NEWS: KIPLINGER
Setup News Ticker
   NEWS: KIPLINGER
Kiplinger
Feb 28, 2020

How to Handle Coronavirus Market Meltdown: Advice from the Pros
Is there a scarier word than "pandemic"? In addition to the human toll, the coronavirus spreading around the world is also sickening supply chains and denting GDP growth. The Kiplinger Letter is forecasting a realistic, worst-case scenario wherein economic growth is cut in half, to something like 1.6% this year. (See How Hard Will Coronavirus Hit U.S., Global Economies?)

No wonder stock markets are in a spiral. What should investors do?

We reached out to the financial planners who contribute to our Wealth Creation channel to discover what they're telling different types of clients. Here is what they had to say.

SEE ALSO: Coronavirus Infects Global Markets

Kiplinger
Feb 28, 2020

How Hard Will Coronavirus Hit U.S., Global Economies?
COVID-19 poses serious risk of economic damage, possibly even a recession, even as its health impacts will be limited.

Kiplinger
Feb 28, 2020

Coronavirus Infects Global Markets
Daily updates about the COVID-19 virus are rattling investors' nerves everywhere.

Kiplinger
Feb 28, 2020

13 Stock Picks Getting Hit by Coronavirus Fears
The COVID-19 coronavirus is making its way across the world. The outbreak began at the end of 2019 in Wuhan, China; it has killed roughly 2,500 people, infected more than 83,000 people overall and spread to nearly 50 countries, including the U.S., since then.

The coronavirus has now passed the 2002-03 SARS and 2015 MERS outbreaks in scale, and that has triggered heavy selling: Stock indices around the world, including here at home, have been sent into correction territory. Numerous stock picks are already in bear markets.

It's no small worry. The SARS outbreak tallied 774 deaths across more than 8,000 cases over a six-month period, yet helped knock China's GDP down from 11.1% in the first quarter of 2003 to 9.1% in the second quarter. The coronavirus's ultimate potential to disrupt the global economy is far worse.

This health issue is weighing on most stocks, but it's cutting particularly deep into a few specific industries where the financial strain is already being felt. If there's any silver lining, it's that, like with SARS, this could end up being an opportunity to buy otherwise high-quality stocks at a discount for a potential snap-back.

Here, we look at 13 stock picks that are being hammered by the coronavirus outbreak. These stocks might be best avoided until a clearer picture of the coronavirus's eventual fallout develops. But they eventually might be extremely attractive buy-the-dip prospects.

SEE ALSO: 11 Best Stocks to Ride Out the Coronavirus Outbreak

Kiplinger
Feb 27, 2020

10 Low-Volatility ETFs for This Roller-Coaster Market
Volatility hasn't crept back into the markets; it has jumped back in. The COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak has sent stocks lurching over the past week. And in the face of such huge market swings, investors sometimes make rash decisions that can ultimately harm their portfolios. That's where exchange-traded funds can help - specifically, low-volatility ETFs.

Big declines trigger fear, and that fear will be even more elevated when it's triggered by something like a genuine health crisis. People don't want to lose money, and they certainly don't want to lose more money than they already have. While you should always be looking for stocks to sell as a matter of regular portfolio maintenance, if you panic-sell, you risk throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

In many cases, investors who jettison their stocks en masse on the way down cement their losses while leaving themselves out of the recovery.

Here are nine low-volatility ETFs that might help ward off this instinct and lessen your pain. Low-vol (and "min-vol") funds use different strategies in the name of providing portfolios that are more stable than the broader market. That not only helps muffle losses during downturns, but the reduction in volatility can give you a little peace of mind and let you participate in an eventual bounce-back. Take a look.

SEE ALSO: The 20 Best ETFs to Buy for a Prosperous 2020

Kiplinger
Feb 27, 2020

Spring Has Sprung: 9 Tips to Bring New Life to Your Finances
When spring is in the air, it's time to put away those winter sweaters and pull out your summery shorts. It's also a great time to clean your financial house, casting aside old habits and starting new ones.

So, as flowers begin to bloom and birds return to their nests, give yourself a fresh financial start, too. Here are nine ways to clear the cobwebs from your wallet and get your financial plan neat and tidy for 2020.

Written by Salene Hitchcock-Gear, president of Prudential Individual Life Insurance, which includes Prudential Advisors.



Kiplinger
Feb 27, 2020

How a Multi-Asset Portfolio Investing Strategy Can Mitigate Risk
Having a basket of stocks and bonds isn't good enough. To help protect your nest egg, you need a bigger basket.

Kiplinger
Feb 26, 2020

The 12 Best ETFs to Battle a Bear Market
Investors worried about the next market downturn can find plenty of protection among exchange-traded funds (ETFs). Individual stocks can carry a lot of risk, while mutual funds don't have quite the breadth of tactical options. But if you browse through some of the best ETFs geared toward staving off a bear market, you can find several options that fit your investing style and risk profile.

Entering 2020, Wall Street keyed in on a multitude of risks: the outcome of the Democratic primaries and the November presidential election; where U.S.-China trade relations would head next; and slowing global growth, among others.

But Collaborative Fund's Morgan Housel hit it on the nose early this year in a must-read post about risk: "The biggest economic risk is what no one's talking about, because if no one's talking about (it) no one's prepared for it, and if no one's prepared for it its damage will be amplified when it arrives."

Enter the COVID-19 coronavirus. This virus, which has a fatality rate of about 2% and appears highly contagious, has afflicted more than 80,000 people worldwide in two months, claiming 2,700 lives. Those numbers almost assuredly will grow. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have already warned that they believe an expanded U.S. outbreak is not a question of "if," but "when." U.S. multinationals have already projected weakness due to both lower demand and affected supply chains, and the International Monetary Fund is already lowering global growth projections.

Whether a bear market is coming remains to be seen. But investors clearly are at least rattled by the prospects; the S&P 500 has dropped more than 7% in just a few days. If you're inclined to protect yourself from additional downside - now, or at any point in the future - you have plenty of tools at your disposal.

Here are a dozen of the best ETFs to beat back a prolonged downturn. These ETFs span a number of tactics, from low volatility

Kiplinger
Feb 26, 2020

Home Prices in the 100 Largest Metro Areas
What's happening in the market where you live?

Kiplinger
Feb 26, 2020

SECURE Act: What to Do Now to Help Limit Heirs' Taxes Later
The new retirement law significantly impacts beneficiaries of retirement accounts and trusts. To limit the tax ramifications, consider your options.

Kiplinger
Feb 26, 2020

The Secret to Finally Meeting Your Financial Goals
This year work smarter, not harder on yourself and your finances. Here are some interesting behavioral strategies to try, including temptation bundling.

Kiplinger
Feb 25, 2020

11 Best Stocks to Ride Out the Coronavirus Outbreak
Health scares can really spook the market, as February's coronavirus-sparked market drubbing illustrates. But we still have portfolios to manage, even if it seems like the world is ending, and that includes hunting down the best stocks for whatever the market might throw at us.

It's never reassuring when you see news footage of quarantined tourists stuck on a cruise ship, or when the Homeland Security agent gives your passport an extra-hard look for recent visits to China. But now that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have admitted that a U.S. outbreak has gone from a question of "if" to one of "when," it has become much more real.

We're not health experts, so we won't pretend to know what's next. What we do know is: This isn't the first global flu scare, and it's not likely to be the last. We also know that while the data on coronavirus is still patchy, it doesn't appear to be exceptionally lethal. The death rate is about 2.3%, and the real rate could be lower. We have no way of counting early carriers of the virus who might have been misdiagnosed with flu or the common cold. For perspective, the "regular" flu kills only about 0.13% of those that catch it, but the SARS and MERS viruses had death rates of 9.6% and 34.4%, respectively.

But while the coronavirus is far less deadly, its effects on the economy will likely be much worse. When SARS hit the Chinese economy in 2003, China accounted for just 4.2% of the world economy, according to IHS Markit. Today, it makes up 16.3%. Thus, any pronounced Chinese slowdown will be felt around the world.

We'll get through this. But in the meantime, we have to deal with a stock market that could suffer considerably at the hands of this worldwide health scare.

Here are 11 of the best stocks to buy if the coronavirus scare continues to escalate. Some are buy-and-hold plays that looked appealing under normal circumstances but also possess strengths that make them an even bet

Kiplinger
Feb 25, 2020

IRA Rollovers: What's in a Name? A LOT!
Do you understand the difference between a 60-day rollover and a trustee-to-trustee transfer? If you don't, you could be slapped with a hefty tax bill and possibly penalties to boot.

Kiplinger
Feb 24, 2020

11 Stocks to Sell That Analysts Are Souring On
Stocks have started to crater as the novel coronavirus spread to Europe and other parts of Asia. Fortunately, Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B), was on hand Feb. 24, telling viewers on CNBC that folks should never sell based on headlines.

As always, the world's greatest investor dispensed excellent advice. Indiscriminate selling is too often a good way to lock in losses or forgo gains.

But that doesn't mean that investors shouldn't be looking for stocks to sell. They should, as part of a natural pruning to weed out lousy holdings and free up cash for better opportunities. To that end, some stocks looked like serious duds even before the Dow Jones Industrial Average tumbled almost a thousand points.

To find stocks Wall Street is most bearish on, we scoured the Center for Research in Securities Prices' (CRSP) total U.S. market index for companies with a minimum market capitalization of $500 million. Our stocks also had to have coverage by at least three analysts. Next, we turned to S&P Global Market Intelligence's recommendation roundup.

S&P Global surveys analysts' stock calls and scores them on a five-point scale, where 1.0 equals a Strong Buy and 5.0 is a Strong Sell. Scores between 3.5 and 2.5 translate into a Hold recommendation. Any score higher than 3.5 means that analysts, on average, believe the stock should be sold. The closer a score gets to 5.0, the higher their collective conviction.

Here are 11 stocks to sell that rank among the worst names listed on any major U.S. exchange. If you're still holding any of the names after the latest market selloff, you might want to rethink your commitment.

SEE ALSO: 16 Stocks Warren Buffett Is Buying and Selling

Kiplinger
Feb 24, 2020

How to Leave a Legacy After the SECURE Act
With the death of "stretch IRAs" comes a new era of estate planning. Many people's plans need some serious tweaks.

Kiplinger
Feb 24, 2020

5 Ways the SECURE Act Could Harm Retirees
To avoid RMD penalties, tax bills that are (possibly MUCH) higher than necessary and other problems, make sure you understand this groundbreaking new retirement law and take steps to keep your plan on track.

Kiplinger
Feb 22, 2020

5 Tips for Choosing a Tax Preparer
You're really organized and on top of things this tax season. Good for you! You received all your W-2s and 1099s, you collected all your financial statements and receipts, and now it's time to find someone to prepare your tax return. But there's one problem...you're not quite sure how to go about choosing a tax preparer.

It goes without saying that you want someone who's qualified. But how do you know? You want someone who's honest and reliable, too. But, again, how do you know? The last thing you want to do is search online for "tax preparers near me" and randomly pick a preparer from the list, but sometimes it feels like there's no better way.

Relax. There is a better way. Follow these 5 tips for picking a tax preparer to help you weed out the fly-by-night preparers and zero in on the best tax professionals in your area. With a little bit of time and a few targeted questions, you can find a competent and dependable preparer to complete and file your return.

SEE ALSO: 9 Things Your Tax Preparer May Not Want You To Know

Kiplinger
Feb 21, 2020

10 Stock Picks With Peter Lynch Qualities
Peter Lynch, as manager of the Fidelity Magellan Fund (FMAGX) between 1977 and 1990, rode masterful stock picks to outsize gains. FMAGX delivered average annual total returns of more than 29% to fund investors during his 13-year tenure, clobbering the stock market by over 13 percentage points. A $10,000 investment in Fidelity Magellan Fund starting when Lynch took the reins would have grown to nearly $280,000 by the time he departed.

Lynch attributed his success to investing principles he shared in One Up on Wall Street and Beating the Street. His overall strategy, based on a few core concepts, is surprisingly simple. A few of the most salient points:

Invest in what you know. This is perhaps the most-quoted Peter Lynch saying. Lynch was wary of complex investment stories; he preferred stocks that were readily understandable. Some of Lynch's best ideas came from walking through grocery stores and talking with family and friends. He reasoned that, with consumer spending driving two-thirds of the U.S. economy, products and services desired by most consumers would be good investments, too. Invest in companies with strong foundations. Companies with certain traits make them easier to buy and hold for the long run. On the business side, look for competitive advantages, such as high barriers to entry or efficient scale. Lynch also preferred stocks that had solid cash balances and conservative debt-to-equity ratios. "It's hard to go backward if you have no debt," he once said. Focus on value. Peter Lynch liked value stocks that traded at cheap valuations based on their price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio. However, he also considered growth as part of the equation and thus wouldn't reject a high-P/E stock if it had a high growth rate, too. Lynch is famous for introducing price/earnings-to-growth (PEG), which factors growth into value. He also used a dividend-adjusted PEG ratio, since cash from dividends is part of the total-return equa

Kiplinger
Feb 21, 2020

Warning: Your Money Smarts May Be Fading
The older you get, the more confusing finances can tend to be for many people. Here are some warning signs that you or someone you love may be getting overwhelmed and some practical tips to stay on top of things.

Kiplinger
Feb 20, 2020

7 Dividend-Rich Sin Stocks to Buy Now
Pop culture has always loved the bad boy. From James Dean's Jim Stark in Rebel Without a Cause to Harrison Ford's Han Solo of Star Wars fame, everyone roots for the lovable rogue. But that's generally not true in the stock market, where "sin stocks" or "vice stocks" often get the stink eye.

Investors, and particularly large institutional investors, have reputations to manage. Pensions and endowments, in particular, increasingly have environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) mandates that prohibit them from investing in industries that are politically incorrect or deemed to be socially harmful.

In the past, this has generally meant vice stocks such as tobacco, alcohol, tobacco, gambling and even defense companies. (No one in polite company wants to be branded as a merchant of death.) But today, the net is cast a little wider. Oil and gas stocks are now personae non gratae in many ESG-compliant portfolios, as are opioid-producing pharmaceuticals. Companies with a lack of diversity on their boards of directors are also often singled out.

Of course, if we take this to an extreme, nearly any industry could find itself blacklisted. Coca-Cola (KO) and PepsiCo (PEP) contribute to the obesity epidemic. Twitter (TWTR) and Facebook (FB) have become mediums for hate speech, and Alphabet (GOOGL) tracks a scary amount of data on its users that could be used for nefarious purposes.

The point here is not to justify bad behavior by companies or knock the idea of socially responsible investing, however. If you find a company's products or business practices objectionable, there's nothing wrong with excluding it from your portfolio. But a sin stock that one person finds objectionable might be personally fine to another. Some of the best stocks of the past decade included companies that glued people to their sofas and stuffed them with carbs.

Today, we're going to look at seven of the best sin stocks to buy now. Betting against the

Kiplinger
Feb 20, 2020

Is Anything Wrong with Your Estate Plan? Here are 5 Common Mistakes
When's the last time you updated your will? Could your beneficiaries have changed? If you have a trust, did you actually fund it? Is your plan ready for the new SECURE Act? Here are five mistakes you don't want to make.

Kiplinger
Feb 19, 2020

7 of Wall Street's Most Heavily Shorted Stocks
"Short interest" is one of the most interesting pieces of stock data that you might pay little or no attention to. But this little metric of negative sentiment, while popular among traders, can be valuable even to buy-and-hold investors who never want to place a single bearish bet.

If you believe a stock will rise, you buy it. Easy. But what if you're bearish on a company's prospects and want to profit off that belief? A popular technique is short selling: To sell a stock short, you borrow shares so you can immediately turn around and sell them. You wait for shares to fall in price, then buy them back and return those shares to the lender. Your profit is the difference between the price you sold and the price you bought back.

But that gamble can go wrong - to the delight of bullish investors. Short sellers incur losses when the stock's price goes higher. Also, time is against you when you short a stock, because you pay interest when you borrow shares. If you want to exit your short trade, you have to buy back shares, which in turn drives the stock price higher. That might force other short sellers to cut their losses, leading to a virtuous cycle of buying called a "short squeeze."

That's why short interest (how many shares are currently sold short to bet against a company) matters. There's no concrete level, but anything above 10% of the float, which is the number of shares available for public trading, is worth watching. If you're a conservative, buy-and-hold investor who hates volatility, you might want to avoid stocks with high short interest. If you're an aggressive investor, however, you might consider buying these stocks in the hope that a small bit of positive news will trigger a short squeeze, netting large returns in a short time.

Here, we'll look at seven heavily shorted stocks to watch. These companies have short interest ranging anywhere from 14% to 96%, and many of them are the kinds of hot-moving growth stocks that ar

Kiplinger
Feb 19, 2020

Working for a Startup: How Well Do You Know Your Employee Stock Options?
They're potentially lucrative, but also complicated and definitely not a sure thing. Get the right advice before you make any moves.

Kiplinger
Feb 19, 2020

Retirement and Estate Planning Opportunities after the SECURE Act
Have a big IRA or a trust? Your strategies for limiting the tax burdens on your beneficiaries may have just changed ... a LOT.

Kiplinger
Feb 18, 2020

16 Stocks Warren Buffett Is Buying and Selling
Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B), oversaw a fairly busy fourth quarter of buying and selling stocks. Berkshire made new investments in the retail and biotechnology sectors, all but dumped a couple of big names and even jumped on the index-investing bandwagon.

We know what the greatest long-term investor of all time has been doing because the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission requires all investment managers with more than $100 million in assets to file a Form 13F quarterly to disclose any changes in share ownership. These filings add an important level of transparency to the stock market and give Buffett-ologists a chance to get a bead on what he's thinking.

When Buffett starts a new stake in some company, or adds to an existing one, investors take that as a vote of confidence. On the other hand, if he pares his holdings in a stock, it can spark investors to rethink their own investments.

Here's the scorecard for what Berkshire Hathaway bought and sold during the three months ended Dec. 31, 2019, based on the most recent 13F that the company filed on Feb. 14. And remember: Not all "Warren Buffett stocks" are actually his picks. Some smaller positions are believed to be handled by lieutenants Ted Weschler and Todd Combs.

SEE ALSO: Every Warren Buffett Stock Ranked: The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio

Kiplinger
Feb 18, 2020

Play the Retirement Flash Card Game
What does retirement look like for you?

To help answer that all-important question, check out a game that Charles Schwab has cooked up. Here's how it works, according to the game's designers: "The Next Chapter is a fun, thought-provoking card game designed to help you picture what you want in your golden years, so that you can start working to make those dreams a reality. Play solo or with your spouse, family or friends by answering questions like ... 'Which long-lost friend would you like to reconnect with?' or 'What moment in your life would you keep framed by your bed?' Not only will your answers tell you a lot about yourself and your friends, they'll also help you visualize your future."

Here are 20 questions pulled from the deck to get you started. For the rest, visit https://content.schwab.com/thenextchapter/ to order your complete set (it's free), or download one and get started planning The Next Chapter.

Written by Joe Vietri, who has been with Charles Schwab for more than 20 years. In his current role, he leads Schwab's branch network, managing more than 2,000 employees in more than 300 branches throughout the country.



Kiplinger
Feb 17, 2020

4 Retirement Questions to Ask Before 'How Much Should I Save?'
Instead of focusing on your retirement "number," focus on what you want your retirement to look like. Once you figure that out, you'll be in a much better position to know what it'll take to make that goal a reality.

Kiplinger
Feb 17, 2020

Stop 'Dollar-Cost Ravaging' Your Portfolio in Retirement
Retirees who live by the 4% rule and who keep pulling out money of their portfolios trusting that they won't run out, could end up regretting it.

Kiplinger
Feb 14, 2020

Is the Stock Market Closed on Presidents' Day?
Stock traders and bond traders alike have Monday off to celebrate George Washington's birthday.

Kiplinger
Feb 14, 2020

This Valentine's Day: Retirement Planning for Couples at Every Stage of Their Financial Life
It's a great time to sit down with your sweetheart and have a little chat about your goals. Here ares some highlights to discuss for young couples, middle-aged couples and couples hitting retirement.

Kiplinger
Feb 14, 2020

Should I Take a Lie Detector Test at Work?
When your boss asks you to take a lie detector test, do you have to do it? Should you do it? Read on to learn your rights and one lawyer's advice.

Kiplinger
Feb 13, 2020

Tax Planning Strategies for the 1% Are a Gamble
Families with $30 million to $60 million in low-cost-basis assets must put their chips down on one of two bets: Count on the current high federal estate tax exclusion amounts being extended or wager that they will sunset in 2026.

Kiplinger
Feb 12, 2020

The 10 Dividend ETFs to Buy for a Diversified Portfolio
Assets in U.S. dividend exchange-traded funds (ETFs) have grown exponentially over the past decade. In 2009, America's dividend ETFs collectively held less than $20 billion. By September 2019, they had shot up to almost $200 billion.

In good times and bad, dividend stocks act almost like rent checks, coming monthly or quarterly like clockwork. Many investors, whether you're a professional working on Wall Street or a regular Joe on Main Street, swear by them.

Dividend ETFs take the strategy up a notch by providing investors with a diversified portfolio of dividend-paying stocks. This allows them to collect income without the additional research and trading complications that would come with buying dozens, if not hundreds, of individual components.

If you're in this camp of income-minded set-it-and-forget-it investors, here are 10 dividend ETFs to buy and hold for the long haul. Several are dedicated specifically to dividends, while others simply hold dividend stocks as an indirect result of their strategy. But this is a collection of funds that are diversified by geography, style, size, sector and more, and thus can be held as a group or individually depending on your preferences, risk tolerance and investment horizon.

SEE ALSO: The 20 Best ETFs to Buy for a Prosperous 2020

Kiplinger
Feb 12, 2020

Keeping the House Post-Divorce Has Gotten More Affordable
The question of whether to keep or sell the family home after divorce is tricky. You've got to set your emotions aside and do the math. Lately, that math has been a little more favorable for those who'd like to stay. Here's why.

Kiplinger
Feb 12, 2020

Don't Let Valentine's Day Ruin Your Marriage
Financial planners meet with couples on the edge all the time. If you're feeling sad this Valentine's Day, take a lesson from two couple's stories.

Kiplinger
Feb 11, 2020

End of Decade Closes with 3 Surprises for Retirement
A trio of unexpected occurrences all point to one conclusion: When it comes to a successful retirement, income reigns as king.

Kiplinger
Feb 11, 2020

The 9 Best Dow Jones Dividend Growth Stocks
The Dow Jones Industrial Average, conceived by Charles Dow in 1896 to serve as the market's benchmark, nowadays also serves as a can't-miss index for income investors. Especially if you're looking for dividend growth stocks.

The Dow consists of 30 large-cap U.S. businesses that are meant to reflect America's economy. Its constituents include many iconic companies, including Exxon Mobil (XOM) and Coca-Cola (KO). Impressively, all 30 stocks pay dividends.

Several of these companies can be found in Simply Safe Dividends' best high dividend stocks list. But high current yield isn't the only dividend metric you should look at. Dividend increases, for instance, can not only lead to higher yields later down the road, but also act as a signal helping you to identify companies with rising profits and a sturdy balance sheet.

Let's review nine of the best Dow Jones dividend growth stocks. These companies appear to be the best equipped to continue rewarding their shareholders with safe and fast-growing dividends for years to come.

SEE ALSO: 64 Dividend Stocks You Can Count On in 2020

Kiplinger
Feb 11, 2020

Tax Changes and Key Amounts for the 2020 Tax Year
Although you're probably focused on filing your 2019 tax return right now, it's never too early to start thinking about next year's return. Proper tax planning requires an awareness of what's new and changed from last year--and there are plenty of tax law changes and updates taking effect in 2020 that you need to know about.

The government funding bills signed by President Trump in December 2019 included a lot of tax provisions. Other 2020 tweaks are the result of new rules or annual inflation adjustments. However, no matter how, when or why the changes were made, they can hurt or help your bottom line--so you need to be ready for them. To help you out, we pulled together a list of the most important tax law changes and adjustments for 2020 (some related items are grouped together). Use this information now to start your tax planning this year so you can save money next April when you file your 2020 return.

SEE ALSO: 20 Most-Overlooked Tax Breaks and Deductions

Kiplinger
Feb 11, 2020

3 Ways to Claim a Life Insurance Benefit: Which Is Right for You?
When you are due a life insurance death benefit, a lump sum payment isn't your only option. There are typically three main ways to take your benefit, and each has its own pros and cons.

Kiplinger
Feb 10, 2020

8 Retail Stocks That Are Doing It Right
Retailing has been forced into a transformation over the past decade. And some retail stocks, once dogged by fear of those changes, have become attractive buys once again.

The rise of Amazon.com (AMZN) and internet commerce has thinned the herd and continue to pick off stragglers. But several of the chains that continue to survive are premium or otherwise sought-out destinations that demand your attention.

Some retailers are no longer just retailers, but manufacturers. They have increasing control over both their supply chains and what consumers pay. Others don't just sell goods, but lifestyles, experiences, journeys. Many are not just conduits for other brands - they're brands themselves.

Read on as we evaluate eight retail stocks to buy as they rewrite the playbook. These companies look attractive for a number of reasons, including returns on their investments in e-commerce, siphoned business from failed competitors, successful efforts to strengthen their brands and more.

SEE ALSO: The 20 Best Stocks to Buy for 2020

Kiplinger
Feb 10, 2020

Tips for Dating Later in Life
Dating as an older adult can be both easier and more difficult than it is for younger adults.

Kiplinger
Feb 10, 2020

Should You Buy an Annuity for Your Grandchild?
There are plenty of ways to leave a legacy, but a deferred income annuity is one creative option that offers guaranteed payments and tax advantages.

Kiplinger
Feb 10, 2020

How to Check Your Financial Baggage for the New Year
If you're already faltering on your financial New Year's resolutions, here's a way to get to the root of the problem and learn a little about yourself along the way.

Kiplinger
Feb 07, 2020

15 Mid-Cap Stocks to Buy for Mighty Returns
Mid-cap stocks aren't exactly spotlight hogs.

Many investors buy into large companies because they tends to be more stable, plus information and media coverage are more readily available. Investors also know to buy small-cap stocks if they want to make aggressive growth investments to boost their long-term returns. But mid-caps - typically, stocks between $2 billion and $10 billion in market value - tend to get lost in the mix.

That's unfortunate, because over the long haul, they tend to outperform their larger and smaller brethren.

Between 2015 and 2019, the S&P 500 outperformed both the S&P MidCap 400 and the S&P SmallCap 600 on a total-return basis (price plus dividends). In the 10 years from 2010 and 2019, small caps flipped the script, outperforming the large- and mid-cap indices. But across the entire span, from 2005 to 2019, the MidCap 400 delivered a total return of 293% - 14 percentage points higher than the SmallCap 600, and 33 percentage points better than the S&P 500. Experts point out that outperformance looks even better once you adjust for risk.

"Large-cap stocks offer the stability that comes with mature multinational businesses with diverse revenue sources," Matthew Bartolini, head of SPDR Americas Research, writes in a 2019 note to clients. "Small-cap stocks are unproven, but they offer potential for further expansion and market penetration. And midcaps offer a unique combination of the managerial maturity associated with large caps and the operational dexterity of small caps."

With this in mind, here are 15 of the best mid-cap stocks to buy to give you upside growth potential in stronger economies, along with some downside protection when the market environment looks weaker.

SEE ALSO: The 20 Best Stocks to Buy for 2020

Kiplinger
Feb 07, 2020

Did You Know There's a Cure for Buyer's Remorse?
The Three-Day Cooling-Off Rule protects consumers from high-pressure sales tactics, so they need to know their rights. And well-intentioned businesses that don't want to get shafted need to know them, too.

Kiplinger
Feb 07, 2020

Life Insurance Cash-Out Options: A Retirement Planning Quiz


Kiplinger
Feb 07, 2020

Think Your DIY Retirement Plan Can Beat an Adviser?
Think again, according to studies by Vanguard and Morningstar. Maybe young, uncomplicated investors can get away with a passive plan, but you'd be surprised at exactly how much anyone near retirement could benefit from the guidance that a real retirement plan offers.

Kiplinger
Feb 06, 2020

The 9 Best 'Purebred' Pet Stocks to Buy
America's love affair with its pets is creating a booming pet care industry - and, as a result, a small but expanding cluster of pet stocks.

Pet care might be bigger than you realize. Edge by Ascential, a market research firm, says that North American spending on pets hit $225 billion in 2018, and is expected to hit $281 billion by 2023 - roughly 5% compound annual growth. Millennials and Gen-Zers are embracing pet ownership in far greater numbers than previous generations; roughly two-thirds of U.S. households own a pet, up from 56% just 30 years ago.

Rising demand is fueling a diverse set of pet stocks - companies that provide everything from premium kibble to medications to even pet DNA testing and health insurance.

You can get some pet-related exposure among blue chips such as General Mills (GIS), which acquired all-natural pet-food leader Blue Buffalo for $8 billion in 2018. Aon (AON) boasts a top-rated pet insurance business in the form of subsidiary Healthy Paws; Synchrony Financial (SYF) bought a principal rival, Pet's Best, in 2019. However, pet care remains a small portion of their overall business.

Here, we look at nine of the best pure-play pet stocks to buy right now. This is a mix of high-growth newcomers and a few more established plays. We'll start with a couple of well-known blue chips before making our way to some under-the-radar names.

SEE ALSO: 64 Dividend Stocks You Can Count on in 2020

Kiplinger
Feb 06, 2020

Taxpayers Weigh In on the New Tax Law
A Kiplinger-Barclays poll shows that most Americans aren't feeling a financial boost from the tax overhaul.

Kiplinger
Feb 06, 2020

What Benchmark Should You Use to Measure Investment Success?
Comparing apples to oranges is just bananas. Unfortunately, that's what investors do all the time, and it can be a risky prospect. Here's what investors should use as a measuring stick instead.

Kiplinger
Feb 05, 2020

4 Back-From-the-Dead Tax Breaks for Your 2019 Return
There's a handful of tax breaks you may have heard about that keep coming back from the dead like zombies. In the tax world, they're collectively referred to as "tax extenders"--every time they expire, Congress jumps in and extends them for another couple of years.

One of the appropriation bills President Trump signed in December 2019 did just that. It revived a number of tax breaks that had expired at the end of 2017. This time, most of them were brought back to life for 2018 to 2020 tax returns only. Four of them, in particular, could save you money on your 2019 tax return, which is due in April. If you can claim them for 2018 as well, go ahead and file an amended return to get a refund.

SEE ALSO: 15 Tax Breaks You Won't Believe Are Real

Kiplinger
Feb 05, 2020

Free (or Cheap) College for Retirees in All 50 States
Retirees, you're already a bona-fide graduate of the school of hard knocks - your decades of full-time employment. There's still plenty to learn, however, whether your goal is pursuing a second act in your career or lifelong learning to keep your brain sharp. Across the country, retirees can take advantage of free (or close to it) college courses for older residents at various public and private institutions. Some programs allow folks as young as 55 to participate.

Most free-tuition programs make older students wait until registration for classes has closed and the add-drop period has ended. In other words, paying students generally get first priority, and you'll only be able to enroll "on a space-available basis." In most cases, you have to go through the normal admissions process and be accepted at the college or university before you can enroll in individual classes. And while tuition may be waived, you may encounter fees to apply or register or to use labs or other resources tied to a particular class. You'll also have to pay for books and other course materials.

Many free-for-retirees programs only allow you to audit classes, meaning you won't get college credit.

Take a look.

SEE ALSO: Taxes in Retirement: How All 50 States Tax Retirees

Kiplinger
Feb 05, 2020

Wealth Lessons from the Year of the Rat
Chinese culture portrays rats as ambitious and cunning, and anyone trying to get ahead in the world and in their finances can take a lesson from their character traits, whether good or bad.

Kiplinger
Feb 05, 2020

4 Questions to Ask Your Accountant Before You File Your Taxes
Your accountant can be one of the most critical members of your financial team. The main reason is obvious: No matter who you are, how much money you have or what goals you hope to accomplish, everyone pays taxes.

At a minimum, a CPA can ensure you file your taxes the right way every year so you avoid penalties and fines. But a good CPA should also be able to help you minimize what you owe, take advantage of opportunities to claim credits you're entitled to, and even help evaluate how the other professionals on your financial team are performing.

But even the best accountant can't read your mind -- which is why to fully utilize how much they can help, you need to know the right areas in which to request their help.

When you send in your tax packet to your accountant this year, make sure to ask these questions to get the most value from your relationship.

Written by Paul V. Sydlansky, founder of Lake Road Advisors. He has worked in the financial services industry for over 20 years. Paul is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and a member of the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) and the XY Planning Network (XYPN). In 2018 he was named to Investopedia's Top 100 Financial Advisors list.

SEE ALSO: How 10 Types of Retirement Income Get Taxed SEE ALSO: Six Things Your Tax Preparer May Not Want You To Know

Kiplinger
Feb 04, 2020

64 Best Dividend Stocks You Can Count on in 2020
When it comes to dividend stocks, yield isn't everything. If you're an income investor in it for the long haul, you know that steadily rising payouts are a vital factor, too.

For one, dividend increases lift the yield on an investor's original cost basis, meaning today's 1% yield might be much more in the future. They're also indicative of a firm's ability to withstand the ups and downs of the economy, as well as the stock market.

Enter the Dividend Aristocrats.

The Dividend Aristocrats are companies in the S&P 500 Index that have improved their annual payouts every year for at least 25 consecutive years. It's a mix of household names as well as companies with less name recognition that nonetheless play an outsize role in the American economy, even if it's mostly behind the scenes. But all of them offer some size, longevity and familiarity, providing comfort amid market uncertainty.

Here are the current 64 Dividend Aristocrats - including the newest faces that were just added in January 2020. These have been among the best dividend stocks for income growth over the past few decades, and they're a great place to start if you're looking to add new dividend holdings to your long-term portfolios.

SEE ALSO: The 20 Best Stocks to Buy for 2020

Kiplinger
Feb 04, 2020

Got a Big Lump Sum to Invest? Watch Out for Vintage Risk
If you've recently received a substantial windfall, consider the "vintage risk" when investing large sums of cash. Easy does it: Now's not the time to make a big move all at one time.

Kiplinger
Feb 03, 2020

Alexa, Protect My Privacy
Take steps to keep speakers, security cameras and other smart devices safe from hackers who want to steal your data--or worse.

Kiplinger
Feb 03, 2020

State Estate Taxes Not Dead Yet
States are starting to beef up their estate tax laws instead of tearing them down. Is your state one of them?

Kiplinger
Feb 03, 2020

13 Ways to Invest in Yourself
When you hear the word "investing," you probably think about stocks, bonds, maybe commodities. It's far less likely that your reflex will be inward - but indeed, you can, and should, invest in yourself, too.

Investing is an enormous industry solely dedicated to the idea of using capital to create more capital. We highly suggest you do it. But in many instances, investing time and energy - which, just like money, are in finite supply - in yourself can lead to a meaningful payoff, too. And sometimes that payoff includes the accumulation of wealth.

It's just a matter of application, and making a plan.

To that end, here's a rundown of 13 different ways to invest in your career, your mind and your happiness that have nothing to do with buying low and selling high. Becoming a more marketable worker, earning a chance to be your own boss and simply broadening your horizons can yield rewards, too.

SEE ALSO: Millionaires in America: All 50 States Ranked

Kiplinger
Feb 03, 2020

15 Nice-Try Tax Breaks Rejected by the IRS
Everyone wants to lower their tax bill--but sometimes people try a little too hard. Over the years, taxpayers have concocted a lot of zany arguments to justify their tax breaks. We've come up with 15 of the most creative ones that the courts decided did not quite work.

SEE ALSO: 15 Tax Breaks You Won't Believe Are Real

Kiplinger
Feb 03, 2020

Choosing an Active Adult Community
Smart tips to help you find the right place for you to land in retirement.

Kiplinger
Feb 03, 2020

Don't Just Give, Give Smarter
Many people give to charities at the end of the year in a mad scramble that ends up leaving tax benefits on the table. There's a better way. Here are three beginning-of-the-year tips to benefit your causes and cut your taxes too.

Kiplinger
Feb 03, 2020

Getting a Pay Raise in 2020? Here's How to Make the Most of It
Congratulations, you just got a nice bump in your paycheck. Don't blow it. Instead, enjoy some, and then make the rest really work for you.

Kiplinger
Jan 31, 2020

The Best Tax Software Values for 2020
It's that time of year again. You've gotten your W-2s and any other paperwork, such as a 1099 for your investment income, in the mail, and you're ready to sit down and do your taxes. But you're unsure of which program to use. We're here to help.

As in previous years, we reviewed nine of the most popular tax preparation software programs for 2019 returns, including TurboTax, H&R Block, TaxAct and others, to help guide you to the right program. In addition to reviewing, we ranked them based on cost, ease of use, tax help and more. Our goal is to identify the products that provide the best overall value.

To help keep everything equal, we created two fictional tax returns using each product. The first return was for a single taxpayer with just W-2 income. The second return was for a married couple with a young child and a mortgage. (For more information about our hypothetical taxpayers, scroll to Methodology slide at the end of this article).

Just remember: Know thy tax situation, as it will determine the best program for you. Here are the rankings, from the software that offers the least to the one providing the most bang for your buck.

SEE ALSO: You Still Have Time to Save on Your Taxes

Kiplinger
Jan 31, 2020

Kip ETF 20: The Best Cheap ETFs You Can Buy
Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are growing at an astronomical rate. U.S. assets are closing in on $4.25 trillion. The ETF share of total assets at investment firms has more than doubled to 17% from 8% at the start of the decade, while mutual funds have lost market share. The only problem with this explosive growth? The industry now boasts thousands of funds, making it difficult to determine the very best ETFs.

But investors are getting smarter about how they use ETFs in their portfolios. "After a decade of market gains, ETFs now play a unique role for investors as the foundation of a portfolio and also as vehicles that enable investors to be nimble," says Kari Droller, who oversees third-party mutual funds and ETFs at Charles Schwab.

We try to be nimble, too. Although a thorough review of the Kiplinger ETF 20 happens only once a year, we watch each fund closely. As you'll see below, we've noted where a couple of funds merit more scrutiny as interest rates stay steady and low. But for now, we're holding fast to our 20.

Read on for more analysis of our Kiplinger ETF 20 picks, which allow investors to tackle various strategies at a low cost.

SEE ALSO: The 20 Best ETFs to Buy for a Prosperous 2020

Kiplinger
Jan 31, 2020

Take the Scenic Route: Diversification on the Road to Retirement
It's no secret that the old rules of retirement no longer apply to many people. For retirements lasting upwards of 30 years, it's crucial to diversify your assets to help reduce risk and minimize taxes down the road.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

A Good Year for Most of the Kip 25 Funds
More winners than losers among our favorite low-cost mutual funds.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Sizing Up the Value Of an Art Collection
Invest time now to decide where your collection goes, or if it's divested, donated or given to your heirs after you die.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Checking in on Social Security
Social Security would like you to conduct your business online, but be prepared to navigate some speed bumps.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

You Still Have Time to Save on Your Taxes
Start now to take advantage of all of the tax breaks available to you.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Social Security Tips and Tricks for All: Divorcees, Widows, Older Workers, Teachers, More
Selecting the right strategy for when to claim Social Security will pay off for years to come. But there's a lot more to maximizing your benefits

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

The Best New Stocks to Buy in 2020 (And 2 to Avoid)
2019 was an explosive year for new stocks ... for better, and for worse.

The year greeted a plentiful number of initial public offerings (IPOs) - 160, to be exact, that collectively raised more than $46 billion. That figure included numerous notable names, including Slack Technologies (WORK) and Pinterest (PINS). Saudi Arabia even got in on the action, listing the world's largest IPO as oil giant Saudi Aramco went public at a valuation of $1.7 trillion. For context, Apple (AAPL) - heretofore Earth's largest company - currently is worth $1.4 trillion by market value.

Should you buy new stocks? Well, for one, you might already own them, in one way or another. Pensions, mutual funds, even insurers invest in IPOs. But it's one thing to own a tiny percentage along with a giant basket of other stocks - it's another to buy a single IPO that could end up representing a few percent of your overall portfolio.

Still, these newly public stocks are often in their early growth stages, making them fraught with risk but also full of upside potential. It's often best to wait a few months after an offering to allow the initial hype to fade and allow Wall Street to focus more on the fundamentals, making now the best time to really start examining 2019's IPOs as prospective holdings.

Read on as we examine six new stocks: four that look like buys, and two that could have a bumpier road ahead.

SEE ALSO: 13 Super Small-Cap Stocks to Buy for 2020 and Beyond

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Travel Secrets That Save You Money
These strategies and money-saving tips will help you unlock the very best values.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Why You Need a Renters Insurance Policy
The average monthly premium for renters insurance is about $17 a month for $40,000 in personal property coverage, according to Insurance.com.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Beware the Roaring Twenties
For the first time in years, valuations -- not black swans or politics or the Fed -- are a challenge.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Benjamin Graham's Timeless Advice
You don't have to be a brilliant analyst like Graham to recognize the value in value today.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Health Care ETF Finishes Strong
Despite Invesco S&P 500 Equal Weight Health Care ETF lagging the S&P 500 most of the year, it still finished out 2019 up more than 20%.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

How to Shop for Life Insurance
You may be able to estimate how much you need online, but that's just the start of your search.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Picking Stocks? Your Brokerage Can Help
Online brokers have beefed up investor tools and research.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Watch Out for Phony Wildfire Charities
Scammers are using social media and fake websites to raise funds for those affected by the fires in Australia.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

A New Way to Repay College Loans
Parents may now use money from their 529 college-savings plans to help their children pay off student loans.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

17 States That Will Gain or Lose Electoral-College Votes After the 2020 Census
Every 10 years, the 435 seats in the House of Representatives are reassigned based on the results of the U.S. Census. This also helps determine a state's number of votes in the Electoral College (House seats plus Senate seats, plus three additional for the District of Columbia for a sum of 538) and thus its power to decide presidential elections.

Where people go, so goes political power. According to Election Data Services, at least 17 states will likely gain or lose seats--and electoral college votes--after the 2020 Census, based on the latest demographic trends. States in the South and West will see the biggest gains; Texas could pick up as many as three seats, the most of any state. The Midwest and Northeast will not fare as well: Eight of the 10 states set to lose House seats are from these two regions.

Both parties could profit from these developments. Take Florida, whose rapid growth is fueled by both increasing numbers of younger Latinos, who tend to vote Democratic, and older retirees, who tend to vote Republican. As a result, the Sunshine State will probably remain the archetypal swing state for years to come.

Keep in mind, since the number of House seats is fixed, even states whose populations are still growing, such as California, are at risk of losing representation in Congress to those that are growing even faster.

Will your state's political influence surge or dwindle in the coming decade? Take a look.

SEE ALSO: Best States for Low Taxes: 50 States Ranked for Taxes

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Investors Prospered by Staying the Course
The long bull market made it easier to avoid buying high and selling low.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Investors, Look Past Global Tensions
The average time it has taken for stocks to bottom is 22 days, with the market recovering all losses in an average of 47 days.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Some Heirs Could Face a Tax Squeeze
IRA owners should review their estate plan as a new law puts an end to stretch IRAs.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Is a Debt Bomb Ticking?
Corporations have amassed a ton of debt. Protect yourself with these funds and ETFs.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Kiplinger's Mutual Fund Rankings
Mutual fund records were toppled in the U.S. in 2019, but foreign shares also rose.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Protect Your Smartphone With Your Credit Card
Before shelling out extra cash on insurance for your mobile device, check to see if your credit card's benefits include coverage.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

2 IRA Changes to Consider Right Now, Thanks to the SECURE Act
Quick: Who did you list as your IRA beneficiary? If you answered your children or grandchildren, not your spouse, you might want to change that ASAP.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Should You Do Your Own Taxes or Hire a Professional?
Are you a prime candidate to go it alone? Here are two types of people who should consider doing their own taxes, and two types who should probably get some help.

Kiplinger
Jan 30, 2020

Hiring a Nanny, Housekeeper or Caregiver? Financial Tips for Household Employers
After years of putting it off, my husband and I finally decided to hire a nanny to take care of our children after school. We could have taken the easy way out by using an outside service, but we really wanted to establish a long-lasting relationship with a qualified, caring individual I found on my own.

Fortunately, we found the right person. And, suddenly, we had to take a crash course in understanding what it means to be an employer. How to ensure that our nanny could legally work for us. How to set up a payroll system. How to calculate the taxes we'd need to withdraw from her paycheck.

Even though I am a financial planner, my experience and credentials didn't fully prepare me for this new role. Fortunately, I was able to get great advice from my accountant and by reading useful publications like the IRS Household Employer's Tax Guide.

If you've been thinking about hiring in-home help, whether it's a nanny, housekeeper, maid, driver, personal chef, gardener or someone else, feel free to learn from my experiences in becoming a newly minted household employer.

Written by Joelle Spear, CFP®, a financial adviser at Canby Financial Advisors in Framingham, Mass. Spear has an MBA with a finance concentration from Bentley University.

SEE ALSO: 4 Ways to Give Your Children and Grandchildren a Financial Head Start

Kiplinger
Jan 29, 2020

The 13 Hottest IPOs to Watch For in 2020
2020 could be a hot year of IPOs despite a few high-profile disappointments last year. Investors finally got their chance to snap up shares in hot companies such as Uber Technologies (UBER), Lyft Inc. (LYFT) and Pinterest (PINS) ... but those three and others posted sobering losses for anyone who bought in early.

What went wrong?

Well, the same thing that often goes wrong for IPOs early on: The market for them is fickle. But while the stocks above were money-losers, the average IPO gained 20% across the year, according to IPO research firm and ETF provider Renaissance Capital. Interestingly, the top-performing sectors for initial public offerings were more traditional fare, such as consumer staples, health care, financials and materials.

One of the biggest obstacles for IPOs last year was the widely publicized implosion of workspace real estate firm WeWork, which had to cancel its planned 2019 offering because the company was running out of cash. It was a stiff reminder that high growth isn't enough - there has to be a viable path to profitability.

Despite some deserved investor skepticism, however, it still looks like 2020 could rejuvenate IPO enthusiasm.

Here, we look at some of the most prominent IPOs that could happen in 2020. This list includes companies that have filed Form S-1 with the SEC, have unofficially stated their intentions with Kiplinger or other media outlets, or have made moves similar to other firms preparing to go public.

SEE ALSO: The 15 Best Tech Stocks to Buy for 2020

Kiplinger
Jan 29, 2020

3 Funds, 3 Stocks to Tap the Tiny Tech Trend
It's no secret that large technology firms have led the way for much of the bull market. By now, every investor knows that FANG stands for Facebook, Amazon.com, Netflix and Google (although Google is now Alphabet). From the beginning of the bull market in 2009 through 2018, tech stocks in the large-company Standard & Poor's 500-stock index edged out tech stocks in the small-cap S&P SmallCap 600 by a half-percentage point per year, on average. In 2019, Big Tech pulled in front big time, returning 50.3%, compared with 39.6% for small-tech firms.

But small tech firms may be poised to close the gap, says Jim Paulsen, chief investment strategist at market research firm Leuthold Group. The "mini FANGs" (as he likes to call them) are currently trading at about the same valuation as big tech names, when small fries have historically commanded a premium. And analysts estimate that over the next three to five years, profits for the small tech stocks will increase at twice the rate of big-tech earnings.

Although small stocks tend to come with more volatility than large ones, small tech firms will largely avoid some of the risks tied to the tech behemoths. "These firms aren't in the crosshairs of regulators over privacy or antitrust issues," he says. Paulsen recommends shifting as much as 50% of whatever you have allocated to tech stocks into smaller names.

Here are six ways to do that.

SEE ALSO: The 15 Best Tech Stocks to Buy for 2020

Kiplinger
Jan 29, 2020

Avoid These 4 Mistakes That Often Derail Retirement Plans
You're chugging along with your savings goals, but are you really doing everything right? See if you're at risk for getting off track due to four all-too-common mistakes.

Kiplinger
Jan 29, 2020

1 Way to Completely Offset Taxes on Millions in Capital Gains
Congratulations! You just made millions selling your stock or the business you spent years growing. Uncle Sam plans to reward your windfall by sending you a big tax bill, but there is a way to possibly take those gains completely tax free: Opportunity Zone funds.

Kiplinger
Jan 28, 2020

5 'Strong Buy' Biotech Stocks to Buy for 2020
Investors seeking out high growth for their portfolios will often turn to biotech stocks. The biotechnology industry, which has become densely populated as our understanding of living systems and organisms continues to expand, has earned a reputation on Wall Street for its explosive potential ... and high volatility.

In contrast to companies in other sectors, the gains and losses in even the best biotech stocks hinge less on earnings results, and more on a few key indicators such as trial-data readouts or verdicts from regulatory agencies. Product approvals unlock vital revenues, so a single positive update can function as a catalyst that propels shares to new highs.

Of course, there's a reason risk-averse investors shy away from these stocks: The opposite also holds true.

Wall Street pros rightly advise a cautious approach when evaluating the biotechnology industries. We find that monitoring the analyst community can be helpful on a couple fronts: For one, we can see where the pros are putting their faith. Also, analysts can provide much-needed insight into many stocks that get little media coverage, and whose progress can be difficult to gauge unless you're a medical expert.

We used TipRanks' Stock Screener tool to comb through hundreds of biotechnology stocks to identify promising picks - ones that have received enough lopsided support from analysts that they earn TipRanks' top Strong Buy consensus rating. Here, we have found five top biotech stocks with overwhelmingly bullish sentiment from the analyst community, and price-growth projections of between 28% and 82%.

SEE ALSO: 8 Stock Picks Getting Hit by Coronavirus Fears

Kiplinger
Jan 28, 2020

Retirees, Cover Yourself With Umbrella Insurance
You may not realize you don't have enough liability coverage until something catastrophic happens.

Kiplinger
Jan 28, 2020

Apple Stock: The Dividend Investor's Guide
As AAPL dedicates increasing sums of cash to its dividend, does it belong in buy-and-hold income portfolios?

Kiplinger
Jan 28, 2020

Moves to Make Now To Age in Place
If you are a longtime homeowner and thinking ahead to your next stage of life, you're probably familiar with the idea of aging in place. You might already be considering renovation projects, such as installing grab bars in your bathroom or widening your doorways, to help you stay put. You're not alone in your pursuit: About 76% of Americans age 50 and older say they want to stay in their homes, and 77% hope to remain in their neighborhoods as long as possible, recent AARP research shows.

But renovations are just a part of what you need to make aging in place work for you. While it's typically less expensive to remain in your home than to pay for assisted living, that doesn't mean it's a slam dunk to stay put. You'll still have a long to-do list. Just one example: You need to plan ahead for how you will manage maintenance and care--for your home, and for yourself, as you age and face health challenges.

And be aware that strengthening your social fabric now might be just as important as shoring up your finances and installing a curbless shower. Building a network of support among friends and neighbors, and establishing strong ties in your community, from volunteering to just enjoying casual conversations at the local coffee shop, play important roles in keeping older adults healthy and functioning, experts say. You won't age in place well if you're isolated and alone, a reality you don't want to overlook as you consider your housing and financial options.

"The social connections you have and the access to services in your community are often more important than anything else," says Jessica Finlay, a University of Michigan researcher who studies older adults and their neighborhoods (learn more about her research at jessicafinlay.com). "You need a reason to get out of bed in the morning and to get out the front door."

Aging in place also can be more challenging than you might expect. While most seniors say they want to age in place, a

Kiplinger
Jan 28, 2020

4 Ways Claiming Social Security Benefits Early Could Work for You
When financial professionals talk about "maximizing" your Social Security income, generally what they're really advising is that you wait as long as possible before claiming your benefits.

Often, that makes perfect sense. After all, if you start your retirement benefits at age 62 (the earliest you can file), your monthly amount will be up to 30% less than it would be if you waited until your full retirement age. And that reduction is permanent. On the flip side, for every year you wait to file after your full retirement age -- until you reach age 70 -- you'll get an extra 8% in delayed retirement credits.

Waiting can make a substantial difference in the check you receive every month. But that doesn't make it the best strategy for everyone. For many retirees, there are good reasons to claim those benefits as early as possible.

Here are a few examples of when claiming earlier rather than later can be the right choice for you:

Written by Jason Lambert, president, CEO and portfolio manager of Vancouver, Wash.-based Northwest Financial & Tax Solutions (www.nwfts.net). He co-hosts "The Retirement Trailhead" radio show, and he hosts the "Peaks and Valleys" podcast. He holds a degree in finance from Auburn University.

SEE ALSO: Time Claims to Maximize Social Security Benefits

TRENDING TAGS
CoronavirusFears stocks Market outbreak Dow
marketstock coronavirus stocks Dow week
stockscoronavirus since Week fears worst
DowCoronavirus points Down week fears
FedCoronavirus Rate Cuts Cut economy
Stockcoronavirus market week since fears
Sinceworst week crisis stocks financial
pointsDow coronavirus week fears worst
worstsince week crisis financial stocks
fearsCoronavirus Dow stocks points worst

NEWS SOURCES
Top News (Business News)
Accounting Today
AdWeek News
Banking Business Review
Barron's This Week Magazine
Barron's Up and Down Wall Street Daily
Brad Ideas
Chicago Tribune Business News
CNBC Business
CNBC Economy
CNBC Finance
CNN/Money
CNN/Money Real Estate News
Dismal.com: Analysis
Dismal.com: Indicators
Enterprise Application News
Entrepreneur.com
Forbes Headlines
Forbes Social Media News
FT.com - China, Economy & Trade
FT.com - Financial Markets
FT.com - Hedge Funds
FT.com - Telecoms
FT.com - US
Google Business News
Google Market News
HBS Working Knowledge
Inc.com
INSEAD Knowledge
International Tax Review
Kiplinger
Knowledge@Wharton
L.S. Starrett News
MarketWatch
MarketWatch Breaking News
MarketWatch MarketPulse
McKinsey Quarterly
MSNBC.com: Business
Nielsen Trends
NonProfit Times
NPR Topics: Business
NYTimes Business
OpinionJournal.com
Private Equity Breaking News
Reuters Business
Reuters Company News
Reuters Money
SEC.gov Updates: News Digest
SHRM HR News
Tax Policy News
The Economist International News
The Motley Fool
USA Today Money
Wall Street Journal US Business
Wall Street Transcript
Washington Post Business
WSJ Asia
WSJ Europe
WSJ MoneyBeat
WSJ Opinion
WSJ US News
WSJ World Markets
Yahoo Business
  • CEOExpress
  • 1 Boston Place | Suite 2600
    Boston MA 02108
  • 617 482 1200
    617 299 8649 (fax)
  • Contact
  • As an Amazon Associate
    CEOExpress earns from
    qualifying purchases.

©1999-2020 CEOExpress Company LLC