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NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

Scientists Discover A New Formula To Calculate A Dog's Age In Human Years
Scientists have come up with a new formula to calculate a dog's age in human years — and it is much more complicated than multiplying its real age by seven.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

To Come To The Rescue Or Not? Rats, Like People, Take Cues From Bystanders
Experiments in people have long shown that the presence of indifferent bystanders hurts the chances that someone will help a stranger in an emergency. Rats, it turns out, behave the same way.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

Antigen Test For COVID-19 Isn't As Reliable As Genetic Test, Experts Caution
Doctors are using a new antigen test that is a faster method to spot people infected with the coronavirus. It's cheaper and simpler but may be less reliable.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

New Clues To ALS And Alzheimer's Disease From Physics
Structures inside healthy brain cells nimbly move from one state to the next to perform different functions. But in certain degenerative brain diseases, scientists now think, that process gets stuck.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

New Clues To ALS And Alzheimer's From Physics
Structures inside healthy brain cells nimbly move from one state to the next to perform different functions. But in certain degenerative brain diseases, scientists now think, that process gets stuck.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2020

Survey: 3% Of Americans Moved Due To The Pandemic
Among the young, the numbers shot up: 9% of adults 18-29 have moved due to the coronavirus. Some people moved to avoid catching the virus, while others were forced by the closing of college campuses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2020

Scientist Makes A Discovery That May Lead To New Drugs For Rare Brain Diseases
J. Paul Taylor has found that some brain diseases, like Alzheimer's and ALS, are linked to a basic process inside brain cells. Scientists hope drugs that tweak the process can treat illnesses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2020

The Dentist Will See You Now. But Should You Go?
Dentists spend their careers eye to eye with infectious patients, their hands inside gaping mouths, and have a vested interest in making sure everyone stays safe. Here's how they do it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 04, 2020

Why Some Young People Fear Social Isolation More Than COVID-19
It's not that young adults aren't worried about the pandemic, psychologists say, but they are at far greater risk of dying by suicide. Finding ways beyond screens to foster social bonds is crucial.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 03, 2020

Widespread Use Of Face Masks Could Save Tens Of Thousands Of Lives, Models Project
Models developed by mathematical epidemiologists project that tens thousands of lives across the US can be saved by more people wearing face masks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 03, 2020

How Showing Special Kindness To Some Can Have Moral Consequences
A type of discrimination is overlooked because it's rooted, not in hate, but in love. Our Hidden Brain team asks why good deeds, those we do for spouses or neighbors, can sometimes lead to injustice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2020

Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment
An experimental COVID-19 medicine that has been shown to shorten the time people with severe illness have to stay in the hospital finally has a price tag that's lower than some analysts expected.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2020

How Snakes Fly (Hint: It's Not On A Plane)
A snake researcher always wondered how flying snakes propelled themselves. Then, someone told him he should work with the snakes in "The Cube" - a vast theater space with cameras everywhere.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 26, 2020

New Research Shows People Are Not As Divided Along Political Lines As They Think
It is no secret that the U.S. citizens are deeply divided along political lines. But a new study has found that Americans are not nearly as divided as they might think.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 26, 2020

This Coronavirus Doesn't Change Quickly, And That's Good News For Vaccine Makers
A coronavirus vaccine could become ineffective if the virus were to undergo certain genetic changes. But so far, so good: Scientists see no evidence that's happening.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2020

How Mutations In The Coronavirus May Affect Development Of The Vaccine
Researchers around the world are tracking the mutations in the coronavirus as it reproduces and spreads to ensure changes in the virus do not affect the development of the vaccine.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2020

How Mutations In The Coronavirus May Affect Development Of A Vaccine
Researchers around the world are tracking the mutations in the coronavirus as it reproduces and spreads to ensure changes in the virus do not affect the development of the vaccine.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2020

Dolphins Learn Foraging Tricks From Each Other, Not Just From Mom
Scientists have found that dolphins learn a neat trick to trap fish by watching their close associates do it. This means that dolphins aren't just motivated to learn from their mothers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2020

Alzheimer's Researchers Go Back To Basics To Find The Best Way Forward
After a decade of failure in treating Alzheimer's with drugs, the National Institutes of Health is funding a five-year effort in Seattle to learn more about how the disease starts in the brain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 24, 2020

All You Wanted To Know About Coronavirus Vaccine Science But Were Afraid To Ask
Some of the technology behind coronavirus vaccine development dates back to the first vaccines; other techniques are much newer. Here are eight top strategies scientists are pursuing.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 23, 2020

Immense Neolithic Ring Discovered Near Stonehenge
The massive prehistoric structure "is significantly larger than any comparative prehistoric monument that we know of in Britain, at least," a lead researcher in the project said.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2020

How Widespread Coronavirus Testing Helped Meatpacking Plants Halt Outbreaks
Thousands of meatpacking workers have been infected with the coronavirus. Some of their employers now are rolling out large-scale testing, and their experience may offer lessons for other businesses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2020

How Widespread Coronavirus Testing Helped Meatpacking Plants Slow Outbreaks
Thousands of meatpacking workers have been infected with the coronavirus. Some of their employers now are rolling out large-scale testing, and their experience may offer lessons for other businesses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 20, 2020

Doctor Warns Of Risks In Rush To Embrace A COVID-19 Treatment
As researchers herald dexamethasone as a potential breakthrough treatment for critically ill patients, Dr. Kirsten Lyke says publicizing research that hasn't been rigorously vetted could erode trust.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 18, 2020

A Scientist's Pink Cast Leads To Discovery About How The Brain Responds To Disability
A neurologist who wanted to know how the brain changes in response to a physical disability put his arm in a pink cast for two weeks to find out.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2020

Scientists Find The Biggest Soft-Shelled Egg Ever, Nicknamed 'The Thing'
A new study of dinosaur eggs as well as a football-sized egg from Antarctica shows how some ancient creatures relied on soft shells rather than hard ones.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2020

Cows Help With COVID-19 Treatment, No Bull
Cattle may turn out to be of help in the coronavirus pandemic. A South Dakota biotech company is using cows to create antibodies that could then be used for disease prevention or treatment.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 16, 2020

Early Results Show Benefit Of Steroid For Very Sick COVID-19 Patients
A low-cost anti-inflammatory drug appears to reduce the risk of death in patients with COVID-19. The promising result comes from a large study of therapies being conducted in the U.K.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 16, 2020

Racism, Hazing And Other Abuse Taints Medical Training, Students Say
More than 35% of students surveyed experienced mistreatment in a U.S. medical school. "There's a direct link between this abuse and how some ... health care disparities play out," a black doctor says.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 15, 2020

FDA Withdraws Emergency Use Authorization For Hydroxychloroquine
Emergency use authorization makes it easier for doctors to use a drug in a manner not specifically approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA granted these drugs this status in March.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 14, 2020

Report: Trust In American Institutions Has Been Dropping For Decades
NPR's Michel Martin discusses a new study, "Our Common Purpose: Reinventing America for the 21st Century," with two people who worked on it: professor Danielle Allen and Justice Wallace Jefferson.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2020

Study: TV Police Shows Affect Real-World Policing
Some police procedurals are getting booted off television. One study reveals how TV portrays police and the criminal justice system can interfere with attempts at reform.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 12, 2020

Researchers Discover People Are Not So Good At Detecting Sick People By Their Coughs
Researchers at the University of Michigan have conducted an experiment to discover how well people could detect people with illnesses from healthy people by the sound of coughs and sneezes.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2020

Sea Otters Can Be Money Makers, But Not Everyone Benefits
The return of sea otters to historic habitats can restore ecosystems and bring economic benefits, but hungry otters can also threaten the food security of remote indigenous communities.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2020

What Happens When Sea Otters Eat 15 Pounds of Shellfish A Day
The return of sea otters to historic habitats can restore ecosystems and bring economic benefits, but hungry otters can also threaten the food security of remote indigenous communities.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2020

Five Coronavirus Treatments In Development
While only remdesivir has been scientifically shown to help treat COVID-19, it is not a particularly effective drug. More drugs like it and fundamentally different ones are in the pipeline.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 04, 2020

Authors Retract Hydroxychloroquine Study, Citing Concern Over Data
A paper suggesting hydroxychloroquine increases the risk of death for patients with COVID-19 has been retracted by three of its authors because they were not able to verify the data used in the study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 04, 2020

NIH Director Hopes For At Least 1 Safe And Effective Vaccine By Year's End
Dr. Francis Collins says some candidates for a coronavirus vaccine will be ready to start large-scale human trials as early as next month. Scaling up production may start before tests are complete.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2020

No Evidence Hydroxychloroquine Is Helpful In Preventing COVID-19, Study Finds
A study of more than 800 health workers, first responders and others finds that taking hydroxychloroquine to prevent COVID-19 is no better than a placebo in preventing the illness.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 29, 2020

Climate Change And Deforestation Mean Earth's Trees Are Younger and Shorter
A new study finds rising temperatures and climate-driven disasters are helping transform the very makeup of the world's forests. This has major implications for biodiversity and more warming.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 29, 2020

Hidden Brain: Heat And Learning. What's The Connection?
As the planet gets warmer students around the globe are dealing with hotter days. A study finds that heat stands in the way of learning, and contributes to the racial achievement gap.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 28, 2020

Theory Vs. Reality: Why Our Economic Behavior Isn't Always Rational
We don't always behave the way economic models say we will. We don't save enough for retirement. We give money to charity. This week, why we act in ways that go against our "rational" self-interest.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 25, 2020

WHO Halts Hydroxychloroquine Trial Over Safety Concerns
The WHO cited a scientific study published last week suggesting that proposed COVID-19 drug hydroxychloroqine may do more harm than good in halting its study to review data.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2020

Herd Of Fuzzy Green 'Glacier Mice' Baffles Scientists
Moss balls seem to roll around glaciers in a coordinated way, and researchers can't explain why the whole group moves at about the same speed and in the same direction.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2020

Herd-Like Movement Of Fuzzy Green 'Glacier Mice' Baffles Scientists
Moss balls seem to roll around glaciers in a coordinated way, and researchers can't explain why the whole group moves at about the same speeds and in the same directions.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 21, 2020

Scientist Discover A Clever Trick Bumblebees Use To Make Flowers Bloom Earlier
New research published on Thursday shows that bumblebees make small moon-shaped incisions in plants' leaves — and those damaged plants appear to flower earlier than plants the bees don't visit.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 21, 2020

Scientists Discover A Clever Trick Bumblebees Use To Make Flowers Bloom Earlier
New research published on Thursday shows that bumblebees make small moon-shaped incisions in plants' leaves — and those damaged plants appear to flower earlier than plants the bees don't visit.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 20, 2020

New Studies Show That A Coronavirus Vaccine Might Be Protective Of The Virus
Three studies published Wednesday suggest it should be possible to come up with a coronavirus vaccine — tests performed on animals have shown the right results to prove the vaccine's efficacy.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 20, 2020

New Studies Show That Developing A Coronavirus Vaccine Should Be Possible
Three studies published Wednesday suggest it should be possible to come up with a coronavirus vaccine — tests performed on animals have shown the right results to prove a vaccine could be possible.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 19, 2020

What Happened Today: House Passes A New Relief Package, Vaccine Questions
NPR's science correspondent answers listener questions about the latest in the hunt for a coronavirus vaccine.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2020

A New Study Explores The Spread Of Misinformation About Coronavirus On Facebook
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Neil Johnson, a professor of physics at George Washington University, about his study on the spread of scientific misinformation about the coronavirus and its effects.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2020

Act Now To Get Ahead Of A Mental Health Crisis, Specialists Advise U.S.
Suicide rates typically drop during natural disasters and other crises but then spike in the months or years after. So mental health specialists are looking to build psychological resilience now.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 11, 2020

Market For Blood Plasma From COVID-19 Survivors Heats Up
As many firms and academic researchers vie for blood donations from survivors in hopes of isolating components for new treatments, one project is turning for help from 10,000 Orthodox Jewish women.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 07, 2020

Mystery Inflammatory Syndrome In Kids And Teens Likely Linked To COVID-19
Doctors in the U.S. and Europe are reporting a small wave of cases of what looks like a "shock syndrome' in young people. They have low blood pressure, inflamed hearts and other serious symptoms.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 06, 2020

Scientists Find Nearest-Known Black Hole, In Distressingly Fitting Metaphor
The black hole is roughly 1,000 light-years from Earth — and more than 2,000 light-years closer than the next one known. What's more, scientists say, it may be just "the tip of an exciting iceberg."

NPR Topics: Research News
May 05, 2020

VIDEO: How The Novel Coronavirus Hijacks Our Defenses
It's just a bit of genetic material wrapped in protein and fat. But the virus behind COVID-19 can wreak havoc deep inside human lungs when it triggers the immune system to go into overdrive.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 05, 2020

Scientists In Arctic Prepare To Return To Society On Lockdown
The Mosaic expedition is an international project to study the warming Arctic. For a year, scientists are taking turns living in an icebreaker, frozen alongside an ice floe in the Arctic Ocean.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2020

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize
On this week's radio show, we trace the history of fake news. Plus, in a time when accurate information is so important, we ask who ultimately bears the cost when no one wants to pay for local news.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2020

A Next-Generation Coronavirus Test Raises Hopes And Concerns
An antigen test could be quick, and much simpler and cheaper than the PCR tests now used to spot people infected with the novel coronavirus. But some scientists worry about an antigen test's accuracy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 29, 2020

News Brief: Economic Data, Meat Shortage Concerns, Research Funds Pulled
We get a measure of how much damage COVID-19 has done to the economy. President Trump orders meat processors to stay open. And, the government terminates funding for a coronavirus research project.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 29, 2020

NIH Ends Funding For U.S. Nonprofit's COVID-19 Research In China
The National Institutes of Health has withdrawn funding from EcoHealth Alliance, a U.S.-based organization that researches emerging diseases including the coronavirus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 28, 2020

San Francisco Enlists A Key Latino Neighborhood In Coronavirus Testing
To get better data this week on a hard-hit community, the public health department and researchers are offering free testing for everyone over age 4 in a broad swath of the Mission District.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 24, 2020

Why The Warning That Coronavirus Was On The Move In U.S. Cities Came So Late
U.S. health officials said equipping six cities with extra testing would pick up under-the-radar viral spread. But an NPR investigation finds conflicts and shortages caused painful delays.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 22, 2020

Did Heavy Rain Cause Hawaii's Historic Volcanic Eruption?
Extreme rainfall might set off volcanoes that are ready to blow. A pair of scientists think that's what happened at Hawaii's Kilauea volcano in 2018, though some volcanologists are doubtful.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 21, 2020

Study Raises Questions About False Negatives From Quick COVID-19 Test
New research suggests the Abbott ID NOW test, which produces results in less than 15 minutes, is the most likely among common tests to reassure people they are not infected when they really are.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 21, 2020

NPR Analysis Of COVID-19 Deaths At New York Nursing Homes
There's one thing that distinguishes the nursing homes that have reported the highest number of deaths: It's not the quality of the nursing home, but the percentage of people of color who live there.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 20, 2020

Study Links Racial Prejudices And Coronavirus Outbreaks
How might a pandemic affect racial prejudice? A new study finds that living in a region with higher infectious disease rates is linked to greater racial prejudice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 20, 2020

Study Links Racial Prejudices And Disease Outbreaks
How might a pandemic affect racial prejudice? A new study finds that living in a region with higher infectious disease rates is linked to greater racial prejudice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 17, 2020

Scientists Try To Speed COVID-19 Vaccine Development
A year to develop a COVID-19 vaccine may seem like a long time, but it typically takes longer. We examine how vaccines are developed, and how researchers are trying to speed things up.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 17, 2020

CRISPR And Spit Might Be Keys To Faster, Cheaper, Easier Tests For The Coronavirus
Researchers are racing to develop quick, home-based tests for the virus that could deliver test results in minutes. None do that yet, but several under development hold promise, scientists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 15, 2020

Bring Home The Tarantulas? As Research Halts, Scientists Face Difficult Decisions
With research projects on hold due to social distancing guidelines, many scientists are being forced to decide what to do with the creatures that they study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 14, 2020

New Survey Highlights Racial Disparities In The Coronavirus Pandemic
People of color and lower-income populations are more concerned about contracting coronavirus and spreading it unknowingly to others.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 14, 2020

Creatures Large And Small Are Stuck In Labs After Coronavirus Pauses Research
Some scientists and researchers are forced to decide the fates of their study subjects — like spiders, sunflower plants and fish — amid the coronavirus lockdown.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 12, 2020

How Antibody Tests Can Inform Public Policies To Mitigate Coronavirus Pandemic
Stanford is testing for coronavirus antibodies so they can determine who has been exposed and who could potentially go back to school or work. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks to Dr. Jay Bhattacharya.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 11, 2020

How Stories Connect And Persuade Us: Unleashing The Brain Power Of Narrative
The power of shared storytelling to soothe or spur us to action may be more crucial than ever, scientists say. Here's what happens in the brain when we feel swept away by a story, book or film.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 06, 2020

A Tiger Has Coronavirus. Should You Worry About Your Pets?
Four tigers and three lions at the Bronx Zoo all had one of the symptoms of a respiratory infection: a dry cough. What does this finding mean for cats and dogs?

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 06, 2020

Promising Drug On The Horizon For COVID-19
A drug that's been tested against the coronaviruses that causes MERS and SARS and shown to have valuable antiviral properties appears to be potent against the COVID-19 virus as well.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 31, 2020

To Stop The Pandemic, Seema Verma Is 'Getting Rid Of A Lot Of Regulations'
As head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Verma says she's working to ease safety rules and lighten licensing requirements, to expand the number of hospital beds and health workers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 31, 2020

HHS To Help Companies Develop COVID-19 Vaccines
The Department of Health and Human Services outlines support for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson, as the companies work to develop coronavirus vaccines. Beefing up manufacturing capacity is a priority.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 30, 2020

With Strict Social Distancing, U.S. COVID-19 Deaths May Total 100,000
Which cities and states are days away from facing a spike in COVID-19 cases? Which others are simmering hotspots that will take 2 to 3 weeks to flare? We examine the U.S. map for red flags in data.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 26, 2020

How Monoclonal Antibodies Might Prove Useful Against The Coronavirus
A treatment strategy that identifies particularly potent immune system proteins, then gins up mass quantities for a single dose might help prevent infections or quell symptoms, scientists say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 26, 2020

The Coronavirus Is Mutating Relatively Slowly, Which May Be Good News
As a virus makes copies of itself, errors may creep in, changing its genetic makeup. Researchers are trying to determine if the changes are significant in the new coronavirus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 26, 2020

Hidden Brain: How Trust May Help To Limit A Disease Outbreak
What helps to contain an epidemic? A study of the Ebola crisis suggests that patients' trust in health workers can encourage patients to report illnesses and receive treatment.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 24, 2020

Supercomputers Recruited To Hunt For Clues To A COVID-19 Treatment
Scientists hope a machine can do what a person can't: Quickly analyze every physical and chemical aspect of the coronavirus and sift through the world's drugs for subtle clues that might prove useful.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 23, 2020

Why Hoarding Of Hydroxychloroquine Needs To Stop
Despite Trump's public remarks, infectious disease experts say it's premature to think hydroxychloroquine will help against COVID-19. But patients with lupus or rheumatoid arthritis rely on the drug.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 23, 2020

Deep Sea Squid May Communicate Through Glowing Pigmentation, Researchers Find
Scientists have discovered that deep-sea squid can communicate with glowing patterns on their bodies — basically turning themselves into e-readers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 23, 2020

'Invisibilia' New Episode: An Unlikely Superpower
NPR's podcast Invisibilia is back with a new season. A Scottish woman discovers she has a biological gift that allows her to see things that will happen in the future that no one else can see.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 21, 2020

'Silent Spreaders' Speed Coronavirus Transmission
A growing body of evidence shows that people without any major signs of illness can spread the coronavirus.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 21, 2020

Might The Experimental Drug Remdesivir Work Against COVID-19?
It's too soon to know if the antiviral compound tested in 2014 as a potential Ebola treatment will hobble the coronavirus. Lab tests show promise, but studies in people with COVID-19 have only begun.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 18, 2020

How Long Can Coronavirus Survive On Hard Surfaces?
The new coronavirus can survive on hard surfaces such as plastic and stainless steel for up to 72 hours and on cardboard for up to 24 hours. To prevent transmission, keep surfaces clean.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 18, 2020

U.S. Coronavirus Testing Starts To Ramp Up But Still Lags
Thousands of tests are now being conducted weekly, but tests remain scarce in many places. And experts question recent steps aimed at boosting testing capacity in states.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 17, 2020

Are U.S. Hospitals Ready?
Here's what it will take for medical facilities across the nation to handle the coming surge of COVID-19 patients.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 16, 2020

As The War On Terror Winds Down, The Pentagon Cuts Social Science
The Pentagon is ending a controversial program to fund social science research. It's part of a shift from asking for academic advice toward building new weapons systems.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 14, 2020

Ages Ago, Beads Made From Ostrich Eggshells Cemented Friendships Across Vast Distances
A new study shows that ostrich eggshell beads were more than just decorative jewelry for the hunter-gatherers in sub-Saharan Africa, as archaeologist Brian Stewart explains.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 13, 2020

Flattening A Pandemic's Curve: Why Staying Home Now Can Save Lives
From school closures to event cancellations, the disruptions are real — and vital. It's all to slow the spread of coronavirus, so hospitals don't get so overwhelmed that they can't treat the sickest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 13, 2020

Research: Coronavirus Can Live For A Long Time In Air, On Surfaces
A new study is first to examine how long the new coronavirus can survive on steel, plastic and cardboard. It can live up to 72 hours, but that's under idealized lab conditions, not the real world.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 12, 2020

New Review Finds Alcoholics Anonymous Is Effective, But Not For Everyone
Alcoholics Anonymous may be just as good or better than scientifically proven treatments to help people quit drinking, according to a new review. But AA still doesn't work for everyone.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 11, 2020

Killer Kitties? Scientists Track What Outdoor Cats Are Doing All Day
Cat owners may often wonder what their outdoor cats is doing all day. One study shows outdoor cats are bad news for birds and other critters. But there are some ways to make cats more visible.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 11, 2020

No Guarantee You'll Get Tested For COVID-19, Even If Your Doctor Requests It
There's still a big gap between what the federal government is promising in terms of testing capacity in the U.S. and what state and local labs can deliver.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 09, 2020

U.S. Flu Season Beginning To Ease, Modelers Say
Though COVID-19 has captured the headlines, influenza places a huge burden on the health care system. This year's flu shot provides good protection, the CDC says, so do get one if you haven't already.

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