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Kiplinger
Aug 20, 2018

Is Your Child at Risk of Catching 'Affluenza'?
Kids from wealthy families aren't immune to behavioral problems. In fact, in some ways, they may be more at risk. As we see with the case of Ethan Couch, the consequences can be severe.

Kiplinger
Aug 20, 2018

Avoiding the Storms in Your Retirement Portfolio
When the financial clouds are gathering, you have some preparations to make. No. 1: Reduce your risk.

Kiplinger
Aug 17, 2018

Cost of Employer Health Coverage to Rise 5% in 2019
It's the sixth year in a row that costs have jumped at least that much.

Kiplinger
Aug 17, 2018

The Money-Management Secrets of A 56-Year Union: "It's Always Been Ours"
Money is a frequent cause of marital friction. Not with Eddie and Sylvia Brown, however. They have kept financial concerns from coming between them. Here's how.

Kiplinger
Aug 17, 2018

The Worst Things to Keep in Your Wallet
One of the worst feelings is reaching for your wallet and finding it's not there. Panic ensues: Did you leave it at home? Drop it? Were you the victim of a pickpocket? Following our advice won't salve that panic, but it may lessen it.

If your wallet is stuffed fat with personal and financial information, know that much of that information can be exploited by identity thieves. All the bad guys need to get started is your name and Social Security number. That alone can lead to bogus loan applications and the opening of fraudulent accounts. It can get worse if they can steal from your wallet your government-issued photo ID and doctor the image.

We reached out to consumer protection experts to identify the things you should immediately purge from your wallet. Oh, and one quick tip before we dive in: Photocopy whatever remains in your wallet. That way, if your wallet is lost or stolen, you can at least quickly and easily file reports with the appropriate government agencies and financial institutions.

SEE ALSO: 12 Reasons You'll Never Be a Millionaire

Kiplinger
Aug 17, 2018

11 New Products Apple Could Release This Fall
Apple (AAPL, $209.75) has been on an incredible run over the past decade, shooting nearly 1,200% higher and becoming the first American company to reach a trillion-dollar market capitalization.

And when you look back at its meteoric rise, it's unquestionably tied to a tireless march of blockbuster Apple products.

Year after year, Apple's biggest quarter is traditionally its fiscal Q1 (ending in December), when the company reaps the rewards of its fall releases -- led by new iPhones and other products -- and holiday sales.

This fall is shaping up to be a pivotal one for Apple, and AAPL stock as the company tries to make a meaningful move above $1 trillion in market cap. Naturally there will be new iPhones, but Apple is rumored to be making some other big moves after the iPhone X's 2017 launch was met with mixed results. The company also could open the floodgates across multiple product lines; if even half these new Apple products hit shelves for the holiday shopping season, the next Q1 report could be incredible.

Here are 11 new Apple products to expect this fall - from sure bets to long shots.

SEE ALSO: 10 Apple Products That Changed Everything (And 10 That Didn't)

Kiplinger
Aug 17, 2018

New Tax Rates Could Provide Push to Help Defuse Your 'Tax Time Bomb'
If 401(k)s and IRAs make up the majority of your retirement savings, with today's lower tax rates, it could make sense to steer more of your money into Roth accounts or properly structured and funded life insurance policies.

Kiplinger
Aug 16, 2018

10 RMD Mistakes to Avoid
After saving for years in an IRA, 401(k) or other tax-deferred retirement plan, you eventually have to take the money out and pay taxes on it. Most people need to start taking these required minimum distributions after they turn age 70½--and the stakes are high. If you don't take out the required amount by the deadline, you could get hit with a penalty worth up to 50% of the amount you should have withdrawn. It's easy to make mistakes when figuring out the timing of RMDs, how much to withdraw and which accounts to tap. Here are 10 common RMD mistakes--and how to avoid them.

SEE ALSO: 14 Retirement Mistakes You Will Regret Forever

Kiplinger
Aug 16, 2018

10 Roughed-Up Stocks to Buy for a Recovery Rally
A stock's price can fall for many reasons. The company may no longer be performing as it's expected to. The industry or sector could be temporarily out of fashion. Sometimes, a weak market simply pulls good stocks down with it.

As long as the issue isn't fundamental (and long-term), you can still buy low and eventually sell high, even in a toppy market like today's.

Today, we will look at 10 stocks with market caps between $10 billion and $200 billion that have fallen hard in the past year, but that some analysts think are poised for a bounce-back. These companies are in a variety of industries - everything from banking to pharmaceuticals to industrial products to consumer goods.

Clearly, each of these stocks comes with some risk given the bearish drivers that have dragged them down by 20%, 30%, even 40%. But investors should be less concerned about why these stocks fell in the past, and more concerned about whether they realistically can rebound from here. None of these stocks need to reach their old highs for investors to neatly profit - the underlying companies just need to follow through on proposed ways to increase shareholder value.

Here's a look at 10 battered stocks to buy for their recovery potential.

SEE ALSO: 20 of the Best Stocks You Probably Haven't Heard Of

Kiplinger
Aug 16, 2018

College Savings 101: Arguments Against 529 Plans and Alternatives That Might Work Better
Before you pump money into a 529 College Savings Plan, make sure you have three important boxes checked. And even after you check those boxes, you might want to consider the alternatives.

Kiplinger
Aug 15, 2018

11 Stocks Warren Buffett Is Buying or Selling
Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B, $205.83), wasn't kidding when he said he couldn't get enough bites of Apple's (AAPL) stock.

The Oracle of Omaha added to Berkshire Hathaway's already hefty stake in the iPhone maker during the three months ended June 30. Apple has since gone on to become the first U.S. company to top $1 trillion in market value.

Buffett has made his ardor for Apple well-known, but the world's greatest value investor made a number of other noteworthy moves in the second quarter, according to a new 13F regulatory filing. (Large investors such as Berkshire are required to disclose their holdings to the Securities and Exchange Commission every three months.)

The big picture remains the same. Buffett is, as always, bullish.

In total, Berkshire spent $6.1 billion on stocks in the second quarter. And since it can be instructive to see what Buffett has been up to, we took a closer look at what Berkshire has been buying and selling. Keep in mind that bigger investments are thought to be made by Warren Buffett himself, while smaller positions are believed to be handled by lieutenants Ted Weschler and Todd Combs.

With that caveat in mind, here are the most notable recent changes to Berkshire Hathaway's stock holdings.

SEE ALSO: 20 Dividend Stocks to Fund 20 Years of Retirement

Kiplinger
Aug 15, 2018

5 of the Best Consumer Stocks You Can Buy
Consumer stocks as a whole are among some of the biggest beneficiaries of the current nine-year bull market. However, as we move through a period of uncertainty and change where tariffs and trade wars could affect some of these very same companies, investors need any edge they can get to make money in the years ahead.

Technology may be that edge. It's already playing a large role in the success and failure of many of this country's biggest consumer stocks, and tech looks to be an even greater determinant of who wins and loses five to 10 years from now.

RBC Capital Markets recently took out its futurist cap, producing a study entitled "Imagine 2025," which highlights the six themes it feels will drive business growth over the next seven years - and the stocks that will benefit as a result.

The themes mostly revolve around technology, but RBC also has addressed non-tech issues such as climate change, population growth, urbanization and others to develop a list of 69 companies it feels will lead the way through 2025.

The following are five of the best consumer stocks to buy right now. What makes them stand out from the rest is that each utilizes one or more of RBC's "Imagine 2025" themes to deliver better-than-average shareholder returns.

SEE ALSO: 20 Dividend Stocks to Fund 20 Years of Retirement

Kiplinger
Aug 15, 2018

Great Tiny Homes for Retirement
If you're planning for retirement, downsizing is likely near the top of your to-do list. After all, it's a lot of work and expense to maintain the 2,426 square feet that makes up the typical single-family house.

Enter the tiny retirement home. Generally at under 400 square feet of living space, a tiny home requires much less upkeep and is much more affordable than a traditional house. That's an attractive combination for retirees on fixed incomes. According to the National Association of Home Builders, 45% of baby boomers would consider buying a tiny home.

Affordability is a compelling factor. On average, it costs $23,000 to build a tiny home yourself, according to TheTinyLife.com, a resource for the tiny home community. The average sale price for a single-family home is $384,900, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Just 3 out of 10 tiny home owners have a mortgage.

Despite the small size, tiny homes come in all shapes. Here are several great tiny homes uniquely suited to the needs of retirees. Take a look.

SEE ALSO: 27 Cheapest Places Where You'll Really Want to Retire

Kiplinger
Aug 15, 2018

The 3 Worst States for Millionaires
These states have the lowest concentrations of millionaire households in the U.S.

Kiplinger
Aug 15, 2018

Why Live Alone in Retirement? Form a Pod Instead
Sharing expenses can be extremely helpful, but that's not the only reason to add some peas to your pod. Sharing friendships, skills and talents can be just as valuable.

Kiplinger
Aug 14, 2018

7 Stocks to Avoid (Or Even Sell) This Fall
This bull market is getting awfully long in the tooth. Stocks haven't recorded a 20% drop since March 9, 2009 - the beginning of the recovery from the Great Recession. At 3,444 days at last count, this bull market is on pace to set the all-time record on Aug. 22, surpassing the 3,452-day rally between Oct. 11, 1990.

Nothing lasts forever, of course, and that will be true of the current bull market at some point. "Since we are back close to the highs for the S&P 500, risks of a pullback have certainly risen," Wall Street veteran Bill Stone told CNBC on Aug. 9.

But even with a bear market nowhere in sight, some individual stocks may be in trouble.

TipRanks' Stock Screener reveals stocks with a bearish analyst consensus rating - so while we often use the screener to identify stocks to buy, it's also useful in targeting stocks to avoid or even sell.

Today, we'll look at seven stocks that have consensus hold or sell ratings from Wall Street right now, indicating that they could be trouble in the months ahead. We'll also share analysts' price targets on these stocks to avoid, and the pros' reasons as to why.

SEE ALSO: 10 of the Market's Most Shorted Stocks

Kiplinger
Aug 14, 2018

21 Top Democratic Presidential Candidates for 2020
The 2020 Democratic presidential nominating contest is attracting unprecedented interest, as it's the first in decades that is truly wide open. Although there are more than 40 politicians, businessmen and celebrities weighing a bid, former Vice President Joe Biden is the only one that virtually all other candidates would step aside for. And this far out, it's impossible to know whether there's another Barack Obama hiding in the mix, ready to catch fire and snatch the nomination from the heir apparent.

We'll be ranking the top 21 contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination, updating our list after the 2018 midterm elections in November and as primary season ramps up in 2019. For now, only three potential candidates stand out enough to rank. Name recognition for everyone else is scant, which is why the remaining 18 names here are listed alphabetically for now.

SEE ALSO: The Best and Worst Presidents (According to the Stock Market)

Kiplinger
Aug 14, 2018

7 Sell-Rated Stocks to Avoid This Fall
This bull market is getting awfully long in the tooth. Stocks haven't recorded a 20% drop since March 9, 2009 - the beginning of the recovery from the Great Recession. At 3,444 days at last count, this bull market is on pace to set the all-time record on Aug. 22, surpassing the 3,452-day rally between Oct. 11, 1990.

Nothing lasts forever, of course, and that will be true of the current bull market at some point. "Since we are back close to the highs for the S&P 500, risks of a pullback have certainly risen," Wall Street veteran Bill Stone told CNBC on Aug. 9.

But even with a bear market nowhere in sight, some individual stocks may be in trouble.

TipRanks' Stock Screener reveals stocks with a bearish analyst consensus rating - so while we often use the screener to identify stocks to buy, it's also useful in targeting stocks to avoid or even sell.

Today, we'll look at seven stocks that have consensus hold or sell ratings from Wall Street right now, indicating that they could be trouble in the months ahead. We'll also share analysts' price targets on these stocks to avoid, and the pros' reasons as to why.

SEE ALSO: 10 of the Market's Most Shorted Stocks

Kiplinger
Aug 14, 2018

Could Your Cash Savings Hurt You?
For Millennials and Gen-Xers, having too much in cash may be a good problem ... but it's a problem nevertheless. Here's why, how much you should have on hand and some ideas on what you may want to do with the rest.

Kiplinger
Aug 14, 2018

YOU Are the Biggest Threat to Your Retirement Plan
When the going gets tough in the market, people invested in stocks have the natural impulse to pull out to cut their losses. By using an income allocation plan instead, you can ride out downturns more confidently.

Kiplinger
Aug 13, 2018

20 Dividend Stocks to Fund 20 Years of Retirement
The conventional approach to funding retirement is to withdraw 4% of your savings in the first year, followed by "pay raises" in each subsequent year to adjust for inflation. Over a 30-year retirement, the thinking goes, there is little chance of running out of money if this retirement portfolio is invested in a mix of dividend stocks, a few growth stocks and bonds.

Today's world is different. Interest rates and bond yields have never been this low for this long, reducing future expected returns. And Americans are living longer than ever before.

Instead of facing the uncomfortable decision of what securities to sell or wondering if you are at risk of outliving your savings, you can lean on the cash from dividend stocks to fund a substantial portion of your retirement. Simply Safe Dividends published an in-depth guide about living on dividends in retirement here.

Many companies in the market yield 4% or more. And unlike with the 4% withdrawal rule, if you rely on solid dividend stocks for that 4% annually, you won't have to worry as much about the market's unpredictable fluctuations. Better still, you'll have a chance to leave your heirs with a sizable portfolio when the time comes.

Here's a look at 20 quality dividend stocks, yielding roughly 4% or higher, that should fund at least 20 years of retirement, if not more. They have paid uninterrupted dividends for more than 20 consecutive years, appear to have secure payouts and have the potential to collectively grow their dividends to protect investors' purchasing power.

SEE ALSO: 39 European Dividend Aristocrats for International Income Growth

Kiplinger
Aug 13, 2018

Just How Pricey Is This Stock Market?
Let's put the S&P 500's P/E ratios under a magnifying glass.

Kiplinger
Aug 13, 2018

7 Momentum Stocks for High-Risk Appetites
One of the best momentum stocks to buy of 2018 recently got a rude awakening from an analyst. On July 20, Credit Suisse analyst Judah Former downgraded discount retailer Five Below (FIVE) to "neutral" from "outperform" after its stock gained more than 125% over the past year.

"[Five Below] remains one of the most differentiated concepts in retail ... and operates the quickest new store return model we have seen," Frommer wrote in a note to clients. "That said, we see risk/reward as balanced at these levels given the stock's material outperformance."

There are two schools of thought when it comes to momentum stocks to buy and sell. The first philosophy is never begrudging a profit. The second is always let your winners run and cut your losses quickly. Which one is correct?

They both depend on your investment psychology. If you're averse to risk, the first school of thought will serve you better. If you've got a no risk, no reward personality, however, you'll find comfort exercising the second philosophy. The one thing you shouldn't do is use both. Commit to one and stick with it through the good times and bad. If you've done your homework, the odds are good you'll do well over the long run.

For the purposes of this article, I'm recommending seven momentum stocks to buy with market caps greater than $2 billion that are up more than 100% over the past year ... and Five Below could be on the list. If you follow the first philosophy, you're welcome to read along, but I don't recommend you take a bite out of any of these given your temperament. You'll thank me later.

SEE ALSO FROM KIPLINGER: 10 Ways to Play the Next Bull Market With Emerging-Markets Stocks

Kiplinger
Aug 13, 2018

Are You Ready for Longevity? 4 Steps to Take Now
A long life is a great gift, but with the joys come some financial and legal challenges. The earlier you act to address them, the better off you and your heirs will be.

Kiplinger
Aug 10, 2018

14 Ways for Everyone to Save on Taxes Under the New Tax Law
We're living in a new tax world now, thanks to the overhaul passed by Congress last year. A number of breaks bit the dust, but some new ones were introduced as well. Your 2018 return will be the first to file under the new rules, but the time to look for tax savings is now.

The following ideas could really pay off in the months--and years--ahead.



Kiplinger
Aug 10, 2018

Emerging-Markets Stocks: 10 Ways to Play the Next Bull Market
Emerging markets have been a real minefield of late. The United States and China have ratcheted up their trade war rhetoric, and investors have been shunning emerging-markets stocks and sticking with the comforts of home.

But they may be doing so at their own detriment. Emerging markets are cheap after a decade of underperformance marked by sagging commodity prices, political instability and strong home-country bias by American investors.

For the contrarian investor willing to look past the headlines, testing the waters in emerging markets makes sense. U.S. stocks are as expensive as they were in the late 1990s by some metrics, while foreign markets in general and emerging markets in particular are cheap and unloved. If history is any guide, EMs should beat the pants off of American stocks over the next decade.

"There is no doubt that the U.S. stock market is expensive (though not quite a bubble like the 1990s), with foreign markets much more reasonable," explains Meb Faber, CEO of Cambria Investment Management and manager of the Cambria Global Value ETF (GVAL), among other funds. "Today, we find the most reasonable valuations in the beaten-down, emerging markets that sport a valuation roughly half that of the U.S. -- some countries are even clocking in with single-digit P/E ratios. "

Faber recommends that investors "close your eyes, hold your nose, and buy a basket of the cheap countries with the plan to hold them for a decade."

Today, we'll look at 10 ways to make that trade on emerging-markets stocks using a mixture of exchange-traded funds (ETFs), closed-end funds (CEFs) and individual companies.

SEE ALSO: 39 European Dividend Aristocrats for International Income Growth

Kiplinger
Aug 10, 2018

Two Medigap Plans to Be Phased Out
Medicare will no longer sell Plan F and Plan C medigap policies to people who sign up for coverage in 2020 and later, but current enrollees won't have to switch.

Kiplinger
Aug 10, 2018

15 Consumer Stocks That Deliver Dividend Growth Like Clockwork
Slow-moving consumer stocks aren't the sexiest investments, but those that can be relied on for regular dividend growth through both good times and bad can be a long-term investor's best friend.

After all, bull markets and economic expansions don't last forever.

"Quality dividend payers can also offer defensive, resilient businesses and current income generation to buffer against potential future (stock market) drawdowns," writes Tony DeSpirito, director of U.S. equity investments at BlackRock.

Whether they make liquor, sell toothpaste or sling hamburgers, some of the nation's best-known consumer companies have proven to be dividend champions. Indeed, more than a dozen of them are members of the illustrious Dividend Aristocrats - companies in the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index that have hiked their payouts every year for at least 25 consecutive years.

And let's not forget: Steady dividend hikes have benefits beyond letting income investors sleep better at night. Not only do annual raises make a dividend stock more alluring to new investors, they also reward existing investors with increasingly higher yields on shares purchased at lower prices in the past.

These 15 quality consumer stocks can be counted on to deliver dividend growth year after year, and they are backed by resilient businesses to boot.

SEE ALSO: 53 Best Dividend Stocks for 2018 and Beyond

Kiplinger
Aug 10, 2018

Before You Buy That Jet: Considerations on Big Purchases
Want to buy a plane? How about a vacation home? Keep in mind that with decisions on big purchases, the initial price paid is just the tip of the iceberg.

Kiplinger
Aug 09, 2018

7 "Zombie Stocks" That Are Coming Back to Life
Just because a stock has performed badly in the past, doesn't mean it's game over for the future. As investors, we can jump into stocks that are rising. But another strategy is to find poorly performing stocks on the cusp of rebounding. Obviously, this is a more risky approach. What happens if the poor results continue?

Well, for instance, you can generate seriously lucrative returns. The key is to cherry-pick your stocks wisely by differentiating between stocks unfairly treated by the market, versus the stocks where all hope is truly lost.

Luckily help is at hand. Here, I turned to top analyst ratings to pinpoint stocks that are worth a second look. I used TipRanks to focus on analysts with the sharpest stock picking abilities.

These stocks have all posted losses, but the upside potential remains intact. Let's take a closer look at these rebounding stock picks now:

SEE ALSO FROM KIPLINGER: 10 of the Market's Most Shorted Stocks

Kiplinger
Aug 09, 2018

Royalty Trusts: 10 Little-Known High-Yield Energy Plays
Royalty trusts can be great holdings for investors who want income that rises in sync with commodity prices. These trusts hold interests in oil, gas or mineral production and collect more income when energy prices rise, resulting in bigger distributions (similar to dividends) and high yields for their investors.

So far in 2018, royalty trust investors have benefited from a 12% improvement in sale prices for benchmark West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which was recently trading at $67 a barrel. Prices are now up nearly 150% from their low of about $27 per barrel two years ago.

Royalty trusts typically offer high yields, frequently better than 7%. And many of these trusts have increased their distributions multiple times this year thanks to higher energy prices.

The principal drawback: Distributions decline over time because the trust's energy reserves deplete; royalty income from oil and gas sales gradually drops to zero. Royalty trusts are required to disclose and annually update estimates of their remaining reserve life - though conservative estimates mean many trusts live on well past their expected termination date.

Royalty trust distributions also can move along with energy prices, which means they don't just rise - they can drop, too. And that tax advantage comes with more complex tax reporting; investors sometimes must pay income taxes to multiple states if the trust's assets are spread over several jurisdictions.

Still, royalty trusts' high-income potential should earn them a spot in most portfolios. These 10 royalty trusts in particular offer high yields that fly far under Wall Street's radar.

SEE ALSO: 53 Best Dividend Stocks for 2018 and Beyond

Kiplinger
Aug 09, 2018

10 Things You'll Spend More on in Retirement
Before you determine how much you need to save for a fulfilling retirement, you first must evaluate how much will you spend in retirement.

Financial planners have traditionally estimated that retirees need 80% or more of preretirement income to maintain their standard of living, but individual situations vary greatly. And, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' annual survey on consumer spending, the average retired household spends 25% less than the average working household each year.

However, retired households do spend more than working households on many items, including big-ticket expenses such as health care and travel. Here's a look at 10 budget categories where retirees are likely to spend more.

SEE ALSO: 14 Retirement Mistakes You Will Regret Forever

Kiplinger
Aug 09, 2018

10 Things You'll Spend Less on in Retirement
A popular rule of thumb suggests that retirees need 80% of their preretirement income to make ends meet, and some experts encourage saving even more to avoid running out of money. In the face of such daunting goals, 53% of preretirees say they plan on working past age 65 to ensure that they have enough money, according to the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies.

But the 80% rule isn't for everybody, and it may lead to inflated savings goals that cause undue anxiety as you plan for retirement. Consumer spending decreases significantly as you age. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that the average retired household spends 25% less than the average working household.

In order to know how much you need to save for retirement, it's important to know what your spending will look like once you actually retire. Consider these 10 budget line items on which you'll likely spend less in retirement.

SEE ALSO: Best States to Retire 2018: All 50 States Ranked for Retirement

Kiplinger
Aug 09, 2018

Young Savers Can't Assume Roths Are Right for Them
Rules of thumb don't tell the whole story. Truth is, sometimes a traditional IRA or 401(k) is the better way to go for young people. Here are some reasons for young savers to be hesitant about Roth savings vehicles.

Kiplinger
Aug 08, 2018

Warning: 3 Serious Red Flags about Financial Advisers
Disclosures pulled from actual adviser profiles show three major red flags you don't want your financial professional to have.

Kiplinger
Aug 08, 2018

Does Apple's $1 Trillion Benchmark Even Matter?
Wall Street collectively pointed and stared at the big, round number. But experts don't agree on what it means for AAPL stock.

Kiplinger
Aug 08, 2018

7 Biotech Stocks With Big Upcoming Catalysts
Are you ready? Biotech stocks provide a compelling opportunity for risk-tolerant investors looking for rich rewards. Regardless of market sentiment, economic data or trade wars, a key regulatory approval or trial data can send prices rocketing.

Consider Madrigal Pharma (MDGL), which exploded by nearly 150% back in May following positive Phase 2 results for a liver-disease treatment.

Of course, the opposite can also be true - prices can fall just as quickly if data or approvals fail to impress. That's why it's so crucial to conduct thorough research before investing. For instance, using TipRanks, we can assess both the analyst consensus rating (all the stocks covered below are a "Moderate Buy" or "Strong Buy") and the expected upside potential based on recent ratings.

Here are seven biotech stocks that could be catapulted higher by near-term catalysts. We'll also explore the pros' analysis and price targets for each company.

SEE ALSO: The 18 Best Stocks to Buy for the Rest of 2018

Kiplinger
Aug 08, 2018

When Your Birthday Isn't Your Birthday (According to Social Security)
Social Security benefits and birthdays go hand in hand, but for those born on certain specific days of the year, bureaucracy can add an interesting twist to such a simple concept.

Kiplinger
Aug 07, 2018

Kiplinger's Economic Outlook for All 50 States, 2018
America's economic engine will continue to hum across all major regions throughout 2018.

The strongest growth is in the West, with plenty of high-wage jobs being created in tech-related hardware and software, plus aircraft, finance and business services. The South is seeing higher demand for exports such as industrial machinery and other equipment. The Midwest is enjoying a surge in demand for manufactured goods, and it leads in productivity gains, though slower auto sales could ding growth in Michigan. The Northeast is benefiting from its high-tech clusters, such as Boston. Mid-Atlantic states have limited exposure to growing trade fights, compared with other areas that rely on exports. Mountain West states stand to benefit from the recovery in oil and minerals prices.

But it's not all good news. For instance, the commodities-heavy economies of the Plains states face some dark clouds. A slowdown in the farming industry and new international tariffs will hit hard.

Read on for Kiplinger's exclusive 2018 economic outlook - including projected job-growth and unemployment rates - for each state, listed alphabetically.

SEE ALSO: 10 States With the Fastest Rate of Job Growth, 2018

Kiplinger
Aug 07, 2018

Stumbling FANGs? No Problem, Says the Market
Tech leaders swooned in late July, but stocks just kept plodding along

Kiplinger
Aug 07, 2018

10 States With the Fastest Rate of Job Growth, 2018
The U.S. economy is humming along nicely. But how long can the good times continue?

Widespread growth spells even tighter labor markets, and that could start to crimp regional growth rates. Job openings have reached or are near record levels in all regions, and hiring is starting to slow because of the lack of qualified candidates. Certain metro areas have unemployment rates below 3%, including Denver; Madison, Wis.; Nashville, Tenn.; and the San Francisco Bay area. Look for hiring slowdowns to continue as more positions become unfillable.

Every year, The Kiplinger Letter forecasts economic growth in all 50 states. Check out the 10 states with the fastest projected rates of job growth this year.

SEE ALSO: Millionaires in America: All 50 States Ranked

Kiplinger
Aug 07, 2018

The 6 Best REIT Funds to Buy
Rising interest rates and the decline of shopping malls have weighed on real estate investment trusts (REITs) over the past few years. The good news is that many REITs - special tax-advantaged businesses provide investors with exposure to real estate - are now trading at bargain prices.

That makes now an opportune time to jump broadly into this traditionally dividend-friendly asset class via mutual and exchange-traded funds.

REITs - which own and often operate real estate such as apartments, office buildings, malls and industrial properties - get certain tax breaks, but in return must pass through 90% of their income to shareholders every year. That makes them good yield plays; currently, the average REIT yields 4%, which is higher than most stock or high-quality bond yields.

They also look cheap right now. While the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index is trading at roughly 24 times trailing 12-month earnings, the S&P U.S. REIT sector is changing hands at a price-to-funds-from-operations (FFO, an important measure of REIT profitability) of 16.

A 5% to 10% weighting in REITs makes a good diversifier for a portfolio of stocks and bonds. While rising interest rates are considered bad news for REITs - as bonds compete with them for income investors' money, and because much of the real estate industry is dependent on bond money - REITs historically have shown some resilience during rising-rate periods.

Investors can easily access wide swaths of this industry by investing in real estate funds and ETFs. Here's a look at six top REIT funds right now:

SEE ALSO: The 25 Best Low-Fee Mutual Funds You Can Buy

Kiplinger
Aug 07, 2018

What Happens to You When Your Financial Adviser Retires?
Unless you're working with someone at least 20 years younger than yourself, chances are you will need to find new help sometime during your retirement.

Kiplinger
Aug 06, 2018

Need New Contact Lenses? Warehouse Clubs Offer Better Deals
You'll find deeper discounts at Costco and Sam's Club compared to traditional eyewear retailers and drugstore pharmacies.

Kiplinger
Aug 06, 2018

10 States That Are Surprisingly "Rich" in Millionaires
There's a lot of conspicuous consumption in the U.S., but in reality, millionaires are actually pretty rare.

Only 5.8% of all American households have investable assets of $1 million or more, excluding the value of real estate, employer-sponsored retirement plans and business partnerships, according to Phoenix Marketing International, a firm that tracks the affluent market. Not surprisingly, the states with the highest concentrations of millionaires also tend to have some of the highest incomes, home values and living expenses in the country.

New York and California have lots of millionaires, you say? No kidding. They also have sky-high median household incomes and other pricey demographic indicators. What's more remarkable is when a state can manage to have a relatively high concentration of millionaires and relatively low costs at the same time.

Using data from Phoenix Marketing International and the U.S. census, we searched for states with median incomes and median home values well below national levels that still managed to support relatively high concentrations (at least 5%) of millionaire households.

Here's a look at 10 states with surprisingly high concentrations of millionaires given their broader income and home value demographics. For perspective, we're also providing the richest residents of these states, as well as important tax and cost-of-living information.

SEE ALSO: 20 Small Towns With Big Millionaire Populations

Kiplinger
Aug 06, 2018

To Avoid a Nasty Tax Surprise on April 15, Check Your Withholding Now
The new tax law promises lower taxes for many, but ironically, up to about half of people could face a tax bill in 2019 due to a withholding problem.

Kiplinger
Aug 06, 2018

Volunteer Abroad in the Peace Corps in Retirement
There is no age limit in some volunteer organizations, including the Peace Corps.

Kiplinger
Aug 06, 2018

Maximize Social Security Benefits for Surviving Spouses
Strategies for getting the most money by timing your claims.

Kiplinger
Aug 06, 2018

5 Stocks That Should Start Paying Dividends
Investors tend to be drawn to hot technology and biotechnology stocks for their growth prospects - not for the cash they return to shareholders. But several well-known tech and biotech stocks could afford to invest in their businesses, buy back their shares and pay dividends, if only they chose to.

When it comes to returning cash to shareholders, corporate management often prefers stock buybacks to dividends because it gives them flexibility. A company can adjust its share repurchases according to business and market conditions. A dividend is a commitment. The market often exacts severe and swift revenge if a company cuts or suspends its payout.

The initiation of a dividend can also be taken as a sign that a company or stock's best days are behind it. A quick look at Apple's (AAPL) performance shows that's not necessarily the case. The company reinstated its dividend in 2012 after a 17-year hiatus. Between price appreciation and payouts, Apple stock has delivered a total return of about 170% since March 2012, when it announced plans to reinstate its dividend later that year - the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index is up about 130% over the same span, including dividends.

The following five stocks don't yet offer dividends, but they should ... and could. Each has the cash-generation ability to start a regular payout without giving up on share repurchases and investments in future growth.

SEE ALSO: 53 Best Dividend Stocks for 2018 and Beyond

Kiplinger
Aug 06, 2018

Hire Help to Assist Older Travelers
These firms ensure that older parents or loved ones navigate the airport, are comfortable on a flight and arrive safely at their destination.

Kiplinger
Aug 06, 2018

Estate Planning 101: 5 Lessons for New Parents
You've prepared the nursery, stocked up on diapers and even sent your baby shower thank-you notes. Now it's time to check a big one off your to-do list: Preparing for the unexpected.

Kiplinger
Aug 03, 2018

Back-to-School 2018: 12 Best Laptops for Students
It still feels like summer, but make no mistake: Fall is coming. And that means the 2018 back-to-school shopping season is ramping up. That typically means a trip to pick up pencils, pens, notebooks, a ruler and a calculator ... but increasingly, it also means scouring stores for the best laptops to get the kids through the school year.

Laptop access used to be a "nice-to-have" - now it's a necessity for college and high school, and it's increasingly important for primary-school students, too. The days of hand-written assignments are dwindling; we've switched to neatly formatted and printed ... or even submitted online.

The stakes for back-to-school shopping are higher as a result. You've gone from $50 worth of office supplies to potentially spending more than $1,000. Striking gold isn't easy, either; finding the best laptops means sorting through literally hundreds of models - a more complicated process than deciding between blue and black ink.

Here are 12 of the best laptops for back-to-school 2018. Some of these picks focus on overall general quality, while a few are focused on specific areas such as high-end power, gaming and value.

SEE ALSO: The Best and Worst Presidents (According to the Stock Market)

Kiplinger
Aug 03, 2018

Voice Assistants Can Help Older Adults
How devices including Amazon Echo and Apple HomePod can help seniors feel more connected.

Kiplinger
Aug 03, 2018

Legal Documents for College Students
You lose some of your parental rights once your offspring turn 18, but they can obtain legal documents that will allow you to intercede on their behalf, particularly when they go away to college.

Kiplinger
Aug 03, 2018

Earn More Interest on Your Savings
Money market deposit accounts and savings accounts provide safe, easily accessible places to store cash.

Kiplinger
Aug 03, 2018

Taxes Are on Sale: Here's How to Take Advantage
If you've got money sitting in pre-tax investments like a traditional IRA or 401(k), you may want to pay the tax bill that comes with them sooner rather than later. Here are three strategies to consider.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

For Some Women, the Financial Services Industry May Be a Fulfilling Career Choice
Some of the top companies are going all out to attract young women and women returning to the workforce.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

The New Banking Law Has Perks for You
Provisions to the Dodd-Frank reform act gives small banks more discretion to make loans and mandates free credit freezes.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Should Lenders Mail Unsolicited Checks to Potential Borrowers?


Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

New IRS "Shorter Form" Is Little Help
Most paper filers using the new 1040 will need to refer to supplemental schedules.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Get Money (or a Tax Deduction) for Your Used Tech
Your old phones and laptops may be worth more than you think.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

My Annual Report
You've sent good ideas for articles and shared your own personal finance journeys. I love hearing what's on your mind.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

The Case for Doing Absolutely Nothing in Today's Market
In 2018's topsy-turvy market there's still one constant to stand by: dividend growth.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Making the Most of a Buyout Offer
I can exchange my AV Homes stock for Taylor Morrison Home shares, receive 60% in cash and 40% in stock, or take the payment in cash.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Apple (AAPL): $1 Trillion Is Just the Beginning
Apple is the first U.S. company to hit the $1T milestone; here's why AAPL shares can climb even higher.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Don't Ignore Small-Company Stocks
Small-cap stocks tend to move in cycles, and we look to be on the rising side of one.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Using a 529 Plan to Pay for Private School
Q. Can I use money in my daughter's 529 college-savings plan to pay her private elementary school tuition?

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Why You Need to Invest in Funds Before Stocks
When you're just starting out with investing, you first need to build a diversified core before betting on individual stocks.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Value Vs. Growth Stocks -- Which Will Come Out on Top?
Investors have shunned bargain-priced stocks in favor of fast growers for years. Is value due for a comeback?

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

10 Small Home Projects That Pay Off Big
The home-improvement boom shows no signs of slowing. Half of homeowners recently polled by Houzz.com, a design and remodeling site, say they plan to start or continue renovations at a median cost of $10,000.

We've highlighted 10 small projects--most of which won't cost more than $10,000--that can increase your enjoyment of your home in a big way. In most cases, you won't recoup the full cost of the project when you sell, but it could help attract buyers when you put your home on the market.

Many of the projects come with kits and prefab components, so you can save money by doing the work yourself. The retailers we mention all ship within the continental U.S., and shipping can run from free to a few thousand dollars.



SEE ALSO: 12 Things Home Buyers Will Hate About Your House

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Funding the Fight Against Alzheimer's
Jennifer DiVittorio donated $300,000 in her parents' names for research into neurological diseases.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Disaster-Proof Your Vacation With Trip Insurance
Travel insurance can recover some costs when a natural disaster ruins your vacation.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

A Sector Redo Shuffles Stocks
Some of the market's biggest names are on the move, dealing a new hand to index funds that invest in these corners of the market.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Dividing Your Assets in a Gray Divorce
The closer you are to retirement, the more crucial it is to get it right.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

More Star Power for the Kiplinger ETF 20
We spotlight new cast members in the list of our 20 favorite exchange-traded funds.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Fidelity New Millennium's Contrarian Bet Pays Off
Unloading high-flying tech stocks and scooping up out-of-favor energy picks has helped this Kiplinger 25 member beat the S&P 500.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Baron Global Advantage Bets Big on Tech
The managers for this large-company global stock fund scout for companies that invest aggressively for growth.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Don't Fall Into the Diversification Trap
Researchers discovered that, when it comes to investment fees, diversification efforts can backfire.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Trade-War Threats Weigh on the Market
A tilt toward domestic-focused stocks makes sense for most investors.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

7 Tesla (TSLA) Risks That Investors Can't Ignore
Give credit where it's due. Tesla Inc. (TSLA, $300.84) CEO Elon Musk, through sheer willpower and persistence, has mainstreamed the idea of electric vehicles. EVs were a fringe project taken on by only a handful of organizations a few years ago; now, every major automaker has entered the EV market. Tesla, meanwhile, has become synonymous with this kind of car, and TSLA stock has firmly grabbed Wall Street's attention.

But Tesla's journey hasn't always been pretty. Sometimes, it has been downright ugly. Musk has led Tesla to the EV fore ... but also into operational challenges and publicity headaches. He often overpromises and underdelivers. He's distracted by leading his other companies, Boring and SpaceX.

Never even mind his penchant for getting Tesla ever deeper into debt, and his company's extreme difficulties in turning a profit.

On the upside, Tesla's earnings report on Wednesday, Aug. 1, hints that the company and Musk finally are moving in a healthier direction. In his quarterly comments to shareholders, Musk said that in the second half of this year, he expects Tesla "to become both sustainably profitable and cash flow positive." Wall Street was encouraged, driving TSLA stock almost 10% higher before the next day's trading commenced.

Here's a look at seven of Tesla's potential pitfalls that deserve closer inspection. Just one of these issues could prove to be the company's undoing. A more plausible outcome is that a combination of these impasses slowly chips away at Tesla's current leadership of the electric vehicle market. If nothing else, even the most ardent bulls should be aware of these factors as potential risks.

SEE ALSO: The 50 Best Stocks of All Time

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

Why I Love My Whole Life Insurance Policy
While they may not be for everyone, I feel like buying a whole life policy was one of the best financial planning decisions I ever made.

Kiplinger
Aug 02, 2018

My 10 Best Financial Literacy Apps for Kids
Yes, learning about money management can be fun! Here are 10 apps that can help you teach your kids to save and spend wisely.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

Cutting the Tax Bill on Company Stock
There's a strategy that allows company stock held in a workplace retirement plan to be split off and rolled over to a taxable account to take advantage of capital-gains tax rates.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

9 Secrets to Making More Money on Your eBay Auctions
Maybe you found your son's old Pokémon cards in a box in your basement. Or perhaps you ordered a professional camera, but you realize you have no time to use it. It's time to de-clutter, and you want this stuff - valuable stuff to somebody out there - gone, now. What do you do? Sell it on eBay, the popular online auction site.

I've done it myself. It's fun and easy, and it quickly fills your pockets with some extra cash. I have sold, for instance, a tennis racket, a tennis bag and strings. To sell the racket, I took some pictures, wrote a product description, listed it at eBay's recommended "Buy It Now" price ($75) and sold the item within two days. Great. . . until I found out that other eBay sellers had sold the same racket for double the price. Why did I come up short? Lots of reasons, I've discovered.

Here are 9 simple ways to get more money on your eBay auction.

SEE ALSO: 5 Myths Keeping You From Getting Rid of Your Stuff

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

Tapping a Roth IRA for a House
You can withdraw contributions from a Roth IRA to help purchase your first home.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

Think Twice About Free Wi-Fi
Hackers and ID thieves have new tricks to target travelers.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

Student Loans Will Cost More
Beware that federal student loans will be more expensive this year because of rising interest rates.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

Online Shopping Could Get Pricier
States now have more latitude to collect sales tax on internet purchases.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

Insurance on Savings and Investments
Know the differences between what agencies help keep your money safe.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

How to Buy Stocks for Kids
Start investing on behalf of your kids by opening an account on Stockpile.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

50 Quick and Easy Tips to Make and Keep More Money
The end of summer, when job and school routines kick back in, is a great time to kick your financial life into gear, too.

We've made it easy with our roster of quick financial tips designed to save you money, get you on track to reach a goal or simplify your life. The suggestions run the gamut from automating investments to setting up a budget to thwarting identity thieves. Each tip will take only 15 or 30 or -- max -- 60 minutes.


SEE ALSO: 70 Valuable Things You Can Get for Free

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

Smart Life Insurance Strategies for Young Buyers
Buy the right life insurance plan now to avoid scrambling to find coverage later.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

What to Do When Your Term Life Insurance Is Expiring
Many families are discovering that a 20-year term for a life insurance policy isn't enough.

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

RBC Capital's 10 Best Tech Stocks to Buy for 2025
It's easy to identify the hottest tech stocks of today, but it's much more difficult to look several years through the fog and determine who'll still be on top.

But RBC Capital's analysts have just released a fascinating report, "Imagine: 2025," highlighting tech stocks they believe will outperform all the way through 2025.

This requires a different set of criteria than would be used for short-term tech analysis. Writes RBC: "Equity valuations are based on the present value of future cash flows. Most analysis is focused on the next quarter or 1-2 years, but rarely is time and effort taken to think about the next 7 years when assessing the valuation of a company."

This involves 1) identifying themes and norms that will become standard by 2025; and 2) identifying forward-thinking companies most boldly and effectively positioned for this new future.

Here are 10 of the top tech stocks to buy for future growth, according to RBC Capital. We'll also use TipRanks market data to understand whether now is a compelling time to invest in these technology companies.

SEE ALSO: 25 Blue-Chip Stocks That Mutual Fund Managers Love Most

Kiplinger
Aug 01, 2018

Is Your Financial Adviser Truly Independent?
Even if the firm you're working with uses the word "independent" in its name, you need to dig deeper to make sure your adviser is putting your best interests first.

Kiplinger
Jul 31, 2018

10 of the Market's Most Shorted Stocks
When can negativity be used for something positive? Well, in the market, a quick look at the most shorted stocks could unearth potential.

The typical investor's approach to the market is buying low, then selling high. This simple approach also is the wisest for most buy-and-holders in that it allows them to ride the market's natural long-term tendency to edge its way ever higher.

But investors also can first sell high, then buy that stock back in the future at (hopefully) a lower price. The practice is called short selling: selling shares you don't own yet, knowing you must buy them back in the future to close out your trade.

It's not for the faint of heart. The risk in short sales is theoretically infinite because a stock's price can continue rising in perpetuity. A trader eventually will have to buy a stock he or she has shorted to close a short position out, and sometimes because the stock's price is moving higher, not lower. When some short trades are dire enough, the brokerage firm handling the trade will force the buyback.

These forced buybacks also create opportunities for more conventional investors. The most shorted stocks also have built-in armies of buyers waiting in the wings. If they're pushed hard enough by fear of losses stemming from a rising stock price, they'll "cover" their short positions - by buying the stock - fanning already bullish flames.

Here are 10 of the stock market's most shorted stocks. While a large chunk of Wall Street is bearish on these names, the potential for a wave of short-covering is on the table.

SEE ALSO: The 18 Best Stocks to Buy for the Rest of 2018

Kiplinger
Jul 31, 2018

How to Use a 529 Plan When Your Child Wins a Scholarship
Even if your child wins a full scholarship, you can use money from a 529 college-savings plan for things other than tuition without triggering taxes or a penalty.

Kiplinger
Jul 31, 2018

A Different Kind of Diversification Pays Off for Retirees
Retirement savers can get more income with less volatility using income allocation instead of asset allocation.

Kiplinger
Jul 31, 2018

7 Myths About Variable Annuities: Exposing Their Dark Side
Once you learn the facts about variable annuities, you'll see why they might not be as great a choice as they sound for retirees.

Kiplinger
Jul 31, 2018

How Amazon Ruined Whole Foods (Or Maybe Not)
I was a happy Whole Foods shopper until recently. I know I usually paid a premium, but I found their fruit crisper than the produce I picked through at other supermarkets, and their fresh salmon worth the cost over frozen fillets I could buy elsewhere. Plus, I often felt like I could offset some of the expense by zeroing in on Whole Foods' reasonably priced 365 Everyday Value house brand.

But now that Amazon owns the grocery chain and is aiming many of its discounts and deals exclusively at Prime members, some of the tricks to shopping at Whole Foods without going broke are no longer available. You see, I was a Whole Foods shopper but not an Amazon Prime member, which puts me in the minority. Magid, a strategy and research company, estimated that 61% of Whole Foods customers were also Prime members a little over a year ago, before the acquisition. Today, that number hovers between 75% and 80%, says Matt Sargent, Magid's senior vice-president of retail.

Without question, Amazon has changed how we shop at Whole Foods--for the worse, perhaps, but also for the better. "In a way, Amazon bought a broken business," says Elley Symmes, a supermarket industry analyst at Kantar Retail. "Organic and natural products have moved mainstream, and people are no longer willing to pay a premium."

Decide for yourself if Amazon is ruining Whole Foods or ultimately enhancing the experience for a new wave of shoppers.

SEE ALSO: 18 Kirkland Products You Should Buy at Costco

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