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NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 22, 2019

Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm
NPR got exclusive access to the only lab known to be trying to edit the DNA in human sperm, which raises all the same thorny issues as modifying genes in human embryos

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2019

Naked And Unafraid: 6 Wild Facts About Naked Mole Rats
Picture a hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato — kinda cool, kinda weird. They also are extraordinarily long-lived. Researchers are lining up to study their secrets.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2019

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People
A detailed comparison of mouse and human brain tissue found differences that could help explain why mice aren't always a good model for human diseases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 20, 2019

Cigarettes Can't Be Advertised On TV. Should Juul Ads Be Permitted?
Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 19, 2019

Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away
A recent study found virtual reality experiences were better at easing pain than watching televised nature scenes. Immersive distraction seems key to the success, scientists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 15, 2019

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail
No ordinary pair of shorts, these were designed by Harvard scientists to work with the wearer's own leg muscles when walking or running, and might make a soldier's heavy loads easier to carry.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 12, 2019

2 Experimental Ebola Drugs Saved Lives In Congo Outbreak
Drugs tested in the Democratic Republic of Congo are effective in treating Ebola, scientists say. They have run a study in the midst of a deadly epidemic and in the face of armed assaults on doctors.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 09, 2019

Scientists Find Out How Leaping Maggots Leap
The scientists captured the acrobatic jumps of a tiny maggot-like creature with high-speed cameras to figure out how it does this trick with no arms, legs, or wings.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 07, 2019

Scientists Discover Prehistoric Giant 'Squawkzilla' Parrot, As Big As Small Child
The flightless bird weighed 15 pounds and was about 3 feet tall and probably feasted on other parrots. Study lead Trevor Worthy made the discovery after examining two 19-million-year-old leg bones.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 06, 2019

New Evidence Shows Popular Pesticides Could Cause Unintended Harm To Insects
Studies are revealing new, unintended threats that neonicotinoid pesticides pose to insects. The chemicals, widely used by farmers, are difficult to control because they persist in the environment.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 05, 2019

Pain Rescue Team Helps Seriously Ill Kids Cope In Terrible Times
An interdisciplinary team in San Francisco uses acupressure, massage, counseling and other methods, as well as medicine, to help kids get relief from chronic pain. But such pediatric centers are rare.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2019

Sesame Allergies Are Likely More Widespread Than Previously Thought
New research suggests allergies to sesame are comparably prevalent as those to some tree nuts. The findings come as the FDA weighs whether to require sesame to be listed as an allergen on food labels.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2019

Trust In Science Is Rising, Poll Finds
The proportion of people who say they have a "great deal" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest increased from 21% in 2016 to 35% in 2019, according to the Pew Research Center.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2019

Poll Finds Trust In Science Is Rising
The proportion of people who say they have a "great deal" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest increased from 21% in 2016 to 35% in 2019, according to the Pew Research Center.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2019

Trust In Scientists Is Rising, Poll Finds
The proportion of people who say they have a "great deal" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest increased from 21% in 2016 to 35% in 2019, according to the Pew Research Center.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 01, 2019

Turtle Embryos May Play A Role In Whether They Become Male Or Female
In many turtle species, sex is determined by temperature in the egg. That makes turtles particularly vulnerable to climate change. But scientists say the animals may have a way to shield themselves.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2019

Kids See Bearded Men As Strong — But Unattractive, Study Finds
New research shows that young children have a negative reaction to beards, but that changes as they get older. Children with bearded fathers did feel more warmly toward facial hair.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2019

Irritating Compounds Discovered In 'Vape Juice'
Research chemists who analyzed a number of flavored e-liquids found that some ingredients combine on the shelf to create "acetals" — compounds likely to irritate or inflame airways when inhaled.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2019

Irritating Compounds Can Show Up In 'Vape Juice'
Research chemists who analyzed a number of flavored e-liquids found that some ingredients combine on the shelf to create "acetals" — compounds likely to irritate or inflame airways when inhaled.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 29, 2019

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder
Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss., has sickle cell disease. She is the first patient ever to be publicly identified as being involved in a study testing the use of CRISPR for a genetic disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 29, 2019

Sickle Cell Patient Reveals Why She Is Volunteering For Landmark Gene-Editing Study
Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss., hopes the gene-editing technique CRISPR will relieve her lifelong suffering caused by the genetic blood disorder that affects millions of people around the world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 26, 2019

Dialysis Firm Cancels $524,600.17 Medical Bill After Journalists Investigate
This week, NPR profiled a Montana man who was billed nearly half a million dollars for 14 weeks of dialysis, after being caught in a dispute between insurer and the dialysis provider. Now he owes $0.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 26, 2019

Birds Are Trying To Adapt To Climate Change — But Is It Too Little, Too Late?
By breeding and migrating earlier, some birds are adapting to climate change. But it's probably not happening fast enough for some species to survive, according to new research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Decisions, Decisions: Some We Struggle To Make, Other's We Can't Forget
This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, decision-making. We learn why we often stumble when trying to make ourselves happy, and why certain decisions leave us wondering "what if?"

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Decisions, Decisions: Some We Struggle To Make, Others We Can't Forget
This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, decision-making. We learn why we often stumble when trying to make ourselves happy, and why certain decisions leave us wondering "what if?"

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Economists Say Trump Administration Is Over-Paying Farmers For Trade Losses
The Trump administration has released details of a $16 billion plan to compensate farmers who've lost money as a result of the trade dispute with China. Some economists say it's too generous.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Economists Say Trump Administration Is Overpaying Farmers For Trade Losses
The Trump administration has released details of a $16 billion plan to compensate farmers who've lost money as a result of the trade dispute with China. Some economists say it's too generous.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

A Warm Bedtime Bath Can Help You Cool Down And Sleep Better
Research suggests a warm bath or shower an hour or two before bedtime can help you unwind and fall asleep faster. Why? It will help lower your core temperature, and that's a circadian sleep signal.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 25, 2019

Mistrust And Lack Of Genetic Diversity Slow Gains In Precision Medicine
Scientists hoping to get more diversity of ancestry among medical research volunteers need to grapple with the history of medical exploitation, says a Columbia University bioethicist.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 24, 2019

Improved Prosthetic Hand Gains A Lighter Touch And Easy Grip
There's still much research to be done before the device is routinely useful. But one man was able to use it to gently grasp his wife's hand and feel her touch — an emotional moment, he says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 24, 2019

Improved Prosthetic Hand Has A Lighter Touch And Easy Grip
There's still much research to be done before the device is routinely useful. But one man was able to use it to gently grasp his wife's hand and feel her touch — an emotional moment, he says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 24, 2019

Sharks Have Few Places To Hide From Fishing, Study Shows
Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. As a result, tens of millions of sharks in the open ocean end up caught either as food or bycatch.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 24, 2019

What Time Of Year Are People Likely To First Try Drugs? Summer, Survey Says
A study finds that summer is when people are more likely to try drugs for the first time. Previous studies showed that summers are also when more people use drugs, leading to more visits to the ER.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2019

If We All Ate Enough Fruits And Vegetables, There'd Be Big Shortages
There's already not enough produce for everyone in the world to get the daily recommended amount. Two new studies urge revamping the food system to feed the growing population and protect the planet.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2019

Future Of Key Farming Research Uncertain As 2/3 Of USDA Staff Say They Won't Move
The mandatory move imposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on most of the workers at two vital research agencies has been criticized as a "blatant attack on science."

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2019

Scientists Desert USDA As Agency Relocates To Kansas City Area
The mandatory move imposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on most of the workers at two vital research agencies has been criticized as a "blatant attack on science."

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 15, 2019

Hidden Brain: How People React To Election Interference By Foreign Countries
Robert Mueller will testify soon before Congress about the Russia probe. New research finds that Americans have partisan reactions to foreign interference in elections.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 12, 2019

Rippling Rainbow Map Shows How California Earthquakes Moved The Earth
NASA has mapped changes in the ground's position caused by the recent earthquakes — and it happens to be look like beautiful, psychedelic art.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 11, 2019

Cutting Just 300 Calories Per Day May Keep Your Heart Healthy
That's the equivalent of about six standard Oreos. But this modest reduction in calories could have protective benefits for our hearts, a new study finds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 11, 2019

Bet On The Bot: AI Beats The Professionals At 6-Player Texas Hold 'Em
Six-player Texas Hold 'em has been too tough for a machine to master — until now. A bot named Pluribus crushed some of the world's best poker players using brash and unorthodox strategies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 11, 2019

Could Mussels Teach Us How To Clean Up Oil Spills?
A review of "mussel-inspired chemistry" points to promising ways we can learn from mussels to clean up water.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2019

How Best To Snag And Destroy Bedbugs?
Vigilance and heat are currently your best weapons against bedbugs, exterminators say. But scientists are working on a way to give the bugs the hook with a strategy inspired by a Balkan folk remedy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2019

ICE Uses Facial Recognition To Go Through Driver's Licenses, Researchers Say
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Jake Laperruque of the Project on Government Oversight about word that FBI and ICE agents used driver's license databases to scan millions of faces without consent.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2019

Hand Dryers Harm Children's Hearing, Canadian Study Shows
Research finds many hand dryers operate at noise levels that are harmful to children. Nora Keegan is the 13-year-old student who did the study in the Canadian journal: Pediatrics and Child Health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2019

13-Year-Old Scientist's Research Shows Hand Dryers Can Hurt Kids' Ears
Research finds many hand dryers operate at noise levels that are harmful to children. Nora Keegan is the 13-year-old student who did the study in the Canadian journal Paediatrics & Child Health.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 04, 2019

New Markers For Alzheimer's Disease Could Aid Diagnosis And Speed Up Drug Development
Researchers are using brain scans, blood and spinal fluid to detect early signs of Alzheimer's disease. These "biomarkers" may also offer a quicker way to test new Alzheimer's drugs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 02, 2019

California's 1st Surgeon General Spotlights Health Risks Of Childhood Adversity
Dr. Nadine Burke Harris has spent much of her career alerting the medical community to health damage that adverse childhood experiences can wreak. Now she aims to protect and heal California's kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 02, 2019

California's First Surgeon General Spotlights Health Risks Of Childhood Adversity
Dr. Nadine Burke Harris has spent much of her career alerting the medical community to health damage that adverse childhood experiences can wreak. Now she aims to protect and heal California's kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 01, 2019

Fair Trade Helps Farmers, But Not Their Hired Workers
According to a new study of cocoa-producing cooperatives, Fair Trade certification boosts the income of small farmers, but those benefits aren't shared with their hired workers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 01, 2019

Scientists Make Model Embryos From Stem Cells To Study Key Steps In Human Development
Researchers hope these so-called embryoids could provide crucial new insights into how to treat infertility, prevent miscarriages and birth defects and many diseases. But they stir ethical concerns.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 01, 2019

There's More Evidence That Too Much Sitting Can Be Very Unhealthy
A study from Columbia University finds that sitting for long periods in front of the television is more dangerous than sitting at work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 28, 2019

How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing
In many states, convicted criminals are being housed in private prisons. New research finds that when a private prison opens, the length of criminal sentences modestly increases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 28, 2019

Hidden Brain: How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing
In many states, convicted criminals are being housed in private prisons. New research finds that when a private prison opens, the length of criminal sentences modestly increases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 27, 2019

Veggie Surprise: Teeth Of Ancient Crocs Reveal Some Likely Ate Plants
What do you imagine an ancient croc snacking on? Maybe a fish or a bird? For some relatives of modern crocodiles, a safer guess would be a big bunch of flowers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 27, 2019

Veggie Surprise: Teeth Of Ancient Crocs Reveal That Some Very Likely Ate Plants
What do you imagine an ancient croc snacking on? Maybe a fish or a bird? For some relatives of modern crocodiles, a safer guess would be a big bunch of flowers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 23, 2019

A New Hope: Seal Learns To Sing Star Wars Theme
Researchers say teaching seals to copy melodies might help inform speech therapy for humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 23, 2019

Breaking The Booze Habit, Even Briefly, Has Its Benefits
Tens of thousands of Instagram followers can't be wrong: Curiosity about the sober life is trending. Scientists say cutting out alcohol can improve your sleep and blood pressure, and help your liver.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 21, 2019

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies
A Moscow scientist claims he has a safe way of editing genes in human embryos — a method that could protect resulting babies from being infected with HIV. Approval of the experiment seems unlikely.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 20, 2019

New Report Says College-Educated Women Will Soon Make up Majority of U.S. Labor Force
This year U.S. women who graduated from college will likely make up a majority of adults with degrees in the labor force. The increase could signal greater earning potential for women in the future.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 20, 2019

New Report Says Women Will Soon Be Majority Of College-Educated U.S. Workers
This year U.S. women who graduated from college will likely make up a majority of adults with degrees in the labor force. The increase could signal greater earning potential for women in the future.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 20, 2019

What Dropping 17,000 Wallets Around The Globe Can Teach Us About Honesty
Scientists used "lost" wallets to test whether people are more likely to be dishonest when they might profit. The results were puzzling — so they put more money in the wallets.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2019

There's More To Look Forward To After Peaking Professionally
Social scientist Arthur Brooks set out to figure out how life after 50 can be more professionally fulfilling. His advice? "Stop being an innovator and start being an instructor."

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 19, 2019

I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers
Scientists are using old spy satellite images to measure the effects of climate change. They're finding that glaciers in the Himalayas are melting twice as fast as they were a few decades earlier.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 18, 2019

Boaty McBoatface, Internet-Adored Sub, Makes Deep-Sea Discovery On Climate Change
Since the delightful snafu that led to the research vessel's goofy moniker, the autonomous submarine has been off gathering deep-sea data on the effects of Antarctic winds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 18, 2019

Scientists Explain Puppy Dog Eyes
You know that feeling you get when a dog looks into your face and either looks really sad or kind of confused? Scientists say they've figured out why they do that, and why it makes us melt.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2019

A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Can Help
Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in the book, Elderhood.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2019

A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Help Seniors Thrive
Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in her book Elderhood.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 15, 2019

Pass The Brazier: Early Evidence Of Cannabis Smoking Found On Chinese Artifacts
Humans have been smoking pot to get high since the first millennium B.C. Archaeologists have found early evidence of cannabis use from wooden bowls exhumed from ancient tombs in western China.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2019

How Almonds Went From Deadly To Delicious
In a new study, researchers pinpoint the genetic mutation that transformed almonds from toxic and bitter to tasty and sweet.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2019

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Improve The Life Expectancy Of Black Men
Black men have the lowest life expectancy of any major demographic group in the U.S. Researchers say the solution appears to be pairing black men with black physicians.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2019

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Improve Black Men's Life Expectancy
Black men have the lowest life expectancy of any major demographic group in the U.S. Researchers say the solution appears to be pairing black men with black physicians.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 12, 2019

The Swap: Less Processed Meat, More Plant-Based Foods May Boost Longevity
A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who ate less.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2019

To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over
Scientists often share their latest research on posters displayed at big conferences. Posters are a long-standing tradition, but one reformer says they're mostly terrible and need to change.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 10, 2019

We Drink Basically The Same Wine As Ancient Romans — And That's Not So Great
Many of today's most popular wine varieties are extremely genetically similar to wines that may have existed for thousands of years, a new study finds. In the face of climate change, that's risky.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 10, 2019

We Drink Basically The Same Wine Varietals As Ancient Romans, And That's Not So Great
Many of today's most popular wine varietals are extremely genetically similar to wines that may have existed for thousands of years, a new study finds. In the face of climate change, that's risky.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 10, 2019

Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?
Changing how the mind reacts to pain can reduce the discomfort experienced, according to scientists who study brain pathways that regulate pain. A new type of therapy aims to enhance that effect.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2019

Accumulated Mutations Create A Cellular Mosaic In Our Bodies
It turns out you aren't simply a clone of cells from the womb. Over a lifetime, mutations create a patchwork of tissues made with pieces that have subtly different genetic signatures.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2019

Microplastics Have Invaded The Deep Ocean — And The Food Chain
Giant gyres of plastic in the ocean grab headlines, but it's the tiny bits of plastic that scare scientists. And they've made their way everywhere, a new study finds - including our seafood.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2019

You May Be Stressing Out Your Dog
When people who own dogs are stressed, their dogs also get stressed, a new study suggests. It's another indication of how emotionally synchronized dogs and their humans can be.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 05, 2019

Trump Administration Bars Federal Research Involving Human Fetal Tissue
At the the National Institutes of Health, "research that requires new acquisition of fetal tissue from elective abortions will not be conducted," the Department of Health and Human Services says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 05, 2019

Trump Administration Restricts Federal Research Involving Human Fetal Tissue
National Institutes of Health research "that requires new acquisition of fetal tissue from elective abortions will not be conducted," the Department of Health and Human Services says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 04, 2019

House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies
A congressional committee has upheld a prohibition against the Food and Drug Administration considering using gene-edited embryos to establish pregnancies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 04, 2019

House Committee Votes To Continue Research Ban On Genetically Modified Babies
A congressional committee has upheld a prohibition against the Food and Drug Administration considering research into gene-edited embryos that could be used to establish pregnancies.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2019

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death
Analysis of DNA from more than 400,000 people in the UK suggests a genetic modification that protects against HIV may actually increase the overall risk of premature death.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2019

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats
Move over, fruit flies, rats and zebrafish. Squid and octopuses have elaborate brains and behaviors, and scientists say studying them in the laboratory could yield important biological insights.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 31, 2019

As CBD Oils Become More Popular, The FDA Considers Whether To Set New Rules
The marijuana extract is touted as a way to ease anxiety and inflammation despite limited science, and the industry has grown quickly. Now, the FDA is holding its first public hearing on CBD.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 30, 2019

Scientists Genetically Modify Fungus To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Malaria
The modified fungus produces spider toxin that rapidly kills mosquitoes, raising hopes for a new weapon to fight a disease that sickens millions. But not everyone is convinced.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 28, 2019

Why It's Time To Think About Self-Driving Cars In Regards To Parking
Self-driving cars may be great for those who don't want to own a car or get behind the wheel, but they promise to be a nightmare for parking enforcement.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 25, 2019

Why Corned Beef Sandwiches — And The Rest Of The Universe — Exist
Somehow, at the beginning of time, there was an imbalance of matter and antimatter. That's how all the stuff in the universe came about. Scientists think they may find an answer by studying neutrons.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2019

At $2.125 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever
The Food and Drug Administration approved a new gene therapy for a rare but devastating genetic disorder. The drugmaker says the cost is worth it because it's a one-time treatment that saves lives.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2019

At $2.1 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever
The Food and Drug Administration approved a new gene therapy for a rare but devastating genetic disorder. The drugmaker says the cost is worth it because it's a one-time treatment that saves lives.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 23, 2019

Since The 1960s, Researchers Track Perry Preschool Project Participants
For decades, researchers have followed the participants of a 1960's preschool program. They found a range of social and economic benefits, and not just for the participants in the program.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2019

Scientists Modify Viruses With CRISPR To Create New Weapon Against Superbugs
Superbugs are bacteria that can beat modern medicine's most powerful drugs. So doctors are racing to find new ways to fight back, such as developing "living antibiotics."

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2019

News Brief: Impeaching Trump, Iran Threat, CRISPR Modified Viruses
House Democrats meet to decide whether to move forward with impeaching the president. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are briefed on the threat Iran poses. And, the latest on genetically modified viruses.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2019

News Brief: Impeaching Trump, Iran Threat, CRSPR Modified Viruses
House Democrats meet to decide whether to move forward with impeaching the president. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are briefed on the threat Iran poses. And, the latest on genetically modified viruses.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2019

Computerized Model Reveals Details Of How Human Cells Divide
The nonprofit Allen Institute in Seattle has produced a visualization of human cell division that promises to be useful for professional scientists and curious amateurs alike.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 21, 2019

Can CBD Reduce Cravings And Stress In Opioid Users?
Researchers wanted to know if CBD can help people who are former opioid users resist relapse. Their double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial suggests CBD can help reduce stress and cravings.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2019

Calories, Carbs, Fat, Fiber: Unraveling The Links Between Breast Cancer And Diet
A new study finds that women who ate a low-fat diet and more fruits, vegetables and grains, lowered their risk of dying from breast cancer. But which of those factors provided the protective effect?

NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2019

Suicide Rate For Girls Has Been Rising Faster Than For Boys, Study Finds
Researchers found that the increase was highest for girls ages 10 to 14 in the U.S., rising by nearly 13% since 2007. The increase for boys of the same age was 7%.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2019

Researchers Say Evidence Shows What You Eat Really Does Matter
Two new diet studies add to the evidence that when it comes to staying healthy, counting calories may not be enough. What really matters is what you choose to eat and the quality of your diet.

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