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NPR Topics: Business
May 29, 2024

What happens after you get scammed? Can you get your money back?
We are living in a kind of golden age for online fraudsters. As the number of apps and services for storing and sending money has exploded - so too have the schemes that bad actors have cooked up to steal that money. Every year, we hear more and more stories of financial heartbreak. What you don't often hear about is what happens after the scam?

On today's show, we follow one woman who was scammed out of over $800,000 on her quest to get her money back. That journey takes her from the halls of the FBI to the fraud departments of some of the country's biggest financial institutions. And it offers a window into how the systems that are theoretically designed to help the victims of financial cybercrime actually work in practice.

This episode was hosted by Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi and Jeff Guo. It was produced by Willa Rubin and edited by Keith Romer. It was engineered by Neal Rauch and fact-checked by Sierra Juarez. Alex Goldmark is Planet Money's executive producer.

Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

NPR Topics: Business
May 29, 2024

Using anecdotes to predict recessions
Eight times a year, we award regional Federal Reserve Banks with our coveted Beigie Award. While the anecdotes within the Beige Book offer us fascinating looks into the economy, to others, it can be difficult to make anything of the stories they tell. That's why we're giving out a special Beigie award today to some economists who found a way to use anecdotes to peer into our economic future.

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 29, 2024

American Airlines faces a discrimination suit after removing 8 Black men from flight
Neither passenger knew each other, nor were they seated together on the Jan. 5 flight from Phoenix to New York. A lawsuit alleges they were removed from the flight after a complaint about body odor.

NPR Topics: Business
May 28, 2024

Can dental therapists fill the gap in oral care?
Dental therapists have been practicing in other parts of the world for decades, but in the U.S. they are relatively few and far between. Like a hygienist, dental therapists can do cleanings as well as some procedures usually reserved for dentists, like simple extractions. They could also be the solution to getting underserved, rural communities better oral care. Today on the show, new momentum for dental therapy and why the American Dental Association is pushing back.

Related episodes:
The value of good teeth

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 28, 2024

Melinda French Gates to give $1 billion to women's rights groups
The 59-year-old says her decision to donate $1 billion was in part due to the racial gap in women's mortality rates. She most recently stepped down as co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

NPR Topics: Business
May 28, 2024

Bette Nash, the world's longest-serving flight attendant, dies at 88
Nash began her career in 1957 when flight attendants handed out cigarettes and got weighed before shifts. She earned her Guinness World Record after 64 years of service in 2022 — then kept working.

NPR Topics: Business
May 27, 2024

After ‘whites only' job posting, tech staffing firm settles with DOJ, Labor
The company, which is a minority-owned federal contractor, will pay a penalty and be monitored to ensure compliance with U.S. anti-discrimination laws.

NPR Topics: Business
May 26, 2024

Air travel has gone to the dogs — literally. Here's what to know about BARK Air
BARK Air says it built its experience "dog first," offering perks like puppucchinos and pheromone blankets. It's flying between New York and LA or London and plans to add more routes soon.

NPR Topics: Business
May 25, 2024

Trump supporters rushed to buy shares in Truth Social, and some are seeing the payoffs
An army of Trump supporters have bought shares in the former president's social media company Truth Social. Wall Street may think that's risky but some of the shareholders are sitting on a profit.

NPR Topics: Business
May 24, 2024

The junkyard economist
On today's episode, we ride through the streets of San Francisco with a long-time junkman, Jon Rolston.

Jon has spent the last two decades clearing out houses and offices of their junk. He's found all sorts of items: a life-time supply of toilet paper, gold rings, $20,000 in cash. Over the years, he's developed a keen eye for what has value and what might sell. He's become a kind of trash savant.

As we ride with Jon, he shows us the whole ecosystem of how our reusable trash gets dealt with — from metals (ferrous and non-ferrous) to tires to cardboard. And we see how our junk can sometimes get a second chance at life.

If you can understand the junk market like Jon, you can understand dozens of trends in our economy.

This episode was hosted by Erika Beras and James Sneed, and produced by James Sneed with help from Emma Peaslee. It was edited by Jess Jiang. Engineering by Josh Newell. It was fact-checked by Sierra Juarez. Alex Goldmark is Planet Money's executive producer.

Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

NPR Topics: Business
May 24, 2024

How Red Lobster got cooked and other indicators
Indicators of the Week is back! On today's episode, we discuss Red Lobster's bankruptcy, the rancid vibes of the U.S. economy, and a surprising shift in vices among Americans.

NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

NCAA, leagues back $2.8B settlement, setting stage for major change in college sports
The monumental decision sets the stage for a groundbreaking revenue-sharing model that could start directing millions of dollars directly to athletes as soon as the 2025 fall semester.

NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

Why tariffs are SO back
Last week, President Biden placed tariffs on a slew of Chinese goods. When Donald Trump was president, he did the same. Regardless of who wins the election, the US is gearing up for heavy tariffs on imports in 2024. But this is far from the first time the economic tool has been in style.

Today, a brief history of US tariffs: how they came into fashion, fell out of fashion, are now back again and why economists aren't too happy about it.

Related Episodes:
Trade wars and talent shortages (Apple / Spotify)
The surprising leader in EVs (Apple / Spotify)
A brief history of tariffs
Worst. Tariffs. Ever.

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

‘It is time to break up Live Nation-Ticketmaster': Justice Department sues concert ticket behemoth
On Thursday, the Department of Justice and 30 states announced a federal antitrust lawsuit against Live Nation Entertainment and its subsidiary Ticketmaster, saying the company has created a monopoly on live show prices across the U.S.

NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

A new Justice Department lawsuit aims to end the Live Nation-Tickemaster monopoly
The Justice Department and several states have filed a lawsuit against Live Nation, the parent company of Ticketmaster.

NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

Department of Justice and 30 states file anti-monopoly lawsuit against Ticketmaster and Live Nation Entertainment
On Wednesday, the Department of Justice and 30 states announced a federal antitrust lawsuit against Live Nation Entertainment and its subsidiary Ticketmaster, saying the company has created a monopoly on live show prices across the U.S.

NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

How the Ascension cyberattack is disrupting care at hospitals
With IT systems down, staff at Ascension have returned to manual processes they left behind 20 years ago. It's the latest in a string of attacks on health care systems that house private patient data.

NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

A billionaire surprised graduates onstage with cash, but it's not all theirs to keep
Billionaire philanthropist Rob Hale gave UMass Dartmouth graduates $1,000 each, and instructed them to donate half. He tells NPR the best cause students can support is one that matters to them.

NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

Prospective homebuyers must move fast because of a shortage of homes for sale


NPR Topics: Business
May 23, 2024

Why Zombie second mortgages are threatening thousands of Americans' homes
An NPR investigation finds thousands of homeowners face foreclosure over old so-called zombie second mortgages from the housing-bubble days. Many thought the loans were dead. But investors buy them and can move aggressively to collect.

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

Lay-offs can leave you with big questions. An HR expert has answers.
By one estimate, 40 percent of American workers get laid off at least once in their careers. And when that happens, companies will often say, "It's not personal. It has nothing to do with you or your performance. We're just changing priorities, making a strategic shift."

It's like the business version of: "It's not you, it's me." And just like a breakup, it feels terrible.

This happened to a man we're calling V, who was working at the same company as his husband when he got laid off. And for V, the experience felt shocking. It left him and his husband with a lot of unresolved questions.

On today's show, the story of that layoff. And we help that couple get some answers by taking their questions to an HR expert who gives the low-down on lay-offs.

This story is adapted from a 3-part series on layoffs produced by Yowei Shaw for her show, Proxy. The layoff series was edited by John DeLore with research and reporting help from Kim Nederveen Pieterse. You can listen to the full layoff series from Proxy wherever you get your podcasts, and you can support the show and find out more by going to patreon.com/proxypodcast. And you can check out her original song "Gold Star" on Spotify and YouTube.

Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

A decade-old scandal in the U.K. haunts CEO of 'Washington Post'
The Washington Post CEO's past actions are coming under severe scrutiny in a British court as he seeks to turn around the financially troubled U.S. newspaper.

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

A lawsuit accuses Hershey's of using 'deceptive' packaging on Reese's products
Four plaintiffs in Florida say Hershey falsely represented several Reese's Peanut Butter products by showing "explicit carved-out artistic designs" on the wrappers being sold.

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

Hershey's lawsuit argues the company uses 'deceptive' packaging in Reese's products
Four plaintiffs in Florida say Hershey falsely represented several Reese's Peanut Butter products by showing "explicit carved-out artistic designs" on the wrappers being sold.

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

How Fortnite brought Google to its knees
In August 2020, Epic Games launched a legal assault against both Google and Apple, alleging that their mobile app stores are illegal monopolies. Almost four years later, Epic could be close to forcing Google to make major changes to its Play Store.

Today, we explain the legal battle behind Epic v. Google and why the outcome could have major implications for where consumers get their apps and how they pay for them.

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

A Michigan farmworker is diagnosed with bird flu in 2nd U.S. case tied to dairy cows
The Michigan dairy worker had mild eye symptoms from the infection and has recovered, health officials said. The worker had been in contact with cows presumed to be infected.

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

Buy-now, pay-later returns and disputes are about to get federal oversight
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is requiring buy-now, pay-later lenders to provide the same protections to shoppers as credit card companies do.

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

A canned water brand says it's giving away a fighter jet — for real
The company Liquid Death is giving away a $400,000 L-39 Aero Jet nicknamed "The Dehydrator." Apparently because its thrust will relieve you of your bodily fluids. You know so you need water. Get it?

NPR Topics: Business
May 22, 2024

A big survey asked Americans about their finances. Here are some trouble spots
A new report from the Fed shows little change in family finances over the last year, but rising prices remain a big worry. And parents of children under the age of 18 feel worse off than a year ago.

NPR Topics: Business
May 21, 2024

AI Tupac and the murky legality of digital necromancy
With a few clicks of AI software, anyone can conjure the voice or visual likeness of a dead celebrity — or really anyone. This new world has opened up a bunch of new legal questions about the rights of people and their heirs to control digital replicas of themselves. Today on the show, how a Drake diss track featuring the voice of Tupac made it into the Congressional record, and how it may lead to more regulation of AI.

To read more of Greg Rosalsky's reporting, subscribe to Planet Money's newsletter.

Related episodes:
AI creates, transforms and destroys ... jobs (Apple / Spotify)
Are the Products in your shopping cart real? (Apple / Spotify)
Planet Money makes an episode using AI

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 21, 2024

Following a corruption court case, the NRA elects new leaders
Ex-leader Wayne LaPierre, who was found liable for misusing millions in NRA funding, has been replaced. NPR's Leila Fadel talks to Mike Spies of The Trace, a nonprofit that covers gun-related news

NPR Topics: Business
May 21, 2024

Target is cutting prices on 5,000 items including milk, butter and pet food
Target joins other retailers trying to draw inflation-weary shoppers to stores. The chain says reductions have already been reflected in about 1,500 products.

NPR Topics: Business
May 21, 2024

Target is reducing prices on 5,000 common goods, including milk, butter and pet food
Target said it is trying to help customers save money as well as stay competitive in its markets. Price reductions have already been reflected in about 1,500 products.

NPR Topics: Business
May 20, 2024

Biden will name new boss soon to lead 'toxic' FDIC
FDIC chairman Martin Gruenberg says he's prepared to step down once a successor is confirmed. Gruenberg has been widely criticized for fostering a toxic workplace at the agency.

NPR Topics: Business
May 20, 2024

OpenAI pulls AI voice that was compared to Scarlett Johansson in the movie 'Her'
The AI company said the voice was not patterned after Johansson, but that it was removing the voice as an option in the wake of speculation about whether the sci-fi film inspired the voice.

NPR Topics: Business
May 20, 2024

Scarlett Johansson says she is 'shocked, angered' over new ChatGPT voice
Johansson says she was approached multiple times by OpenAI to be the voice of ChatGPT, and that she declined. Then the company released a voice assistant that sounded uncannily like her.

NPR Topics: Business
May 20, 2024

Red Lobster files for bankruptcy after missteps, including all-you-can-eat shrimp
Red Lobster is in hot water. The chain is on bankruptcy watch after a series of missteps by a parade of executives — including an ill-fated promotion for all-you-can-eat-shrimp.

NPR Topics: Business
May 20, 2024

Building generational wealth in rural America
Homes are not just where we eat and sleep, but one of the primary ways people build generational wealth in the U.S. But with home shortages and harsh climates, rural America's path to building that wealth looks a little different than other parts of the country. Today on the show, we focus in on housing challenges in Alabama's Black Belt and one innovative solution to preserving generational wealth.

Related:
There is growing segregation in millennial wealth

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 20, 2024

Red Lobster files for bankruptcy after missteps including all-you-can-eat shrimp
The seafood chain is in hot water after a series of bad choices by a parade of executives. Almost 580 restaurants will stay open, after dozens closed abruptly last week.

NPR Topics: Business
May 18, 2024

'Magic United': Disneyland characters vote to unionize
Disneyland employees in California, including those who perform as characters from Mickey Mouse to Moana, have voted to unionize. The 1,700 workers will be represented by Actors' Equity Association.

NPR Topics: Business
May 18, 2024

Boeing held its annual shareholders meeting amid a string of controversies
Boeing held its annual shareholders meeting on Friday. This follows a difficult week and year for the plane-maker, which is facing renewed scrutiny over its safety and production practices.

NPR Topics: Business
May 18, 2024

Mercedes-Benz workers vote against unionizing Alabama plant, halting UAW's streak
Mercedes-Benz workers voted against union representation in Alabama, a defeat for the United Auto Workers.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

The hack that almost broke the internet
Last month, the world narrowly avoided a cyberattack of stunning ambition. The targets were some of the most important computers on the planet. Computers that power the internet. Computers used by banks and airlines and even the military.

What these computers had in common was that they all relied on open source software.

A strange fact about modern life is that most of the computers responsible for it are running open source software. That is, software mostly written by unpaid, sometimes even anonymous volunteers. Some crucial open source programs are managed by just a single overworked programmer. And as the world learned last month, these programs can become attractive targets for hackers.

In this case, the hackers had infiltrated a popular open source program called XZ. Slowly, over the course of two years, they transformed XZ into a secret backdoor. And if they hadn't been caught, they could have taken control of large swaths of the internet.

On today's show, we get the story behind the XZ hack and what made it possible. How the hackers took advantage of the strange way we make modern software. And what that tells us about the economics of one of the most important industries in the world.

Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

How tariffs — like those on Chinese goods — might impact inflation and jobs
When the U.S. imposes tariffs on specific foreign-made goods, what is the effect on American consumers and on the regions and industries the tariffs were supposed to protect? It's complicated.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

Comcast plans to offer a new streaming bundle. Is streaming the new cable?
Comcast announced that it plans to offer a new streaming bundle with Peacock, Netflix and Apple TV , which sounds a lot like the cable channels packages that consumers left cable TV to get away from.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

Mercedes workers vote no to union, putting the brakes on UAW's march South
More than 5,000 Mercedes-Benz workers who build luxury SUVs in Alabama were eligible to vote on whether to join the UAW. Workers faced intense anti-union messaging from Mercedes in the run-up.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

Mercedes workers vote no to union. UAW says they were illegally intimidated
More than 5,000 Mercedes-Benz workers who build luxury SUVs in Alabama were eligible to vote on whether to join the UAW. Workers faced intense anti-union messaging from Mercedes in the run-up.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

Morning news brief
President Biden to meet leaders of Black sororities and fraternities. Mercedes-Benz workers in Alabama finish union vote. Boeing's shareholder meeting comes at a turbulent time for the company.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

'The Indicator from Planet Money' sheds light on the 'winner-take-all' problem
Gender equality in the workplace has been stalled for years. And one big reason behind this trend is something called the "winner-take-all" approach to business.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

The result of a union election at Mercedes-Benz in Alabama is about to be revealed
Mercedes-Benz workers in Alabama finish up five days of voting on whether to join the United Auto Workers union. A ballot count begins Friday morning.

NPR Topics: Business
May 17, 2024

Troubled plane-maker Boeing holds its annual shareholders meeting on Friday
The airplane maker continues to answer difficult questions about production and quality control lapses on its 737 Max jets.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

How the Dominican Republic became Latin America's economic superstar
For decades, the Dominican Republic's economy has been growing at a remarkably steady pace. The Caribbean nation of 11 million people is today considered a middle-income nation, but the International Monetary Fund projects it could become an advanced economy within the next 40 years.

Today on the show, we uncover the reasons behind the Dominican Republic's economic success and whether or not these benefits are being felt widely in the country.

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

UAW president Shawn Fain's swagger has helped unionize the deeply anti-union South
Auto workers are doing what long seemed impossible - unionizing in the South. The United Auto Workers chief Shawn Fain's connection with workers and willingness to fight have led to the resurgence.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

AI-generated articles are permeating major news publications
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Maggie Harrison Dupre, staff writer at Futurism, about her reporting into AI-generated articles appearing on major news publications.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

Biden ending new leases in America's top coal region
Citing climate change, federal land managers are moving to end new leasing for coal in the country's top producing region.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

The Dow Jones hits 40,000 for the first time. What to know about this major milestone
Stock markets received a boost from new data showing inflation is easing. Lower inflation has raised hopes about the U.S. economy — but there are still a lot of unknowns.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

Supreme Court upholds funding structure for CFPB
The opinion was written by Justice Clarence Thomas who reversed the decision of the Fifth Circuit. Justices Neil Gorsuch and Samuel Alito dissented.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

Supreme Court upholds funding structure for consumer watchdog agency
The opinion was written by Justice Clarence Thomas, who reversed the decision of the 5th Circuit. Justices Neil Gorsuch and Samuel Alito dissented.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

With flyers more distracted than ever, United rolls out a rebooted safety video
United Airlines is releasing a new safety video for the first time in years. The refresh comes as airlines struggle to hold the attention of passengers who are distracted by screens of their own.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

OpenAI releases latest ChatGPT — it can talk, laugh and even sing like a human
The latest version of ChatGPT has the internet wondering: Was it meant to make it sound like Scarlett Johansson in the movie Her? Its creators insist the model was not based on the movie.

NPR Topics: Business
May 16, 2024

Why United Airlines is rolling out a rebooted safety video
United is releasing a new safety video for the first time in years. The refresh comes as airlines struggle to hold the attention of passengers who are distracted by screens of their own.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

The highs and lows of US rents
The latest inflation numbers are in. This month's Consumer Price Index, or the CPI, is ... well, good and bad news for renters. Shelter prices went up over the last year, but at a slower pace. Shelter makes up nearly a third of the CPI. Today's episode: Rent. Where is it high? Where is it low? What exactly is "coffee milk"? The Indicator tours the U.S. to bring you the answers.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Why Gold? (Classic)
In the past few months, the price of gold has gone way up - even hitting a new high last month at just over $2,400 per troy ounce.

Gold has long had a shiny quality to it, literally and in the marketplace. And we wondered, why is that?

Today on the show, we revisit a Planet Money classic episode: Why Gold? Jacob Goldstein and David Kestenbaum will peruse the periodic table of the elements with one goal in mind: to learn which element would really make the best money.

This classic Planet Money episode was part of the Planet Money Buys Gold series, and was hosted by Jacob Goldstein and David Kestenbaum.

This rerun was hosted by Sally Helm, produced by Willa Rubin, edited by Keith Romer, and fact-checked by Sierra Juarez. Alex Goldmark is our executive producer.

Help support Planet Money and hear our bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

Always free at these links: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, the NPR app or anywhere you get podcasts.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Inflation eased and the stock market rallied in April
Consumer prices in April were up 3.4% from a year ago — a smaller annual increase than the month before.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Is this the beginning of the end of beauty pageants?
NPR's Juana Summers talks with Amy Argetsinger, author of There She Was: The Secret History of Miss America, about the recent controversy surrounding the resignations of Miss USA and Miss Teen USA.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Egg and milk prices fall, fueling hope for interest rate cuts
Inflation eased last month, according to a report Wednesday from the Labor Department, which means people feeling stretched by high prices and high borrowing costs could feel a little relief soon.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Eggs and milk prices fall, fueling new hope for interest rate cuts
Inflation eased a bit last month, according to a report Wednesday from the Labor Department. Consumer prices in April were up 3.4% from a year ago — a smaller annual increase than the month before.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Eggs, milk and other grocery prices fall as overall inflation eases
Inflation eased a bit last month, according to a report Wednesday from the Labor Department. Consumer prices in April were up 3.4% from a year ago — a smaller annual increase than the month before.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Consumer Price Index report for April gives an idea of where inflation stands
The latest report, will not only give an update on inflation, it could also indicate if the Federal Reserve will resume lowering interest rates.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Republicans called for a tough stance on China. Are they happy with new tariffs?
NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with Republican Rep. John Moolenaar of Michigan about the Biden administration's decision to increase tariffs on Chinese goods.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Americans are struggling to pay off credit card debt; Tiny Desk Contest's 2024 winner
Nearly 1 in 5 Americans have maxed out their credit card borrowing, according to the Federal Reserve Bank in New York. Tiny Desk Contest crowns its 10th anniversary winner.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Nearly 1 out of 5 credit card users have maxed out on their borrowing
The Federal Reserve Bank of New York says a growing number of card user are falling behind on their monthly credit card bills. Fallout from years of rising prices and high interest rates.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Target scales back on its LGBTQ merchandise ahead of Pride Month 2024
In a statement to NPR, a spokesperson for the retail giant says it is committed to supporting the LGBTQ community year-round, not only during the month of June.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

There's usually no need to panic when planes make emergency landings. Here's why
Planes make diversions — also called "emergency landings" — all the time. Almost always, everyone on board is fine. Here are some reasons why.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Lots of drug companies talk about putting patients first — but this one actually did
When Amylyx Pharmaceuticals found out its ALS drug Relyvrio didn't work, the company took the unusual step of voluntarily pulling it off the market.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Aldi and Hy-Vee stores recall cream cheese varieties for possible salmonella risk
There have been no reports of negative reactions as a result of the recall, the FDA said last week. The products should be thrown away, or returned to either an Aldi or HyVee store for a full refund.

NPR Topics: Business
May 15, 2024

Walmart lays off hundreds of employees and requires others to relocate
Walmart said it will require most remote workers in its Dallas, Atlanta and Toronto offices to relocate to its offices in Bentonville, Arkansas; Hoboken, New Jersey; and the San Francisco Bay Area.

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

DOJ says Boeing broke deal that avoided prosecution after 2 fatal 737 Max crashes
Boeing has violated the terms of a deal to avoid prosecution after the fatal crashes of two 737 Max planes more than five years ago, the Department of Justice told a federal judge on Tuesday.

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

The "Winner Take All" problem
When June Carbone, Naomi Cahn and Nancy Levit set out to write a book about women in the workforce, they initially thought it would be a story all about women's march towards workplace equality. But when they looked at the data, they found something more disturbing: of the ways in which women's push toward workplace equality has actually been stalled for years.

In today's episode, law professor June Carbone argues that the root of the problem lies in something they call the "winner take all" approach to business. That's the thesis of their new book, "Fair Shake: Women & the Fight to Build a Just Economy".

Related episodes:
What would it take to fix retirement? (Apple / Spotify)

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

More Americans are falling behind on credit card bills
Credit card delinquencies rose in the first three months of the year. That's a sign of the growing financial stress that some families are feeling in an era of rising prices and high interest rates.

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

Five things to know about Biden's tariff hikes on Chinese electric vehicles
The Biden administration is quadrupling tariffs on China-made EVs. The tariffs are part of a broad swath of protectionist policies first imposed by former President Trump.

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

Legal experts say a TikTok ban without specific evidence violates the First Amendment
The Justice Department is expected to argue that its clamp down on TikTok is about national security, but Constitutional lawyers say there is no way around grappling with the free speech implications.

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

Fallout continues from the Miss USA resignations as a runner-up declines the crown
After a pair of resignations rocked the pageant world, organizers have found a replacement for Miss USA but not Miss Teen USA. Last year's runner-up said this week that she turned down the crown.

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

Biden to raise tariffs on Chinese goods from electric vehicles to semiconductors
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai about the Biden's administration's decision to raise tariffs on certain Chinese goods.

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

It was a classic rap beef. Then Drake revived Tupac with AI and Congress got involved
AI can conjure the voice or likeness of a dead celebrity with just a few clicks. This opens a host of legal questions about the rights of the deceased and their heirs to control their digital replicas

NPR Topics: Business
May 14, 2024

Biden announces new tariffs on imports of Chinese goods, including electric vehicles
President Biden is keeping the tariffs on Chinese imports put in place by his predecessor and 2024 opponent, former President Donald Trump. And he's adding new ones for things like electric vehicles.

NPR Topics: Business
May 13, 2024

More hotels are catering to the 'bleisure' — business and leisure — traveler
"Bleisure" is a new term in hospitality, a combination of business and leisure travel. It's part of a post-pandemic reset of our travel habits.

NPR Topics: Business
May 13, 2024

Is 'government crypto' a good idea?
Advancements in cryptocurrency networks are sparking conversations about the potential for Central Bank Digital Currencies, or CBDCs for short. Advocates for CBDCs think they would provide security and unlock more efficient fiscal policy actions. However, opponents believe they would provide a shortcut for government interference and the erosion of privacy.

Today on the show, we'll dive deep into the world of CBDCs and pose the question if countries actually need them at all.

For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.

NPR Topics: Business
May 13, 2024

Melinda French Gates resigns as co-chair from the Gates Foundation
French Gates says she is "immensely proud" of the work of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the decision to step down as co-chair was not easy. Her last day is June 7.

NPR Topics: Business
May 13, 2024

GameStop surges after meme stock investor 'Roaring Kitty' resurfaces online
Shares in the video game retailer more than doubled at one point after a prominent meme stock investor made his first online posting in about three years.

NPR Topics: Business
May 13, 2024

With 'bleisure' and fewer workers, the American hotel is in recovery
A new type of traveler is part of the post-pandemic reset at U.S. hotels, along with fewer daily cleanings and pancake-slinging machines.

NPR Topics: Business
May 13, 2024

Mercedes-Benz workers in Alabama begin union vote amid pressure from all sides
Workers at Mercedes-Benz in Alabama start voting this week on whether to join the United Auto Workers union. Last month, Volkswagen workers in Tennessee voted overwhelmingly to unionize.

NPR Topics: Business
May 13, 2024

Auto workers in Alabama are voting on joining a union. Here's what you need to know
Workers at Mercedes-Benz in Alabama start voting this week on whether to join the United Auto Workers union. Last month, Volkswagen workers in Tennessee voted overwhelmingly to unionize.

NPR Topics: Business
May 13, 2024

Auto workers in Alabama are voting to form a union. Here's what you need to know
Workers at Mercedes-Benz in Alabama start voting this week on whether to join the United Auto Workers union. Last month, Volkswagen workers in Tennessee voted overwhelmingly to unionize.

NPR Topics: Business
May 12, 2024

The U.S. is refilling the Strategic Petroleum Reserves. What purpose can they serve?
NPR's Ayesha Rascoe speaks with Joe Weisenthal co-host of Bloomberg's "Odd Lots" podcast about how the Strategic Petroleum Reserves can be utilized in 2024.

NPR Topics: Business
May 11, 2024

25 Years of 'The Phantom Menace'
NPR's Scott Detrow talks to Erich Schwartzel, who covers the film industry for The Wall Street Journal, about the 25th anniversary of Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace.

NPR Topics: Business
May 11, 2024

Podcast explores the changing music scene in Austin, Texas
We look at the latest season of the Pause/Play podcast, from KUT and KUTX Studios, which explores how global and local changes are impacting Austin's music ecosystem.

NPR Topics: Business
May 11, 2024

A federal judge temporarily halts U.S. plan to lower credit card late fees to $8
The temporary injunction imposed by Judge Mark Pittman in the Northern District of Texas is a win for the big banks and major credit card companies. The plan was set to go into effect next week.

NPR Topics: Business
May 10, 2024

Biden will keep Trump's China tariffs, and add new ones on electric vehicles
The Biden administration is finally wrapping up its review of President Donald Trump's tariffs on Chinese imports. It will keep those tariffs, and add more on things like electric vehicles.

NPR Topics: Business
May 10, 2024

Zombie 2nd mortgages are coming back to life
Karen MacDonough of Quincy, Mass., was enjoying her tea one morning in the dining room when she sees something odd outside of her window: A group of people gathering on her lawn. A man with a clipboard tells her that her home no longer belongs to her. It didn't matter that she'd been paying her mortgage for 17 years, and was current on it. She was a nurse with a good job and had raised her kids here. But this was a foreclosure sale, and she was going to lose her house.

Karen had fallen victim to what's called a zombie second mortgage. Homeowners think these loans are long dead. But then the loans come back to life because they get bought up, sometimes for pennies on the dollar, by debt collectors who then move to collect and foreclose on people's homes.

On today's episode: An NPR investigation reveals the practice to be widespread. Also, what are zombie mortgages? Is all this legal? And is there any way for homeowners to fight the zombies?

This episode was hosted by Chris Arnold and Robert Smith. It was produced by Sam Yellowhorse Kesler. It was edited by Jess Jiang with help from Bob Little. And it was fact-checked by Sierra Juarez. Engineering by Robert Rodriguez with an assist from Patrick Murray. Alex Goldmark is Planet Money's executive producer.

Help support Planet Money and get bonus episodes by subscribing to Planet Money in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

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