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NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 21, 2020

CDC Publishes — Then Withdraws — Guidance On Aerosol Spread Of Coronavirus
The CDC says the guidelines were posted to its website in error. The now-deleted updates were notable because so far the agency has stopped short of saying that the virus is airborne.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 20, 2020

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19
One thing that has improved a lot over the course of the pandemic is treatment of seriously ill COVID-19 patients in intensive care units. Here's one man's success story.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 18, 2020

Scientists Discover 120,000-Year-Old Human Footprints In Saudi Arabia
Scientists discovered 120,000-year-old human footprints in Saudi Arabia along with those of horses and elephants — hinting the region was once more hospitable to people moving out of Africa.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2020

Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine
Researchers were able to mimic the mind-altering effects of the drug ketamine by inducing a particular rhythm in one area of the brain.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2020

Scientists Discover Way To Induce Altered State Of Mind Without Drugs
The drug ketamine can cause an out-of-body experience. Scientists have been able to induce this altered state in a person without drugs. The ability to control dissociation could help many patients.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2020

Latinos Report Financial Strain As Pandemic Erodes Income And Savings
An NPR poll finds 72% of Latino households in the United States are facing serious financial problems — double the share of whites who report this. Major health problems are mounting, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 16, 2020

The Majority Of Children Who Die From COVID-19 Are Children Of Color
According to data reported to the CDC, 121 children died from COVID-19 between February and July of this year. And 78% of the children who died were Hispanic, Black or Native American.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 14, 2020

A Possible Sign Of Life Right Next Door To Earth, On Venus
Scientists have found a gas associated with living organisms in a region of Venus' atmosphere. They can't figure out how it got there if it didn't come from life.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 12, 2020

AstraZeneca Resumes Its COVID-19 Vaccine Trials In The U.K.
The company had placed its worldwide vaccine trials on hold for several days. It now says a safety review by regulators and reviewers is complete. No word on when studies in the U.S. might resume.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 12, 2020

A COVID-19 Vaccine May Be Only 50% Effective. Is That Good Enough?
As scientists race to develop a vaccine that proves "safe and effective," that doesn't mean it will prevent infection in everyone who gets it. Though it might eventually stop the pandemic. Here's how.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2020

Climate Change May Wipe Out Large Mangrove Forests, New Research Suggests
Mangroves help protect coastal areas from flooding and sequester more carbon than tropical forests. But new studies suggest they may be wiped out by the rise of sea levels.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2020

Researchers Discover A Form Of 'Culture' Among Bonobos
Primatologists observed that different groups of bonobos have different dietary preferences — indicating a form of "culture" among the animals.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 11, 2020

As COVID-19 Vaccine Trials Move At Warp Speed, Recruiting Black Volunteers Takes Time
Some pharmaceutical companies are well into the final phase of clinical trials for a coronavirus vaccine. But efforts to recruit patients from minority groups are just beginning.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2020

Pandemic Financially Imperils Nearly Half of American Households, Poll Finds
There are dividing lines when it comes to how families are weathering the pandemic: Those living in big cities, those making less than $100,000 a year, and Latino and Black families are faring worst.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2020

'I Try So Hard Not To Cry': Half Of All U.S. Households In Serious Financial Trouble
There are dividing lines when it comes to how families are weathering the pandemic: Those living in big cities, those making less than $100,000 a year, and Latino and Black families are faring worst.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 10, 2020

'I Try So Hard Not To Cry': Nearly Half Of U.S. Households Face A Financial Crisis
There are dividing lines when it comes to how families are weathering the pandemic: Those living in big cities, those making less than $100,000 a year, and Latino and Black families are faring worst.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Paused, Due To Illness In One Volunteer
A large study of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been put on hold after one of the volunteers became ill.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Paused Due To Illness In One Volunteer
A large study of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been put on hold after one of the volunteers became ill.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Paused Due To Illness In Volunteer
AstraZeneca, which is working with the University of Oxford, hasn't said what the illness is. It will try to determine whether the illness is related to the vaccine, or just a chance event.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

California Scientists Build A Camera To Take Pictures Of Huge Swath Of Sky
Scientists and engineers in California are building a unique 3.2 billion pixel camera for a telescope under construction in Chile. The camera has taken its first test pictures — of broccoli.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

Drug That Bulked Up Mice In Space Might Someday Help Astronauts Make Long Voyages
An experiment involving some "mighty mice" on the International Space Station could someday help astronauts maintain muscle and bone strength on interplanetary journeys.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 08, 2020

Eating Disorders Thrive In Anxious Times, And Pose A Lethal Threat
Eating disorders strike nearly 1 in 10 Americans, with the second-highest death rate of all psychiatric disorders. The pandemic's food insecurity, stockpiling and stress are triggering flare-ups.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2020

Researchers Find A Drug That Could Allow Astronauts Spend Years In Space
An experimental drug let mice spend a month in the International Space Station's near-zero gravity without losing mass. It could help people spend years in space without major health consequences.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2020

The Hubble Space Telescope Still Works Great—Except When It Doesn't
None of us are perfect, and sometimes the Hubble Space Telescope just flat-out points to the wrong spot in the sky. This has been happening more than ever in the last couple years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2020

The Hubble Space Telescope Still Works Great — Except When It Doesn't
None of us is perfect, and sometimes the Hubble Space Telescope just flat-out points to the wrong spot in the sky. This has been happening more than ever in the last couple of years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2020

Researchers Say Fresh Air Can Prevent Aerosol Transmission Of The Coronavirus
There's increasing evidence that the coronavirus can linger and spread through the air in crowded indoor rooms. Researchers say infectious clouds can be dispersed with fresh air.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 05, 2020

Young Voter Engagement In This Year's Election
NPR's Michel Martin explores how young voters may impact November's election with researcher Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 03, 2020

Flu Season Looms And Scientists Wonder How Flu And COVID-19 Might Mix
There's a lot scientists don't know about how viral infections can interact. But researchers are eager to figure out how COVID-19 infections might affect flu infections and vice versa.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 03, 2020

Study: How The Power Of Facebook And Google Affects Local Communities
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Pat Garofalo of the American Economic Liberties Project, about the progressive group's study indicating Facebook and Google are harming local journalism.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2020

Inexpensive Steroids Can Save Lives Of Seriously Ill COVID-19 Patients
Multiple studies now confirm earlier research: Dexamethasone and hydrocortisone, drugs that reduce an immune system's overreaction, can help reduce deaths of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2020

Drug Combination Slows Progression Of ALS And Could Mark 'New Era' In Treatment
Scientists say new drugs are on the way for patients with ALS. The latest is a two-drug combo that appears to slow the progression of the fatal nerve disease with a modest but meaningful benefit.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2020

Pandemic's Emotional Hammer Hits Hard
Mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have been profound, researchers find. Nearly 25% of Americans are depressed, particularly those who have low incomes and have lost a job or a loved one.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 02, 2020

Making Gyms Safer: Why The Virus Is Less Likely To Spread There Than In A Bar
Gyms are reopening with fewer people and more protocols, and they want to rehabilitate their pandemic-battered image. Although there's not much evidence, they say the science is on their side.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 31, 2020

Bats Use Baby Talk To Teach Their Pups, Researchers Say
Researchers say mother bats use baby talk to communicate with their pups. Experts say that it helps bats learn the language.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 29, 2020

Scientists Explore Why Some People Are Able To Live With An Infection Unscathed
What if your body could corral an infection instead of eliminating it? Immunologists who see this sort of "disease tolerance" in plants wonder what role it might play in asymptomatic human infections.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 28, 2020

What A Nasal Spray Vaccine Against COVID-19 Might Do Even Better Than A Shot
A vaccine against the coronavirus needs to keep people from getting very sick and dying. But preventing the spread of the disease is also important, and vaccines delivered by nasal spray may do that.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2020

Where Did Earth's Water Come From?
Scientists have long debated whether the Earth's water was here when the planet formed or whether it arrived later. A study suggests much of the water originated in rocks from which Earth is built.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2020

Water, Water, Every Where — And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From
Some unusual meteorites suggest that Earth got its water at its start, rather than forming dry and being watered by comets later on.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2020

Water, Water, Every Where—And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From
Some unusual meteorites suggest that Earth got its water at its start, rather than forming dry and being watered by comets later on.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 27, 2020

'Racial Inequality May Be As Deadly As COVID-19,' Analysis Finds
A century of U.S. statistics finds mortality rates and life expectancy were much worse for Black Americans during pre-pandemic years than they have been for white people during the COVID-19 crisis.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 25, 2020

FDA's Hahn Apologizes For Overselling Plasma's Benefits As A COVID-19 Treatment
The Food and Drug Administration's chief said Sunday the therapy reduces deaths among COVID-19 patients by 35%. On Monday he apologized, acknowledging that statistic greatly exaggerates any benefit.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 24, 2020

German Experiment Tests How The Coronavirus Spreads At A Concert
Researchers hope it can provide insight as to how COVID-19 spreads in large stadiums — and how to prevent it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 24, 2020

Another COVID-19 Medical Mystery: Patients Come Off Ventilator But Linger In A Coma
Doctors are researching why some patients remain unconscious for days or weeks, even after sedating drugs are withdrawn. They also worry that these patients aren't being given time to recover.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 24, 2020

Another COVID-19 Medical Mystery: Patients Come Off Ventilator, But Linger In A Coma
Doctors are researching why some patients remain unconscious for days or weeks, even after sedating drugs are withdrawn. They also worry that these patients aren't being given time to recover.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2020

Fallen Boulder Reveals 313 Million-Year-Old Fossil Footprints At Grand Canyon
The side-by-side tracks of two ancient animals have been called "by far the oldest vertebrate tracks in Grand Canyon."

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2020

Why Coronavirus Superspreading Events Happen
The coronavirus appears to transmit unevenly: A few people can infect many, while others don't pass the virus on at all. Researchers are working to understand the factors that drive superspreading.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 20, 2020

Why Do Zebras Have Stripes?
The stripes on zebras have been found to repel flies. But now researchers have found a black-and-white checkered pattern will, too — making them question the optical effect behind the phenomenon.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 18, 2020

The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White
New research suggests that penguins' ancestors originated not in frozen Antarctica but, instead, off the coasts of Australia and New Zealand, adapting to new climes over 22 million years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 18, 2020

How Bars Are Fueling COVID-19 Outbreaks
To owners of bars and nightclubs, pandemic restrictions on the industry can feel punitive. But there are important differences, virus hunters say, between a bar and a restaurant that serves alcohol.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 17, 2020

CDC Study Finds Hispanics Hit Disproportionately Hard By Workplace Outbreaks
A study out Monday found that Hispanic and nonwhite workers made up 73% of cases associated with workplace outbreaks in certain industries, despite representing 24% of the workforce in those sectors.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 13, 2020

Yale Researchers Seek FDA Approval For Coronavirus Saliva Test
Researchers at Yale University are seeking emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for a coronavirus saliva test. This streamlined test can offer results faster and easier.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 13, 2020

Everyone Needs A Buddy. Even Sharks
Contrary to the image of sharks as lone predators, new research has found evidence that some species are social creatures, who return repeatedly to the same fellow sharks, often for years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 12, 2020

Scientists Find A Species Of Sharks With Strong Social Ties
Scientists found that grey reef sharks in the central Pacific Ocean form social groups — and they say those connections can last for years.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 12, 2020

'Teeth The Size Of Bananas'; New Study Paints Picture Of 'Terror Crocodiles'
A new study reveals there were multiple species of Deinosuchus, the giant crocodylians that lived 75 million years ago. They were among the largest predators in the ecosystem and ate dinosaurs.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 11, 2020

Skepticism Greets Putin's Announcement Of Russian Coronavirus Vaccine
It's the first country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, but it has not finished Phase III trials to assess safety and effectiveness in the general population.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 06, 2020

The Special Sauce That Makes Some Vaccines Work
Adjuvants play a crucial role in many vaccines' effectiveness. Some scientists say there needs to be more research into developing a wider variety of adjuvants because of how important they are.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 06, 2020

Cutting-Edge Research Shows How Hair Dulls Razor Blades
Hair is soft compared to steel, but shaving can dull a razor surprisingly quickly. A new study examines exactly how a strand of hair can chip and crack a sharp blade.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 05, 2020

Attaching Small Weights To Pigeons Helps Them Shoot Up In The Social Hierarchy
Scientists found that attaching small weights to pigeons causes them to shoot up in the social hierarchy. The finding is important because scientists often attach trackers to pigeons.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 04, 2020

New Research Shows Dinosaurs Suffered From Malignant Cancer, Too
Scientists have identified an aggressive bone cancer — for the first time — in the fibula of a dinosaur that lived 76 to 77 million years ago. The diagnosis sheds new light on dinosaurs and disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 04, 2020

Scientists Discover Malignant Cancer In A Dinosaur
Scientists have discovered the first incidence of malignant cancer in a dinosaur in the leg bone of a horned dinosaur.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 04, 2020

2020 Flu Shot Strategy: Get Yours Early In The Season
With the flu season looming, public health officials urge nearly all Americans over 6 months old to get immunized starting next month. Strategize now to avoid getting the flu while COVID-19 is raging.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 02, 2020

Splashdown! SpaceX And NASA Astronauts Make History
NASA and SpaceX are welcoming home two astronauts who splashed down safely in the Gulf of Mexico after several months on the International Space Station.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 31, 2020

New Study Finds Expanded Jobless Benefits Don't Reduce Employment
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Dana Scott, a doctoral candidate in economics at Yale University, about her study that looked at whether expanded jobless benefits reduced incentives to look for work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2020

Vaccine Candidate Delivers Protection In A Single Shot (In Monkeys)
Studies COVID-19 vaccine candidates in monkeys show promise of an effective vaccine, but it will large scale human trials to know for sure if they work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2020

The First Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists
Scientists have modified the genes of a squid, and genetically-altered octopuses could be coming soon.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 30, 2020

The 1st Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists
Scientists have modified the genes of a squid, and genetically altered octopuses could be coming soon.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 29, 2020

Researchers Solve A Question About Stonehenge Megaliths' Origin
Scientists found that the outer stones of the prehistoric structure originated about 15 miles away from where the structure stands.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 29, 2020

Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19
Scientists are now checking to see if purified blood serum from people who have recovered from COVID-19 might be more than a useful treatment. Perhaps it's a way to prevent disease in someone else.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 28, 2020

Pandemic Is Overwhelming U.S. Public Health Capacity In Many States. What Now?
With the coronavirus spreading out of control in many parts of the U.S., some experts say the strategy of testing and tracing can't contain the pandemic until lockdowns bring case numbers down.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 28, 2020

'Hidden Brain': How Psychology Was Misused In Teen's Murder Case
In 1979, dubious psychological techniques were used to put a teenager behind bars for life. These flawed ideas may still be at play in other criminal cases.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 28, 2020

Demand Surges For See-through Face Masks As Pandemic Swells
Face coverings are key to stopping spread of the coronavirus, but also slow communication, especially for people who don't hear well. Volunteers and companies suggest some transparent alternatives.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 27, 2020

Exotic Australian Fruit May Help Save Florida's Citrus Industry
Researchers are working to control citrus greening, a disease that has killed thousands of acres of orange trees. Finger limes produce a peptide that kills the bacterium responsible for the disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 27, 2020

A Boy With Muscular Dystrophy Was Headed For A Wheelchair. Then Gene Therapy Arrived
Gene therapy has helped a 9-year-old boy regain enough muscle strength to run. If successful in others, the treatment could change the lives of thousands of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 27, 2020

Flu Shot And Pneumonia Vaccine Might Reduce Alzheimer's Risk, Research Shows
Two new human studies back earlier hints that vaccines designed to prevent respiratory infections might also provide some protection against Alzheimer's disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 24, 2020

Without A Vaccine, Researchers Say, Herd Immunity May Never Be Achieved
A growing number of researchers think until there's an effective vaccine, the coronavirus will simply persist in the population, causing illness indefinitely. Better to squelch the spread instead.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 23, 2020

How Long Will Immunity To The Coronavirus Last?
Recent studies have raised fears that immunity to the coronavirus might be fleeting, thus making potential vaccines ineffective. The reality of the science is more complex — and more reassuring.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 22, 2020

Studies Suggest Immunity To The Coronavirus Is Likely To Be Short Term
Some studies suggest immunity to the coronavirus doesn't last long. That might have implications for the development of vaccines.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 22, 2020

Rapid, Cheap, Less Accurate Coronavirus Testing Has A Place, Scientists Say
A single test that can give false reassurance sounds bad. But a $10 test for the coronavirus, if repeated daily, would discover real infections, say proponents of such tests as screening tools.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 20, 2020

Researchers Hope Experimental Gene Therapy Is An Answer To A Fatal Genetic Disorder
Researchers believe gene therapy is poised to change the lives of thousands with the fatal genetic disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy — thanks to over 40 years of scientist Jude Samulski's work.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 20, 2020

Early Oxford-AstraZeneca Coronavirus Vaccine Data 'Encouraging,' Scientists Say
Testing in more than 1,000 people found the vaccine spurred an immune response and had no severe side effects. Larger trials are underway.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 20, 2020

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For Hemophilia, But Could Be Most Expensive U.S. Drug Ever
The first gene therapy for hemophilia could be approved by the FDA within six months, according to the drugmaker, raising hopes among families. But the drug's price could be $3 million per patient.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2020

Navigating Pregnancy Risks In The COVID-19 Era
Preliminary evidence suggests the coronavirus can pass through the placenta, and pregnancy slightly raises a woman's risk of a severe case of COVID-19. Medical experts urge calm and common sense.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 17, 2020

Safe Pregnancy As COVID-19 Surges: What's Best For Mom And Baby?
Preliminary evidence suggests the coronavirus can pass through the placenta, and pregnancy slightly raises a woman's risk of a severe case of COVID-19. Medical experts urge calm and common sense.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 16, 2020

It's A Good Time To Head To Mars
NASA is sending a six-wheeled rover to Mars to look for signs of microbial life stored in the rocks at Jezero crater. The rover is also the first step in returning samples of Martian rock to Earth.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 15, 2020

Loneliness Hasn't Increased Despite Pandemic, Research Finds. What Helped?
Though anxiety has increased in the U.S. in recent months, a drastic spike in loneliness that psychologists expected hasn't emerged. People seem to be finding new ways to connect, researchers say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 15, 2020

Video Chats, Driveway Dances And Dino Parades Buffer Pandemic's Loneliness
Though anxiety has increased in the U.S. in recent months, a drastic spike in loneliness that psychologists expected hasn't emerged. People seem to be finding new ways to connect, researchers say.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 09, 2020

Scientists Discover Enzyme That Could Result In A Drug Substitute For Exercise
Scientists have discovered an enzyme that is elevated in people and mice who exercise a lot. They hope the discovery could lead to medicine that would have some of the benefits of exercise.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

Scientists Discover A New Formula To Calculate A Dog's Age In Human Years
Scientists have come up with a new formula to calculate a dog's age in human years — and it is much more complicated than multiplying its real age by seven.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

To Come To The Rescue Or Not? Rats, Like People, Take Cues From Bystanders
Experiments in people have long shown that the presence of indifferent bystanders hurts the chances that someone will help a stranger in an emergency. Rats, it turns out, behave the same way.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

Antigen Test For COVID-19 Isn't As Reliable As Genetic Test, Experts Caution
Doctors are using a new antigen test that is a faster method to spot people infected with the coronavirus. It's cheaper and simpler but may be less reliable.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

New Clues To ALS And Alzheimer's Disease From Physics
Structures inside healthy brain cells nimbly move from one state to the next to perform different functions. But in certain degenerative brain diseases, scientists now think, that process gets stuck.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 08, 2020

New Clues To ALS And Alzheimer's From Physics
Structures inside healthy brain cells nimbly move from one state to the next to perform different functions. But in certain degenerative brain diseases, scientists now think, that process gets stuck.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2020

Survey: 3% Of Americans Moved Due To The Pandemic
Among the young, the numbers shot up: 9% of adults 18-29 have moved due to the coronavirus. Some people moved to avoid catching the virus, while others were forced by the closing of college campuses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2020

Scientist Makes A Discovery That May Lead To New Drugs For Rare Brain Diseases
J. Paul Taylor has found that some brain diseases, like Alzheimer's and ALS, are linked to a basic process inside brain cells. Scientists hope drugs that tweak the process can treat illnesses.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 06, 2020

The Dentist Will See You Now. But Should You Go?
Dentists spend their careers eye to eye with infectious patients, their hands inside gaping mouths, and have a vested interest in making sure everyone stays safe. Here's how they do it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 04, 2020

Why Some Young People Fear Social Isolation More Than COVID-19
It's not that young adults aren't worried about the pandemic, psychologists say, but they are at far greater risk of dying by suicide. Finding ways beyond screens to foster social bonds is crucial.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 03, 2020

Widespread Use Of Face Masks Could Save Tens Of Thousands Of Lives, Models Project
Models developed by mathematical epidemiologists project that tens thousands of lives across the US can be saved by more people wearing face masks.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jul 03, 2020

How Showing Special Kindness To Some Can Have Moral Consequences
A type of discrimination is overlooked because it's rooted, not in hate, but in love. Our Hidden Brain team asks why good deeds, those we do for spouses or neighbors, can sometimes lead to injustice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2020

Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment
An experimental COVID-19 medicine that has been shown to shorten the time people with severe illness have to stay in the hospital finally has a price tag that's lower than some analysts expected.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jun 29, 2020

How Snakes Fly (Hint: It's Not On A Plane)
A snake researcher always wondered how flying snakes propelled themselves. Then, someone told him he should work with the snakes in "The Cube" - a vast theater space with cameras everywhere.

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