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NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 23, 2020

FDA Approves First Drug For A Rapid Aging Disorder In Children
A newly approved drug can extend the lives of children with progeria, a rare disorder that causes rapid aging. The drug is the result of one family's effort to help a child with the fatal condition.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 23, 2020

Mask Mandates Work To Slow Spread Of Coronavirus, Kansas Study Finds
When the state of Kansas issued a mask mandate, 81 counties opted out. Researchers found coronavirus infection rates rose sharply in the opt-out counties, while falling in those that required masks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 22, 2020

Pandemic Pet Therapy: What's So Special About A Critter Friend?
"Relationships with animals are simple," notes one researcher. In a year when life feels fraught, pets have been healers, helping human companions get exercise, quell anxiety and make new friends.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 21, 2020

A Look At COVID-19 Vaccine Development Progress
The race to develop COVID-19 vaccines is moving swiftly, both nationally and internationally. But challenges remain when it comes to distributing vaccines around the world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 20, 2020

Why Does A Virus Cause Problems In One Region But Not Another? A Study Offers Insight
In 2015, the mosquito-borne virus Zika exploded in South America. Health experts predicted it would erupt in Africa. But a major outbreak never happened. Now scientists think they understand why.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 20, 2020

Why Does COVID-19 Seem To Spare Africa? Zika May Have The Answers
In 2015, the mosquito-borne virus Zika exploded in South America. Health experts predicted it would erupt in Africa. But a major outbreak never happened. Now scientists think they understand why.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 18, 2020

Scientists Discover Outer Space Isn't Pitch Black After All
Scientists have used a NASA probe way out in space, beyond Pluto, to measure visible light that's not connected to any known source like stars or galaxies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 18, 2020

Scientists Discover Outer Space Isn't Pitch-Black After All
Scientists have used a NASA probe way out in space, beyond Pluto, to measure visible light that's not connected to any known source such as stars or galaxies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 17, 2020

Deep Sleep Protects Against Alzheimer's, Growing Evidence Shows
People who get more deep sleep appear less likely to develop Alzheimer's. That may be because this phase of sleep allows the brain clears out waste products.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 16, 2020

Scientists Discover A Link Between Lack Of Deep Sleep And Alzheimer's Disease
There's growing evidence that a lack of deep sleep increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Scientists say that's because during deep sleep, the brain removes toxins associated with Alzheimer's.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 12, 2020

Cicadas Might Help Humans Discover New Hydrophobic Materials
Cicadas can stay totally dry in the pouring rain. One researcher is trying to figure out how they do that. This finding may lead to interesting new materials for humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 11, 2020

From Stinky Cheese To Cat Pee, Author Takes A 'Nose Dive' Into The Science Of Smell
Harold McGee talks about how our sense of smell affects taste, why things smell the way they do and the ways different chemicals combine to create surprising (and sometimes distasteful) odors.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2020

Operation Warp Speed's Logistics Chief Weighs In On Vaccine Progress
Gen. Gustave Perna says as soon as the FDA deems a vaccine safe and effective, his team is ready to coordinate deployment of tens of millions of doses as early as next month.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 05, 2020

First COVID-19 Vaccine Doses To Go To Health Workers, Say CDC Advisers
A team of independent advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a science-based outline for deploying a vaccine when it's ready. The goal is to stop deaths and viral spread fast.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 05, 2020

Clots, Strokes And Rashes. Is COVID-19 A Disease Of The Blood Vessels?
COVID-19 can cause symptoms that go well beyond the lungs, from strokes to organ failure. To explain these widespread injuries, researchers are studying how the virus affects the vascular system.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 31, 2020

How Humans Domesticated Themselves
Duke anthropologist Brian Hare argues that humans evolved in a way that left us more cooperative and friendlier than our now extinct human cousins, like Neanderthals and Denisovans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 30, 2020

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out
In advance of a COVID-19 vaccine being available, a group of independent medical advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention weighed Friday who should get the vaccine first and how.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 29, 2020

Why Some Memories Seem Like Movies: 'Time Cells' Discovered In Human Brains
Scientists have identified special cells in the human brain that organize movie-like memories, helping us to relive important experiences and events.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 29, 2020

As Biotech Crops Lose Their Power, Scientists Push For New Restrictions
Some of the first GMOs - corn and cotton plants that have been genetically modified to fend off insects - are running into problems. Bugs have become resistant to them because they've been overused.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 28, 2020

Scientists Find Cells In The Human Brain Responsible For Episodic Memory
Many memories are like short movies. People relive experiences such as arriving for the first day of school or falling off a bike. Scientists have shown how the brain organizes these episodes.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 27, 2020

Mask-Wearing Is Up In The U.S., But Young People Are Still Too Lax, CDC Survey Finds
A general increase in mask-wearing has been encouraging, U.S. public health experts say. But too few young people, especially, are social distancing and taking other steps to slow coronavirus' spread.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 26, 2020

They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That May Spread The Virus
Most nursing homes are connected by shared staff to seven others. Instead of limiting workers to one facility to curb COVID-19 spread, advocates urge better pay and more PPE for nursing home staff.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 26, 2020

They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That Spreads The Virus
Most nursing homes are connected by shared staff to seven others. Instead of limiting workers to one facility to curb COVID-19 spread, advocates urge better pay and more PPE for nursing home staff.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 26, 2020

Water On The Moon: NASA Confirms Water Molecules On Our Neighbor's Sunny Surface
The breakthrough suggests that water, vital to life on Earth, could be distributed across more parts of the lunar surface than the ice that has previously been found in cold and dark places.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 20, 2020

A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously Despite The Pandemic
Researchers launched a major study of an experimental Alzheimer's drug this summer. They also learned a lot about how to protect participants who must make frequent visits to a medical center.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 20, 2020

A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously, Despite The Pandemic
Researchers launched a major study of an experimental Alzheimer's drug this summer. They also learned a lot about how to protect participants who must make frequent visits to a medical center.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 19, 2020

If This NASA Spacecraft Can Avoid 'Mount Doom,' It Might Nab A Bit of Asteroid
NASA is getting ready to collect its first sample from an asteroid ever. The rocks and dust could help us understand potentially dangerous space rocks and the history of the solar system.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 19, 2020

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid
NASA has collected and is returning its first sample from an asteroid. The rocks and dust could help us understand potentially dangerous space rocks and the history of the solar system.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 17, 2020

Helping Hands Need A Break, Too: How To Lend Support Without Burning Out
These days, there are hundreds of reasons to open your heart to others, but it's easy to get exhausted. Try these tips honed by social workers for staying healthy and empathetic.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 16, 2020

Jim Hudspeth: How Do We Hear — And How Do We Lose Our Ability To Hear?
Over 30 million people in the U.S. have hearing loss. Neuroscientist Jim Hudspeth explains how the ear's thousands of hair cells function to amplify sound—and how they can be damaged but not repaired.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 15, 2020

Is The Risk Of Sea Level Rise Affecting Florida Home Prices? A New Study Says Yes
Research published this week finds that home sales volume and prices have declined in coastal census tracts vulnerable to sea level rise, relative to coastal areas less threatened by climate change.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 15, 2020

Tobacco Plants Contribute Key Ingredient For COVID-19 Vaccine
Here's irony: tobacco plants may be key in preventing COVID-19. Two companies are using the plants to produce proteins for a vaccine. One candidate vaccine is already in a clinical trial.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 15, 2020

A Disturbing Twinkie That Has, So Far, Defied Science
A Twinkie stored in a basement for eight years has been transformed by fungi, giving scientists something unusual to ponder and probe.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 14, 2020

Water Or A Sports Drink? These Brain Cells May Decide Which One We Crave
Scientists have identified specialized brain cells that create two distinct kinds of thirst. Some cells respond to a need for water alone, while others produce a craving for water and salt.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 13, 2020

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow
Mountains on Pluto look strikingly similar to white-capped peaks on Earth, but these cold, alien mountains got whitened in a completely different way.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 09, 2020

The Sound of Laughter Can Be Key In Determining People's Relationships
A new study showed that laughter is a better indicator in determining friendships than even speech. Volunteers were able to pinpoint groups of friends versus strangers by listening to their laughter.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 06, 2020

Scientists Find Proof Early Humans Could Control Fire Temperature In Tempering Tools
Early humans may have controlled fire temperature in tempering their stone tools, according to an analysis of 300,000-year-old artifacts found in a cave in Israel.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2020

Americans Are Drinking 14% More Often During Pandemic, Study Finds
The study compared drinking habits of adults age 30-80 with their habits a year earlier. The study found the increase is most pronounced among women, for whom days with heavy drinking spiked by 41%.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2020

Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine Awarded To Discoverers Of Hepatitis C Virus
Three scientists, Harvey Alter, Michael Houghton and Charles Rice, who all did their research in the United States, received the prize for discovering the Hepatitis C virus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2020

3 Scientists Win Nobel Prize For Hepatitis C Virus Discovery
The scientists' work led to a test to protect blood transfusion recipients from hepatitis C and drugs to treat the infection that have saved millions of lives, according to the Nobel Assembly.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 01, 2020

A Study In India Shows That Children Play Major Role In Coronavirus Transmission
A massive study of coronavirus cases in India found that a significant number of virus transmissions originate from and happen between children.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 29, 2020

When Young People Get COVID-19, Infections Soon Rise Among Older Adults
As college campuses grapple with outbreaks of coronavirus infections, research from the CDC suggests young adults are driving infection rates, putting older, more vulnerable people at risk.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 29, 2020

Evictions Damage Public Health, Which Is Why The CDC Has Banned Them ? For Now
A survey of 17 cities found more than 50,000 pandemic-related eviction filings. Housing advocates worry that increased housing instability will lead to more COVID-19 and other illnesses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 29, 2020

Evictions Damage Public Health. The CDC Aims To Curb Them ? For Now
A survey of 17 cities found more than 50,000 pandemic-related eviction filings. Housing advocates worry that increased housing instability will lead to more COVID-19 and other illnesses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 27, 2020

Paradox-Free Time Travel Is Theoretically Possible, Researchers Say
In the peer-reviewed journal article, University of Queensland physicists say time is essentially self-healing. Changes in the past wouldn't necessarily cause a universe-ending paradox. Phew.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2020

Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It
People of African ancestry have been excluded from many studies of brain disorders. In Baltimore, scientists, doctors and community leaders are working to make neuroscience research more diverse.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2020

A Neuroscience Project Pushes To Include More African Americans In Brain Research
People of African ancestry have been excluded from many studies of brain disorders. In Baltimore, scientists, doctors and community leaders are working to make neuroscience research more diverse.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 23, 2020

Why Tens Of Thousands Of People Are Key To Testing A COVID-19 Vaccine
Volunteers getting the shot help determine if a candidate vaccine works. But what with social distancing and masks, scientists must discern if it's the shot or these other measures preventing illness.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 21, 2020

CDC Publishes — Then Withdraws — Guidance On Aerosol Spread Of Coronavirus
The CDC says the guidelines were posted to its website in error. The now-deleted updates were notable because so far the agency has stopped short of saying that the virus is airborne.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2020

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19
One thing that has improved a lot over the course of the pandemic is treatment of seriously ill COVID-19 patients in intensive care units. Here's one man's success story.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2020

Scientists Discover 120,000-Year-Old Human Footprints In Saudi Arabia
Scientists discovered 120,000-year-old human footprints in Saudi Arabia along with those of horses and elephants — hinting the region was once more hospitable to people moving out of Africa.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2020

Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine
Researchers were able to mimic the mind-altering effects of the drug ketamine by inducing a particular rhythm in one area of the brain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2020

Scientists Discover Way To Induce Altered State Of Mind Without Drugs
The drug ketamine can cause an out-of-body experience. Scientists have been able to induce this altered state in a person without drugs. The ability to control dissociation could help many patients.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2020

Latinos Report Financial Strain As Pandemic Erodes Income And Savings
An NPR poll finds 72% of Latino households in the United States are facing serious financial problems — double the share of whites who report this. Major health problems are mounting, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2020

The Majority Of Children Who Die From COVID-19 Are Children Of Color
According to data reported to the CDC, 121 children died from COVID-19 between February and July of this year. And 78% of the children who died were Hispanic, Black or Native American.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 14, 2020

Why Nobody Feels Rich: The Psychology Of Inequality
If you've ever flown in economy class on a plane, you probably had to walk through the first class cabin to get to your seat. Maybe you noticed the extra leg room. The freshly-poured champagne. Maybe you were annoyed, or envious. Social psychologist Keith Payne says we tend to compare ourselves with those who have more than us, but rarely with those who have less. This week, we revisit our 2019 episode on the psychology of income inequality, and how perceptions of our own wealth shape our lives.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 14, 2020

A Possible Sign Of Life Right Next Door To Earth, On Venus
Scientists have found a gas associated with living organisms in a region of Venus' atmosphere. They can't figure out how it got there if it didn't come from life.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 12, 2020

AstraZeneca Resumes Its COVID-19 Vaccine Trials In The U.K.
The company had placed its worldwide vaccine trials on hold for several days. It now says a safety review by regulators and reviewers is complete. No word on when studies in the U.S. might resume.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 12, 2020

A COVID-19 Vaccine May Be Only 50% Effective. Is That Good Enough?
As scientists race to develop a vaccine that proves "safe and effective," that doesn't mean it will prevent infection in everyone who gets it. Though it might eventually stop the pandemic. Here's how.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2020

Climate Change May Wipe Out Large Mangrove Forests, New Research Suggests
Mangroves help protect coastal areas from flooding and sequester more carbon than tropical forests. But new studies suggest they may be wiped out by the rise of sea levels.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2020

Researchers Discover A Form Of 'Culture' Among Bonobos
Primatologists observed that different groups of bonobos have different dietary preferences — indicating a form of "culture" among the animals.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2020

As COVID-19 Vaccine Trials Move At Warp Speed, Recruiting Black Volunteers Takes Time
Some pharmaceutical companies are well into the final phase of clinical trials for a coronavirus vaccine. But efforts to recruit patients from minority groups are just beginning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2020

Pandemic Financially Imperils Nearly Half of American Households, Poll Finds
There are dividing lines when it comes to how families are weathering the pandemic: Those living in big cities, those making less than $100,000 a year, and Latino and Black families are faring worst.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2020

'I Try So Hard Not To Cry': Half Of All U.S. Households In Serious Financial Trouble
There are dividing lines when it comes to how families are weathering the pandemic: Those living in big cities, those making less than $100,000 a year, and Latino and Black families are faring worst.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2020

'I Try So Hard Not To Cry': Nearly Half Of U.S. Households Face A Financial Crisis
There are dividing lines when it comes to how families are weathering the pandemic: Those living in big cities, those making less than $100,000 a year, and Latino and Black families are faring worst.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Paused, Due To Illness In One Volunteer
A large study of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been put on hold after one of the volunteers became ill.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Paused Due To Illness In One Volunteer
A large study of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been put on hold after one of the volunteers became ill.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Paused Due To Illness In Volunteer
AstraZeneca, which is working with the University of Oxford, hasn't said what the illness is. It will try to determine whether the illness is related to the vaccine, or just a chance event.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

California Scientists Build A Camera To Take Pictures Of Huge Swath Of Sky
Scientists and engineers in California are building a unique 3.2 billion pixel camera for a telescope under construction in Chile. The camera has taken its first test pictures — of broccoli.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

Drug That Bulked Up Mice In Space Might Someday Help Astronauts Make Long Voyages
An experiment involving some "mighty mice" on the International Space Station could someday help astronauts maintain muscle and bone strength on interplanetary journeys.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

Eating Disorders Thrive In Anxious Times, And Pose A Lethal Threat
Eating disorders strike nearly 1 in 10 Americans, with the second-highest death rate of all psychiatric disorders. The pandemic's food insecurity, stockpiling and stress are triggering flare-ups.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2020

Researchers Find A Drug That Could Allow Astronauts Spend Years In Space
An experimental drug let mice spend a month in the International Space Station's near-zero gravity without losing mass. It could help people spend years in space without major health consequences.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2020

The Hubble Space Telescope Still Works Great—Except When It Doesn't
None of us are perfect, and sometimes the Hubble Space Telescope just flat-out points to the wrong spot in the sky. This has been happening more than ever in the last couple years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2020

The Hubble Space Telescope Still Works Great — Except When It Doesn't
None of us is perfect, and sometimes the Hubble Space Telescope just flat-out points to the wrong spot in the sky. This has been happening more than ever in the last couple of years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2020

Researchers Say Fresh Air Can Prevent Aerosol Transmission Of The Coronavirus
There's increasing evidence that the coronavirus can linger and spread through the air in crowded indoor rooms. Researchers say infectious clouds can be dispersed with fresh air.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 05, 2020

Young Voter Engagement In This Year's Election
NPR's Michel Martin explores how young voters may impact November's election with researcher Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 03, 2020

Flu Season Looms And Scientists Wonder How Flu And COVID-19 Might Mix
There's a lot scientists don't know about how viral infections can interact. But researchers are eager to figure out how COVID-19 infections might affect flu infections and vice versa.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 03, 2020

Study: How The Power Of Facebook And Google Affects Local Communities
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Pat Garofalo of the American Economic Liberties Project, about the progressive group's study indicating Facebook and Google are harming local journalism.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2020

Inexpensive Steroids Can Save Lives Of Seriously Ill COVID-19 Patients
Multiple studies now confirm earlier research: Dexamethasone and hydrocortisone, drugs that reduce an immune system's overreaction, can help reduce deaths of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2020

Drug Combination Slows Progression Of ALS And Could Mark 'New Era' In Treatment
Scientists say new drugs are on the way for patients with ALS. The latest is a two-drug combo that appears to slow the progression of the fatal nerve disease with a modest but meaningful benefit.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2020

Pandemic's Emotional Hammer Hits Hard
Mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have been profound, researchers find. Nearly 25% of Americans are depressed, particularly those who have low incomes and have lost a job or a loved one.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2020

Making Gyms Safer: Why The Virus Is Less Likely To Spread There Than In A Bar
Gyms are reopening with fewer people and more protocols, and they want to rehabilitate their pandemic-battered image. Although there's not much evidence, they say the science is on their side.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 31, 2020

Bats Use Baby Talk To Teach Their Pups, Researchers Say
Researchers say mother bats use baby talk to communicate with their pups. Experts say that it helps bats learn the language.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 29, 2020

Scientists Explore Why Some People Are Able To Live With An Infection Unscathed
What if your body could corral an infection instead of eliminating it? Immunologists who see this sort of "disease tolerance" in plants wonder what role it might play in asymptomatic human infections.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 28, 2020

What A Nasal Spray Vaccine Against COVID-19 Might Do Even Better Than A Shot
A vaccine against the coronavirus needs to keep people from getting very sick and dying. But preventing the spread of the disease is also important, and vaccines delivered by nasal spray may do that.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2020

Where Did Earth's Water Come From?
Scientists have long debated whether the Earth's water was here when the planet formed or whether it arrived later. A study suggests much of the water originated in rocks from which Earth is built.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2020

Water, Water, Every Where — And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From
Some unusual meteorites suggest that Earth got its water at its start, rather than forming dry and being watered by comets later on.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2020

Water, Water, Every Where—And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From
Some unusual meteorites suggest that Earth got its water at its start, rather than forming dry and being watered by comets later on.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2020

'Racial Inequality May Be As Deadly As COVID-19,' Analysis Finds
A century of U.S. statistics finds mortality rates and life expectancy were much worse for Black Americans during pre-pandemic years than they have been for white people during the COVID-19 crisis.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 25, 2020

FDA's Hahn Apologizes For Overselling Plasma's Benefits As A COVID-19 Treatment
The Food and Drug Administration's chief said Sunday the therapy reduces deaths among COVID-19 patients by 35%. On Monday he apologized, acknowledging that statistic greatly exaggerates any benefit.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 24, 2020

German Experiment Tests How The Coronavirus Spreads At A Concert
Researchers hope it can provide insight as to how COVID-19 spreads in large stadiums — and how to prevent it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 24, 2020

Another COVID-19 Medical Mystery: Patients Come Off Ventilator But Linger In A Coma
Doctors are researching why some patients remain unconscious for days or weeks, even after sedating drugs are withdrawn. They also worry that these patients aren't being given time to recover.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 24, 2020

Another COVID-19 Medical Mystery: Patients Come Off Ventilator, But Linger In A Coma
Doctors are researching why some patients remain unconscious for days or weeks, even after sedating drugs are withdrawn. They also worry that these patients aren't being given time to recover.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2020

Fallen Boulder Reveals 313 Million-Year-Old Fossil Footprints At Grand Canyon
The side-by-side tracks of two ancient animals have been called "by far the oldest vertebrate tracks in Grand Canyon."

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2020

Why Coronavirus Superspreading Events Happen
The coronavirus appears to transmit unevenly: A few people can infect many, while others don't pass the virus on at all. Researchers are working to understand the factors that drive superspreading.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 20, 2020

Why Do Zebras Have Stripes?
The stripes on zebras have been found to repel flies. But now researchers have found a black-and-white checkered pattern will, too — making them question the optical effect behind the phenomenon.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 18, 2020

The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White
New research suggests that penguins' ancestors originated not in frozen Antarctica but, instead, off the coasts of Australia and New Zealand, adapting to new climes over 22 million years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 18, 2020

How Bars Are Fueling COVID-19 Outbreaks
To owners of bars and nightclubs, pandemic restrictions on the industry can feel punitive. But there are important differences, virus hunters say, between a bar and a restaurant that serves alcohol.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 17, 2020

CDC Study Finds Hispanics Hit Disproportionately Hard By Workplace Outbreaks
A study out Monday found that Hispanic and nonwhite workers made up 73% of cases associated with workplace outbreaks in certain industries, despite representing 24% of the workforce in those sectors.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 13, 2020

Yale Researchers Seek FDA Approval For Coronavirus Saliva Test
Researchers at Yale University are seeking emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for a coronavirus saliva test. This streamlined test can offer results faster and easier.

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