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NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 22, 2021

Tips And 'Service With A Smile' Rules Fuel Sex Harassment In Restaurants, Study Says
The authors say their research is the first to show an empirical link between tipping and forced friendliness to sex harassment. More than 70% of female restaurant workers report being harassed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 22, 2021

Tips And Service With A Smile Drive Sexual Harassment In Restaurants, Study Finds
The authors say their research is the first to empirically link tipping and forced friendliness to sexual harassment. More than 70% of female restaurant workers report being harassed.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 19, 2021

How To Heat-Proof Your Summer Workout
With much of the U.S. already sweltering this summer, even avid runners, hikers and bikers are wilting. We've got 10 strategies from experts on how to enjoy hot weather exercise without keeling over.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 19, 2021

How To Stay Safe When You Work Out In The Heat
With much of the U.S. already sweltering this summer, even avid runners, hikers and bikers are wilting. We've got 10 strategies from experts on how to enjoy hot weather exercise without keeling over.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 13, 2021

Why Clearing Brazil's Forests For Farming Can Make It Harder To Grow Crops
Clearing natural forests in Brazil in order to grow crops like soybeans has actually made it harder to grow those crops. That's because deforestation makes the weather hotter and drier.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 13, 2021

It's Summer, And That Means The Mysterious Return Of Glacier Ice Worms
On mountaintop glaciers of Alaska, Washington and Oregon, billions of tiny black worms are tunneling upward, to the barren, icy surface. What lures them, and how do they survive the frozen depths?

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 11, 2021

You Can Learn A Thing Or Two From Dinosaur Poop
There's a lot to be learned from fossilized dinosaur dung. Paleontologist Martin Qvarnstrom and entomologist Emmanuel Arriaga-Varela detail some of their discoveries.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2021

A 51,000-Year-Old Bone Carving Supports Neanderthals' Creativity
Scientists have discovered a giant deer toe bone, engraved by Neanderthals — a hint that our ancient cousins had conceptual imagination.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 03, 2021

You Could Save A Child From Drowning This Summer. Here's How
A swimmer of any skill level might need your help, and preventing a drowning takes closer supervision of the kids than you might think. The distress signs can be subtle and quick.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2021

When A City-Size Star Becomes A Black Hole's Lunch, The Universe Roils
It's a smackdown of one space monster by another: Scientists have made unprecedented observations of two black holes gobbling two neutron stars — among the weirdest space collisions ever detected.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2021

When A City-Sized Star Becomes A Black Hole's Lunch, The Universe Roils
It's a smack down of one space monster by another: Scientists have made unprecedented observations of two black holes gobbling two neutron stars — among the weirdest space collisions ever detected.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 28, 2021

Protecting The Immuno-Compromised Against COVID Could Be Key To Ending The Pandemic
Vaccines may not be as effective for those who are immuno-compromised. Protecting them needs to be made a top priority, says researchers — to keep them safe and to slow the emergence of variants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 25, 2021

Flesh-Eating Parasites May Be Expanding Their Range As Climate Heats Up
Scientists caution that as the planet warms, more Americans could be exposed to disfiguring varieties of the Leishmania parasite. Overtreatment can be a problem, too, experts warn.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 24, 2021

Baby Dinosaur Bones Found In The Alaska Arctic Suggest They Lived There Year-Round
Researchers have found hundreds of baby dinosaur bones in the Alaskan Arctic — suggesting dinosaurs may have lived at cold northern latitudes year round.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 24, 2021

A New Study Suggests Dinosaurs Might Not Have Been As Cold-Blooded As We Thought
Researchers have found hundreds of baby dinosaur bones in the Alaskan Arctic, suggesting that dinosaurs may have lived at cold northern latitudes year-round.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 23, 2021

Alien Planet-Hunters In Hundreds Of Nearby Star Systems Could Spot Earth
Potentially, observers in plenty of solar systems could have detected Earth sometime in the last 5,000 years. More stars will soon move into positions that would let them see our planet.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2021

A New Way To Understand Automation
We speak with one of the leading scholars of automation about its evolving impacts on society.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2021

Delta Variant Of The Coronavirus Could Dominate In U.S. Within Weeks
More contagious than other variants, and maybe more likely to cause severe disease, Delta is spreading so fast it could cause yet another U.S. surge this summer or fall, according to new research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 22, 2021

Fauci Warns Dangerous Delta Variant Is The Greatest Threat To U.S. COVID Efforts
More contagious than other variants, and maybe more likely to cause severe disease, Delta is spreading so fast it could cause yet another U.S. surge this summer or fall, according to new research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2021

Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic
A new CDC study finds that people who provide unpaid care for their children or adult loved ones are twice as likely as noncaregivers to have experienced depression or anxiety, or thoughts of suicide.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2021

Pfizer's COVID Vaccine In Teens And Myocarditis: What You Need To Know
Health officials are investigating reports of mostly mild, temporary and treatable heart inflammation that may or may not be causally linked to vaccination with with an mRNA vaccine against COVID-19.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 17, 2021

COVID Vaccines In Teens And Myocarditis: What You Need To Know
Health officials have been investigating an extremely rare side-effect of vaccination with the mRNA vaccines in young people: heart inflammation that's mostly mild and temporary.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 16, 2021

5 Ways To Stop Summer Colds From Making The Rounds In Your Family
Run-of-the-mill runny noses and coughs are back, after a break during the pandemic's height, when so many of us were circulating less and wearing masks. Here's how to keep household viruses at bay.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 13, 2021

Tackling 'Energy Justice' Requires Better Data. These Researchers Are On It
President Biden's climate plans call for spending big on energy efficiency. New research could help make sure it actually targets the poor and minority households that most need it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 11, 2021

Lyme Disease-Carrying Ticks Are Turning Up On California's Beaches
The blood-sucking critters are capable of thriving along the western coast, according to new research. Though experts don't exactly know how they're picking up the bacteria that causes the illness.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 10, 2021

In Montana, Crisis Support Teams Offer Alternatives To Policing Mental Health
Montana now has six mobile crisis response teams — up from one in 2019 — with more in the works. Each team has a different makeup, but all use mental health support to diffuse tricky situations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 09, 2021

Women Now Drink As Much As Men - Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope
Women aren't just upping their drinking, researchers say. Increasingly they are "drinking to cope," instead of for pleasure — which accelerates the risk of alcohol use disorder and its health damage.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 09, 2021

Women Now Drink As Much As Men — Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope
Women aren't just upping their drinking, researchers say. Increasingly they are "drinking to cope," instead of for pleasure — which accelerates the risk of alcohol use disorder and its health damage.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 09, 2021

Women Now Drink As Much As Men And Suffer Health Effects More Quickly
Women aren't just upping their drinking, researchers say. Increasingly they are "drinking to cope," instead of for pleasure — which accelerates the risk of alcohol use disorder and its health damage.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 08, 2021

As Long As A Basketball Court: Australia's Largest Dinosaur Confirmed
"Cooper," a gargantuan dinosaur that roamed the Outback, is first of its kind found outside South America. The new species had long necks and tails, four legs and ate plants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 08, 2021

Dinosaur Found In Australia Was 2 Stories Tall And The Length Of A Basketball Court
"Cooper," a gargantuan dinosaur that roamed the Outback, is the first of its kind found outside South America. The new species had a long neck and tail, as well as four legs, and ate plants.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2021

A New Type Of COVID-19 Vaccine Could Debut Soon
Instead of putting genetic instructions into people whose cells then make a viral protein, the vaccines from Novavax, Medicago and Sanofi carry a spike protein payload.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 06, 2021

New Type Of COVID Vaccine Could Debut Soon
Instead of putting genetic instructions into people whose cells then make a viral protein, the vaccines from Novavax, Medicago and Sanofi carry a spike protein payload.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2021

Right Whales Are Shrinking In Numbers— New Study Shows They're Also Shrinking In Size
North Atlantic right whales now grow about three feet shorter than they did 40 years ago. Research suggests a leading cause is the damage human activity inflicts on the critically endangered mammals.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 03, 2021

Endangered Right Whales Are Shrinking. Scientists Blame Commercial Fishing Gear
A new study concludes that endangered right whales born today will end up smaller than adult whales in the past. Researchers say stress from getting caught in fishing gear stunts the mammals' growth

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 01, 2021

Why Jumping Spiders Spend All Night Hanging Out—Literally
Little is known about the night-time habits of tiny creatures all around us. Take the jumping spider--it mysteriously can spend much of the night suspended in mid-air, hanging by a thread.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 01, 2021

Why Jumping Spiders Spend All Night Hanging Out — Literally
Little is known about the night-time habits of tiny creatures all around us. Take the jumping spider--it mysteriously can spend much of the night suspended in mid-air, hanging by a thread.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 30, 2021

After 50 Years, U.S. Opens The Door To More Cannabis Crops For Scientists
Until recently, plants from only one U.S. facility were approved for use in research. Adding new suppliers will accelerate understanding of cannabis' health effects and possible therapeutic uses.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 29, 2021

Scientists Say These Monkeys Use An 'Accent' To Communicate With Their Foe
In the Amazon rainforest, one species of monkey changed their territorial call to better communicate with a competing species.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 29, 2021

Amid Growing Anti-Asian Racism, A Call For More Research Into Its Health Effects
Many Asian Americans live daily with the corrosive effects of racism and racialized violence, yet there's very little research funded on Asian American health.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 27, 2021

CDC Approach To Breakthrough Infections Sparks Concerns
The CDC has decided to focus investigations of cases in which the COVID-19 vaccines fail on people who get hospitalized or die, but critics say that's short-sighted.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 27, 2021

CDC Move To Limit Investigations Into COVID Breakthrough Infections Sparks Concerns
The CDC will now track only cases of breakthrough infections in which COVID-19 vaccines fail on people who get hospitalized or die. But critics say that's shortsighted and cuts off valuable data.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 26, 2021

Controversial New Guidelines Would Allow Experiments On More Mature Human Embryos
An influential scientific society has recommended scrapping a long-standing taboo on studying human embryos in lab dishes beyond 14 days and green lit a long list of other sensitive research.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2021

Avoid Medical Jargon To Shrink COVID Health Disparities, Say Patient Advocates
There's a lot of room for dangerous misunderstanding when doctors and public health officials talk to diverse groups about COVID-19. Health literacy projects aim to dispel confusion in all languages.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 24, 2021

How Medical Jargon Can Make COVID Health Disparities Even Worse
There's a lot of room for dangerous misunderstanding when doctors and public health officials talk to diverse groups about COVID-19. Health literacy projects aim to dispel confusion in all languages.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 22, 2021

Dozens Of Animals Laugh Too, Study Shows
A new study in the journal Bioacoustics found that 65 different species of animals have their own form of laughter. Study co-author Sasha Winkler describes the sounds animals make during play.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 19, 2021

How Virtual Reality Is Used To Help Recognize Unconscious Biases
A team of researchers at Michigan State University is using virtual reality to bring awareness to unconscious biases by placing people in "others' shoes."

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2021

Colorectal Cancer Screening Should Start At Age 45, Experts Recommend
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says the age that routine screening begins for colorectal cancer should drop from 50 to 45. Colorectal is the third-leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2021

The Case For Universal Pre-K Just Got Stronger
A new study looks at the effects of government-funded preschool in Boston and finds big benefits for kids.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2021

It's Time For America's Fixation With Herd Immunity To End, Scientists Say
Researchers say the herd immunity threshold isn't the right finish line to end the pandemic. Instead, the public should just focus on getting as many people vaccinated as possible.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 18, 2021

It's Time For America's Fixation On Herd Immunity To End, Scientists Say
Researchers say the herd immunity threshold isn't the right finish line to end the pandemic. Instead, the public should just focus on getting as many people vaccinated as possible.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 17, 2021

Fighting Weight: How Military Recruiters Take On Obesity, Case By Case
A decade ago, Army recruiters started coaching individuals to help them lose weight so they could enlist. It's not an official Army program, but has become necessary to recruitment, many say.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2021

Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says
MIT bioengineer Linda Griffith spent years in debilitating pain before she was diagnosed with a condition often neglected in research. Her focus on the basic biology could lead to better treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2021

Freshly-Made Plutonium From Outer Space Found On Ocean Floor
Something went boom in outer space and sent radioactive stardust our way, and it's just been found at the bottom of the ocean.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 13, 2021

Freshly Made Plutonium From Outer Space Found On Ocean Floor
Something went boom in outer space and sent radioactive stardust our way, and it's just been found at the bottom of the ocean.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2021

FAQ: What You Need To Know About Pfizer's COVID Vaccine And Adolescents
Adolescents age 12 and older are now eligible to be vaccinated against COVID-19, the FDA says. Buy when and where, and what about younger kids? You have questions. We have answers.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2021

Cats Take 'If I Fits I Sits' Seriously, Even If The Space Is Just An Illusion
If you've spent any time around cats, you've seen them curl up in cozy spaces. A new study on feline cognition shows that they also like to sit in snug squares created by a kind of optical illusion.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2021

News Brief: COVID-19 Vaccine, Clashes In Jerusalem, Gene-Editing Experiment
The FDA is expected to authorize the Pfizer vaccine for 12 to 15-year-olds. Security ramped up for Jerusalem Day parade. Experiment could restore vision for some patients with genetic disorders.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 10, 2021

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision
The unprecedented study involves using the gene-editing technique CRISPR to edit a gene while it's still inside a patient's body. In exclusive interviews, NPR talks with two of the first participants.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 08, 2021

Will My Sense Of Smell Ever Return? Olfactory Insights From COVID And Beyond
COVID-19 has renewed interest in a key way humans perceive the world. A reporter who hasn't been able to tell the scent of a rose from a sweaty gym shoe for decades takes heart in the latest science.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 07, 2021

Vaccination Against COVID 'Does Not Mean Immunity' For People With Organ Transplants
For most people, COVID-19 vaccines promise a return to something akin to normal life. But for the hundreds of thousands of Americans who have a transplanted organ, it's a different story.

NPR Topics: Research News
May 04, 2021

Trees Talk To Each Other. 'Mother Tree' Ecologist Hears Lessons For People, Too
Ecologist Suzanne Simard says trees are "social creatures" that communicate with each other in remarkable ways — including warning each other of danger and sharing nutrients at critical times.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 30, 2021

Carolyn Freiwald: What Can Our Teeth Tell Us About Where We Come From?
Much of our ancestral histories can be found in our bones. Archaeologist Carolyn Friewald traces the story of human migration through the hidden clues in our bones and our teeth.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 28, 2021

25 Down And 71,632 To Go: Scientists Seek Genomes Of All Critters With A Backbone
Biologists say newly efficient and accurate gene sequencing techniques have allowed them to fairly quickly detail full genomes and find overlooked genes in a broad range of 25 important species.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 23, 2021

Man's Ancient Friend: 6,000-Year-Old Dog Remains Found On Arabian Peninsula
As archeologists in Saudi Arabia excavated an ancient tomb last year, they were surprised to find what's believed to be the earliest example of dog domestication in the region.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 21, 2021

The Secret Mission To Unearth Part Of A 142-Year-Old Experiment
Scientists in Michigan went out in the dead of night to dig up part of an unusual long-term experiment. It's a research study that started in 1879 and is handed from one generation to the next.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 18, 2021

Researcher Studies How Messaging On COVID-19 Disparities Affects Policy Preferences
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with professor Evan Lieberman about the study he co-authored looking at how sharing information about the pandemic's racial disparities affect peoples' policy opinions.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 18, 2021

The Incredible Shrinking And Growing Brains Of Indian Jumping Ants
A new study of Indian jumping ants shows they have the ability to shrink and expand their brains — a first for any insect.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 18, 2021

OPINION: Doctors Should Be More Candid With Their Patients
As a doctor, I was eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine in December, but I also was pregnant, and there wasn't yet much data to inform my decision. What I needed was a different kind of information.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 15, 2021

Scientists Create Early Embryos That Are Part Human, Part Monkey
An international team has put human cells into monkey embryos in hopes of finding new ways to produce organs for transplantation. But some ethicists still worry about how such research could go wrong.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 13, 2021

A Mystery Under Study: How, Why And When COVID Vaccines Aren't Fully Protective
COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective but don't always provide perfect protection. Some vaccinated people later exposed to the virus still get sick. Why and how often that happens is under study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 13, 2021

CDC Studies 'Breakthrough' COVID Cases Among People Already Vaccinated
COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective but don't always provide perfect protection. Some vaccinated people later exposed to the virus still get sick. Why and how often that happens is under study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 07, 2021

Drugs Targeting Immune Response To COVID-19 Show Promise
Researchers are reporting some progress in their search for drugs that tamp down the overwhelming immune reaction that can kill a patient with COVID-19.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 06, 2021

Woman Gets New Windpipe In Groundbreaking Transplant Surgery
A medical team in New York City says it has performed the first complete surgical transplant of a trachea. These kinds of transplants are one of the last big transplant challenges.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 02, 2021

Mummified Parrots Reveal 'Sophisticated' Trade In Ancient South American Desert
Scientists found remains of parrots in the Atacama desert, far from the birds' home in the Amazon. The discovery allowed scientists to reconstruct ancient trading routes used to transport the birds.

NPR Topics: Research News
Apr 01, 2021

Mice That Hear Imaginary Sounds May Help Explain Hallucinations In People
An experiment that induced imaginary sounds in both people and mice could help explain how brain disorders like schizophrenia cause hallucinations.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 29, 2021

Scientists Get Closer To Redefining The Length Of A Second
A group of scientists from Boulder, Colo., compared three different atomic clocks. It's a step toward redefining the length of a second.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 27, 2021

Scientific Specimens Are Going Online, But Much Remains Hidden In Storage
From fish in jars to rare seeds and microbes, hundreds of millions of biological specimens are stored around the U.S., and caretakers are trying to make them accessible for future research.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 25, 2021

OPINION: 5 Ways To Make The Vaccine Rollout More Equitable
Getting the COVID-19 vaccine into most Americans' arms will involve much more than a good supply and logistics. Values such as equity, deep listening, and informed choice are crucial, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 21, 2021

European Scientists Zero In On AstraZeneca Blood Clot Link
A rare blood clotting condition has occurred in some people after receiving the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. If the new research is correct, it could mean that blood clots could be easily treated.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 19, 2021

Emily Levesque: How Have Telescopes Transformed Our Understanding Of The Universe?
Astronomers once gazed at the night sky and charted the stars using their naked eyes. Astrophysicist Emily Levesque describes how generations of telescopes have unlocked the wonders of the universe.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 16, 2021

How A Building Block of Life Got Created In a Flash
Lightning strikes may have supplied a key ingredient that allowed life to emerge on the early Earth, according to a new study of "fossilized" lightning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 12, 2021

Hark! Glow-In-The-Dark Shark Sparks Biology Landmark
A kitefin shark is the largest known bioluminescent vertebrate, according to a new study. The shark lives in the dimly lit "twilight zone" of the ocean, and may glow to camouflage itself as it hunts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 08, 2021

A 300-Year-Old Tale Of One Woman's Quest To Stop A Deadly Virus
In 1721, London was in the grips of a deadly smallpox epidemic. One woman learned how to stop it, but her solution sowed political division.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 07, 2021

Scientists Observe First Ever 'Space Hurricane'
A storm of electrons created the first known "space hurricane" over the North Pole. Professor Mike Lockwood from the University of Reading in the U.K. talks about the newly-published findings.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 07, 2021

Why Cuttlefish Are Smarter Than We Thought
Cuttlefish, the squishy sea creatures, showed impressive self-control in an experiment. It means they have something in common with primates.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 05, 2021

Study Finds Wildfire Smoke More Harmful To Humans Than Pollution From Cars
In Southern California, pollutants from wildfire smoke caused up to a 10% increase in hospital admissions. Researchers say there's a need for better air monitoring and public health programs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 04, 2021

Why Scientists Aim To Make A Drone Nearly As Small As A Mosquito
Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are trying to match the flexibility and resilience of an insect with a more muscular generation of mini-drones.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 02, 2021

Utah Considers State Park Named For Utahraptor Dinosaur
Utah is considering naming a new park in honor of dinosaurs discovered there. Researchers expect to uncover more Utahraptor bones — provided they can get them out of a massive block of rock.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 02, 2021

Reading A Letter That's Been Sealed For More Than 300 Years — Without Opening It
A signed, sealed but not delivered letter from 1697 has finally been read with the help of a high-tech scan that looked inside without breaking its seal.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 02, 2021

Reading A Letter That's Been Sealed For More Than 300 Years—Without Opening It
A signed, sealed, but not delivered letter from 1697 has finally been read with the help of a high-tech scan that looked inside without breaking its seal.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 02, 2021

5 Medical Appointments You Should Stop Putting Off
If you've been delaying routine medical care in the past year, now's the time to catch up, doctors say. The consequences of missing some key screenings and health checkups can be lethal.

NPR Topics: Research News
Mar 01, 2021

To Help Farmworkers Get COVID-19 Tests And Vaccine, Build Trust And A Safety Net
Getting COVID-19 tests and vaccine to essential workers on commercial farms and in meatpacking plants requires more than a pop-up clinic miles away. A positive test can be financially devastating.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 28, 2021

CDC Panel Endorses Johnson & Johnson's One-Dose COVID-19 Vaccine
Advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voted to endorse the emergency use of a single dose of a vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson. A study showed it was 66% effective in the U.S.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 27, 2021

Scientists Talked To People In Their Dreams. They Answered
Scientists have found that two-way communication is possible with someone who is asleep and dreaming. Specifically, lucid dreaming — dreaming while being aware you're dreaming.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 23, 2021

Do 'Tight' Cultures Fare Better In The Pandemic Than 'Loose' Cultures?
That's the question posted by a study in The Lancet Planetary Health. In case you're wondering, the United States is characterized as "loose." And Singapore is "tight."

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 23, 2021

Why 'Tight' Cultures May Fare Better Than 'Loose' Cultures In A Pandemic
A new study in The Lancet Planetary Health finds that cultural attitudes may explain the stark differences in how countries experience the pandemic.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2021

Ancient Trees Show When The Earth's Magnetic Field Last Flipped Out
A precise record of the last major reversal of the Earth's magnetic poles can be found in ancient trees. Researchers say this event 42,000 years ago had a huge impact on the planet and ancient humans.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2021

What A 30,000-Person Survey Reveals About Day-To-Day Life In The Pandemic
The responses reveal the impact on living standards in nine low- and middle-income countries — and may help governments find a way to help citizens most in need.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2021

American Life Expectancy Dropped By A Full Year In The First Half Of 2020
The group that suffered the largest drop in life expectancy was Black males — a decline of 3 years. Hispanic males also saw a large decrease, with a decline of 2.4 years.

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