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NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 23, 2024

Clues to a better understanding of chronic fatigue syndrome emerge from major study
After seven years of research, the findings shed light on the long-neglected illness. Scientists say the results could lead to future trials for potential treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 22, 2024

Scientists scanning the seafloor discover a long-lost Stone Age 'megastructure'
The more than half mile long wall, called the Blinkerwall, was likely used by Stone Age hunter-gatherers to herd reindeer toward a shooting blind.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 21, 2024

An ambitious NIH study has brought new attention to chronic fatigue syndrome
Long COVID has brought new attention to how complex chronic illnesses can develop in the aftermath of a viral infection. Prior research may help forward clinical trials to test possible treatments.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 21, 2024

In light of the solar maximum, a look at the biggest solar storm in recorded history
We are at the height of the Sun's activity in its eleven year cycle, known to astronomers as the solar maximum. This means that over the next several months there's going to be a lot of solar activity. It's got us thinking back to 1859. That's when astronomer Richard Carrington was studying the Sun when he witnessed the most intense geomagnetic storm recorded in history. The storm, triggered by a giant solar flare, sent brilliant auroral displays across the globe causing electrical sparking and fires in telegraph stations. This encore episode, Regina talks to solar physicist Dr. Samaiyah Farid about what's now known as the Carrington event and about what may happen the next time a massive solar storm hits Earth.

Want to hear us cover other parts of the solar system? Email the show at shortwave@npr.org to let us know!

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 19, 2024

One woolly mammoth's journey at the end of the Ice Age
Lately, paleoecologist Audrey Rowe has been a bit preoccupied with a girl named Elma. That's because Elma is ... a woolly mammoth. And 14,000 years ago, when Elma was alive, her habitat in interior Alaska was rapidly changing. The Ice Age was coming to a close and human hunters were starting early settlements. Which leads to an intriguing question: Who, or what, killed her? In the search for answers, Audrey traces Elma's life and journey through — get this — a single tusk. Today, she shares her insights on what the mammoth extinction from thousands of years ago can teach us about megafauna extinctions today with guest host Nate Rott.

Thoughts on other ancient animal stories we should tell? Email us at shortwave@npr.org and we might make a future episode about it!

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 18, 2024

A new study finds the memory systems that give trivia champions an edge
Memory is complicated. A new study co-authored by Jeopardy! contestant Monica Thieu looks at how two different memory systems might give some people an edge with recalling facts.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 14, 2024

Tai chi reduces blood pressure better than aerobic exercise, study finds
The slow-moving Chinese martial art tai chi is known to increase flexibility and balance. Now, research suggests it's more effective at reducing blood pressure than more vigorous forms of exercise.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 14, 2024

Manny loves Cayenne. Plus, 5 facts about queer animals for Valentine's Day
In a Valentine's Day exclusive report, NPR has learned there is currently a gay anteater couple at Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Washington D.C.But this couple is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg when it comes to queerness in the animal world - it's been documented in hundreds of species. We spoke with wildlife ecologist Christine Wilkinson of the "Queer is Natural" TikTok series to uncover the wildest, queerest animals of the bunch.

Questions, comments or thoughts on queer animal love? Email us at shortwave@npr.org and we might feature it on a future episode!

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 12, 2024

Across the world, migrating animal populations are dwindling. Here's why
In a landmark UN study, researchers found nearly half of the world's threatened migratory species have declining populations. More than a fifth of the assessed animals face extinction.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 09, 2024

Clownfish might be counting their potential enemies' stripes
At least, that's what a group of researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University thinks. The team recently published a study in the journal Experimental Biology suggesting that Amphiphrion ocellaris, or clown anemonefish, may be counting. Specifically, the authors think the fish may be looking at the number of vertical white stripes on each other as well as other anemonefish as a way to identify their own species. Not only that — the researchers think that the fish are noticing the minutiae of other anemonefish's looks because of some fishy marine geopolitics.

Questions, comments or thoughts on another marine sea creature you want to hear us cover? Email us at shortwave@npr.org and we might feature it on a future episode!

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 08, 2024

This week in science: moths' anti-bat signal, fish who count and GMO crops at home
Short Wave's Regina Barber and Margaret Cirino talk through how moths produce an anti-bat signal, why clownfish could be counting to 3 and the first GMO food crop sold directly to home gardeners.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 08, 2024

California sea otters nearly went extinct. Now they're rescuing their coastal habitat
California sea otter populations have rebounded in recent decades. New research finds that by feasting on shore crabs, these otters are helping to protect their coastal marsh habitat against erosion.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 05, 2024

Why wolves are thriving in this radioactive zone
In 1986 the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded, releasing radioactive material into northern Ukraine and Belarus. It was the most serious nuclear accident in history. Over one hundred thousand people were evacuated from the surrounding area. But local gray wolves never left — and their population has grown over the years. It's seven times denser than populations in protected lands elsewhere in Belarus. This fact has led scientists to wonder whether the wolves are genetically either resistant or resilient to cancer — or if the wolves are simply thriving because humans aren't interfering with them.

This episode, researchers Shane Campbell-Staton and Cara Love talk through what might be causing this population boom. Plus, why researchers in the field of human cancer are eager to collaborate with them.

Want to hear about other ways humans are impacting the planet? Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2024

Home sapiens and Neanderthals may have interbred, new research shows
NPR's Elissa Nadworny speaks with Elena Zavala of the University of California, Berkeley, about new research showing how homo sapiens and Neanderthals interacted and may have even interbred.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 04, 2024

Homo sapiens and Neanderthals may have interbred, new research shows
NPR's Elissa Nadworny speaks with Elena Zavala of the University of California, Berkeley, about new research showing how homo sapiens and Neanderthals interacted and may have even interbred.

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 01, 2024

Meet the 'chicken from hell' 2.0: a newly discovered dinosaur
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Kyle Atkins-Weltman, a PhD student of paleoecology at Oklahoma State University, about a newly discovered dinosaur dubbed the "chicken from hell".

NPR Topics: Research News
Feb 01, 2024

Need to track animals around the world? Tap into the 'spider-verse,' scientists say
Spiderwebs can capture environmental DNA, or eDNA, from vertebrate animals in their area, potentially making them a useful tool in animal monitoring, tracking and conservation.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 31, 2024

Spiderwebs could offer a snapshot of an ecosystem, study shows
Scientists have found that spiderwebs can be used to capture environmental DNA, which reflects the animal population of an area. The technique may help track the biodiversity of an ecosystem.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 30, 2024

'Like moths to a flame'? Here's what's going on with insects and porch lights
Those insects you see flying in crazed circles are trying to keep their backs towards the light because they think that direction is up, new research suggests.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 30, 2024

Why do moths fly in circles around a light? They can't tell 'up' from 'down'
Those insects you see flying in crazed circles are trying to keep their backs towards the light because they think that direction is up, new research suggests.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 28, 2024

Hearing loss is greater among people living in rural areas, study finds
A new study looking at hearing loss finds that it's greater among people living in rural areas. NPR's Ayesha Rascoe talks with audiologist Nicholas Reed, who co-authored the study.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 28, 2024

Coronavirus FAQ: How long does my post-COVID protection last? When is it booster time?
How long does immunity last after an infection? Are rapid tests always accurate? How often is a booster in order? In this installment of our FAQ series, we look into questions about "COVID time."

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 26, 2024

'Hot droughts' are becoming more common in the arid West, new study finds
Scientists looked at trees to better understand the interplay between temperatures and droughts in the Western U.S. Human-caused climate change is exacerbating both.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 26, 2024

That giant extinct shark, Megalodon? Maybe it wasn't so mega
The ancient extinct shark that starred in the film The Meg is thought to be the largest shark that ever swam the Earth. But there's debate over what it really looked like.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 23, 2024

The megalodon maybe wasn't so mega, research suggests
The megalodon went extinct 3.6 million years ago, and is thought to be the largest shark that ever swam the Earth. But the megalodon may not have been as big as once thought, some researchers suggest.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 23, 2024

New fossils suggest kelp forests have swayed in the seas for at least 32 million years
A new study of kelp forests from the coast of Washington state show that kelp forests, which host all manner of marine life, developed tens of millions of years ago.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 22, 2024

New kelp fossils may help explain the Pacific Ocean's underwater jungles
Newly discovered kelp fossils peg their existence to 32 million years ago. These fossils may help explain how the Pacific Ocean's underwater 'forests' came to be.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 20, 2024

Advocates push for greater investment in long COVID research at Senate hearing
Four years after the first known case of COVID-19 in the United States, long COVID remains a mystery to scientists. Medical experts called for more research funding at a Senate hearing Thursday.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 17, 2024

James Webb Telescope detects earliest known black hole — it's really big for its age
Data from the James Webb Space Telescope indicate that a galaxy known as GN-z11 has a supermassive black hole at its center — one that's far more massive than astronomers expected.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 15, 2024

An old relative of the T. rex sparks new questions about the dinosaur's origins
Researchers say they've identified the oldest known Tyrannosaurus, shaking up the ongoing debate over how and when the dinosaurs arrived in North America.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 13, 2024

Coronavirus FAQ: Are we in a surge? How do you cope if your whole family catches it?
Are we in a surge? How would we know? Is winter now "COVID season?" And what do you do if your whole family got the coronavirus over the holidays? We tackle readers' coronavirus questions.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 10, 2024

Researchers find a massive number of plastic particles in bottled water
Researchers found roughly 240,000 detectable plastic fragments in a typical liter of bottled water. Most of them were nanoplastics — particles less than 1 micrometer in size.

NPR Topics: Research News
Jan 05, 2024

Don't look so blue, Neptune: Now astronomers know this planet's true color
Neptune has long been depicted as a deeper, darker blue than its fellow ice giant Uranus, but a new study shows that both are a similar shade of light greenish blue.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 31, 2023

Study sheds new light on the social evolution of primates
For decades, researchers have said that our mammalian ancestors were solitary but a new analysis turns that thinking on its head, suggesting they were far more sociable than was previously thought.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 25, 2023

Just how big can a snowflake get? It depends on what you mean by 'snowflake'
The Guinness World Record folks would have us believe in a 19th century snowflake more than a foot wide, but some scientists are skeptical.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 21, 2023

Science says declining social invites is OK. Here are 3 tips for doing it
A new study has examined the potential ramifications of declining an invitation for a social outing, and found that people tend to overestimate just how much it matters.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 15, 2023

Cats play fetch, too — as long as they're in control, a study finds
A new study showed that cats fetched objects instinctively, in the absence of overt training. Fetching is defined as when the animal retrieves an object that's thrown.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 13, 2023

Infertile people, gay and trans couples yearn for progress on lab-made eggs and sperm
An experimental technology that might someday allow infertile couples, as well as gay and trans couples, to have genetically related children stirs hope. So far, the technique has worked in mice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 13, 2023

These songbirds sing for hours a day to keep their vocal muscles in shape
Zebra finches who did not sing every day quickly lose their vocal prowess, a new study finds. The results could potentially shed light on vocal rehabilitation for humans, too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2023

The murderous creature you live with is a murderous creature, a study confirms
More scientific evidence has surfaced to show that while Mittens may be your sweet angel, letting her roam outside is also a big threat to biodiversity.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2023

The murderous creature you live with is a murderous creature, study confirms
More scientific evidence has surfaced to show that while mittens may be your sweet angel, letting her roam outside is also a big threat to biodiversity.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2023

Songbirds flex singing muscles every day to stay in shape, shows new study
A new study shows male zebra finches must sing every day to keep their vocal muscles in shape. Females prefer the songs of males that did their daily vocal workout.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 12, 2023

Scientists have quantified exactly how murderous your cat is
Scientists have compiled an exhaustive list of all the species cats consume, and it includes more than 2000 birds, reptiles, mammals and insects — a sixth of which are of conservation concern.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 08, 2023

FDA approves first gene-editing treatment for human illness
The Food and Drug Administration approved two genetic treatments for sickle cell disease, including one that uses gene-editing. The approvals offer hope for patients and signal a new medical era.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 07, 2023

Looking for honey? This African bird will heed your call and take you there
The wild honeyguide responds to distinct calls from local honey foragers. Says one researcher: The bird basically seems to be saying, "Hey, I'm here and I know where there's some honey, so follow me."

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 07, 2023

This African bird will lead you to honey, if you call to it in just the right way
The wild honeyguide responds to distinct calls from local honey foragers. Says one researcher: The bird basically seems to be saying, "Hey, I'm here and I know where there's some honey, so follow me."

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 07, 2023

A fibrous path 'twixt heart and brain may make you swoon
A newly discovered pathway between the heart and brain can cause fainting, at least in mice.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 06, 2023

A little electric stimulation in just the right spot may bolster a damaged brain
A small study found that electrically stimulating an area deep in the brain allowed people with severe traumatic brain injuries to complete a cognitive test more quickly.

NPR Topics: Research News
Dec 04, 2023

Big city mosquitoes are a big problem — and now a big target
Africa's cities have become home to an invasive, malaria-carrying mosquito. New research suggests vulnerabilities that could be exploited to take on the disease-bearing insects.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 23, 2023

Salty much? These brain cells decide when tasty becomes blech
Scientists say two separate brain circuits control how much salt we consume.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 22, 2023

What can trigger an itch? Scientists have found a new culprit
This itchy microbe really touches a nerve. A common skin bacterium can directly interact with a nerve cell to trigger an itch, new study shows, suggesting possible new therapies for itchy conditions.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 22, 2023

Can we grow veggies on Mars? Fly larvae and synthetic soil may hold the answer
A Texas undergrad is investigating how to grow vegetables on Mars — and has cultivated test samples of English peas in simulated Martian soil, with fertilizer from fly larvae.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 21, 2023

2 different brain circuits influence our taste for salt, study finds
Two brain circuits help regulate salt intake: One adjusts salt cravings, the other determines whether we find salty food delicious or disgusting. (Story aired on ATC on Nov. 20, 2023.)

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 21, 2023

Army ants use collective intelligence to build bridges. Robots could learn from them
As army ants travel over uneven terrain, they link their bodies together to create bridges — a system that might give engineers insight into controlling robotic swarms.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 20, 2023

A new study says the global toll of lead exposure is even worse than we thought
A new study finds that 5.5 million adults worldwide died in 2019 from cardiovascular disease attributable to lead exposure, more than six times higher than a previous estimate.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 15, 2023

Clouds made of sand make for a strange kind of rain on this hot planet
On Earth, clouds and rain are made of water. But the James Webb Space Telescope has found that on a planet called WASP-107b, the rain and clouds are made of sand.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 14, 2023

How army ants' architecture demonstrates their collective intelligence
As army ants travel over uneven terrain, they link their bodies together to create bridges — a system that might give engineers insight into controlling robotic swarms.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 14, 2023

Scientists are beginning to understand how long COVID symptoms affect the brain
Many symptoms of long COVID are related to the brain. Now scientists are beginning to understand why brain fog, fatigue, and pain can linger for years after a person was infected.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 13, 2023

Skinny roads save lives, according to a study on the width of traffic lanes
A new study found engineers should make roads narrower to reduce car crashes. Such improvements would also come with environmental and economic benefits.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 11, 2023

Researchers rediscover an echidna named after David Attenborough
Attenborough's long-beaked echidna, a mammal with a unique evolutionary history, was caught on camera for the first time. Researchers hope their find advances conservation efforts in remote Indonesia.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2023

The Kinsey institute faces possible separation from Indiana University
Indiana University trustees will decide whether to partially sever the University's long standing ties with the famous organization.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 09, 2023

'Just say no' didn't actually protect students from drugs. Here's what could
For years, programs like D.A.R.E. told students to "just say no" to drugs. But research shows that approach alone didn't work. Now experts are backing a new approach that could help save lives.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 05, 2023

Research finds female frogs play dead to avoid mating with males
In some species of frogs, the females play dead to avoid mating with aggressive males. Dr. Carolin Dittrich, behavior ecologist at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, tells us more.

NPR Topics: Research News
Nov 01, 2023

A 'tropical disease' carried by sand flies is confirmed in a new country: the U.S.
Leishmaniasis, a disease spread by a parasite carried by sand flies, is generally considered a tropical disease. Now, thanks to climate change, new research finds it's endemic to the United States.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 27, 2023

Q&A: This scientist developed a soap that could help fight skin cancer. He's 14.
Inspired by a childhood in sun-baked Ethiopia, Heman Bekele wanted to tackle skin cancer. He came up with a topical cancer-fighting soap, and it won him the 3M Young Scientist's Challenge.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 27, 2023

This popular weight-loss strategy might help with Type 2 diabetes
Intermittent fasting is popular for weight-loss. A new study finds it might help with diabetes too.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 27, 2023

At 14 years old, America's Top Young Scientist dreams of curing skin cancer
Heman Bekele, winner of 3M's Young Scientist Challenge, wants to make cancer treatment cheaper and more accessible.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 25, 2023

How many friends do Americans have? A survey crunched the numbers
A study released this month from the Pew Research Center has delved into what friendship in the U.S. looks like, and just how much they mean to us.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 24, 2023

Long COVID brain fog may originate in a surprising place, say scientists
Scientists studying the causes of long COVID symptoms are proposing a surprising pathway. Their research weaves together several prominent lines of evidence on what might be driving the condition.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 19, 2023

This week in science: How albatrosses navigate, fossilized ocean worms, meteor shower
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Regina Barber and Aaron Scott of Short Wave about albatrosses' impressive navigational abilities, fossilized ocean worms and an upcoming meteor shower.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 16, 2023

Scientists built the largest-ever map of the human brain. Here's what they found
A new atlas of the human brain could help explain abilities like language - and vulnerabilities, like Alzheimer's disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 12, 2023

New atlas of brain cells offers insight on disorders like autism and ADHD
An NIH-led effort to create an atlas of human brain cells has identified more than 3,000 types of cells. The finding will help researchers understand disorders like autism, ADHD, and schizophrenia.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 11, 2023

Next time you flip a coin you might want to pick the side that's already facing up
Researchers find flipped coins have what's called same side bias. They flipped coins in 46 currencies 350,000 times, and registered that 51% of the time the coins landed on the side they started on.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 08, 2023

With new research, your smart speaker might better understand African American English
NPR's Ayesha Rascoe speaks to Howard University professor Gloria Washington about a new project that will make it easier for Black people to be understood by automatic speech recognition technology.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 08, 2023

Ready to cold plunge? We dive into the science to see if it's worth it
When it comes to the health benefits of cold water dips, the hype is ahead of the science. NPR talked to researchers about what's true, what's not, and the latest on how to get the most out of it.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 07, 2023

Fossil footprints in New Mexico suggest humans have been here longer than we thought
A new study of fossil footprints in White Sands National Park bolsters the argument that humans may have lived in North America longer than thought.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 05, 2023

White Sands fossil footprints challenge notions about human history
How long have humans lived in North America? For decades, the commonest answer has been perhaps 14,000 years — but new findings add weight to arguments for a longer human history in the Americas.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2023

Scientists looked at nearly every known amphibian type. They're not doing great
A new global assessment of the world's amphibians finds that more than 2 of every 5 known species is at risk of extinction. Habitat loss, disease and climate change are the main drivers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2023

Scientists looked at nearly every known amphibian type. They're not doing great.
A new global assessment of the world's amphibians finds that more than 2 of every 5 known species is at risk of extinction. Habitat loss, disease and climate change are the main drivers.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2023

This expert on water scarcity would never call herself a 'genius.' But MacArthur would
Amber Wutich, an anthropologist and newly minted 'MacArthur genius,' says water scarcity is a human-caused problem that requires human-generated solutions.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2023

This MacArthur 'genius' knew the initial theory of COVID transmission was flawed
When COVID-19 first emerged, Linsey Marr suspected right away it spread through the air. Time has proved this aerosols engineer right. Now she's being honored with a MacArthur "genius grant."

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2023

Nobel Prize in chemistry goes to three scientists for tiny, colorful quantum dots
Three scientists were honored for their work with the tiny nanoparticles that allow for very bright colors. They are used in many electronics, like LED displays.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 04, 2023

3 scientists win Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on tiny quantum dots
The three were honored for their work with the tiny particles that are just a few atoms in diameter and allow for very bright colors. They are used in many electronics, like LED displays.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 02, 2023

Brain cells, interrupted: How some genes may cause autism, epilepsy and schizophrenia
Researchers have identified 46 genes that can disrupt a process that is critical to early brain development. The finding could help scientists find new treatments for disorders including autism.

NPR Topics: Research News
Oct 01, 2023

The alternative to buying new snow boots for kids every year? Expandable shoes
Parents often lament having to get a new pair of winter boots for their kids every year as they grow out of their old ones. A group of Northwestern University students came up with a fix for that.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 29, 2023

What black holes can teach us about daily life
Black holes may contain the masses of more than a billion suns, but they also hold a few lessons that we humans can apply to everyday life.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 28, 2023

250 million is the new 40: Mammals may already be halfway done on Earth, study finds
The future is always hard to predict, especially millions of years from now. But researchers found that a future supercontinent centered around the tropics may be tough for mammals to survive.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 24, 2023

Risk factor for Parkinson's discovered in genes from people of African descent
An effort to diversify genetic studies has led to a discovery about Parkinson's disease in people of African descent.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 23, 2023

A study of this champion's heart helped prove the benefits of exercise
More than a 100 years ago, doctors thought that too much running or other vigorous activity could harm us. Marathoner Clarence DeMar proved them wrong.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 22, 2023

World's oldest wooden structure defies Stone-Age stereotypes
Archaeologists dug into a riverbank in Zambia and uncovered what they call the earliest known wood construction by humans. The half-million year-old artifacts could change how we see Stone-Age people.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 21, 2023

This 500,000-year-old structure has researchers rethinking early human intelligence
A newly discovered example of wood construction by humans is nearly 500,000 years old and has archaeologists rethinking how technologically advanced these pre-homo-sapiens may have been.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 21, 2023

This 500,000-year-old wood structure has researchers how advanced early humans were
A newly discovered example of wood construction by humans is nearly 500,000 years old and has archaeologists rethinking how technologically advanced these pre-homo-sapiens may have been.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 09, 2023

Unraveling long COVID: Here's what scientists who study the illness want to find out
At a recent medical gathering, researchers presented their latest hypotheses about what causes - and what could treat - the lingering disease.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2023

Is your dog a super good boy or girl? Here's the scientifically best way to tell them
Researchers in Hungary have looked at whether the high pitched babble people use with their dogs scientifically resonates with pets.

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 07, 2023

Study shows NFL jersey numbers are linked to perceptions of body type
A UCLA study finds that lower NFL jersey numbers tend to be associated with the idea that a player's body is slimmer and faster. (Story aired on All Things Considered on Sept. 6, 2023.)

NPR Topics: Research News
Sep 06, 2023

Study shows NFL jersey numbers linked to perceptions of body type
A UCLA study finds that lower NFL jersey numbers tend to be associated with the idea that a player's body is slimmer and faster: evidence that "higher level" cognition steers "lower level" perception.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 28, 2023

Ozempic seems to curb cravings for alcohol. Here's what scientists think is going on
People taking weight-loss drugs Ozempic and Wegovy report a dampening of the urge to drink. Here's how the drugs curb cravings and what that could mean for helping treat addiction.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 25, 2023

Smoke from Canadian wildfires sent more asthma sufferers to the emergency room
Centers for Disease Control studies increased asthma-related ER visits by 17% nationwide during 19 of the smokiest days. On the worst air quality day in New York state, those visits spiked 82%.

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2023

This video from a humpback 'whale spa' shows skin care is serious — and social
The footage of humpback whales exfoliating their skin with sand offer new insight into these animals' complex lifestyles deep beneath the ocean

NPR Topics: Research News
Aug 21, 2023

Pink Floyd's 'Another Brick in the Wall,' helps researchers study the brain
Researchers, studying which parts of the brain are responsible for processing elements of music, played a Pink Floyd song to a group of patients with electrodes implanted in their brains.

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