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Kiplinger
Mar 28, 2020

Will You Get a Bigger Stimulus Check If You File Your Tax Return Now?
It depends. You'll have to compare numbers from your 2018 and 2019 returns...but we have a tool that makes this much easier.

Kiplinger
Mar 28, 2020

Will You Get a Bigger Stimulus Check by Waiting to File Your Tax Return?
Perhaps. Use our Stimulus Check Calculator to find out.

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

When Will You Get Your Stimulus Check?
The official government response is that people will start getting money in just a few weeks. But don't hold your breath waiting for that to happen.

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

15 Dividend Cuts and Suspensions Chalked Up to the Coronavirus
Most investors buy dividend stocks for the consistent income they generate. Whether we're talking about Achievers, Aristocrats or Kings, or just plain ol' dividend payers, their income provides certainty in an uncertain world.

That is, of course, until the dividend cuts and suspensions start rolling in.

The global COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic has thrown a wrench into corporate dividend programs as companies of all sizes scramble to raise cash and fortify their finances. As the coronavirus has gained momentum here in the U.S., dividend investors have become concerned about the sustainability of their regular income payments - and rightly so.

Inevitably, just like the Great Recession of 2008, companies one by one have begun suspending or cutting their dividends as part of their plan to fight the negative effects of this pandemic on their businesses.

Here are 15 dividend stocks that have recently announced dividend cuts or suspensions, and what they plan to do to keep operations running until they get through to the other side. As you'll soon see, some industries have been more swiftly and severely impacted than others.

SEE ALSO: 25 Dividend Stocks the Analysts Love the Most

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

How Much Stimulus Check Money Will You Get?
That's the question on everyone's mind. However, there's not an across-the-board answer. Here's why.

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

Survival Tips for Small Businesses on the Edge Awaiting Stimulus Help
The CARES Act could put money in Americans' pockets soon, but those checks and the relief for small businesses may not come soon enough for some. To hold them over, here are some strategies to try in the meantime.

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

A Hidden Benefit of the Coronavirus Stimulus Bill: You Can Wait to Take Your RMD
Legislation is expected to waive required minimum distributions from retirement savings accounts for 2020.

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

Hey, Landlords: Let's Pay It Forward During This Coronavirus War
We all should be asking ourselves what we can do to help others during this difficult time. Forgiving rent is a good place to start.

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

10 Facts You Must Know About Recessions
A recession is the scariest creature in the average investor's closet of anxieties. Even though the last recession ended more than a decade ago, people fear recessions because they can mean lower home prices, lower stock prices - and no job.

Any number of things can cause, or exacerbate, a recession: an exogenous shock, such as today's COVID-19 crisis (which now has even Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell admitting that we might currently be in a recession) or the Arab oil embargo of 1973; soaring interest rates; or ill-conceived legislation, such as the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930.

Recessions are parts of the warp and woof of a dynamic economy, albeit unpleasant ones. If you're prepared for a recession, there will be plenty of opportunities when the recession ends. Thus, the more you know about recessions, the better. Here are 10 must-know facts about recessions.

SEE ALSO: Where Is the Stock Market Headed? 14 Wall Street Pros Sound Off

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

5 Tips for Retirees Worried about Today's Market Volatility
While we can't control the stock market, we do have control over many aspects of our retirement savings. Here are five ways to help tackle market uncertainty and market volatility for retirees and those close to retirement.

Kiplinger
Mar 27, 2020

Coronavirus Coping Tips for Family and Finances
Yes, the COVID-19 pandemic is scary. But there are ways to channel that anxiety in a positive direction.

Kiplinger
Mar 26, 2020

7 Stock Picks That Analysts Are Actually Upgrading Now
The stock market is a mess of bearishness and volatility right now. But despite the carnage, a sizable number of stock picks are starting to look better in the eyes of Wall Street's pros, and they're starting to compile some analyst upgrades as a result.

The Federal Reserve has introduced aggressive measures and Congress is finalizing a $2 trillion rescue package. That's at least providing a sense that there might be a backstop in place to prevent a total implosion of GDP over the next two quarters. But the hit to corporate profits still is hard to quantify at this point. We know it will be bad once the first-quarter earnings reports start trickling in next month. We just don't know how bad.

"We have zero visibility on the earnings front," says Sonia Joao, a financial advisor based in Houston, Texas. "We're hoping for the best but bracing for the worst and trying to keep our portfolios weighted toward higher-quality names."

Nonetheless, Wall Street's pros are starting to see a brighter picture for a few stock picks. Part of this is simply a function of price: No matter how bad the economic picture looks, at some price, most stocks are worth owning. And in some cases, stock prices have fallen far more than even a worst-case scenario would suggest.

"We don't necessarily need things to look good," says Doug Robinson, principal of San Francisco-based Robinson Capital Management. "We simply need for the outlook to go from awful to less bad. That's enough to see meaningful improvement in the sentiment toward most stocks."

Here are seven stock picks that have earned analyst upgrades amid the market chaos. An analyst upgrade is not holy writ - it's an educated guess. But it's an educated guess by the professionals that study the companies and know their financial situation inside and out. Thus, this list is a great start-off point for investors looking to put some cash to work.

SEE ALSO: Where Is th

Kiplinger
Mar 26, 2020

15 Money-Smart Ways to Spend Your Coronavirus Quarantine Time (Now That Sports Are Gone)
You're stuck at home for the next few weeks, and local bars and restaurants are closed. There's no March Madness to watch. For many Americans, this is our reality for the next several weeks -- or longer. And to make matters worse, you're swimming in financial dread as you fear (or perhaps have already experienced) job loss and helplessly watched the stock market plunge suddenly into bear-market territory. So, OK, go ahead and have a Netflix or Hulu binge-watching session -- you deserve it.

But when you're done watching, it's time to fight back. Money-smart Kiplinger readers will see this unprecedented period of home detention as an opportunity to get ahead with their finances -- to beat the market, to build defenses against scammers, and to pad their bank accounts. Take a look at 15 personal-finance projects you can undertake from home in the next three weeks.

And for more information on day-to-day developments, sign up for A Step Ahead, our e-newsletter that gives you daily insight and guidance on how to navigate major disruptions and challenges to business, the economy, and financial markets.

SEE ALSO: 10 Coronavirus Stimulus Measures That Could Help You in 2020

Kiplinger
Mar 26, 2020

When It Comes to Coronavirus, Can My Boss Do That?
From enforcing temperature checks to testing for COVID-19 and whether the results of those tests must be kept private, here's what lawyers have to say on new workplace issues cropping up.

Kiplinger
Mar 26, 2020

Small Financial Changes to Help Build Your Wealth Faster
To grow your wealth to its full potential, start implementing these best practices today.

Kiplinger
Mar 26, 2020

6 Money-Smart Ways to Spend Your Stimulus Check
The $2 trillion stimulus package agreed upon by lawmakers and the White House will, among other things, provide a direct payment of $1,200 to millions of American adults, plus $500 for most children. The package will also extend unemployment benefits for millions of people who have lost their jobs, including freelancers and gig workers.

Many families will need to use their checks to put food on the table or keep the roof over their heads. But if you're working, consider putting your stimulus check to work.

"The beauty of the situation is there are no stores open, so it is much more difficult to waste your stimulus check," says Andrew Marshall, a certified financial planner in Carlsbad, California. "Instead of buying something you really don't need, put it toward a goal you have."

Here are 6 ways you can make your stimulus check work for you or help your community. (If you want to know how much you will get, use our handy Stimulus Check Calculator.)

SEE ALSO: 11 Coronavirus Stimulus Measures That Could Help You in 2020

Kiplinger
Mar 26, 2020

Your 2020 Stimulus Check: How Much? When? And Other Questions Answered
People have a lot of questions about the economic stimulus checks that were just approved by the Senate. We have answers.

Kiplinger
Mar 26, 2020

Stimulus Check Calculator
Find out how much your economic stimulus check will be using this handy tool.

Kiplinger
Mar 26, 2020

Inside Tips on Handling Coronavirus Business Insurance Claims
Business owners should be digging out their insurance policies to see what coverage they might have to help with losses due to the coronavirus pandemic. Two attorneys share what to look for and what to say to the insurance company.

Kiplinger
Mar 25, 2020

Coronavirus Drugs Already in the Pipeline
It's not just chloroquine. Other existing medicines are being brought to bear against COVID-19. We look at what drugs have promise against COVID-19, and when they will get here.

Kiplinger
Mar 25, 2020

8 Dividend Consumer Stocks to Buy for Income & Growth
Consumer stocks have been a mixed bag for investors in this bear market.

On the one hand, consumer staples, which provide life's necessities, have held up far better than the broader market as Americans stock up for what could be weeks spent indoors. But consumer discretionary stocks - companies selling clothes, burgers and cars - have been every bit as bad as the S&P 500, if not worse.

But there are several consumer stocks to buy on both sides of the aisle now: staples that should continue to perform well as long as the outbreak keeps a grip on the country, as well as discretionary plays that have been knocked down into value status and have higher yields - and higher upside potential when the economy rebounds - as a result.

Here are eight large-cap consumer stocks to buy for income and growth. These companies boast varied mixes of dividend and upside potential. Some of them are bounce-back plays, while others are steady Eddies that investors can hold to protect against additional market declines. However, all of them have seen their dividend yields become at least a little richer over the past few weeks.

SEE ALSO: 25 Dividend Stocks the Analysts Love the Most

Kiplinger
Mar 25, 2020

The Legal Risks of Couples Living Together
A marriage license isn't just a piece of paper. It's a legal document offering legal protections.

Kiplinger
Mar 25, 2020

You Just Lost Your Corporate Job Due to the Coronavirus Crisis. Now What?
From how to make the most of your severance pay to pension plan payouts and stock options, you have a lot of variables to take into consideration right now. These decisions come with opportunities to weigh and pitfalls to avoid.

Kiplinger
Mar 24, 2020

Where Is the Stock Market Headed Now? 14 Wall Street Pros Sound Off
Getting a handle on the stock market's direction is becoming increasingly difficult as volatility has ratcheted up and daily moves of 5% or more have become commonplace. The S&P 500 has already lost a third of its of its value from its Feb. 19, 2020, peak, and some (though not all) analysts see even lower prices ahead.

Economists and market strategists are predicting that the 2020 bear market could descend as low as 60% losses as the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak begins to look very, very real. Small business owners are being forced to close up shop en masse. Many U.S. manufacturers, including the "Big Three" automakers, have halted production at their North American facilities. Airlines, cruise operators and hotel owners have seen their businesses rapidly dry up. Crude oil prices are in a deep bear market.

Meanwhile, European and U.S. stimulus packages designed to back businesses and consumers alike have barely moved the needle. But those governments - and many more across the world - still are preparing even more measures to throw at the coronavirus effort.

So where does the stock market go from here? Here's what 13 Wall Street investment bankers, analysts and financial advisors had to say about what's coming for America's stocks, the economy and corporate earnings.

SEE ALSO: 25 Dividend Stocks the Analysts Love the Most

Kiplinger
Mar 24, 2020

SECURE Act Basics: What Everyone Should Know
The rules on retirement have recently been rewritten. Here are the biggest changes and how they could affect you.

Kiplinger
Mar 24, 2020

Financial Keys to Help Weather Coronavirus Crisis
From tips to help reduce pressure on your income to thoughtful ways to support your community, here are four things you can do to get through this crisis.

Kiplinger
Mar 23, 2020

11 Coronavirus Stimulus Measures That Could Help You in 2020
The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak is crushing the U.S. economy. The stock market is tanking (we're now in a bear market), businesses are closed, unemployment claims are spiking, consumer spending is down sharply, 2020 GDP estimates are dropping fast, and recession fears are rampant. We're in a bad place.

But the federal government is making moves that we all hope will turn things around. Congress and the Trump administration are working together on stimulus legislation, the Federal Reserve has lowered interest rates, and the IRS is providing relief to taxpayers. Other government agencies and institutions are pushing forward with additional measures to stop the bleeding and get the economy back on track. It will take time, and we have a bumpy road ahead, but action is being taken.

While some of the economic stimulus will prop up businesses, many initiatives will flood the economy with cash and directly benefit ordinary Americans who are facing a financial hit. Some action has already been taken, but there are other ideas being discussed at the highest levels of government that could be rolled out later. Here are 11 coronavirus stimulus measures that could help you financially in 2020. Some have already been enacted, while others are still just proposals, but all of them could have a positive impact on your financial health.

SEE ALSO: How to Invest in This Bear Market

Kiplinger
Mar 23, 2020

The 10 Best Cars for Senior Drivers
Older drivers shopping for new cars have one trend going for them and one that's a problem. In their favor: The increasing popularity of small SUVs means far more vehicles have a seat that's at just the right height to get in and out, without being too big overall. Against older drivers: In the quest for greater passenger safety, vehicles' roof pillars have grown very thick, compromising your ability to see out.

We've picked our best cars for seniors by considering their accessibility, visibility, active safety features, headlight performance and controls--in particular, whether the vehicle has a traditional Park-Reverse-Neutral-Drive-Low (PRNDL) shift lever rather than a dial, pushbuttons or some kind of inscrutable toggle switch. We didn't forget factors that matter to everyone, though: price, performance and reliability.

Check out our 10 picks.

SEE ALSO: The Safest Cars for $30,000 or Less

Kiplinger
Mar 23, 2020

24 Major U.S. Companies Hiring Now to Meet Coronavirus Demand
The COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic isn't just taking a terrible toll in lives, straining the healthcare system and disrupting daily life: It's eliminating American jobs at an unprecedented pace.

Goldman Sachs is predicting that unemployment could reach up to 9% later this year. St. Louis Federal Reserve President James Bullard isn't nearly so optimistic, believing unemployment could spike to 30% by next quarter.

However, if you've suddenly found yourself on the job search, some temporary relief might be on the way. A few sectors are seeing a huge spike in demand, and as a result, a number of companies are hiring right now, en masse.

Employment categories currently seeing a surge in hiring include grocery stores, food delivery services, package delivery drivers, freight trucking, cleaning services, call centers, e-commerce warehouses and logistics, nursing homes, manufacturers of popular shelf-stable food products, pharmacies and security services.

To help anyone out there trying to find a job, we've put together a list of two dozen of the largest, best-known companies hiring now in response to coronavirus-sparked demand. This list includes what types of job openings are available, how many, and direct links to job application sites. Many of these companies have declared nationwide openings, there's a good chance that several of these places are hiring near you.

SEE ALSO: 10 Coronavirus Stimulus Measures That Could Help You in 2020

Kiplinger
Mar 23, 2020

Coronavirus and Your Retirement Savings: Answering Important Questions
There's a lot going on, and investors and retirement savers could use all the guidance they can get.

Kiplinger
Mar 23, 2020

What to Do If You Lose Your Health Insurance During the Coronavirus Crisis
Now is not the time to be without coverage, but that's a reality a growing number of people are facing. If you are one of them (or fear that you might soon be), know that you do have some options.

Kiplinger
Mar 22, 2020

Jumping Back into the Workforce After Raising Kids?
Here are six ideas for getting started well before you're ready to launch.

Kiplinger
Mar 22, 2020

Estate and Tax Planning in These Unexpected Times
The serious health and economic crises families everywhere are facing right now have left them with many questions. Take a look at answers to a couple of questions that could give you ideas about your own plans.

Kiplinger
Mar 21, 2020

A CPA's Guide to the New Later Tax-Filing Deadline
Wondering how the July 15, 2020, extended tax-filing deadline affects you and how to make the most of it? Check out this FAQ with CPA Riley Adams.

Kiplinger
Mar 20, 2020

Raise Your Hand If You're Waiting for a Coronavirus Stimulus Check
It's looking more and more like Americans will be getting coronavirus relief checks from Uncle Sam. But do you know how much you'll get and when you'll get it?

Kiplinger
Mar 20, 2020

14 Money-Smart Ways to Spend Your Coronavirus Quarantine Time (Now That Sports Are Gone)
You're stuck at home for the next few weeks, and local bars and restaurants are closed. There's no March Madness to watch. For many Americans, this is our reality for the next several weeks -- or longer. And to make matters worse, you're swimming in financial dread as you fear (or perhaps have already experienced) job loss and helplessly watched the stock market plunge suddenly into bear-market territory. So, OK, go ahead and have a Netflix or Hulu binge-watching session -- you deserve it.

But when you're done watching, it's time to fight back. Money-smart Kiplinger readers will see this unprecedented period of home detention as an opportunity to get ahead with their finances -- to beat the market, to build defenses against scammers, and to pad their bank accounts. Take a look at 14 personal-finance projects you can undertake from home in the next three weeks.

And for more information on day-to-day developments, sign up for A Step Ahead, our e-newsletter that gives you daily insight and guidance on how to navigate major disruptions and challenges to business, the economy, and financial markets.

SEE ALSO: 10 Coronavirus Stimulus Measures That Could Help You in 2020

Kiplinger
Mar 20, 2020

25 Dividend Stocks the Analysts Love the Most
The longest bull market in history came to a crashing end on Feb. 19 as panic over the global spread of COVID-19 sent stocks into a tailspin. The S&P 500, the most common benchmark for the U.S. equity market, plunged 30% in only a month.

The outlook for stocks has arguably never been more uncertain. The situation under which we live is subject to change not just by the day, but by the hour. Although there are few places for equity investors to hide these days, Wall Street analysts are pinning their hopes on a select group of dividend stocks.

Dividends are known for adding some defensive characteristics to stocks, and so it makes sense at this time to single them out. To that end, we scoured the S&P 500 for dividend stocks with yields of more than 2%, excluding a number of extremely high yielders because of excessive current risk (such as certain energy stocks). Sometimes, a too-high yield can be a warning sign that a stock is in deep trouble.

From that pool, we focused on stocks with an average broker recommendation of Buy or better. S&P Global Market Intelligence surveys analysts' stock ratings and scores them on a five-point scale, where 1.0 equals Strong Buy and 5.0 means Strong Sell. Any score of 2.0 or lower means that analysts, on average, rate the stock a Buy. The closer the score gets to 1.0, the stronger the Buy call.

Lastly, we dug into research and analysts' estimates on the top-scoring names.

That led us to these top 25 dividend stocks, by virtue of their high analyst ratings, at this unprecedented moment in American history.

SEE ALSO: 64 Dividend Stocks You Can Count On

Kiplinger
Mar 20, 2020

Income Tax Returns and Payments Extended
The IRS has pushed back the April 15 tax return filing and tax payment deadline to help Americans struggling with the coronavirus crisis.

Kiplinger
Mar 20, 2020

10 Coronavirus Stimulus Measures That Could Help You in 2020
The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak is crushing the U.S. economy. The stock market is tanking (we're now in a bear market), businesses are closed, unemployment claims are spiking, consumer spending is down sharply, 2020 GDP estimates are dropping fast, and recession fears are rampant. We're in a bad place.

But the federal government is making moves that we all hope will turn things around. Congress and the Trump administration are working together on stimulus legislation, the Federal Reserve has lowered interest rates, and the IRS is providing relief to taxpayers. Other government agencies and institutions are pushing forward with additional measures to stop the bleeding and get the economy back on track. It will take time, and we have a bumpy road ahead, but action is being taken.

While some of the economic stimulus will prop up businesses, many initiatives will flood the economy with cash and directly benefit ordinary Americans who are facing a financial hit. Some action has already been taken, but there are other ideas being discussed at the highest levels of government that could be rolled out later. Here are 10 coronavirus stimulus measures that could help you financially in 2020. Some have already been enacted, while others are still just proposals, but all of them could have a positive impact on your financial health.

SEE ALSO: How to Invest in This Bear Market

Kiplinger
Mar 20, 2020

A Financial Crash Course for Those Getting Married
Marital bliss and financial preparedness go hand in hand. Here's a little of list of money topics to cover well before you take a walk down the aisle.

Kiplinger
Mar 20, 2020

The New Mom's Guide to Transitioning Back to Work
The best time to start preparing for your return to the office is long before your maternity leave is over. Take these seven tips to heart to help smooth your transition.

Kiplinger
Mar 19, 2020

Low Interest Rates Reduce the Cost of Mortgages
Interest rate reductions triggered by the coronavirus crisis can create money-saving opportunities for mortgage shoppers.

Kiplinger
Mar 19, 2020

6 Med-Tech and Medical-Device Stocks to Buy
Health care, which makes up nearly 18% of American GDP, has long been a fruitful hunting ground for investors seeking growth. And medical-tech and medical-device stocks have always been particularly compelling niches.

Not only do these companies ride the coattails of inexorable health-care spending, but their commitment to research and development can create new industries that they can in turn dominate.

It's not an easy time right now, of course. The COVID-19 outbreak has taken a chunk out of every sector and almost every industry, with only a few "coronavirus stocks" enjoying any meaningful gains. Medical devices have at least been better than the market, which has declined by about 29% in this bear market so far, as measured by the S&P 500. But the iShares U.S. Medical Devices ETF (IHI) still has been cut to the tune of 25% in the same time frame.

That could provide investors with a chance to buy medical-device stocks and other med-tech plays at a significant discount, however. While their growth might be stunted in the short-term, their longer-term prospects are likely to improve again once the COVID-19 threat is contained - and a few are seeing additional business in the wake of the outbreak.

Here, we look at six med-tech and medical-device stocks to buy.

SEE ALSO: 10 Health and Pharmaceutical Companies Fighting the Coronavirus

Kiplinger
Mar 19, 2020

Coronavirus Fears Suppress Student Loan Interest Rates
The plunge in interest rates could reduce borrowing costs for students who take out federal loans for the 2020-2021 academic year--and their parents could get a break, too.

Kiplinger
Mar 19, 2020

22 Retailers With Store Closures or Reduced Hours Due to the Coronavirus
In an effort to help keep customers and workers safe, these retailers have opted to either shut their doors or scale back operations.

Kiplinger
Mar 19, 2020

Online Grocery Shopping in the Coronavirus Era: 8 Things You Must Know
The coronavirus outbreak has forced many consumers to rethink how they'll carry out everyday household errands without putting themselves in harm's way. In recent weeks, grocery stores have been wiped out by frantic shoppers stocking up on essential items such as toilet paper and disinfectant wipes. But as more consumers adhere to shelter-in-place recommendations and more stores limit access, online grocery shopping is fast trending up.

In fact, GroceryDive.com reports that Instacart, Walmart Grocery and Shipt have all seen surges in average daily app downloads in the last month. Instacart led the way with a 218% increase, followed by Walmart at 160% and Shipt at 124%.

Suddenly, the dynamics of online grocery shopping have changed dramatically -- even for longtime customers. We've talked with industry insiders and smart shopping experts about what consumers can expect these days when ordering groceries online. Here's what they had to say.

SEE ALSO: 10 Products in Short Supply Due to the Coronavirus

Kiplinger
Mar 19, 2020

Gifting: 3 Areas You Shouldn't Overlook
How do you plan to pass the gift of your good financial fortune on? Defining your goals and creating a giving strategy is key to beginning the process.

Kiplinger
Mar 18, 2020

Tax Credits Included in Coronavirus Paid Leave Law
The Families First Coronavirus Response Act creates tax credits to help employers required to provide sick and family leave benefits and self-employed people who can't work because of the coronavirus.

Kiplinger
Mar 18, 2020

12 Bond Mutual Funds and ETFs to Buy for Protection
As the stock market continues to take a beating, nervous investors look to bond mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) for protection and sanity. After all, fixed income typically provides regular cash and lower volatility when markets hit turbulence.

And the markets are absolutely hitting turbulence. For instance, between Feb. 19 and March 10, not only did the S&P 500 experience a historically rapid loss of 14.8% - it experienced a dramatic rise in volatility, too, hitting its highest level on that front since 2011, says Jodie Gunzberg, chief investment strategist at New York-based Graystone Consulting, a Morgan Stanley business. The index's losses and volatility have escalated even more since then.

Bonds offer ballast - "not only downside protection but also moderate upside potential as investors tend to seek out the safety of U.S. government and investment-grade corporate bonds amid stock market uncertainty" - says Todd Rosenbluth, senior director of ETF and mutual fund research at CFRA, a New York-based investment research company.

Bond prices often are uncorrelated to equities. Stocks typically do well in periods of economic growth, whereas bonds typically do well in periods of declining economic activity, Gunzberg says.

"Even though the current 30-day correlation has risen between stocks and bonds, the correlation between the S&P 500 and the S&P U.S. Aggregate Bond Index is still negative," she says. "Bonds are strong diversifiers, with the exception of high yield (junk), when added to a portfolio of equities throughout different economic scenarios." Indeed, junk debt has been punished severely of late.

Here are 12 bond mutual funds and bond ETFs to buy. These funds offer diversified portfolios of hundreds if not thousands of bonds, and most primarily rely on debt such as Treasuries and other investment-grade bonds. Just remember: This is an unprecedented environment, one in which bond funds aren't

Kiplinger
Mar 18, 2020

COVID-19 at Work: Your Legal Rights and Responsibilities
Answers to frequently asked questions about coronavirus in the workplace. A pair of lawyers who specialize in employment law weigh in with some practical advice for workers and business owners alike.

Kiplinger
Mar 18, 2020

The Coronavirus at Work: Your Legal Questions Answered
The coronavirus has become a sneak attack in slow motion on the American workforce. Fear has become the operative word, not only of falling ill, but the impact this virus is having on our economy, on jobs.

Employment law attorneys are swamped by calls from business owner clients, wondering what they are allowed to do in an effort to keep their employees safe and their doors open.

I ran the following questions by two attorneys in Bakersfield, Calif., who specialize in employment law: Dan Klingenberger and Jay Rosenlieb. They provide a global perspective to these issues challenging American businesses today.

Written by H. Dennis Beaver, Esq. A graduate of Loyola University School of Law, Mr. Beaver joined California's Kern County District Attorney's Office, where he established a Consumer Fraud section. He is in the general practice of law and writes a syndicated newspaper column, "You and the Law." Through his column he offers readers down-to-earth advice free of charge.

SEE ALSO: A Coronavirus Checklist: Tips for Your Mental and Financial Health

Kiplinger
Mar 18, 2020

How to Survive the Economic Fallout from COVID-19
The bull market and economic expansion are over. Here's what to do now.

Kiplinger
Mar 18, 2020

Strategies for CD Savers After the Coronavirus Interest Rate Cuts
As yields on certificates of deposit drop, you need to be smarter when it comes to saving with CDs.

Kiplinger
Mar 18, 2020

Warren Buffett's Famous Saying Bears Repeating Now
If everyone around you is in a panic, it's not easy to stay calm. But before you make any moves with your stock portfolio, remember what the Oracle of Omaha had to say.

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

Coronavirus Fears Suppress Student Loan Rates
The plunge in interest rates could reduce borrowing costs for students who take out federal loans for the 2020-2021 academic year--and their parents could get a break, too.

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

Finding the Best Savings Account After the Coronavirus Interest Rate Cuts
Savers searching for top yields should check out our list of the top online banks.

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

15 Safe Ways to Earn Extra Cash in the Age of the Coronavirus
Coming up with extra cash to pay the bills, cover unexpected expenses, boost savings, or accelerate your flagging 401(k) as we hunker down to ward off the coronavirus isn't as hard as it seems. Heck, many of you may have been temporarily cut off from your full- or part-time job as the coronavirus forces businesses to scale back or shut down for weeks. To that end we found plenty of legit, and many unique, moneymaking opportunities out there for you to capitalize on at your convenience, with the perk of no long-term commitment and, in most cases, setting your own hours. Plus, you can keep a healthy social distance away from others while you work these gigs.

We found 15 ideas for you to consider, along with resources and pointers to get you started. Some are good for a fast buck, while others could turn into consistent streams of income. Find out which cash-generating ideas could work best for you.

SEE ALSO: 70 Valuable Things You Can Get for Free

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

10 Solid Social Distancing Stocks to Buy
Many of us probably weren't even aware of the concept of social distancing until the past couple of months. Sadly, it has been necessarily used so often during the coronavirus outbreak, we'd all be blasphemously rich if we got a dollar every time it was mentioned.

Social distancing, of course, is the practice of keeping physical distance from other people - typically to slow down a pandemic like the current COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak - through measures such as schools suspending classes, offices having employees work from home and people avoiding mass gatherings. And, as opportunities arise from almost any sea change, a few "social distancing stocks" stand to benefit from this trend.

Many global economies will pay dearly to stop this coronavirus. That puts us, as investors, in uncharted territory. Warren Buffett says to be greedy when others are fearful, but it's difficult to do that when all stocks look like losing propositions.

That said, with the S&P 500 down almost 30% (including dividends) in the past month, the time to sell has likely passed for most investors. You could go to cash to ride out the coronavirus and the recession that's likely to follow. However, during the recession of 2008, many people got out of the markets and never got back in. So if you want to stay in, it might be worth hitching your wagon to stocks that stand to benefit from the new social rules.

Here are 10 social distancing stocks to buy. All of them are at least set up to outperform for as long as social distancing is necessary - and some of them could be worthwhile holdings for much longer after that.

SEE ALSO: 13 Stock Picks Getting Hit by Coronavirus Fears

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

Income Tax Payments to Be Extended
According to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, most taxpayers will get a 90-day extension to pay taxes owed.

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

How to Clean and Maintain Your Car in the Coronavirus Era
First things first: Let's disinfect that small, enclosed space.

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

Financial Planning for Another 'Lost Decade'
Investors have gotten used to hot returns over the years. What happens if stocks are flat (or worse) for years to come? That's a scary thought for those near retirement, but luckily there are some things you have control over. Here are some steps to consider taking now.

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

Hey Parents: Financial 'Adulting' Tips for Your Kids
Congratulations! Your children have graduated college, found jobs and have (finally!) moved out. You truly are empty nesters.

Of course, you'll probably be riding a roller coaster of conflicting emotions during this time. You're glad to have your space -- and your refrigerator -- back, but it's hard to stop worrying about your children's ability to make it on their own.

One symptom of this separation anxiety is that many parents continue to pay for certain expenses that their children really should be handling themselves. But the longer Mom and Dad continue to provide this support, the harder it will be for the kids to learn to be financially independent. That's why it's important to gradually sever these monetary apron strings.

Some may call this "tough love." I like to think of it as "adulting." Here are a few places where you can start.

Written by Chris Gullotti, CFP®, a financial adviser and Partner at Canby Financial Advisors in Framingham, MA. He has an MS in Financial Planning from Bentley College.

SEE ALSO: 70 Time-Tested Tactics to Build Your Wealth

Kiplinger
Mar 17, 2020

Tax Credits Included in Coronavirus Paid Leave Bill
If enacted, the legislation would create tax credits to help employers required to provide sick and family leave benefits and self-employed people who can't work because of the coronavirus.

Kiplinger
Mar 16, 2020

Tax Credits Included in Proposed Coronavirus Paid Leave Bill
If enacted, legislation would create tax credits to help employers required to provide sick and family leave benefits and self-employed people who can't work because of the coronavirus.

Kiplinger
Mar 16, 2020

10 Products in Short Supply Due to the Coronavirus
Certain consumer goods are getting scarce, and we don't just mean hand sanitizer and toilet paper. Expect a number of products to be in short supply this spring. Many imports from China didn't make it onto cargo ships in January or February.

Inventories are falling because of delayed shipments of raw materials and components sourced from Asia, but supply-chain breakdowns go beyond China. Businesses that import parts or materials from Southeast Asia are finding out that many of those suppliers depend on China for raw materials. One-third of Cambodia's garment factories have shut down for lack of Chinese fabrics. Myanmar, Bangladesh, Thailand, Pakistan and other countries are experiencing similar China-related shortages.

China's factories should be humming again by the end of this month, but it'll take longer than that to make up for lost production and restock inventories.

SEE ALSO: The 5 Best Stocks (And 5 Worst) of the Coronavirus Correction

Kiplinger
Mar 16, 2020

How to Invest in This Bear Market
Now that we're officially well into bear-market territory now, the question is: How do you invest in the midst of one?

The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped into bear territory on Wednesday, March 11. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq followed suit the following day, as Thursday, March 12, saw the biggest drop in the stock market since the 1987 market crash. For those not versed in market lingo, a bear market is a decline of 20% or more in stocks. This is more severe than a stock market correction, which is a decline of 10% to just under 20%.

These numbers are arbitrary, of course. As an investor, you don't necessarily care if your portfolio drops by exactly 20% or if it loses just 19%. But semantics aside, the bear market is here and growling with a vengeance.

It's been a while since we've had a proper bear market - the last one was during the 2008 financial crisis. For a few, it's entirely possible that this is the first one you've had to live through as an investor.

But even if you're a grizzled market veteran, this bear market - which is being fueled by a global pandemic, in the form of the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak - has been full of surprises. It's the fastest bear market in history as measured by the length of time it took stocks to fall from new all-time highs to official bear territory. It took the Dow Industrials just 20 days to drop into bear territory, and the S&P 500 and Nasdaq just 21.

Today, we're going to cover the basics of how to invest in bear markets and make a portfolio action plan. The coming weeks might be rough, but we'll get through this together.

SEE ALSO: 11 Defensive Dividend Stocks for Riding Out the Storm

Kiplinger
Mar 16, 2020

Stay the Course, Stay the Course, Stay the Course
Investors are being tested by the stock markets: Can they stay the course? Should they? Take a look at a few charts of market performance over the long term to see the case for sticking with a diversified portfolio.

Kiplinger
Mar 16, 2020

Why Did the Fed Cut Rates to Near Zero?
The Federal Reserve's move won't impact the economy right away, but that's not the point

Kiplinger
Mar 16, 2020

A Coronavirus Checklist: Tips for Your Mental and Financial Health
Take a deep breath and check out some reassuring advice that one financial adviser is sharing with all her clients.

Kiplinger
Mar 16, 2020

7 Ways to Sabotage Your Financial Future
Why would anyone sabotage their own future? It's not typically a conscious decision, but the product of focusing on short-term gains instead of long-term results. Here are some common ways we sabotage ourselves:

Hitting the snooze button because the bed is so warm, and the gym doesn't sound fun at 5 a.m. Deciding to get gas tomorrow when you may be pressed for time instead of today when you have time, but you're tired. Checking out social media when you should be finishing an important project with an impending deadline. Some of these are more serious than others, but we often make decisions that set ourselves up for long-term failure without even realizing that's what we're doing. Here are seven ways you can sabotage your own financial future and work against yourself.

Written by Josh Monroe, a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ practitioner and a Chartered Financial Consultant designee who listens actively and plans thoughtfully to help clients achieve their goals. He joined the Brightworth team in 2019 as a Financial Planner.

SEE ALSO: 10 Money Mistakes Millennials Should Avoid (No. 10's a Shocker)

Kiplinger
Mar 16, 2020

Coronavirus Legal Advice: Get Your Business and Estate in Order Now
Estate planning attorneys are getting mobbed with questions. So, here is some timely advice from three attorneys on what families and business owners should be doing to prepare in case the unimaginable happens.

Kiplinger
Mar 13, 2020

The 12 Best Low-Volatility Stocks of the Market Crash
When stocks go from setting all-time highs to tumbling 20% into a bear market in only three weeks, there are precious few places for equity investors to hide. But that doesn't mean defensive, low-volatility stocks aren't doing their jobs.

Investment professionals helping people construct a diversified portfolio always harp on the need for stocks that will hold up better in hard times. Well, hard times are here, and so it's time to see exactly how much defense the top performing defensive stocks are actually providing.

We screened the S&P 500 for stocks in classically defensive sectors: consumer staples, utilities, health care and real estate. Next we limited ourselves to low-volatility stocks with a "beta" of less than 1.0. Beta is a measure of volatility that indicates how closely a stock's price movement correlates with a benchmark.

For example, the S&P 500 has a beta of 1.0. Any stock that has a beta less than 1.0 can be said to be less volatile than the broader market. What this means in practice is that low-beta stocks tend to lag the broader market when stocks are going up, but - critically - they also hold up better when the S&P 500 is in decline.

Recent market carnage means it's time for defensive, low-beta stocks to shine. Even if they lose value in a selloff, they should lose less value than the broader market. And if they have above-average dividends that further soften losses, all the better.

Have a look at the 12 best-performing low-volatility stocks in this market crash so far.

SEE ALSO: 64 Dividend Stocks You Can Count On in 2020

Kiplinger
Mar 13, 2020

Sail and Sightsee On a River Cruise in Retirement


Kiplinger
Mar 13, 2020

To Budget or Not to Budget? The Argument for Why Not Having One Might Be Best
Some people need the boundaries budgets set, but others thrive with more freedom. The best method for you own financial success is the one that you can live with for the long term.

Kiplinger
Mar 13, 2020

The Perplexing Tax You May Never Have to Pay
You've done well in life, and now you want to share some of your wealth with the people you know and love. Perhaps you want to help your children make a down payment on a home. Or contribute to your grandchild's college savings plan. Or give a retirement gift to a loyal household employee.

But one concern that might be holding back your generosity is the question of whether you'll have to pay federal gift taxes. It's a topic that comes up in all kinds of discussions of giving. But here's the good news: In general, the only people who have to worry about it are the so-called "one percenters."

Still, even if you probably will never have to pay gift taxes, it's worth getting the answer to common questions about this widely misunderstood IRS provision.

Written by Joelle Spear, CFP®, a financial adviser and a partner at Canby Financial Advisors in Framingham, Mass. She has an MBA with a finance concentration from Bentley University.

SEE ALSO: 10 Common Estate Planning Mistakes (and How to Avoid Them)

Kiplinger
Mar 13, 2020

Cure Your IRA Tax Infestation with a Roth
Nasty taxes are hiding in 401(k)s, 403(b)s and traditional IRAs. To help eradicate that problem, Roth accounts could give you the flexibility you'll need for retirement.

Kiplinger
Mar 12, 2020

10 Health and Pharmaceutical Companies Fighting the Coronavirus
Coronavirus fears have triggered volatility, a correction and ultimately a bear market in U.S. stocks in 2020. Many companies have suffered massive price drops, but a handful of stock picks have seen their prices hold up - and in some cases even soar. One such cluster includes pharmaceutical companies and other health-care stocks that are in the race to develop COVID-19 coronavirus vaccines and therapeutics.

You can't overstate the stakes. As of March 11, there were 129,771 officially recorded coronavirus cases worldwide, causing more than 4,700 deaths, across 125 countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) has officially declared this a pandemic, and the threat to life is very real. That has governments increasingly shutting down any mass gatherings of people to slow the spread.

The hope? That they can buy time for pharmaceutical companies to come up with antivirals and vaccines.

More than 30 Big Pharma and small biotechnology companies alike are already involved in COVID-19 coronavirus treatment and vaccine development. But other health-care stocks are rising to the challenge, too: Makers of diagnostic test kits, sanitizers and protective masks are all ramping up to meet unprecedented demand.

Here are 10 health and pharmaceutical companies playing a role in the fight to control the COVID-19 coronavirus. Each of these stocks has the potential for considerable gain, whether it's because they're developing a treatment or their products are in greater need amid the outbreak. And to date, each stock has outperformed the S&P 500 since it started plunging in mid-February, with many posting considerable gains.

SEE ALSO: 11 Defensive Dividend Stocks for Riding Out the Storm

Kiplinger
Mar 12, 2020

How Do Stock Market Circuit Breakers Work?
Trading halts are designed to give investors a chance to breathe when things get ugly. Here's how they function.

Kiplinger
Mar 12, 2020

Ways to Make Wellness Work for You in Retirement
There are evidence-based benefits for older adults who engage in some wellness basics, such as exercise, a healthy diet, and reducing stress.

Kiplinger
Mar 12, 2020

Why I'm Not a Fan of 401(k)s
Watch out: Saving money in 401(k)s, 403(b)s and 457 plans is like throwing that money in jail.

Kiplinger
Mar 12, 2020

A Reality Check 11 Years after the Last Crash
Eleven years ago, many investors watching the Dow gyrating thought things could only get worse and that we'd never see 14,000 again. Clearly, they were wrong. So, what does that mean for worried investors today?

Kiplinger
Mar 11, 2020

Free Coronavirus Testing and Treatment Won't Affect HSA Deduction
Anyone with a high-deductible health plan that covers medical expenses related to COVID-19 before plan deductibles have been met can still contribute to a health savings account.

Kiplinger
Mar 11, 2020

5 Safe-Haven Stocks to Buy on Broader Market Weakness
A wide investor search is on for safe-haven stocks to buy.

We've plunged into a stock market correction that's nearing bear-market territory amid escalating coronavirus fears and a potential oil-price war. Some of the headline numbers have been eye-popping. The S&P 500 Index dropped roughly 18% in the course of two weeks - something it took nearly two months to do during the near-bear market in the fourth quarter of 2018. And oh, the volatility. The index has endured eight moves of 3% or more (in either direction) since Feb. 20, 2020. The last one before that came on Jan. 4 ... of 2019.

Goldman Sachs analysts are calling for the end of the current bull market: "We believe the S&P 500 bull market will soon end," they write, projecting another 15% decline in stocks from here. However, Merrill Lynch strategists, led by Savita Subramanian, believe investors shouldn't panic-sell all of their holdings, arguing that while stocks will feel the effects, a bear market isn't imminent. "Negative headlines and panic selling are not good reasons to sell, but the coronavirus outbreak is now meaningfully impacting fundamentals," the firm writes.

This brutal market environment has investors seeking out "safe havens" - investments that are relatively more insulated if economic conditions worsen. Many safe-haven stocks boast products that people need regardless of the economic landscape (think health care, utilities and consumer staples). However, as the broader market finds itself further mired in the downturn, pinpointing the tickers that can hold up strong in the long run isn't easy. That's where TipRanks comes in.

Here are five save-haven stocks to buy on the current weakness. Using TipRanks' Stock Screener tool, we were able to zero in on five stocks the analyst community widely believes can maintain their bearings amid heightened levels of volatility. No stock is perfectly safe, but these companies are widely expected to come out on the

Kiplinger
Mar 11, 2020

Fighting Against Aging Stereotypes
Ageism is "the last prejudice to bubble to the surface of our consciousness," says author/activist Ashton Applewhite.

Kiplinger
Mar 11, 2020

3 Reasons to Take a Closer Look at ETFs
Their low cost and transparency are admirable, but their tax efficiencies may take the cake.

Kiplinger
Mar 10, 2020

5 Dividend Mutual Funds Yielding 3% or More
Dividend investing is a favored strategy among many investing icons (Warren Buffett comes to mind) because income provides a cushion to your portfolio. When prices decline, a regular dividend can buoy your total return, helping to keep you from making panicked decisions. And if you reinvest those dividends, you can enjoy the benefits of compounding over time.

However, while dividend investing certainly can be a lucrative strategy, managing a portfolio of dividend-paying stocks isn't for everyone. If that's your situation, a simpler and more diversified approach is to invest in dividend mutual funds. 

Mutual funds packed with income plays can provide a healthy yield without the need to select and monitor each individual company yourself, not to mention buying and selling more as their attractiveness ebbs and flows. And since dividend mutual funds typically hold hundreds of companies, you can easily create a diversified income-generating portfolio with just a handful of funds.

Here are five dividend mutual funds yielding 3% or more to diversify your dividend portfolio.

SEE ALSO: The 25 Best Low-Fee Mutual Funds to Buy in 2020

Kiplinger
Mar 10, 2020

Do's and Don'ts Of Grandparenting
Avoid overstepping boundaries, passive-aggressive comments and outright criticism, or risk being exiled from seeing the little ones.

Kiplinger
Mar 10, 2020

8 Things to Know About Stock Market Corrections
You've probably heard the stock market referred to as a roller-coaster ride. But what do you do when stocks fall into a correction - a steep, stomach-twisting decline of at least 10% from a peak?

The current stock market correction, which began Feb. 19, is particularly turbulent. U.S. markets have quickly gone from setting a series of record highs to a volatile churn in which stocks are conceding huge chunks almost every other day.

On March 9, for instance, the S&P 500 dropped 7% at the open as the coronavirus outbreak spread, oil markets looked primed for a price war and bond yields continued to fall to record lows. That fall was deep enough to trigger market circuit breakers that stop trading for 15 minutes, and the index closed more than 7% lower.

It's easy for investors to get scared when facing any sort of market downturn. That said, market corrections happen more than you might think. Here, we look at eight things you should know about stock market corrections to better help you deal with the current one.

SEE ALSO: The 12 Best ETFs to Battle a Bear Market

Kiplinger
Mar 10, 2020

7 Financial Considerations Before You Remarry
During a beach vacation while having dinner, Hoda Kotb's boyfriend of six years, a Wall Street financier named Joel Schiffman, proposed to her. Kotb, the 55-year-old Today show host, said yes, joining a growing number of people giving marriage another shot.

According to Pew Research, two-thirds of previously married individuals between the ages of 55 and 64 had remarried as of 2013, up from 55% in 1960. Meanwhile, half of those 65 and older remarried, up from just 34% in 1960.

Embarking on a new chapter of life with a new partner by your side is both exciting and romantic. Still, more pragmatic considerations, like financial and estate planning, cannot be overlooked.

Kotb, for one, is worth approximately $30 million, while Schiffman has wealth and assets worth $19 million. Kotb also has two adopted children, the oldest of whom was also adopted with Schiffman, and he has a grown daughter of his own.

No matter your family situation or net worth, the following seven things must be checked off your list before you say, "I do."

Written by Melissa Attanasio, CFP®, CDFA®, MAFF®. Attanasio is the founder and CEO of Abundant Wealth Strategies (www.abundantws.com) and Divorce Strategies Group (www.melissaa.net). The firm specializes in financial matters and comprehensive cash flow management for high net worth individuals, among them, women in transition.

SEE ALSO: 14 Frugal Habits of the Super Rich and Famous

Kiplinger
Mar 10, 2020

Watch Out for a New Tax Bomb, Courtesy of the SECURE Act
Don't let the death of the "stretch IRA" diminish your legacy. Here are three strategies to consider to keep the inheritance you plan on passing down from blowing up.

Kiplinger
Mar 09, 2020

The 11 Best (And 11 Worst) Stocks of the 11-Year Bull Market
It might not feel like it right now, as the coronavirus panic is roiling the stock market. But we're still technically in the longest bull market in history at 132 months and counting - a run that sent the best stocks of the group up by several thousand percent.

That might not be the case for much longer, but nothing lasts forever. This bull market is destined to come to an end, like all the rest. But it's still worthwhile to stop and consider a run for stocks that shattered all longevity records.

The great 1990s bull market (the previous title holder) lasted 113 months and saw the S&P 500 advance by 417%. That market occurred during the dot-com era, of course, dominated by new technology stocks. The current bull market - which has seen the S&P 500 advance by 339% - hasn't been quite as spectacular. But technology has been a big story here as well. Retail, medical devices and fintech also have a healthy representation among the biggest winners.

Interestingly, energy stocks, which are under intense pressure right now, were underperformers in both epic bull runs.

Today, on the 11th anniversary of the bull market, we're going to take a look at the 11 best stocks over that stretch, as well as the 11 biggest losers. To allow for a bigger pool of stocks, we expanded the universe to the full Russell 1000 Index - the 1,000 largest companies in America's equity market.

SEE ALSO: 11 Defensive Dividend Stocks for Riding Out the Storm

Kiplinger
Mar 09, 2020

U.S. Manufacturing Is Already Ailing from Coronavirus
Supplies are hard to come by, and in the longer-term demand may be at risk.

Kiplinger
Mar 09, 2020

Inheriting an Annuity? Here's a Little-Known Way to Stretch Its Tax Benefits
There are a few different ways beneficiaries of annuities can claim their inheritance. One you might not have heard of is called an "annuity stretch." It gives non-spouse beneficiaries a way to receive income and defer taxes.

Kiplinger
Mar 09, 2020

Financially, Marriage Makes a Lot of Sense for Retirees
There are some major financial benefits to tying the knot. From IRAs to Social Security and tax exemptions, there are many reasons (besides the obvious one: love) for older couples to say I do.

Kiplinger
Mar 08, 2020

7 Great ETFs to Avoid the Havoc in Energy Stocks
Energy stocks have been belted since the start of 2020 amid the rising threat of the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak. Now, a potential price war threatens to turn the sector into one of the biggest liabilities in investor portfolios.

Oil prices, which have been under pressure all year, officially fell into bear-market territory by February as coronavirus fears hampered expectations for demand. The Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLE), a fund made up of the S&P 500's energy stocks, had declined by 29% as of March 6.

Now, energy prices and the sector's stocks face even more disruption. Saudi Arabia announced on March 8 that it would cut prices on oil deliveries by nearly 10%. The retaliatory move is aimed at Russia for not agreeing to a production cut to stabilize oil prices, but it's sure to be felt across the rest of the energy-producing world. Some analysts fear the move is the start of a new price war in oil.

"The prognosis for the oil market is even more dire than in November 2014, when such a price war last started, as it comes to a head with the significant collapse in oil demand due to the coronavirus," Goldman Sachs oil strategist Damien Courvalin wrote March 8. His firm is cutting its second- and third-quarter price forecasts for Brent crude oil (a world benchmark) to $30 per barrel, "with possible dips in prices to operational stress levels and well-head cash costs near $20." Brent traded around $45 per barrel just days before.

The energy sector doesn't make up a huge percentage of most broad-market funds, but some funds are more insulated than others. Here, we look at seven great ETFs that will minimize your exposure to the chaos that's wrenching energy stocks.

SEE ALSO: The 20 Best ETFs to Buy for a Prosperous 2020

Kiplinger
Mar 08, 2020

Coronavirus Is Speeding the Fall of Oil
Oil prices and the energy industry were facing an eventual reckoning. COVID-19 is adjusting the timetable.

Kiplinger
Mar 07, 2020

Consumers Will Feel Impact of Rapidly Falling Interest Rates
Mortgage and car loans will experience the most significant dips, while some holders of Treasuries may get a slight boost.

Kiplinger
Mar 06, 2020

IRS Extends Tax Due Dates for Tennessee Tornado Victims
Victims of the recent tornadoes in and around Nashville will have until July 15 to file tax returns and make tax payments.

Kiplinger
Mar 06, 2020

Retirees, No Tax Deduction for Hobby Losses
Business losses are generally deductible on Schedule C of your federal tax return. But there's a double-edged sword on the taxation of hobby losses.

Kiplinger
Mar 06, 2020

Home Sweet Asset
A home is a valuable and versatile financial tool that can help you increase your wealth.

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