XPrize says, is to tackle "the biggest threat facing humanity — fighting climate change and rebalancing Earth's carbon cycle. "

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 08, 2021

Hope Heads For A Rendezvous With Mars
The UAE probe arrives at Mars on Tuesday, Feb 9. Its purpose is to both study the weather on Mars as well as inspire the next generation of that country's scientists and engineers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 08, 2021

My Mother Got Vaccinated. Is It Now Safe To Go Visit?
I haven't seen my mother in over a year. I was going to visit in April to celebrate her 90th birthday, but the pandemic put that on hold. Now that she's been vaccinated is time for the birthday hug?

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 08, 2021

My Mother Got Vaccinated. Is It Now Safe To Visit?
I haven't seen my mother in over a year. I was going to visit in April to celebrate her 90th birthday but the pandemic put that on hold. Now that she's been vaccinated is it time for the birthday hug?

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2021

Dr. Fauci On Vaccinations And Biden's 'Refreshing' Approach To COVID-19
It's early days yet, but Dr. Anthony Fauci says he's encouraged by the new president's approach to the pandemic. Science, Fauci says, is "going to rule." And the whole world needs vaccine.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 02, 2021

How Poverty Makes Workers Less Productive
A new study adds to the growing mountain of evidence that says that poverty impairs people's ability to think.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 02, 2021

COVID-19 Vaccine: Will It Protect Against New Variants And Do You Need A 2nd Dose?
The spread of new strains raises new questions as two COVID-19 vaccines continue their rollout across the U.S. and another vaccine candidate preps for regulatory review. Here's what you need to know.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 31, 2021

Did Closing Schools Save Lives Or Cost Lives? The Debate Continues
In November, a scientific paper estimated millions of years of life could be lost due to prolonged school closures in the U.S. The paper has since been corrected and critiqued.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 28, 2021

Friend or Foe? Naked Mole Rats Can Tell By A Unique Squeak
A new study shows that naked mole rats speak with distinct dialects that appear to be learned — and reveal what group they belong to.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 25, 2021

Protect Pregnant Women 'Through Research,' Not 'From Research,' OB-GYNs Urge
As COVID-19 vaccines roll out, doctors say it's long past time to address the exclusion of pregnant women from research on drugs and vaccines. They say better study design is the answer.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 22, 2021

How Does Catnip Make Cats High? New Study Offers Answers
Cats act high when they're given catnip because, well, they are. Researchers say that catnip and another plant, silver vine, produce a chemical that activates their opioid reward systems.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 18, 2021

Researches Show Efficacy Of Personalized Brain Stimulation In Psychiatric Treatments
Two new studies show the potential of personalized brain stimulation to treat psychiatric disorders. The approach delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2021

OPINION: Moral Tragedy Looms In Early Chaos Of U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution
As states suddenly expand the categories of people eligible for the first scarce shipments of vaccine, who will be watching to make sure those hit hardest by the pandemic aren't left behind?

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 13, 2021

After Being Booted By Big Tech, Parler Registers With Hosting Service
Parler, the messaging app favored by far-right activists, has a new home. NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Brian Friedberg of Harvard's Shorenstein Center. He tracks social media and hate groups,

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 13, 2021

After Booted By Big Tech, Parler Registers With Hosting Service
Parler, the messaging app favored by far-right activists, has a new home. NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Brian Friedberg of Harvard's Shorenstein Center. He tracks social media and hate groups,

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 12, 2021

Why You Should Still Wear A Mask And Avoid Crowds After Getting The COVID-19 Vaccine
It takes time after vaccination for immunity to the virus to build up, and no vaccine is 100% effective. Plus, scientists don't yet know if the vaccine stops viral spread. Here's what's known so far.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 04, 2021

To 'Keep Sharp' This Year, Keep Learning, Advises Neurosurgeon Sanjay Gupta
CNN's chief medical correspondent says it's never too late to develop new brain pathways. Even small changes, like switching up the hand you use to hold your fork, can help optimize brain health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 04, 2021

What Drove The Drop In Kids' Asthma ER Visits At A Boston Hospital During Lockdown?
Boston Children's Hospital saw a precipitous drop in cases during the spring shutdown, and the trend continues. Researchers are asking why — and what it would take to keep up the change post-pandemic.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 29, 2020

C.V. Vishveshwara's Revolutionary Black Hole Research Turns 50
Before scientists were even sure black holes existed, an Indian astrophysicist did the math behind Einstein's predictions of what would happen if two black holes collided.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 29, 2020

How To Make A New Year's Resolution
A new study looks at ways to make New Year's resolutions succeed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 28, 2020

Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission
Due to the coronavirus pandemic, scientists this year made significant progress in understanding how respiratory viruses can be transmitted from one person to another through the air.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 26, 2020

Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older
Ice is usually emphemeral; it doesn't last that long before melting. But some ice on our planet has stayed frozen for millions of years, according to scientists are on a quest to find the oldest ice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 26, 2020

For Scientists Who Study Virus Transmission, 2020 Was A Watershed Year
The emergence of COVID-19 started scientists on a year-long, crash course to learn how this virus might travel through the air and how to stop it. They learned a lot, and quickly.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2020

WATCH: Octopuses Punch Fish, Sometimes For No Apparent Reason
Researchers discovered that an octopus might punch a fish when both are hunting. Although some of the thrown punches can be explained, others remain a mystery.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2020

'Trusted Messengers, Trusted Messages': How To Overcome Vaccine Hesitancy
As the first COVID-19 vaccines begin to be rolled out across the U.S., community leaders in diverse groups already are working hard to dispel misinformation and reach skeptics with truth.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 22, 2020

How To Be An Elite Athlete, According To The Data
A new book digs into the social science of athletic greatness and reveals patterns leading to glory.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 18, 2020

I Felt Fine, But Tested Positive For The Coronavirus. What's That Really Mean?
Science writer Robin Marantz Henig has written about dangerous emerging pathogens for 30 years. But none of what she learned could shed light on her own confusing encounter with this virus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 17, 2020

Without Resources, Vaccine Rollout Could 'Fall At The Last Hurdle,' Journalist Warns
Atlantic writer Ed Yong says the COVID vaccination program will be the most complicated the U.S. has ever attempted: "It's going to be a slow process, and there are a lot of possible roadblocks."

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 16, 2020

What Impact Can Having An Older Sister Have On A Child's Development?
A new study suggests kids in poor countries benefit hugely from having older sisters — who are more likely than brothers or even mothers — to engage in stimulating play.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 16, 2020

Distant Cousins Of Food Crops Deserve Respect And Protection
Scientists are calling for efforts to protect hundreds of wild plants in the United States that are related to native foods such as cranberries and chili peppers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 15, 2020

1st Patients To Get CRISPR Gene-Editing Treatment Continue To Thrive
As the first patient to receive an experimental treatment that relied on the gene-editing technique CRISPR continues to do well 17 months later, more patients seem to be benefiting, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2020

What You Need To Know As The First COVID-19 Vaccine Heads Your Way
Within hours, U.S. states are expected have in hand their first shipments of Pfizer's newly FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccine. It marks a new phase in the pandemic, but what's that mean for you?

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2020

What You Need To Know As The First COVID-19 Vaccines Head Your Way
States are starting to administer their first doses of two newly FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccines. It marks a new phase in the pandemic, but what's that mean for you?

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 09, 2020

Researchers On Why Dogs Learn Only A Limited Number Of Words
Dogs are good at learning new words. But researchers say dogs don't understand small sound differences in words such as "dog" or "dig." It may explain why most don't learn a large number of words.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 09, 2020

Progress Toward A Safer Psychedelic Drug To Treat Depression And Addiction
A synthetic version of the psychedelic drug ibogaine appears to relieve depression and addiction without producing hallucinations or other dangerous side effects — at least in rodents.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 08, 2020

What Is Your Time Worth?
A new study did experiments on millions of Lyft riders to figure out how much they value time. They found time is worth more money than previously thought.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2020

Immune Response In Animals Good News For COVID-19 Vaccine Development
Researchers found that a class of antibodies in a monkey's blood provides protection from COVID-19. If that hold true for humans, a blood test may predict whether a vaccine candidate is working.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 02, 2020

'We Don't Have To Live This Way': Doctors Call For Climate Action
Heat waves, air pollution and extreme weather are making people sick and, increasingly, killing people. A key report by global physicians says fossil fuels are to blame.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 02, 2020

Social Distancing Plummeted In Lead Up To Fall Surge, Survey Finds
Social distancing fell dramatically between spring and fall and the gap between Democrats and Republicans widened. But both ends of the political spectrum agree on some measures to fight COVID-19.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 02, 2020

Social Distancing Plummeted In Lead-Up To Fall Surge, Survey Finds
Social distancing fell dramatically between spring and fall and the gap between Democrats and Republicans widened. But both ends of the political spectrum agree on some measures to fight COVID-19.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 02, 2020

Adding Red Seaweed To Cow Feed Could Cut Bovine Flatulance
Seaweed can potentially help fight climate change. Research shows that a specific type of seaweed can cut cows' methane production by up to 98%.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 02, 2020

Adding Red Seaweed To Cow Feed Could Cut Bovine Flatulence
Seaweed can potentially help fight climate change. Research shows that a specific type of seaweed can cut cows' methane production by up to 98%.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 30, 2020

More Good News For Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate
Biotech company Moderna has new data reinforcing that its COVID-19 inoculation is safe and effective. The company is submitting an application to the FDA Monday requesting emergency use authorization.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 30, 2020

Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Gets More Good News
The biotech company has new data reinforcing that its COVID-19 inoculation is safe and effective. Moderna is submitting an application to the FDA requesting emergency use authorization.

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