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NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 31, 2020

To Stop The Pandemic, Seema Verma Is 'Getting Rid Of A Lot Of Regulations'
As head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Verma says she's working to ease safety rules and lighten licensing requirements, to expand the number of hospital beds and health workers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 31, 2020

HHS To Help Companies Develop COVID-19 Vaccines
The Department of Health and Human Services outlines support for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson, as the companies work to develop coronavirus vaccines. Beefing up manufacturing capacity is a priority.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 30, 2020

With Strict Social Distancing, U.S. COVID-19 Deaths May Total 100,000
Which cities and states are days away from facing a spike in COVID-19 cases? Which others are simmering hotspots that will take 2 to 3 weeks to flare? We examine the U.S. map for red flags in data.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 26, 2020

How Monoclonal Antibodies Might Prove Useful Against The Coronavirus
A treatment strategy that identifies particularly potent immune system proteins, then gins up mass quantities for a single dose might help prevent infections or quell symptoms, scientists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 26, 2020

The Coronavirus Is Mutating Relatively Slowly, Which May Be Good News
As a virus makes copies of itself, errors may creep in, changing its genetic makeup. Researchers are trying to determine if the changes are significant in the new coronavirus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 26, 2020

Hidden Brain: How Trust May Help To Limit A Disease Outbreak
What helps to contain an epidemic? A study of the Ebola crisis suggests that patients' trust in health workers can encourage patients to report illnesses and receive treatment.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 24, 2020

Supercomputers Recruited To Hunt For Clues To A COVID-19 Treatment
Scientists hope a machine can do what a person can't: Quickly analyze every physical and chemical aspect of the coronavirus and sift through the world's drugs for subtle clues that might prove useful.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 23, 2020

Why Hoarding Of Hydroxychloroquine Needs To Stop
Despite Trump's public remarks, infectious disease experts say it's premature to think hydroxychloroquine will help against COVID-19. But patients with lupus or rheumatoid arthritis rely on the drug.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 23, 2020

Deep Sea Squid May Communicate Through Glowing Pigmentation, Researchers Find
Scientists have discovered that deep-sea squid can communicate with glowing patterns on their bodies — basically turning themselves into e-readers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 23, 2020

'Invisibilia' New Episode: An Unlikely Superpower
NPR's podcast Invisibilia is back with a new season. A Scottish woman discovers she has a biological gift that allows her to see things that will happen in the future that no one else can see.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 21, 2020

'Silent Spreaders' Speed Coronavirus Transmission
A growing body of evidence shows that people without any major signs of illness can spread the coronavirus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 21, 2020

Might The Experimental Drug Remdesivir Work Against COVID-19?
It's too soon to know if the antiviral compound tested in 2014 as a potential Ebola treatment will hobble the coronavirus. Lab tests show promise, but studies in people with COVID-19 have only begun.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 18, 2020

How Long Can Coronavirus Survive On Hard Surfaces?
The new coronavirus can survive on hard surfaces such as plastic and stainless steel for up to 72 hours and on cardboard for up to 24 hours. To prevent transmission, keep surfaces clean.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 18, 2020

U.S. Coronavirus Testing Starts To Ramp Up But Still Lags
Thousands of tests are now being conducted weekly, but tests remain scarce in many places. And experts question recent steps aimed at boosting testing capacity in states.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 17, 2020

Are U.S. Hospitals Ready?
Here's what it will take for medical facilities across the nation to handle the coming surge of COVID-19 patients.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 16, 2020

As The War On Terror Winds Down, The Pentagon Cuts Social Science
The Pentagon is ending a controversial program to fund social science research. It's part of a shift from asking for academic advice toward building new weapons systems.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 14, 2020

Ages Ago, Beads Made From Ostrich Eggshells Cemented Friendships Across Vast Distances
A new study shows that ostrich eggshell beads were more than just decorative jewelry for the hunter-gatherers in sub-Saharan Africa, as archaeologist Brian Stewart explains.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 13, 2020

Flattening A Pandemic's Curve: Why Staying Home Now Can Save Lives
From school closures to event cancellations, the disruptions are real — and vital. It's all to slow the spread of coronavirus, so hospitals don't get so overwhelmed that they can't treat the sickest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 13, 2020

Research: Coronavirus Can Live For A Long Time In Air, On Surfaces
A new study is first to examine how long the new coronavirus can survive on steel, plastic and cardboard. It can live up to 72 hours, but that's under idealized lab conditions, not the real world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 12, 2020

New Review Finds Alcoholics Anonymous Is Effective, But Not For Everyone
Alcoholics Anonymous may be just as good or better than scientifically proven treatments to help people quit drinking, according to a new review. But AA still doesn't work for everyone.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 11, 2020

Killer Kitties? Scientists Track What Outdoor Cats Are Doing All Day
Cat owners may often wonder what their outdoor cats is doing all day. One study shows outdoor cats are bad news for birds and other critters. But there are some ways to make cats more visible.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 11, 2020

No Guarantee You'll Get Tested For COVID-19, Even If Your Doctor Requests It
There's still a big gap between what the federal government is promising in terms of testing capacity in the U.S. and what state and local labs can deliver.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 09, 2020

U.S. Flu Season Beginning To Ease, Modelers Say
Though COVID-19 has captured the headlines, influenza places a huge burden on the health care system. This year's flu shot provides good protection, the CDC says, so do get one if you haven't already.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 09, 2020

Scarcity Of Health Workers A New Concern As Self-Quarantining Spreads With Virus
Should "potential exposure" by a health worker to someone with coronavirus be enough to send that worker home for two weeks of self-quarantine? Health systems have begun debating relative risks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 07, 2020

Latest On New EPA Proposal
NPR's Scott Simon talks to Andrew Rosenberg of the Union of Concerned Scientists about the latest Environmental Protection Agency proposal that could limit scientific research used for regulations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 06, 2020

Respirators Key To Coronavirus Battle But They Must Be Worn Correctly
A respirator is a central piece of protective gear vital for keeping health care workers healthy — but wearing one incorrectly can put the wearer at risk.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 04, 2020

How Computer Modeling Of COVID-19's Spread Could Help Fight The Virus
As the world watches the outbreak of a novel coronovirus, epidemiologists are watching simulations of that outbreak in their computers, to try to predict what might happen next.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 04, 2020

News Brief: Election Results, Stock Markets Drop, Gene-Editing Tool
After Super Tuesday, Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders are the front-runners. U.S. financial markets fell again on concerns over the coronavirus outbreak. And, details of a new development in medicine.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 04, 2020

In A 1st, Scientists Use Revolutionary Gene-Editing Tool To Edit Inside A Patient
Doctors used CRISPR to edit genes of cells inside a patient's eye, hoping to restore vision to a person blinded by a rare genetic disorder. A similar strategy might work for some brain diseases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 03, 2020

Seagulls Study Human Behavior When Scavenging Food, Scientists Find
A new study suggests that seagulls study human behaviors when trying to locate food. Researchers claim it's one of the first studies of this kind on non-domesticated animals.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 03, 2020

Staring At Seagulls Makes Them Less Likely To Steal Your Food, Scientists Find
A new study suggests that seagulls study human behaviors when trying to locate food. Researchers claim it's one of the first studies of this kind on non-domesticated animals.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 29, 2020

Good Medical Care Can Suffer Late In The Day
Many of us feel increasingly stressed and short on time as the day wears on. But does that make for worse medical care? Studies suggest preventive maintenance suffers with late appointments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 27, 2020

Scientists Find Speech And Music Live On Opposite Sides Of The Brain
Canadian scientists have shown that brain scans of people listening to songs found that an area in the left hemisphere decoded words while one in the right hemisphere decoded the melody.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 27, 2020

New Test Begins To Help Scientists Respond To Coronavirus
Scientists are missing a proven tool to help them fight the coronavirus: A blood test that can tell who has been exposed in the past. U.S. scientists are developing one — China may already have one.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 26, 2020

'Hidden Brain': How 'Egocentric Bias' Can Lead Us Astray
Asking a stranger for help can be stressful. But research shows that people are more likely to say yes than you may think. Researchers are studying our understated ability to influence others.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 25, 2020

'Mini' MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms In Detecting Cancer In Women With Dense Breasts
A new study published in JAMA compares the effectiveness of abbreviated MRI and 3-D mammography to detect breast cancer in women with dense breasts. It finds the mini MRI is more effective.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 22, 2020

Survival Of The Friendliest: How Our Close Friendships Help Us Thrive
In her new book, Lydia Denworth makes the case for the vital necessity of friendship, tracing its effects on your genes, on your brain and even on animals like sheep and fish.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 21, 2020

NIH Lab Races To Create Coronavirus Vaccine In Record Time
Scientists at a National Institutes of Health lab are in a hurry to develop a vaccine to protect people against the new coronavirus. They are trying to do it in record time.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 20, 2020

Trusting Injection Drug Users With IV Antibiotics At Home: It Can Work
When patients need long-term treatment with IV antibiotics, hospitals usually let them do it at home — but not if they have a history of injection drug use. A Boston program wants to change that.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 20, 2020

The Case For Sending Drug Users Home From The Hospital With Open IV Lines
When patients need long-term treatment with IV antibiotics, hospitals usually let them do it at home — but not if they have a history of injection drug use. A Boston program wants to change that.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 20, 2020

The Case For Sending Drug Users Home From The Hospital With Open IV Lines.
When patients need long-term treatment with IV antibiotics, hospitals usually let them do it at home — but not if they have a history of injection drug use. A Boston program wants to change that.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 19, 2020

Scientists Announce Fresh Experiments On Antimatter
Researchers have conducted a new test on antimatter — matter's weird opposite. The researchers found that anti-hydrogen atoms behave exactly the same as regular hydrogen. But many questions remain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 19, 2020

Hunt For New Coronavirus Treatments Includes Gene-Silencing And Monoclonal Antibodies
The new coronavirus has spurred biotech labs in universities and companies to try to find new approaches to stopping the virus — from blocking its key enzymes to interfering with its genetics.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 13, 2020

IMAGES: What New Coronavirus Looks Like Under The Microscope
The images were made using scanning and transmission electron microscopes by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 13, 2020

U.S. Response To China's Talent Plan Is Described As Heavy-Handed
The arrest of a Harvard researcher late last month has led to questions about a Chinese program to recruit American talent. Prosecutors say it's a form of economic espionage. Scientists disagree.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 12, 2020

'Ghost' DNA In West Africans Complicates Story Of Human Origins
Modern genomes from Nigeria and Sierra Leone show signals that scientists call ghost DNA — from an unknown human ancestor. That means that prehistoric humans likely procreated with an unknown group.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 12, 2020

Timetable For A Vaccine Against The New Coronavirus? Maybe This Fall
Recent advances in biotech make scientists optimistic that they might have a vaccine that has passed basic tests of human safety and efficacy ready to go to clinics as soon as this fall.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 10, 2020

Will That Antidepressant Work For You? The Answer May Lie In Your Brain Waves
Scientists say certain brain wave patterns can predict whether a person is likely to respond to a common antidepressant, or would do better with non-drug therapy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 10, 2020

Taking Zinc Can Shorten Your Cold. Thank A 91-Year-Old Scientist For The Discovery
Dr. Ananda Prasad first turned up zinc's benefits to human growth back in the 1960s. Years later, his study and others found that the right dose of zinc can cut a cold's duration by days.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 08, 2020

For Kid's Coughs, Swap The Over-The-Counter Syrups For Honey
For parents desperate to calm a kid's hacking cough, so the whole family can get some sleep, turns out there's evidence that a common kitchen ingredient works better than OTC medicine.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 07, 2020

Polar Express: New Spacecraft Will Explore Elusive Parts Of The Sun
The Solar Orbiter, a new mission from the European Space Agency and NASA, was designed to give us our first look at the sun's poles and to gather data that might help predict space weather.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 06, 2020

Dates Like Jesus Ate? Scientists Revive Ancient Trees From 2,000-Year-Old Seeds
Researchers in Israel have grown date palm trees from ancient seeds found at the same site as the Dead Sea Scrolls. Those trees might soon produce fruit, re-creating the taste of antiquity.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 06, 2020

TV Cop Shows Affect Real-World Policing, Study Says
Police procedurals are standard fare on television. But a recent study says the way TV portrays police and the criminal justice system at large can get in the way of attempts at reform.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 03, 2020

Researchers Link Autism To A System That Insulates Brain Wiring
Brains affected by autism appear to share a problem with cells that make myelin, the insulating coating surrounding nerve fibers that controls the speed at which the fibers convey electrical signals.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 03, 2020

No, You Won't Catch The New Coronavirus Via Packages Or Mail From China
Experts in infectious disease say viruses like the novel coronavirus don't survive long on surfaces. And there's no evidence from similar outbreaks that anyone got infected by handling a package.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 30, 2020

A New Form Of Northern Lights Discovered In Finland - By Amateur Sky Watchers
It was the members of a Facebook group who noted that the auroras they'd seen didn't look like any that had been previously catalogued. So physicists asked them to take a few carefully timed photos.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 29, 2020

Worried About Catching The New Coronavirus? In The U.S., Flu Is A Bigger Threat
At least 8,000 people have died from the flu in the U.S. this season. The good news: Easy steps you can take now to protect against the flu may also help you steer clear of the new coronavirus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 29, 2020

Scientists Find Imperfections In 'Minibrains' That Raise Questions For Research
Brain organoids grown in the lab look a lot like developing human brains. But a new study finds some important differences that could affect how scientists use them.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 25, 2020

Space Walk Underway For Final Fix Of International Space Station Device
Two astronauts aboard the International Space Station make their fourth foray outside the spacecraft to prolong the lifespan of a cosmic ray detector.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 25, 2020

Astronauts Finish Spacewalk For Final Fix Of International Space Station Device
Two astronauts aboard the International Space Station made their fourth foray outside the spacecraft to prolong the lifespan of a cosmic ray detector.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 24, 2020

Drug To Prevent Premature Birth Divides Doctors, Insurers And FDA Experts
An expert panel convened by the FDA says the drug Makena should be withdrawn from the market because a review of its effectiveness shows it doesn't work. But OB-GYNS who prescribe the drug disagree.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 21, 2020

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?
The U.S. government this week is pondering how much the public needs to know about funding decisions for studies and experiments that involve tinkering with already dangerous viruses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 21, 2020

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Risky Virus Research?
The U. S. government this week is pondering how much the public needs to be told about funding decisions for lab research that could make risky viruses even worse.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 21, 2020

More Data On The Midlife Crisis
An economist uses a broad range of data from 132 countries to understand why middle age is such a drag.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 20, 2020

NASA Taps Snowstorm-Chasing Team To Improve Forecasting
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Lynn McMurdie, a University of Washington professor and principal investigator for IMPACTS, NASA's new project to more accurately predict snowstorms.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 20, 2020

Patients Still Struggle To Balance High Costs Of MS Treatment, Despite Generic
Drugs to treat multiple sclerosis can run $70,000 a year or more. Patients hoped competition from a generic version of one of the most popular brands would spur relief, but prices went up. Here's why.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2020

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Bird-Like Flight
Birds change the shape of their wings far more than planes. The complexities of bird flight have posed a major design challenge for scientists trying to translate the way birds fly into robots.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2020

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight
Birds change the shape of their wings far more than planes. The complexities of bird flight have posed a major design challenge for scientists trying to translate the way birds fly into robots.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 16, 2020

Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth
Forty mice spent more than a month in orbit to test two approaches to strengthening muscle and bone in microgravity conditions. The results could help people with muscle and bone diseases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 15, 2020

Embryo Research To Reduce Need For In Vitro Fertilization Raises Ethical Concerns
Aiming to find a cheaper, easier way than IVF to ensure human embryos are healthy before implantation, researchers paid women to be inseminated, then flushed the embryos from their wombs for analysis.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 09, 2020

Tell Me A Story: What Narratives Reveal About The Mind
We live in a world of stories. They're in movies, books, and plays. They're even in the things that we buy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 09, 2020

Polly Share A Cracker? Parrots Can Practice Acts Of Kindness, Study Finds
Researchers found that African grey parrots voluntarily helped a partner get a food reward by giving the other bird a valuable metal token that could be exchanged for a walnut.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 03, 2020

Doulas Are Becoming Part Of The End-Of-Life Equation
According to The New England Journal of Medicine, more people are choosing to die at home rather than in a hospital. It's a trend that's shifting how we think about care at the end of life.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 02, 2020

Effort To Control Opioids In An ER Leaves Some Sickle Cell Patients In Pain
People with sickle cell disease aren't fueling the opioid crisis, research shows. Yet some ER doctors still treat patients seeking relief for agonizing sickle cell crises as potential addicts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 02, 2020

How Does The Way You Feel Shape The Way You Think About Your Life?
A recent study found students may inadvertently choose their college major, in part, based on how tired they were in the subject's introductory course — especially if it was an early morning class.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 02, 2020

Researchers Have Found A Way To Improve TB Vaccine
The vaccine for tuberculosis has been around since the 1920s but it doesn't work very well. A new study shows that the vaccine could be far more effective if given at higher doses, intravenously.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 31, 2019

Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Emotional Well-Being In 2020
Joy can be cultivated. Hostility often masks depression. As one year ends and another begins, these six insights and tips from psychologists offer hope for a good new year.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 31, 2019

Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020
Joy can be cultivated. Hostility often masks depression. As one year ends and another begins, these six insights and tips from psychologists offer hope for a good new year.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 25, 2019

A Young Mississippi Woman's Journey Through A Pioneering Gene-Editing Experiment
NPR tells the exclusive, behind-the-scenes story of the first person with a genetic disorder to be treated in the United States with the revolutionary gene-editing technique CRISPR.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2019

A Christmas Tree Thrives On Farms, Struggles In The Wild
The Fraser fir is found in a lot of homes around Christmas. But its wild cousins have been in decline for almost a century because of a small invasive pest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2019

Why Certain Poor Shepherds In Nativity Scenes Have Huge, Misshapen Throats
In some historical Nativity scenes, the shepherds have grossly enlarged thyroid glands — also known today as goiter. It's an apparent symbol of their poverty and iodine-deficient diet.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2019

Steam On, Steamboat: The World's Tallest Active Geyser Has Another Record Year
The world's tallest active geyser is Steamboat Geyser, in Yellowstone National Park. It's been on a real eruption streak lately and 2019 saw the most recorded eruptions in a calendar year.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 24, 2019

4 Out Of 5 Smokers Are Male But Research Shows That Number Is Dropping
The number of men who use tobacco has declined for the first time since the World Health Organization started tracking it. The shift is significant because 80 percent of smokers are men.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 20, 2019

CDC Confirms A THC Contaminant, Vitamin E Acetate, The Culprit In Most Vaping Deaths
The spate of more than 2,500 acute vaping-related lung injuries tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the decline, epidemiologists say, and the number of deaths has slowed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 20, 2019

CDC Confirms A THC Additive, Vitamin E Acetate, Is The Culprit In Most Vaping Deaths
The spate of more than 2,500 acute vaping-related lung injuries tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the decline, epidemiologists say, and the number of deaths has slowed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 20, 2019

CDC Confirms A THC Additive, Vitamin E Acetate, The Culprit In Most Vaping Deaths
The spate of more than 2,500 acute vaping-related lung injuries tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the decline, epidemiologists say, and the number of deaths has slowed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 19, 2019

How Online Grocery Delivery Could Help Alleviate Food Deserts
Delivery service could make it easier to access fresh, healthy food in these areas, a study finds. It lends support to a pilot program that lets people pay for these groceries with food stamps.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 18, 2019

Where A Child Grows Up Plays A Major Role In Future Opportunities
NPR got an early look at data showing vastly different opportunities for children of different races across the U.S. living just neighborhoods apart. Albany, N.Y., has some of the biggest inequities.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 17, 2019

Archaeologists Discover Ancient Greek Royal Tombs Dating Back 3,500 Years
Among the findings are a gold pendant with the image of an Egyptian goddess, suggesting wider interaction between ancient Greece and Egypt than previously known.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 17, 2019

What Ancient 'Chewing Gum' Can Tell Us About Life 5,700 Years Ago
For the first time ever, scientists managed to extract an entire human genome from the gum. It told them a lot about the person chewing it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 16, 2019

Vaping Nicotine Linked To Increased Risk Of Chronic Lung Disease
A new study suggests the use of e-cigarettes can increase smokers' and nonsmokers' risk of developing chronic lung disease, including conditions such as COPD, chronic bronchitis, emphysema or asthma.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 16, 2019

New Study Offers First Evidence Of Vaping's Long-Term Risks
The study finds that e-cigarettes are linked to increased risk of chronic lung diseases including emphysema, chronic bronchitis and COPD, as well as weakened immune defenses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 16, 2019

Teens With ADHD More Likely To Get Hooked On Nicotine, Research Shows
Vaping use among high school students is rising and that's likely driving an increase in nicotine use. Teenagers who may be more likely to get hooked are those with ADHD.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 14, 2019

Holiday Parties Make You Squirm? Here's How To Conquer Social Anxiety
People with social anxiety disorder fear their "fatal flaws" will be exposed by a wayward comment or other social misstep. If holiday parties send you spiraling, try these tips.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 11, 2019

44,000-Year-Old Indonesian Cave Painting Is Rewriting The History Of Art
In a cave in Indonesia, archaeologists have uncovered a stunning ancient painting of a hunting party that is thousands of years older than similar works found in Europe.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 10, 2019

Gene Therapy May Aid In Sickle Cell Disease Treatment
Scientists report progress using gene therapy to treat sickle cell disease, a common and devastating genetic blood disorder.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 05, 2019

Offshore Wind May Help The Planet — But Will It Hurt Whales?
New York has awarded two contracts for large offshore wind farms, with more anticipated. Researchers are surveying whales in the area to craft strategies to mitigate dangers to them and their habitat.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2019

Research Raises Concerns About Safety Of Hair Dyes, Chemical Straighteners
Researchers have found that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don't use these products.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2019

For HIV-Positive Babies, New Evidence Favors Starting Drug Treatment Just After Birth
Doctors used to worry that antiretroviral drugs were too powerful for HIV-positive newborns. More evidence is emerging that, in fact, early treatment can be safe and effective.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2019

The Psychology Behind When Emotions Turn Us Into Different People
In a fit of anger or in the grip of fear, many of us make decisions that we never would have anticipated. Researchers say it is very hard to understand how we'll act in certain situations.

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