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Kiplinger
Nov 14, 2019

Year-End Financial Checklist to Prevent Tax Penalties and Missed Planning Opportunities
Several significant tax and savings deadlines are fast approaching. Before you flip your calendar to December, consider making some of these smart money moves.

Kiplinger
Nov 14, 2019

Don't Bet Your Retirement on Monte Carlo Models
They measure market risk but don't eliminate it, and they don't consider all the twists and turns life can take. Instead, build a plan to create a stable income throughout your retirement, no matter what.

Kiplinger
Nov 13, 2019

14 High-Yield Dividend Stocks to Buy for the 4% Rule
Financial planners often recommend the 4% rule as a guideline for determining the annual amount that a retiree can withdraw from portfolios without depleting their nest egg over a 30-year retirement. And high-yield dividend stocks are a critical component of executing this strategy.

Financial adviser William Bengen devised the 4% rule after evaluating stock and bond data across several decades and discovering that a pattern of 4% yearly withdrawals provided reasonable security without bleeding a portfolio dry for at least 30 years, even through occasional market downturns.

The concept is simple: Draw down 4% of the portfolio value in the first year of retirement, then a matching amount (adjusted for inflation) in each subsequent year. Bengen himself later updated the number from 4% to 4.5%.

It's a good starting point for planning a comfortable retirement, but investors must consider a couple factors when applying it. For instance, the 4% rule doesn't account for big one-time purchases that might push your spending growth above the rate of inflation. It also assumes future market performance will resemble past results.

That said, income from your investments can count toward that amount, so if you draw a high (and preferably growing) yield from your portfolio, it means you'll only need minimal price appreciation to remain on track.

Here are 14 high-yield dividend stocks to buy that yield 4% or more. These picks have other qualities that are beneficial to retirees, too - some feature much lower volatility than the broader market, and many are consistent dividend raisers whose payouts may keep up with or even outrun inflation.

SEE ALSO: 20 Dividend Stocks to Fund 20 Years of Retirement

Kiplinger
Nov 13, 2019

Medicare Part B Premiums Climb for 2020
High-income retirees will experience the biggest changes.

Kiplinger
Nov 13, 2019

5 Timeless Financial Lessons Our Children Need Now
These gems served me well growing up, and now I'm passing them down to my own children.

Kiplinger
Nov 13, 2019

Four Ways to Disinherit Family Members
If you don't want your deadbeat brother or even an estranged spouse inheriting your estate, you have to tread carefully.

Kiplinger
Nov 12, 2019

Proposed RMD Rules Would Trim Mandated Distributions for Retirees
Ways to get your voice heard on possible new life expectancy tables that would affect your money.

Kiplinger
Nov 12, 2019

Year-End Tax Tip: Max Out Your 401(k) Plan Contributions
You can still save more for retirement if you haven't reached the 2019 contribution limit yet.

Kiplinger
Nov 12, 2019

5 Signs the Stock Market Has Reached a Tipping Point
An old investment saw goes like this: "Market tops are processes, bottoms are events." This means that in the stock market, it takes time for all the moving parts to top out and head lower. It's usually a gradual affair, unlike major bottom that are often marked with panic selling and sharp moves.

The market can easily shrug off events that could hurt it, such as a wide miss on economic growth or unusually weak housing statistics. However, when major issues start to accumulate, before we realize it, we've hit a tipping point where there are too many changes for the bull market to handle.

Let's be clear: We are not trying to pick a top or master market timing. But investors should take action when it becomes clear things have changed for the worse. And the sooner we recognize that change, the better.

Here are five signs investors should look for to gauge the likelihood of a stock market top. They're not set in set in stone - what was effective at one peak might not be effective for the next. However, evaluating these major areas still can provide clues as to the market's health and intentions.

SEE ALSO: The 15 Best Recession-Resistant Stocks to Buy

Kiplinger
Nov 12, 2019

Hate Math? Your Retirement Could Be at Risk
Math anxiety is extremely common, and it could affect your retirement saving potential. Here's why and what you should do about it.

Kiplinger
Nov 12, 2019

So, You Have an Estate Plan ... Now What?
These legal documents can't just be put in a drawer and forgotten for years and years. They need to be tended to periodically, or else they may cause problems when you need them the most.

Kiplinger
Nov 11, 2019

Market Timing: The Importance of Doing Nothing
Investors, as a whole, actually earn less than the funds that they invest in. Here's how to avoid that fate.

Kiplinger
Nov 11, 2019

5 Surprising Facts to Know About Retirement
Check out some often-overlooked retirement planning facts of life that everyone should be aware of.

Kiplinger
Nov 11, 2019

Lines of Desire: Follow the Trail to Real Estate Investment Success
What can the wagon tracks carved by 1800s American pioneers teach us about modern day investing? Karlin Conklin explains the key to 'striking gold' in commercial real estate.

Kiplinger
Nov 09, 2019

Health Plans for Early Retirees
Finding coverage until Medicare kicks in isn't hard, but policies can be pricey.

Kiplinger
Nov 09, 2019

Does Rental Income Count for IRA Contributions?
Rental income is considered "passive," and traditional and Roth IRA contributions must come from "active" income, or compensation from working.

Kiplinger
Nov 08, 2019

Proposed RMD Rules Winnow Mandated Distributions for Retirees
Ways to get your voice heard on possible new life expectancy tables that would affect your money.

Kiplinger
Nov 08, 2019

End-of-Year Moves to Trim Your 2019 Tax Tab
It's time to look for last-minute moves that can shrink your 2019 tax bill. But the end of the year is coming fast, so don't procrastinate.

Kiplinger
Nov 08, 2019

The 7 Best New ETFs of 2019
More than a thousand new ETFs have launched over the past five years. That includes nearly 200 fund debuts through the lion's share of 2019.

But ETFs are hitting the market at a slower pace than in previous years. Last year saw 268 new products come to market, following 276 in 2017 and 246 in 2016. Indeed, August 2019 saw only four launches across the entire month.

"The ETF industry has peaks and valleys in terms of launches," Todd Rosenbluth, head of ETF and mutual fund research at CFRA, told Financial Advisor magazine in September. "It's a sign of maturity - not maturing - that they're not just throwing products out there but are being more rational in trying to spot the trends that investors might find appealing."

Some of this year's new ETFs seem to prove that point. While 2019's crop is smaller than it has been in recent years, fund providers have come up with some truly worthwhile ideas. A few of these cover nascent industries that previously had little to no fund representation, while others are twists on tried-and-true investing strategies.

Here are the seven best new ETFs of 2019. Because they're all less than a year old, several of these funds have extremely low assets under management (AUM). While low assets can eventually force a fund to liquidate, for the moment, it's not a pressing concern. Just make sure to keep an eye on asset growth over time should you invest in any of these.

SEE ALSO: The 19 Best ETFs for a Prosperous 2019

Kiplinger
Nov 08, 2019

Avoiding the Debt Trap for Your Child's Higher Education
A four-year college experience could easily cost a family $100,000 these days. So, to make it work, parents need to do three things: Start saving early, help their kids be realistic and get a little creative.

Kiplinger
Nov 08, 2019

Wealth Shame: When Wealth Changes Your Life (and Not Everyone Else's)
Defined as a real or perceived distance when you make more money than your family or community of origin, wealth shame can be a painful transition.

Kiplinger
Nov 07, 2019

10 Companies With Lower Tax Rates Than Most Americans
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is coming up on its two-year anniversary, which makes it a good time to look at just how much it really changed the landscape for America's biggest firms.

The bottom line? A horde of the nation's largest companies have lower tax rates than most citizens.

The number crunchers at WalletHub analyzed annual reports for the S&P 100 - a blue-chip index of the largest companies in the U.S. stock market - to determine the federal, state and international tax rates they paid in 2018. Although individual companies' tax rates diverge widely, corporate America as a whole is paying much less to Uncle Sam than ever before.

The TCJA, signed by President Donald Trump in late 2017, permanently lowered the federal corporate tax rate to 21% from 35%. Data shows it worked. WalletHub says the overall tax rate (which includes federal, state and international) that S&P 100 companies pay is around 21%, which is more than 15 percentage points lower than they paid in 2017.

To get a sense of how small some of the nation's largest companies' tax bills are, we sorted through the WalletHub data to find the 10 corporations with the lowest overall tax rates. We excluded companies with negative tax rates in 2018 - the idea being that one year's discrete net tax benefit is less likely to be indicative of a company's tax situation going forward. For instance, we don't expect PepsiCo (PEP) to receive a 36.67% annual tax refund in perpetuity.

All of the companies on this list paid a lower federal tax rate (and overall tax rate) than the average American.

Read it and weep.

SEE ALSO: 20 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks With More Cash Than Debt

Kiplinger
Nov 07, 2019

Thinking of Relocating Your Business to California? Don't!
Let me tell you: California is La La Lawsuit Land. It can be a very expensive place to conduct business, so my advice is to steer clear.

Kiplinger
Nov 07, 2019

Protecting Teens' Mental Health Is a Wise Investment
As kids settle into college life, parents and teachers need to be on the lookout for signs of anxiety and depression and be ready to step in to help.

Kiplinger
Nov 06, 2019

The 25 Best Canadian Dividend Stocks for U.S. Investors
The U.S. is home to literally thousands of dividend payers, which would seem to eliminate the need to look elsewhere for income. But there's a convincing case to be made for at least a couple dozen Canadian dividend stocks.

Newer income investors often look for the highest-yielding dividend stocks. They see a 7% yield as being better than 6%, 8% yields superior to 7%, and so on. But that's a much riskier proposition than it seems; sometimes, high yields are indicative of a troubled stock or company.

A safer approach is selecting companies with more reasonable current yields that consistently grow their payouts over time. Here in America, many investors look to the Dividend Aristocrats - a group of 57 dividend stocks in the S&P 500 that have improved their annual payouts for at least 25 consecutive years. But America isn't the only part of the world with Aristocrats. Canada, for instance, has 82.

The Canadian Aristocrats' standards aren't as stringent as those of their U.S. counterpart. To qualify for the Canadian Dividend Aristocrats, a stock must be listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange, be a member of the S&P Canada BMI (Broad Market Index), increase its annual payout for at least five consecutive years (it can maintain the same dividend for two consecutive years) and have a float-adjusted market cap of at least C$300 million.

We've trimmed down that list to 25 Canadian dividend stocks that are best suited for American investors. The following 25 Canadian Dividend Aristocrats trade on either the New York Stock Exchange or Nasdaq, and have increased their dividends annually for at least seven years.

SEE ALSO: 20 Dividend Stocks to Fund 20 Years of Retirement

Kiplinger
Nov 06, 2019

12 Luxury Goods That Are Cheaper at Costco
When you think about shopping at Costco, bulk groceries and household supplies typically come to mind. You don't necessarily think about making a run to the warehouse club if you're looking to buy a designer watch or you need to re-up your stash of high-end skin cream. However, you could be missing out on huge savings. Costco stocks a limited selection of luxury goods at discounted prices both in-store and online.

We scoured the aisles at a Washington, D.C.-area Costco location and clicked around on Costco.com to see which luxury goods were available to members. Then, we compared the warehouse club's price against the manufacturer's suggested retail price for each item. Take a look at our surprising list of a dozen luxury items that are cheaper at Costco.

SEE ALSO: 16 Worst Things to Buy at Warehouse Clubs

Kiplinger
Nov 06, 2019

Is the Stock Market Open on Veterans Day?
Despite being a federal holiday, the stock market is open on Veterans Day during regular trading hours.

Kiplinger
Nov 06, 2019

Grocery Wars: Walmart's Great Value vs. Target's Good & Gather
If you shop for groceries at Target, you've no doubt noticed the rapid rollout of Good & Gather, the retailer's newest line of store-brand products. Get used to it. Target expects to have some 2,000 private-label grocery items under that banner by the end of the year, ranging from organic produce and quick meals to snacks and drinks.

Store brands are big business. Supermarkets saw $75 billion in private-label sales in 2018, a 1.5% uptick from the previous year, according to a study by the Food Marketing Institute. Sales for mass merchants, including Target and Walmart, soared to $5 billion, up 7.4%.

The launch of Good & Gather is squarely aimed at Walmart and its popular (and dirt cheap) Great Value store brand. How's Target competing on price so far? To find out, we shopped Walmart and Target stores in Northern Virginia to compare private-label prices on an assortment of grocery staples. Here's what we found.

SEE ALSO: 21 Best and Worst Things to Buy at Aldi

Kiplinger
Nov 06, 2019

The 10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Military Retirees
If you spent your career in the military, you've probably lived all over the U.S. and around the world. But before you put down roots in retirement, find out how much of your hard-earned pension will be taxed. You'll pay tax to the federal government on military retirement pay that's based on age or length of service (disability pensions might not be taxed). With state taxes, though, it isn't always so clear.

Many states provide special tax breaks for military retirees or for retirement income in general. And, of course, some states don't even have an income tax. But some other states aren't so generous when it comes to helping retired veterans at tax time.

We've identified 9 states, and Washington, D.C., with not-too-friendly tax rules for military pensions. These states may tax at least part of your pension, and some tax the entire amount. We've listed the least tax-friendly of these states first. Take a look.

SEE ALSO: Best States for Low Taxes: 50 States Ranked for Taxes, 2019

Kiplinger
Nov 06, 2019

Why Annuities Could Be an Especially Good Deal for Women
Ensuring a secure retirement, with a lifetime of dependable income, comes with many challenges for women. But there is a way they can create their own pensions.

Kiplinger
Nov 06, 2019

What Proposed IRA Updates Could Mean for Your Retirement - and Your Kids
The SECURE Act is not a done deal yet, but it makes sense to watch it closely because it could affect everything from RMDs to inheritances.

Kiplinger
Nov 05, 2019

5 REITs That Make the Cloud Pay You Dividends
Most investors know about tech stocks that have harnessed the cloud for growth, such as Salesforce.com (CRM), Adobe Systems (ADBE) and Amazon.com (AMZN).

But are you familiar with the cloud's landlords?

"Cloud czars" don't operate entirely on their own. There's a huge industry in connecting these clouds to each other, and to large and small customers alike. It requires cell towers, data centers and other communications technology.

A number of real estate investment trusts (REITs) specialize in properties and other assets that ensure your tablet can stream Netflix (NFLX) content and that your company's data is secured in the cloud. As a reminder: REITs are a special type of business structure - one that requires at least 90% of taxable income be paid out to shareholders as dividends, in exchange for generous tax benefits.

Many of these stocks have risen by leaps and bounds in 2019, though they're getting expensive as a result. Still, they sit smack-dab in the middle of a growth industry, and some of them remain valuable as takeover targets. Private equity firms EQT Partners and Digital Colony Partners bought fiber network owner Zayo Group for $8 billion in May. And in October, Digital Realty Trust (DLR) bought European data center giant Interxion (INXN) for $8.4 billion.

Here are five REITs that can help you squeeze dividends out of the cloud. If you're looking for a broad-based play on the industry, the Pacer Benchmark Data & Infrastructure Real Estate ETF (SRVR) invests in 20 such companies. However, these five holdings stand out among the rest.

SEE ALSO: 20 Dividend Stocks to Fund 20 Years of Retirement

Kiplinger
Nov 05, 2019

How Risk Profiling Can Help Score a More Secure Retirement
Based on the work of a Nobel laureate, determining your personal risk number can help pinpoint a sweet spot for the level of risk that's appropriate for your investment portfolio.

Kiplinger
Nov 05, 2019

10 Most Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2019
If you're thinking of moving to a different state in retirement, you'll want to consider climate, proximity to family and friends, access to quality health care, and a host of other important factors before picking a new location. But make sure you add taxes in the new state to the list of considerations. The total state and local tax burden in one place can be thousands of dollars more per year than in another. That can make a huge difference when you're trying to stretch out your retirement savings.

To help retirees analyze the overall tax burden in each state, we've updated our State-by-State Guide to Taxes on Retirees for 2019 and identified the 10 states that impose the lowest taxes on retirees. Our results are based on the estimated state and local tax burden in each state for a hypothetical retired couple with a mixture of income from Social Security, an IRA, a private pension, interest and dividends, and capital gains. We also gave them a $400,000 home (with a small mortgage) and $10,000 in deductible medical expenses.

All the states on our "most tax-friendly" list exempt Social Security benefits from state income taxes. Most also exempt at least a portion of other retirement income, such as pensions and withdrawals from tax-deferred retirement plans. They tend to have below-average property tax rates and/or reasonable sales tax rates, too. Take a look and see for yourself. We list the most tax-friendly state for retirees last.

SEE ALSO: 10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees

Kiplinger
Nov 05, 2019

10 Least Tax-Friendly States for Retirees, 2019
Whether you plan to retire at the beach, near the mountains or to some other dream destination, make sure you check out the local tax situation before packing your bags. If you don't, you might be unpleasantly surprised by hefty state and local taxes in your new hometown.

State and local taxes can vary greatly from one place to another. The difference can easily exceed $10,000 or more per year in many cases, which is enough to break the bank for a lot of retirees. So, to avoid this kind of bombshell, make sure you do some research before settling on a new location. You can start with Kiplinger's State-by-State Guide to Taxes on Retirees, which has been updated for 2019. This tool maps out the tax landscape for each state and the District of Columbia, and allows you to do a side-by-side comparison for up to five states at a time.

We also identified the 10 states that impose the highest taxes on retirees, which are listed below (we saved the worst state for last). Our results are based on the estimated state and local tax burden in each state for a hypothetical retired couple with a mixture of income from Social Security, an IRA, a private pension, interest and dividends, and capital gains. We also gave them a $400,000 home (with a small mortgage) and $10,000 in deductible medical expenses. Take a look to see if your state--or the state you've been dreaming about for retirement--made our "least tax-friendly" list for retirees (we hope it didn't).

SEE ALSO: The 10 Most Tax-Friendly States for Retirees

Kiplinger
Nov 05, 2019

2020 is Around the Corner, So Make These 10 Money Moves Before Year's End
The end of 2019 is in sight, but there is still plenty of time left to make a number of financial moves that will help improve your retirement savings, reduce your tax bill and benefit your community.

You don't have to be wealthy to get tangible benefits. If you have a job, you can contribute to a retirement savings plan, while any parent or grandparent can contribute to a child's college education plan. And each group can receive tax breaks.

Here are 10 ways that you can improve your financial condition between now and Dec. 31. Some of these ideas involve transactions with third parties, so it's best to move ahead as quickly as you can to reap the most benefits.

Written by Lisa Brown, CFP®. Brown is a partner and wealth adviser at Brightworth, an Atlanta-based wealth management firm serving high net worth families across the country. Working with busy corporate executives for nearly 20 years has been her passion inside the office. Outside the office she's an avid runner and supporter of charitable causes focused on homeless children and their families.



Kiplinger
Nov 04, 2019

Best States for Low Taxes: 50 States Ranked for Taxes, 2019
No two states are alike when it comes to taxes. They all have their own rules, rates and special tax breaks. As a result, your overall state and local tax burden in one state can be thousands of dollars more (or less) than in another.

What about your state? Are you in a high-tax state or a low-tax state (or somewhere in between)? That can be hard to determine. There are so many state and local taxes to worry about, and they're constantly changing. However, we've made it easy. We estimated the tax burden in each state for a hypothetical married couple with a combined earned income of $150,000, $10,000 in dividend income, two dependents and a $400,000 home (with a mortgage). Then we ranked each state according to the total state and local tax bill in each location. Check out the alphabetical list below to see where your state fits in ... you might be surprised by what you find!

SEE ALSO: 50 Best Places to Retire in All 50 States

Kiplinger
Nov 04, 2019

Two Tax Breaks Trump Will Get by Moving from New York to Florida
President Trump isn't the only rich guy out there trying to slash his state and local tax bill by declaring a change of residency from New York to Florida. Thousands of other wealthy New Yorkers have tried this move, too. After all, Florida has some of the lowest taxes in the country, while New York has some of the highest.

We'll see how this plan works out for the president once he leaves office. The New York Department of Taxation and Finance has a well-earned reputation for fighting wealthy part-time residents who don't want to pay New York taxes anymore, so it isn't clear yet whether the change of residency will stick for state tax purposes. But if Trump can show a true change of domicile from New York to Florida, the president can save a ton on taxes in the following two ways.

SEE ALSO: State-by-State Guide to Taxes

Kiplinger
Nov 04, 2019

9 Dividend Stocks That Are Waving Red Flags
A strong economy typically lifts the broader market, and a rising broader-market tide will lift a lot of boats. But not all of them. Even in the midst of America's longest bull market, numerous publicly traded companies are struggling - including several dividend stocks whose payouts appear to be on thin ice.

Dividend cuts and suspensions are among the worst things that can happen to shareholders - especially those that are relying on that stock for retirement income. Not only are you missing out on cash you were depending on, but the stock's value itself typically suffers ahead of - and after - that kind of announcement.

Fortunately for investors, dividend cuts don't come out of nowhere. Even once-proud blue chips such as General Electric (GE) and Kraft Heinz (KHC) telegraphed considerable financial issues before ultimately slashing their regular payouts. But investors need to heed these signs. For instance, high yields - especially if a stock's yield is much higher than its industry peers - can be a sign of heightened risk and a struggling stock (as stock prices go down, dividend yields go up). Also, watch out for companies that pay out most or all of their earnings in dividends, as they will have little breathing room should their profits dip.

Here, we look at nine dividend stocks that are flashing warning signs of a payout cut. Some of these companies have already chopped their dividends within the past few years. Some of them have maintained or even grown their payouts of late. In no case is a dividend cut or suspension a guarantee, but all of them face issues that, at the very least, should have current and prospective shareholders on their guard.

SEE ALSO: 13 Vulnerable Stocks to Watch If the Market Trembles

Kiplinger
Nov 04, 2019

How to Reduce Taxable RMDs and Improve Your Retirement Income Plan at the Same Time
Adding annuity payments to your IRA withdrawals could save on taxes and help ensure a stable cash flow throughout your retirement. With that in mind, here's a QLAC strategy to consider.

Kiplinger
Nov 04, 2019

9 Essential Practices to Make College Pay Off
One of the biggest investments families make is the money they spend on college. Here are nine things college students should do during their school years to help ensure the best return on that investment.

Kiplinger
Nov 04, 2019

The 5 Best Money and Retirement Podcasts You Haven't Heard of Yet
Want to retire early? Learn the difference between being frugal and being cheap? Get over embarrassing money matters, and apply practical money rules to your own life? I've got some off-the-beaten path podcasts for you.

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

The 30 Best Mutual Funds in 401(k) Retirement Plans
How good are the mutual funds in your 401(k) plan? Choose wisely, and you might sip café au lait as you celebrate your retirement on an around-the-world cruise. Choose unwisely, and you might have to settle for the local Starbucks.

Every year, with the help of financial data firm BrightScope, which ranks 401(k) plans, we look at the 100 mutual funds with the most assets in 401(k) and other defined-contribution plans, including 403(b)s. To help you pick the best mutual funds for your 401(k), we analyze the actively managed funds among the 100 most popular options. Most of the funds are solid, some are standout and only a handful are disappointing. In the end, 30 funds, described below, won our seal of approval.

We didn't weigh in on the index funds that rank high in employer-sponsored plan assets because the art of choosing a good index fund rests on three simple questions: Which index do you want to emulate? How well has the fund done in matching that index? How much does the fund charge? We have no problem with the index funds listed in the top 100.

But assessing actively managed mutual funds is trickier. We analyzed each fund's long-term returns and year-by-year performance. We looked past raw results to examine each fund's volatility and how it fared in difficult markets. We also considered manager tenure and fees, among other factors.

Here are the 30 best mutual funds for 401(k) retirement savers, plucked out of the nation's 100 most popular options. Some of these funds might not be available in your 401(k), and some might not be suitable for your personal situation. But each of these mutual funds stands out for their quality, making it a good choice for its respective category.

SEE ALSO: The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio: All 47 Buffett Stocks Explained

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

Go Ahead, Reach for Yield
The best bets are in arcane areas such as commercial mortgage-backed securities, nonbank business lending and structured credit.

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

How to Cash In When Firms Merge
These funds let Main Street investors profit from Wall Street's deals.

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

Buy Mid Caps on the Cheap
In spite of a rocky 12 months, mid-cap stocks are in a market sweet spot. And investors should consider snapping them up.

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

The Pitfalls Behind Zero-Fee Trading
Commissions hit zero at big online brokers, but investors should be aware of other, sometimes hidden costs.

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

American Century Equity Income Focuses on Value
This fund chooses high-quality but overlooked stocks.

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

Wasatch Small Cap Value Holds Its Head Up
Wasatch Small Cap Value smashes both the Russell 2000 and S&P 500, even as small-company stocks have experienced more turbulence.

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

Getting Divorced? Avoid These 2 Tax Traps
A divorce can be challenging for everyone involved, but there could also be additional tax traps that you're not aware of. Find out how to avoid these tax traps, and make a taxing divorce tax efficient.

Kiplinger
Nov 01, 2019

Navigating Through Times of Market Volatility
Ongoing market fluctuations can pose a risk to hard-earned savings and retirement assets, so be prepared by considering these level-headed steps.

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

Why Inflation Is All But Dead
And why your portfolio should be protected against it anyway

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

10 Year-End Moves to Lower Your 2019 Tax Bill
Don't let the holidays sidetrack your tax planning. Moves you make between now and the end of the year can have a significant effect on how much tax you have to pay next April. This is particularly true if you're saving for retirement, itemize deductions, or hold investments outside a retirement account.

But time is running short. It will be too late to cut your tax bill using most of the tips we've assembled below after we ring in the new year. So check out our list right away and get cracking!

SEE ALSO: Most-Overlooked Tax Breaks and Deductions

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

If You Need a Real ID, Visit the DMV Soon
2020 is the year Real ID goes into effect for air travel. So having a star on your license will become more important if you don't have a passport.

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

5 Ways to Max Out Your Credit Card Rewards
Play your cards right and a first-class flight, luxe hotel suite or a pile of cash can be yours.

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

Hitting My Stride In Retirement
We've visited nine national parks since we retired, and next year we're heading to Acadia in Maine.

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

Avoid the Obstacles of Long-Term-Care Claims
Filing a claim can be an ordeal, but these preventive measures will streamline the process.

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

Time Your Package Delivery Right
Online shoppers who procrastinate get a reprieve, but it may not be free.

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

The New Uber Law's Ripple Effect
Independent contractors across the U.S. could become eligible for employee benefits.

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

Active Retirees Seek Adventure Travel
The key for adventurous older travelers is to decide what "adventure" really means to them before booking an adventure tour.

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

10 Superfoods to Boost Productivity at Work
When you're faced with a hectic workday, it can be all too easy to make some not-so-healthy food choices in between attending meetings, checking emails and returning phone calls. In the moment, it might seem harmless, but that burger and fries you had for lunch may come back to haunt you (and your productivity) later in the afternoon. In fact, poor nutrition can significantly impact your ability to perform well on the job, because it can lead to fatigue, lower energy levels, decreased mental effectiveness and a reduced ability to think clearly, according to HealthLine.com, a health information site.

That's why it's important to consume healthy foods and beverages consistently throughout the day, rather than waiting until you're starving to have a snack or meal, advises Keri Glassman, a New York City-based nutritionist and founder of NutriousLife.com. It's not easy. You're more likely to make poor food choices when you're under a time crunch, Glassman says, and it's not always realistic -- or cost effective -- to grab fresh, nutritious foods while at the office.

With input from nutrition experts, we've identified several so-called superfoods that purportedly pack extra health benefits to help keep you focused and effective on the job. In addition, we've outlined cost-friendly options for where to buy and how to prepare these items without breaking the bank or taking up too much time. Take a look at our list of 10 superfoods to boost workplace productivity.

SEE ALSO: 30 Best Jobs of the Future

Kiplinger
Oct 31, 2019

3 Vital Financial Planning Stages for Gen X & Gen Y
You may think you're too young (or poor) to start working on a retirement saving plan, but actually now is the perfect time.

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

Is It 1969 All Over Again?
You don't need nostaglia to prompt a good look at your own finances and prepare for the new year.

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

Find the Best Savings Account
Are you willing to walk for a higher return? There's an app (and account) for that.

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

Should Shareholders Share the Wealth?
Business leaders say firms should be accountable to customers and workers, and protect the environment, too.

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

10 "Autopay" Dividend Stock Picks to Subscribe To
A common element shared by many great dividend stocks that raise their payouts through good times and bad: a low-risk business model that drives recurring revenues. Some of the market's most consistent stock picks have subscription-based models, or razor-razorblade models that generate repeat sales of consumables.

Gillette, now part of Procter & Gamble (PG), pioneered the razor-razorblade model as a way to build recurring sales it could count on and plan around. But it wasn't alone. Printer manufacturers HP Inc. (HPQ) and Seiko Epson (SEKEF) used a similar approach, selling inkjet printers with replaceable ink cartridges. Keurig, now part of Keurig Dr. Pepper (KDP), rose to fame by selling Keurig machine that brewed single-serve K-Cup pods. More recently, tech companies have discovered the benefits of putting customers on subscription models and setting them to "autopay," leveraging cloud-based services to generate recurring fees.

In a CFO Research/Salesforce survey of senior finance executives, more than half of respondents said 40% or more of their company's revenues were subscription- or usage-based. And why not? Profits become more predictable. Customer turnover is reduced because of high switching costs. You can also achieve greater operating efficiency thanks to more predictable demand. Recurring sales also often deliver higher margins, enhancing the bottom line. And finally, many investors prefer less risk, and can be enticed to giving higher valuations to companies with more predictable financial results.

Just ask Adobe Systems (ADBE), which launched its Creative Cloud in April 2012. Revenues have spiked from $4.4 billion in 2012 to $9.0 billion last year. The stock has shot up 700% since then - a performance six times greater than the S&P 500.

What other companies are harnessing recurring revenues? Here are 10 "autopay" dividend stock picks to subscribe to.

SEE ALSO: 15 Dividend Kin

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

Are Your Taxes Set to Explode in Retirement? (Strategies to Help Defuse the Problem)
If you've stashed most of your nest egg in your 401(k), the last thing you want is for taxes to blow up in your face when the time comes to start taking withdrawals.

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

6 Stocks to Buy for Their Massive Stock Buybacks
Stock buybacks are big business. In the second quarter of 2019 alone, S&P 500 companies spent almost $165 billion on share repurchases - and that was 26% less than the record high spent in Q4 2018.

But it's still a big number. "While the decline is significant compared to 2018, it remains higher than the pre-2018 levels," writes Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst at S&P Dow Jones Indices.

Buybacks yield several benefits. Among them, given the simple math of calculating earnings per share (EPS) - total earnings divided by total shares outstanding - buying back shares can "juice" the EPS figure. Moreover, they tilt supply and demand in shareholders' favor. If a company takes shares off the market, in theory, it should make the remaining ones worth more.

But are stock buybacks a reason to buy? Not on their own. But they are one of several material signs - dividend programs, manageable or no debt, intelligent capital expenditures - that a company is putting its stock in a position to succeed.

Here are six stocks to buy that have spent considerably on stock buybacks over the past few years. Importantly, all six stock picks sport additional fundamentals that should help them make the most of a tailwind as they continue to reduce their share counts.

SEE ALSO: 20 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks With More Cash Than Debt

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

IRS: Uncashed Payout Checks From Retirement Plans Are Still Taxable
You owe tax on a 401(k) or IRA distribution for the tax year in which the money was paid out--even if you don't cash the check until the following year.

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

How to Diagnose and Treat Financial Portfolio Stress
To safeguard your financial health, now would be a great time to give your holdings a thorough checkup, looking carefully for any potential weak spots.

Kiplinger
Oct 30, 2019

Are Your Taxes Are Set to Explode in Retirement? (Strategies to Help Defuse the Problem)
If you've stashed most of your nest egg in your 401(k), the last thing you want is for taxes to blow up in your face when the time comes to start taking withdrawals.

Kiplinger
Oct 29, 2019

27 Money Moves to Make Now to Prepare for 2020
Among the items on our to-do list: Trim your 2019 tax bill by pruning your portfolio and giving to charity. Boost your retirement-plan contributions. Cash in credit card rewards. We also suggest moves that will boost your bottom line in 2020 and beyond. Take a look.

SEE ALSO: The Millionaire Quiz: Do You Have What It Takes?

Kiplinger
Oct 29, 2019

Why Winter Tires Trump All-Wheel Drive
Really want to get there safely when it's slippery out? Get more grip with dedicated winter tires.

Kiplinger
Oct 29, 2019

10 Money-Losing Stock Picks That Might Make You Money Anyway
Investors spent much of 2019 gobbling up a healthy helping of recent initial public offerings (IPOs) and other companies that haven't made a penny in profits.

However, the rapid rise and fall of WeWork sobered up Wall Street and knocked many of these money-losing (yet nonetheless popular) stock picks back toward some semblance of reality.

A quick recap: WeWork, a privately held company that specializes in leasing office space to startups, freelancers, and employees of large companies, garnered a $47 billion valuation as recently as January 2019. But ahead of an expected September IPO, diligent investors and members of the media scrutinized the company's financials, revealing corporate governance issues and massive, growing losses that forced WeWork to shelve its offering. The company's valuation plummeted, CEO Adam Neumann was forced to step down and Japanese multinational SoftBank (SFTBY), which heavily invested in WeWork ahead of the offering, recently gave the company a $9.5 billion "rescue" package that valued it at less than $8 billion.

Before the anticipated offering, New Constructs Investment Research analyst Sam McBride called WeWork the "most ridiculous IPO of 2019." Technically, he was wrong - the IPO never happened. Spiritually, he was right on the mark.

WeWork's fall from grace has sent numerous recent IPOs and other net-income-deficient stocks lower. But don't give them up for dead. Unprofitable companies, once they reach a certain scale and their businesses evolve, can end up creating profits and rewarding shareholders with red-hot gains. Just ask longtime Amazon.com (AMZN) shareholders.

Here are 10 stock picks that might be losing money today, but shouldn't be forever. It could be a bumpy ride until they get over that hump, but once they do, watch out.

SEE ALSO: 20 More Best Stocks to Buy That You Haven't Heard Of

Kiplinger
Oct 29, 2019

Can You Fly With That?


Kiplinger
Oct 29, 2019

5 Ways Retirees Can Play Defense With Retirement Portfolios
As a volatile third quarter came to a close, stocks and bonds looked pricey by historic standards, there were signs of slowing economic growth, and markets were rattled by the state of U.S.-China trade talks and the start of an impeachment inquiry against President Trump.

All this might unnerve investors of any age--but particularly those just entering retirement. If new retirees get socked by steep market declines, they may be forced to pull spending money from shrinking portfolios--locking in losses and slashing the odds that their money will last a lifetime.

Combine that with retirees' reluctance to spend from their portfolios even in the best of times, and it's easy to see the financial anxieties compounding for those just entering retirement. Many retirees anchor to their portfolio value at retirement "and get really nervous when that balance goes down," says Judith Ward, senior financial planner at T. Rowe Price.

While market swings may leave you feeling powerless, "times of uncertainty and volatility remind us to focus on the things we can control," Ward says, such as your investment mix and spending rate. Here are five ways to maintain control of your retirement security, no matter what the markets throw at you.

SEE ALSO: 20 Dividend Stocks to Fund 20 Years of Retirement

Kiplinger
Oct 29, 2019

The Kiplinger Dividend 15: Our Favorite Dividend-Paying Stocks
Income investors love dividend stocks for their regular payouts; any stock-price appreciation is just gravy. The Kiplinger Dividend 15, the list of our favorite dividend-paying stocks, delivers on the first front, yielding 3.4%, on average, compared with a 1.9% yield for Standard & Poor's 500-stock index and a 1.7% yield for the 10-year Treasury bond. What's more, over the past year, our list has slathered on the gravy, too, returning 13.6%, on average, counting dividends and price appreciation, compared with a 4.3% return for the S&P 500. Big gains don't come without some strings attached. Like many stocks that have ridden this record-long bull market, some of the names on our list appear to be richly valued now. And although dividends buttress returns when a stock's price slides, pricey stocks could take a big hit in the event of a stock market plunge. Perhaps more salient for dividend investors, major boosts in the share price diminish a stock's yield, as is the case with Blackstone Group and Realty Income--two stocks originally chosen for our list because, among other things, they historically provided yields above 4%. Although they've slipped below that bar, we're not yet ready to jettison them for performing too well, and we believe that their yields can return to historical averages. We're keeping an eye on them, but we're making no changes to the list at present.

The Dividend 15 are divided into three categories: stocks with a long history of stable dividends, stocks with the potential for rapid growth in their payouts, and high yielders. Find a dividend stock that suits your needs, or select a mix.

SEE ALSO: 25 Dividend Stocks That Analysts Love the Most

Kiplinger
Oct 29, 2019

Stock Market Losses or Lower Returns: Which Is More Dangerous to Your Retirement?
One eye-opening, simple math equation can clearly show retirement savers the answer to that question, and if you are among those investors who take pride in their high-performing portfolios, you may be surprised.

Kiplinger
Oct 28, 2019

Documents that Parents and College Students Need
Here are a few documents that families will need if parents are to remain involved in the medical and financial affairs of a child who has reached adulthood.

Kiplinger
Oct 28, 2019

State Taxes on Retirees Differ by Types of Retirement Income
Where you retire can have a big impact on your tax bills for Social Security, pensions, IRAs, 401(k)s and other income.

Kiplinger
Oct 28, 2019

Should You Relocate to Trim Taxes in Retirement?
Factor in all states and local taxes, plus the nontax implications of retiring to a new place, before making a move.

Kiplinger
Oct 28, 2019

Worried about Estate Taxes? One Strategy to Try
If your heirs might face a big estate tax bill one day, an irrevocable life insurance trust could help protect your legacy.

Kiplinger
Oct 28, 2019

Most Americans Think They Know More about Money Than They Do
While the majority of Americans believe they are financially literate, tasks like interest rate and inflation calculations are beyond many of us. Here are three ways to bridge the financial literacy gap for a better financial future.

Kiplinger
Oct 25, 2019

20 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks With More Cash Than Debt
More than a decade of historically low interest rates has prompted companies to go on a borrowing binge. Although there's no sign of a debt bubble right now, market watchers are increasingly concerned about corporate indebtedness.

No surprise there. Excluding financial companies, U.S. corporate debt is at a record high.

Companies carrying excess debt are more vulnerable to rising interest rates, a global economic slowdown or an outright recession. Conversely, companies with more Benjamins in the bank than IOUs are fortified against many financial headwinds.

Large-cap dividend stocks can be a redoubt in times of market volatility. If they have rock-solid balance sheets and generate gushers of cash, so much the better.

We searched the major indexes for dividend payers with market values of at least $10 billion that have more cash on their balance sheets than total debt. And because dividends and interest payments come from free cash flow, we also limited ourselves to companies with ample FCF after paying interest on debt.

The result: Fewer than two dozen large-cap dividend stocks across all the large publicly traded companies in the U.S. Here, we look at 20 of the best.

SEE ALSO: 25 Dividend Stocks That Analysts Love the Most

Kiplinger
Oct 25, 2019

How to Fight the Retirement Gender Gap
Because women's salaries still haven't caught up to men's, the wage gap often means women have less saved for retirement. But there are steps they can take to ensure their savings provide enough income in retirement.

Kiplinger
Oct 25, 2019

Learn from My Best and Worst Financial Decisions
It's normal to have financial regrets. I know I do, and I don't mind sharing. Use them as a growing opportunity. And make sure to celebrate your successes along the way, too.

Kiplinger
Oct 24, 2019

5 'Strong Buy' Biotech Stocks With Rapidly Approaching Catalysts
When searching for big rewards, look no further than biotech stocks.

Just be prepared for big risk, too.

Biotechs offer gobs of price potential. That's because unlike many companies that can slowly but steadily build up their businesses over time, the survival of biotechnology companies (especially early on) hinges on just a few trials of their developing treatments. Eventual approval of the drug means life-sustaining revenues for the company, so positive trial news can send shares skyrocketing. Setbacks, however, can spark an exodus.

While it's impossible for regular investors to gauge what's going on in testing labs, you can give yourself a small leg up by paying attention to the analysts who cover the biotechnology industry. If you find a stock that's mostly surrounded by bulls, that might be a signal that something rewarding is around the bend.

Here are five biotech stocks that have a "Strong Buy" consensus analyst rating and have potential catalysts right around the corner. We've used TipRanks' Smart Score system to identify this health-care short list. Also remember that biotechnology stocks come with a considerable amount of risk, and that sharp drops are not uncommon. Consider using only a small allocation from the portion of your portfolio dedicated to aggressive investments.

SEE ALSO: 10 High-Quality, High-Growth Stocks to Buy

Kiplinger
Oct 24, 2019

Defrauding the Elderly: Watch for These Danger Signs
Adult children of seniors need to be alert, because there are some insidious financial scams out there. Here's what they look like, and why they work.

Kiplinger
Oct 24, 2019

Using a Construction Loan to Build Your Retirement Dream Home
Construction loans operate a little differently than a typical home mortgage, so you need to know a couple of things: like what's the difference between a construction-to-permanent loan and a stand-alone construction loan.

Kiplinger
Oct 23, 2019

Should You Fear The Next Bear Market?
That depends on whether you're a young investor eager to grow your nest egg or a soon-to-be retiree anxious to protect it. If you're the latter, here's what you can do to help keep yourself safe.

Kiplinger
Oct 22, 2019

13 Vulnerable Stocks to Watch If the Market Trembles
America's economy is showing cracks. It's not just the ongoing trade war with China. Global economic weakness unrelated to China is weighing here at home. Uncertainty around Brexit, instability in the Middle East are among the contributors. As a result, there are a number of vulnerable stocks to watch, as another push could send them over the cliff.

Yes, the Federal Reserve is helping to ease the pain with lower interest rates. But consumers still are dealing with higher costs in health care, education and food. Consumer spending, which has been a sign of strength of late, even started to turn recently, cooling off in August.

Several stocks already are showing serious fundamental issues, such as stagnant growth, high levels of debt, lack of free cash flow (FCF; essentially, what's left over once the company spends and invests to maintain and expand its business). Continued volatility in the market could exacerbate the drop in currently falling stocks, and start the slide in others. In some cases, a broader market downturn on sentiment alone could do the trick; in others, further signs of economic fragility could unleash the sellers.

Here are 13 vulnerable stocks to watch. Some of these are deeply troubled stocks that might not warrant investor funds even in a strong market. A few are more stable companies that could experience outsize stock losses from temporary weakness - but might warrant buying on a future dip.

SEE ALSO: The Pros Say No: 7 Large-Cap Stocks to Sell or Avoid

Kiplinger
Oct 22, 2019

Building Your Financial Plan Around Cash Flow
The process is a lot like putting a puzzle together.

Kiplinger
Oct 22, 2019

Annuity Exchanges, Full or Partial, Boost Flexibility without Creating Taxes
1035 exchanges let you trade up for a better annuity or trade in unneeded life insurance.

Kiplinger
Oct 21, 2019

The 25 Best Mutual Funds of All Time
If you're seeking out the best mutual funds, keep your wits about you. Mutual funds have a mind-numbing selection of ways to claim bragging rights. "Best five-year record." "Best three-year record for value funds." "Best 10-year record for growth funds with at least $1 billion in assets."

Morningstar counts 110 mutual fund categories. Even if you spread the awards among the 8,000 or so garden-variety open-ended mutual funds, there would be plenty of opportunities for bragging rights. And, thanks to the longest-running bull market in history, everyone's 10-year record looks great.

But it's another thing to outperform the competition over the entirety of a fund's life.

Here are the 25 best mutual funds of all time. We looked at the records of all U.S.-listed stock funds - holding U.S. and/or international stocks alike - with at least a 20-year record, and ranked them based on returns since inception. Going for a minimum of two decades eliminates some of the bias from a decade-long bull market, and adds in at least two major bear markets.

You'll note there are no index funds, nor any international funds. We didn't exclude them - they just weren't in the top 25 top equity funds. Index funds don't aim to be top performers, and international funds are in a long-term performance drought. We did exclude bond and money market funds, however, because that's not where you go for high performance.

SEE ALSO: The 25 Best Low-Fee Mutual Funds to Buy Now

Kiplinger
Oct 21, 2019

Secure Act Threatens 'Stretch' IRA Rules That Benefit Heirs
Some retirees are concerned about a provision that could require heirs to empty inherited retirement accounts within 10 years and pay a lot more in taxes.

Kiplinger
Oct 21, 2019

Retiring At 30: How To Sensibly Handle An Early Fortune
When you retire early, the pressure is on, because you've got to make your money last for decades. And those coming into sudden money have the added high-stakes challenge of a steep financial learning curve.

Kiplinger
Oct 21, 2019

3 Great Reasons Why You Should Start Saving Early
Once you see what you could gain by stuffing your piggy bank now (and the potential riches you're giving up by waiting), you'll see why there really is no time like the present.

Kiplinger
Oct 18, 2019

4 Strategies to Cut Your Taxes in Retirement
To help reduce your tax burden once you retire, and free up more money for expenses and fun, give income planning a try. Here are four ways to adjust your income and get a better grip on your tax bill.

Kiplinger
Oct 18, 2019

This Isn't (or, at Least, Shouldn't Be) Your Father's Retirement Plan
Advice that worked in past decades may no longer serve today's retirees. Here's a look at what has changed over the years that you'll need to account for today.

Kiplinger
Oct 17, 2019

5 Top Semiconductor Stocks to Buy Now
Investors' focus has locked in on semiconductor stocks following news of a potential "phase one" trade deal between the U.S. and China. Many chipmakers do production work in China and/or distribute products to Chinese companies, so the industry has suffered a nasty case of whiplash throughout the two or so years of the two countries' tariff spat.

The upside is that the volatility still is coming out on their side. The iShares PHLX Semiconductor ETF (SOXX) has soared nearly 40% year-to-date, doubling the already better-than-average returns for the S&P 500. While trade enthusiasm has helped, the industry also is recovering from inflated inventory levels that have weighed heavily on the space.

SunTrust Robinson Humphrey analyst William Stein wrote in October, "Looking through any tactical correction (due to tariffs), the big move is still to the upside. We believe patient investors will be rewarded for being long semis." And Goldman Sachs' Toshiya Hari wrote in July that chipmaking equipment companies' fundamentals could improve "sooner than previously expected."

Here are five semiconductor stocks to buy to take advantage of an improving outlook for the industry. We took advantage of TipRanks' Stock Screener tool to pinpoint five chip stocks that have recently accumulated bullish sentiment from Wall Street analysts. Let's take a look.

SEE ALSO: 12 Tech Stocks That Wall Street Loves the Most

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